Media Mining Digest 108 – 6 Dec 2013: 3D Sensing, Austerity Pitfalls, Casino Capitalism, Columbia T-shirts, Conspiracy Theories, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Fair Housing, First Lady Pat Nixon, First Lady Lady-Bird Johnson, Food Stamp Fight, Forest Uses, Growth and Technology, Haitian Luxury Hotels, International Textile Production, Khan Academy, Knowledge-Based Journalism, Mealtime in America, Mexican Exorcisms, Next Big Thing, Orphan Trains, Sutton hoo

The following audio files come from a larger group of 146 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 23 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

3-D Sensing 23 mins – “A look at 3-D sensor technology, and why Apple recently bought PrimeSense. Includes an interview with University of Toronto computer science professor David Fleet.” At the link find the title “Apple Goes 3-D,” right-click “Media files  misenerontech 20131126_79336.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austerity Pitfalls 51 mins – “In the wake of the Great Recession, large Western governments have tried to keep their economies afloat by imposing austerity measures. The hope is that by reducing wages and spending they could bail themselves out of budget deficits and jumpstart global economic growth. The political economist Mark Blyth says that plan hasn’t worked out. He says austerity has led to sluggish growth and increasing inequality, and not for the first time, either. Blyth joins us to explain why austerity, like a zombie, is a dangerous idea that just won’t die.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Casino Capitalism 52 mins – “This week on Moyers & Company, author and scholar Henry Giroux explains how our political system has turned people into zombies – “people who are basically so caught up with surviving that they become like the walking dead — they lose their sense of agency, they lose their homes, they lose their jobs.” Also on the broadcast, Bill looks at Birth of the Living Dead, a mesmerizing new documentary that examines the singular time in which the classic 1968 film Night of the Living Dead was shot – when civil unrest and violence gave the nation nightmares and zombies were a metaphor for a troubled and distressed American public. Bill also reflects on his 2003 interview with Nobel-prize winning novelist Doris Lessing who passed away earlier this week in London at the age of 94.” At the link find the title, “Full Show: Zombie Politics and Casino Capitalism,” right-click  “Media files Moyers and Company 246 Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Columbia T-shirts 24 mins – “The Planet Money men’s T-shirts were made in Bangladesh. The Planet Money women’s T-shirts were made in Colombia. On today’s show, we move from Bangladesh to Colombia — and we see an entirely different world. It’s a world where workers make more money and work under better conditions than their counterparts in Bangladesh. But it’s also a world that may not last.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracy Theories 52 mins – “On November 22nd, 1963, 50 years ago, President John F. Kennedy was killed while riding in a motorcade in Dallas – a tragedy that inspired conspiracy theories that persist to this day. Why have alternative assassination theories proven so resilient over the years? And why do other conspiracy theories persist in public memory? This episode takes a look at conspiracy thinking throughout American history, and finds a long tradition stretching all the way back to the Founding.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doris Kearns Goodwin 58 mins – “Our guest is Pulitzer prize winning author and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin to talk about her latest book titled, “The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism. She discusses the technological and economic changes brought on by the Industrial Revolution in the United States.” At the link in the “Q and A” section right-click (there or here) “Doris Kearns Goodwin, Author, “The Bully Pulpit'” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fair Housing 57 mins – “Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week’s show, stories about destiny by address. Much of this story is told to Nancy Updike by ProPublica reporter Nikole Hannah-Jones, whose series on the Fair Housing laws — with more stories, research and interviews — is here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Lady Pat Nixon 91 mins – “C-SPAN and the White House Historical Association are co-producing a two-season feature series on the First Ladies, examining their private lives and the public roles they played in the White House. This week: Pat Nixon.” At the link under the section, “Podcast of the Week” right-click the title (there or here) “First Ladies: Pat Nixon” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Lady Lady Bird Johnson 92 mins – “C-SPAN and the White House Historical Association are co-producing a two-season feature series on the First Ladies, examining their private lives and the public roles they played in the White House. This week: Lady Bird Johnson.” AT the link under the section, “Podcast of the Week” right-click the title (there or here) “First Ladies: Lady Bird Johnson” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Stamp Fight 51mins – “On Nov. 1, a temporary boost in the federal food stamp program came to an end. Anti-hunger advocates across the country said they saw an almost immediate rise in the number of people at food pantries and soup kitchens. Congress is seeking billions of dollars in additional cuts over the next decade to the food assistance program, now known as SNAP. Diane talks with [6] representatives of anti-hunger organizations across the country about why so many Americans are not getting enough to eat.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Forest Uses 54 mins – “Are our forests fiber mines or recreational playgrounds? Are they an economic engine or necessary for our environmental health? And are they essential to our mental well being? Dick Miller re-imagines the forest of the future.” At the link find the title, “The Witness Trees,” right-click (there or here) “Download The Witness Trees ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Growth and Technology 65 mins – “Joel Mokyr of Northwestern University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the future of the American economy. Mokyr rejects the claims that the we are entering an area of stagnation or permanently lower economic growth. He argues that measured growth understates the impact on human welfare. Many of the most important discoveries are new products that are often poorly measured and not reflected in measures such as gross domestic product or income. The conversation closes with a discussion of the downsides of technology and why Mokyr remains optimistic about the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haitian Luxury Hotels 5 mins – “It has been a long slog to recovery after Haiti’s earthquake almost four years ago. Thousands remain in provisional housing of plywood, tarps, and corrugated metal. New lodging is being created, though. It’s just not all of the type you might expect.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the play bar.

