Media Mining Digest 144 – 15 August 2014: Afghanistan Saur Revolution, Amazon Glacier, Animal CSI, Argentine Grandmothers, Bats in Australia, Blind WWI Vets, Broadband and State Law, Building Things, Bundy Range War, Chickengunya, Colorectal Cancer Screening, Columbia’s Lost Children, Coral Reefs, Corporate Inversions, Crimea, Drought in California, Earned Income Tax, Ebola Hearing, Finding Our Way, Foldscope, Genius Grants, Hacking Happiness, Hepititus E,Innovation Process, Job Loss Moves, LinkedIn, Market Basket Demonstrations, McDonald Employees, Mentoring, Mexico Journalism, Neuromorphic Chips, Newburgh Sting, Online Education Debate, Online Learning Equality, Paris in WWII, Part-time Work Trends, Password Research, Police State U.S.A., Programming Vocation, Prostate Screening, Rare Earths, Renaissance Engineer, Slavery Impact, Solar Outshines Coal, Supreme Court Panel, Tipping, Water History in the U.S., Watergate Legacy, World Trade Center Bldg 7

The following audio files come from a larger group of 243 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 49 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Afghanistan Saur Revolution – 1978  20 mins – “David Loyn investigates how a lost document is helping Afghanistan come to terms with its painful past. A war crimes trial in the Netherlands has unearthed a list of 5,000 prisoners detained, tortured and killed by the radical communist regime that ran the country in 1978-79 – a “death list” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Afghanistan’s Death Lists,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140806-1436a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Glacier  38 mins – Talk about this runs from 11 to 23 mins of this elpisode of KnowHow: “Amazon Glacier is one of the services sold within the “Amazon Web Services” family. It’s not like some of the other cloud-storage services (like Dropbox, OneDrive) because it’s NOT designed to be a fast and easy way to sync your files with multiple devices and the cloud. Amazon Glacier is designed to be ARCHIVE storage in the cloud. It’s SLOW; It’s NOT web accessible; It’s NOT designed for syncing across multiple devices; It’s NOT designed for continuous downloads. What is DOES offer is: — a TREMENDOUS amount of online storage for LITERALLY a penny a Gigabyte….” At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow.

Animal CSI 5 mins – “At the International Mail Facility at New York’s John F. Kennedy airport, an inspector for this US Fish and Wildlife Service opens a box that’s been flagged as suspicious, reaches inside and pulls out a zebra skin rug….The telltale pattern of the stripes shows that it was a common Burchell’s zebra, rather than a protected species, such as the Hartmann’s zebra. For trickier ID questions though, the inspectors often pack up suspicious samples of animals or plant material and ship them across the country to a facility in the hills of southern Oregon — the Fish and Wildlife Service’s Forensics Lab. It’s basically a CSI unit for wildlife crime. And it’s the only one in the world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing pointing arrow at the right end of the pop-up menu.

Argentina Grandmothers 5 mins – “In 1984, geneticist Dr. Mary-Claire King began working with the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo, an organization that searches for the hundreds of babies stolen by Argentina’s military dictatorship during the country’s “Dirty War.’” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bats in Australia 62 mins – “Vincent visits the Australian Animal Health Laboratory in Geelong, Australia and speaks with Linfa about his work on bats and bat viruses.” At the link right-click “WIV 297 beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind WWI Vets – 20 mins “Dr Fred Reid joins Peter White to reflect on changes to blind and partially-sighted people’s lives since the start of World War I. Tom Walker talks to Blind Veterans UK archivist Robert Baker about the history of the charity and to ex-serviceman Joe Cousineau on how the charity has helped to rehabilitate him.” At the link, for a limited time, find the title, “Changes to blind people’s lives since WWI; Blind Veterans,” right-click “Download 9MB” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband and State Law 25 mins – “Given the exciting development of the FCC opening comment on petitions from Wilson, NC and Chattanooga, TN to restore local authority to their states, Lisa and I decided to take over this week’s podcast of Community Broadband Bits. We talk about the petitions, some background, and interview Will Aycock from Wilson’s Greenlight Gigabit Network and Danna Bailey from Chattanooga’s EPB Fiber network. We finish with some instructions on how you can comment on the record. The Coalition for Local Internet Choice also has commenting instructions and some sample comments.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Building Things 51 mins – “We’re looking at how to build something that lasts. First, those brightly colored blocks that we all played with — and some of us still do. Wharton professor David Robertson explains how Lego, the company, went wrong when they tried to innovate the same way as everyone else. Then, Daniel Brook, author of “A History of Future Cities,” describes the great cities of the past and what the super cities of the 21st century can learn from them. Plus, if today’s elementary school kids are going to be the engineers of tomorrow, they need better building blocks.” At the link find the title, “7.26.14 – The Whole building Show,” right-click “IHUB-072614-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bundy Range War 52 mins – “Over the weekend, rancher Cliven Bundy told a political gathering in St. George that God instructed him to “disarm” federal law enforcement agents when they tried to confiscate his cattle in April. We’re talking with Bundy on Wednesday about his controversial actions and about how his Mormon faith and heritage inform his political views. The journalist Scott Carrier will also join us to examine where Bundy and his self-styled freedom-fighter compatriots fit on the spectrum of political dissent.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chikungunya 4 mins – “But the chikungunya virus can cause such extreme joint pain that you can’t even sit up for weeks. There’s no cure or vaccine. And now the disease has established a beachhead in the United States. This month, health authorities in Florida identified what they say are the first two cases of the nasty disease that were clearly acquired in the US. Chikungunya is transmitted by mosquitoes and has been slowly expanding around the tropics and subtropics from southern Africa over the past 50 years or so. It began knocking on the door of the US late last year when it caused a major outbreak in the Caribbean. Hundreds of cases have been spotted in the US but until this summer all of those had been contracted outside the country.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colorectal Cancer Screening 25mins – ”Two related studies in the August issue of Gastroeneterology discuss factors that could affect colorectal cancer screening strategies, including age, sex, race, ethnicity, and whether or not repeat colonoscopy is advisable within ten years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia’s Lost Children 18 mins – “In Colombia’s Marxist guerrilla war, thousands of rebel fighters have been female. When they got pregnant, they were forced to have abortions or give their babies up. Now, many of these rebel mothers have demobilised and are desperate to find their children.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Colombia’s Lost Children,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140805-0400a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Reefs 51 mins – “A new report says most Caribbean coral reefs may disappear in the next 20 years. Climate change has long been thought to be the main offender in the alarming rate of coral degradation. But this latest study says over-fishing and pollution are the key culprits, killing off vital grazers like parrot fish and sea urchins. Some scientists say this is good news: there is a clear path to removing these local stressors, including tighter fishing regulations. But others warn that destructive coral bleaching due to rising water temperatures remains a major concern. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: the health and future of our coral reefs.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Corporate Inversions 51 mins – “A growing number of American companies are re-incorporating overseas for lower tax rates. But critics say it’s a loophole that ends up costing taxpayers. Join us for debate over IRS rules for U.S. companies.” [4 guests] At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Crimea  20 mins – “-As Ukrainian holidaymakers stay away from Crimea’s beaches following Russia’s annexation of the peninsula, Lucy Ash meets the Russians who are reclaiming their bit of paradise.” At the link find the title, “Docs: Crimea: Paradise Regained,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140807-0330a.mp3″ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 48 mins – “They are praying for rain in California. And facing drought. A drought emergency, Governor Jerry Brown declared last week. Worst in years. Winter weather so warm you’ve got a confused bear wandering through skiers on the slopes last week. So dry that farmers are thinning herds and letting fields go fallow. Wondering which crops to lose. Up in the Sierra Nevada, only 20 percent of the normal snow pack. Less to melt, less to drink. It’s just dry. This hour On Point: fire, food, climate and the drought emergency in California.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Earned Income Tax 19 mins – “In 2012, a federal program took about $60 billion from wealthier Americans and gave it to millions of working poor. This program — a massive redistribution of wealth — has been embraced by every president from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama. On today’s show, we look at a huge, often overlooked, surprisingly interesting corner of the tax code: The Earned Income Tax Credit.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Hearing 148 mins – “Witnesses testified at a House Foreign Affairs subcommittee hearing on the threat of the ebola virus. Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said the ebola outbreak in West Africa could be stopped but would take time and meticulous attention to detail. Dr. Frieden also said he was confident there would be no large outbreak in the U.S. The subcommittee also heard from representatives of two missionary groups working in Africa, Ken Issacs of Samaritan’s Purse and Dr. Frank Glover of Serving in Mission (SIM).” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Evolution and Sculpting 52 mins – “Tuesday, Utah Valley University geneticist and artist Daniel Fairbanks is our guest. Fairbanks has written extensively on how humans have evolved over time. But his most recent book also demonstrates why it matters. Fairbanks says that evolution has impacted our environment, our food production, and even our health. He joins Doug to talk about how understanding evolution can help us make better choices for our future. We’ll also talk about his work as a sculptor, and how art helps him explore science.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finding Our Way 17 mins – “As humans have developed cities and built environments, we have also needed to develop ways to find our way through them. Signage goes back at least as far as the Roman Empire where they constructed “milestones” along their roadways. Today, signage and other queues to help you find your way come from the field of environmental graphic design, or “wayfinding.” Chances are that any signs in an airport, in a hospital, or on a freeway, were created by professional wayfinders.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foldscope 4 mins- “Origami may soon start saving lives. That’s the hope of Stanford professor Manu Prakash, who created Foldscope – a foldable paper microscope. He says it will help healthcare workers who need to quickly diagnose diseases like malaria. And it could be a low-cost, high-payoff tool for curious students around the world.” At the link find the title, “Your 1 Dollar Origami Microscope,” right-click “IHUB-0080914-E.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genius Grants 12 mins – “Lavishing money on cool projects isn’t just for billionaires – or millionaires – any more. We look at how the Awesome Foundation has grown so quickly by offering “micro-genius grants for flashes of micro-brilliance.” We’re joined by Christina Xu, chancellor of the Institute on Higher Awesome Studies.” At the link find the title, “Giving Money Away – Step Aside, Bill Gates,” right-click “IHUB-080914-D.mp3“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking Happiness 29 mins – “John Havens talked by video link from New York City about his book, Hacking H(app)iness: Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking It Can Change the World. Topics included how personal data was being tracked, what data brokers do, and how individuals could take back control of some of this data.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Hepatitis E 12 mins – “Richard Tedder discusses the prevalence and transmission of hepatitis E in blood donors and recipients in south-east England.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 28 July,” right-click “Media files 25july.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Process 2 mins – “Sometimes little bets are the ones that really pay off. Author Peter Sims talks about how surprisingly small moves have helped launch everything from Facebook to Pixar to the comedy routines of Chris Rock.” At the link find the title, “Small Ideas, Big Payoffs ,” right-click “IHUB-080914-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Loss Moves 17 mins – “Life transitions, from expanding families to job losses and promotions, can be financially stressful. Host Michel Martin speaks with money coaches about what to do when you are facing big changes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

LinkedIn 70 mins – “Reid Hoffman, co-founder of professional networking site LinkedIn, and Ben Casnocha, former Chief-of-Staff of LinkedIn, talk to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about LinkedIn and their book The Alliance. Hoffman and Casnocha discuss the founding and vision of LinkedIn along with their ideas in The Alliance on how to improve employee/employer relations when turnover is high and loyalty on each side is low.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Basket Demonstrations 47 mins – “It’s not easy standing up as a worker-friendly company in America these days. Set yourself up as a Costco or Southwest Airlines with good benefits and wages and a long-term outlook, and the cost-cutting Wall Street crowd will be on your case in a hurry. Right now, workers at an American grocery chain called Market Basket are going to the mat for a CEO they think has their best interests at heart. Risking their jobs for a worker and community-oriented corporate culture that goes against the grain. This hour, On Point: a story of American workers saying “enough.’” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

McDonald Employees 47 mins – “Since the first strikes hit New York City, fast-food workers have been saying that the big corporations that dominate their industry were ultimately responsible for their working conditions. In other words, it wasn’t a coincidence that McDonald’s employees from Chicago to St. Louis, Philadelphia to Seattle have the same low wages and complain of the same unfair labor practices. Now, the general counsel at the National Labor Relations Board has ruled that McDonald’s can be held responsible as a “joint employer” of those workers across the country alongside its franchisees.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mentoring 13 mins -”Freeman Hrabowski, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, talks about the importance of mentoring in academia, especially in science, technology, engineering and math fields.” At the link find the title, “When Searching For Mentors, Look ‘Beyond Race’,” right-click “Media files 20140730 tmm_mentoring_matters.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico Journalists 7 mins – “ We have often turned to Alfredo Corchado to keep us up-to-date on our southern neighbor. He’s lived and worked in Mexico for some 20 years now. He is the bureau chief for the Dallas Morning News and author of the memoir Midnight in Mexico. Recently though, he’s been spending time at the Guatemala-Mexico border following the journey of would-be immigrants. He joins us now from Mexico.” At the link find the title, “Mexican Journalist Hopes His Reporting Can ‘Bridge The Gap’,” right-click “Media files 20140731 tmm alfredos notebook.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuromorphic Chips 12 mins – “Bob Service discusses the future of neuromorphic chips, processors modeled on the brain’s architecture.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newburgh Sting 52 mins – “ In 2009, four men from a poor New York town were arrested for trying to bomb a pair of synagogues. In the months leading up to their apprehension, the men were befriended by Shahed Hussain, an F.B.I. informant. The attorneys for the “Newburgh Four” thought they had a clear-cut case of entrapment, but the men received lengthy prison sentences. A new film dissects their story and sheds light on the F.B.I.’s pattern of targeting Muslims in depressed communities and luring them into committing terrorist acts. Filmmaker David Heilbroner joins us Monday to discuss his film. It’s called The Newburgh Sting.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Education Debate 51 mins – “Online degree programs are proliferating – and many cost a fraction of the price of a traditional, on-campus degree. Massive Open Online Courses, known as MOOCS, are also catching on in the U.S. and around the world. In a society that conducts more and more work and play online, these online offerings seem to represent a natural progression of the higher education experience. Proponents point out that “college by Internet” is flexible and economical, and allows students to review material as needed. But skeptics are concerned that taking courses online is a pale substitute for real-world exchanges with instructors and peers inside a classroom. Two teams recently faced off on the motion, “More Clicks, Fewer Bricks: The Lecture Hall is Obsolete,” in an Oxford-style debate for Intelligence Squared U.S.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Learning Inequality 74 mins – “How are inequality regimes challenged, or sometimes perpetuated, in online environments? In this talk Tressie McMillan Cottom — blogger, PhD candidate in the Sociology Department at Emory University, and PhD Intern at the Microsoft Research Network’s Social Media Collective — discusses inequality in online learning, based on qualitative research with students taking courses online at for-profit institutions.”At the link right click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris in WWII 51 mins – “Seventy years ago, Paris was liberated from German occupation. Unlike other major European cities during World War II, “The City of Light” was spared mass devastation. This was part of Hitler’s plan — he wanted to preserve the beautiful Paris for his own. But if the physical damage to the city was minimal, a new book by European studies professor Ronald Rosbottom says four years of occupation left subtle scars. As he put it, they were ones that were difficult to evaluate and easier for history to ignore. “When Paris Went Dark” explores daily interaction between Parisians and Germans and looks at the kind of questions the occupation raised for the French about why they didn’t do more to prevent it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Part-time Work Trends 51 mins – “The number of people working part-time who would rather work full-time is almost double what it was seven years ago at 7 million people. Despite signs of economic recovery, many businesses say they are still struggling and depend on part-time workers, especially those who work on-call. New federal data show that almost half of all part-time workers under age thirty-two work unpredictable hours, leaving them with reduced paychecks and scrambling for child-care. A discussion [4 guests] about the latest trends in part-time work and the push for new laws that protect employees.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Password Research 18 mins – “Lorrie Faith Cranor studied thousands of real passwords to figure out the surprising, very common mistakes that users — and secured sites — make to compromise security. And how, you may ask, did she study thousands of real passwords without compromising the security of any users? That’s a story in itself. It’s secret data worth knowing, especially if your password is 123456 … “ At the link click “Download” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police State U.S.A. 58 mins – “Cheryl Chumley talked about her book, Police State U.S.A.: How Orwell’s Nightmare is Becoming Our Reality, in which she argues that the government’s desire to monitor and control the public is greater now than ever before. She spoke with former White House Chief Information Officer Theresa Payton.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Programming Vocation 46 mins – Hosts Fr. Robert Ballecer, SJ and Shannon Morse interview Raphael Mudge, the founder of Strategic Cyber, LLC, and developer of Armitage and Cobalt Strike — tools for red teams and penetration testers. Mudge explains how he became a programmer, his work history, and compares formal versus informal training values. He recommends Joel Spolsky’sJoel on Software”. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow.

Prostate Screening 13 mins – “Professor Fritz Schröder discusses the latest research on prostate cancer screening.” At the link find the title, “Listen to The Lancet: 7 August,” right-click “Media files 07august.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rare Earths 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from September 12, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with William J. Evans, Professor of Physical Sciences, Dept of Chemistry, University of California-Irvine. Bill introduces us to lanthanides and how they can lead to better fertilizers, synthetic rubber, and even better sutures for surgeons.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renaissance Engineer 74 mins – “Our conversation with Dr. Janusz Kozinski, Founding Dean of the Lassonde School of Engineering, covers the trials and tribulations of starting a new engineering school, as well as the the attributes and mindset of a “renaissance engineer.” Additionally, we learn a little bit about the skill sets that will be expected of tomorrow’s engineering professional.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Impact 57 mins – “Chris Tomlinson talked about his book, Tomlinson Hill: The Remarkable Story of Two Families who Share the Tomlinson Name – One White, One Black, in which he explores his family’s slave-owning history and the part of Texas that carries the family name, Tomlinson Hill. While researching his book, he found a history of two families, one white and one black. The author is the descendant of the Tomlinson Hill’s former slave owners, and former NFL running back LaDainian Tomlinson is a descendant of the hill’s former slaves. Mr. Tomlinson argued that the history of both families demonstrates how the legacy of slavery still affects American society. He spoke with Lavar Tomlinson, LaDainian’s younger brother and event coordinator at Tomlinson Touching Lives Foundation.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Solar Outshines Coals 4 mins – In Australia solar power produced at a home now costs less than producing it with coal, described between the 4 and 8 minute marks in this thirty-minute program. In a few years the same will be true for nuclear-produced power. Links to several articles that provide more details are at the bottom of the page, there. At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Panel 66 mins – “Constitutional law attorneys reviewed the 2013-14 Supreme Court term. Topics included campaign finance, cell phone searches, and presidential recess appointment powers. The American Constitution Society held its annual panel discussion at the National Press Club.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

Tipping 38 mins – “As we all know, the practice of tipping can be awkward, random, and confusing. This episode tries to offer some clarity. At its center is Cornell professor Michael Lynn, who has written 51 academic papers on tipping.The practice of tipping is one of the most irrational, un-economic behaviors we engage in. It’s not in our economic best-interest to tip; essentially we do it because it’s a social norm — a nicety. In this episode of Freakonomics Radio, Stephen Dubner looks at why we tip, what kinds of things can nudge tips upward, and what’s wrong with tipping overall. Research shows that African American waiters make less in tips than people of other races, so tipping is a discriminatory practice. In the end, we wonder whether or not the practice of tipping should be eliminated altogether.” At the link find the title, “ Should Tipping be Banned? (Rebroadcast),” right-click “Play Now “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water History in the U.S. 52 mins – “The Western U.S. is in the grip of a punishing drought. Reservoir levels are dropping, and farmers are struggling to ensure water access for their crops and livestock. Consider California. Without water access, one of the nation’s largest states could lose up to $2.2 billion in revenue – and let’s not forget the strain on an already fragile climate. Some scientists even fear that Americans have reached “peak water” in the West.In this episode, we’re looking at how Americans have managed access to water throughout our history.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Legacy 18 mins – “Forty years on from President Nixon’€™s resignation we hear from Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, who broke the Watergate story. Did their reporting make Americans more mistrustful of government and ready to believe the worst of their leaders?” At the link find the title, “Special: The Watergate Legacy,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140806-1408a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Trade Center Bldg 7 29 mins – “Richard Gage talked about his group, Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth, which claimed that the World Trade Center was brought down by explosive demolition on September 11, 2001. The group was founded in 2006 and said its mission was to “expose the official lies and cover-up surrounding the events of September 11, 2001 in a way that inspires the people to overcome denial and understand the truth.” Mr. Gage spoke via video link from San Francisco, California.” At the link you can listen or purchase the podcast for $.99, but a copy is included in the blog archive.

==============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3600 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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One Response to Media Mining Digest 144 – 15 August 2014: Afghanistan Saur Revolution, Amazon Glacier, Animal CSI, Argentine Grandmothers, Bats in Australia, Blind WWI Vets, Broadband and State Law, Building Things, Bundy Range War, Chickengunya, Colorectal Cancer Screening, Columbia’s Lost Children, Coral Reefs, Corporate Inversions, Crimea, Drought in California, Earned Income Tax, Ebola Hearing, Finding Our Way, Foldscope, Genius Grants, Hacking Happiness, Hepititus E,Innovation Process, Job Loss Moves, LinkedIn, Market Basket Demonstrations, McDonald Employees, Mentoring, Mexico Journalism, Neuromorphic Chips, Newburgh Sting, Online Education Debate, Online Learning Equality, Paris in WWII, Part-time Work Trends, Password Research, Police State U.S.A., Programming Vocation, Prostate Screening, Rare Earths, Renaissance Engineer, Slavery Impact, Solar Outshines Coal, Supreme Court Panel, Tipping, Water History in the U.S., Watergate Legacy, World Trade Center Bldg 7

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