International Textile Production 19 mins – “The nation of Bangladesh was created out of chaos in the early 1970s, at a moment when millions in the country were dying from a combination of war and famine. The future looked exceedingly bleak. Abdul Majid Chowdhury and Noorul Quader were Bangladeshi businessmen who wanted to help their country. “We asked ourselves, ‘What the hell do we want?’ ” Chowdhury recalls. The answer he and his friends arrived at: “We need employment. We need dollars.” Their solution involved Richard Nixon, an obscure but hugely influential trade deal, and a cultural struggle over kimchi.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Khan Academy 51 mins – “Sal Khan talks about the digital education revolution and how Khan Academy is spreading around the world.” Two parts. At the link find “Sal Khan: The Education Revolution Part 1 of 2” and “Part 2 of 2,” right-click “Media files IHUB-113013-A.mp3” and “Media files IHUB-113013-B.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menus.

Knowledge-Based Journalism 51 mins – “Americans have access to more information than at any time in history. Yet surveys show widespread misunderstanding among the public on critical issues of the day. One example among many: at a point in the health care reform debate, about half of Americans falsely believed the bill included “death panels” to prematurely end the lives of seniors. In a new book, a Harvard professor looks at why Americans are so misinformed. He puts a good deal of blame on the media. With Fox News saying one thing and MS-NBC saying the opposite, it’s little wonder Americans are confused. Diane talks with Thomas E. Patterson on how journalists can better serve the public.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Mealtime in America 52 mins – “Three square meals a day. Three to five servings of fruits and vegetables, two to three servings of milk, yogurt, or cheese. Avoid fats and sugar. Red meat in moderation. We’re used to hearing these kinds of instructions. But eating isn’t simply about the perfect nutritional balance. It has profound social implications too, especially when we sit down with others to share a meal. And so in this episode, the Guys recover from their Thanksgiving feasts by looking back over the history of mealtime in America. From Victorian table manners to the school lunch program, how have our ideas about what, when, and how we eat our meals evolved? At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican Exorcisms 27 mins – “Vladimir Hernandez meets the Mexican Catholic priests who believe the country’s drug wars mean it’s in the grip of the devil – and who are fighting it through exorcism.” At the link find the title “Docs: Mexico – Exorcising the Narco-Devil,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20131128-0030a.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Next Big Thing 54 mins – “For years, people proclaimed that the Internet was going to completely transform media. In 2013, it actually happened, according to New York Times media columnist David Carr who delivers the 2013 Dalton Camp Lecture in Journalism.” At the link find the title, “The Next Big Thing Has Finally Arrived,” right-click (here or there) “Download The Next Big Thing Has Finally Arrived” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orphan Trains  4 mins – “The 1849 report by New York’s police chief was unimaginable: the number of children living on the streets accounted for fully one percent of the city’s population. Social stratification fueled by the industrial revolution had taken its toll. Scattered efforts to build orphanages were underway, but no broadly organized safety net was in place. “Help” for vagrant children often meant incarceration.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sutton Hoo 72 mins – “Raedwald… King of East Anglia… Bretwalda. When he is mentioned, if you had heard that name before this show, chances are you heard it in connection with Sutton Hoo, which is possibly his burial site. And Sutton Hoo is one of the most famous archaeological digs in Britain. Just the name conjures images of the great Anglo Saxon helmet, with its impressive faceplate and ornate decorations in bronze, iron and tin. But there’s much more to it than that. And today, we’re going to talk about some of what makes Sutton Hoo so special. Our story begins in the late 16th century when tomb raiders came across the mounds at Sutton Hoo and dug a shaft straight down into Mound 1. They were over ten feet down into the mound and only inches above the burial chamber, but for some reason it looks like they stopped and lit a fire. And at that point it’s assumed that the shaft collapsed and the ransacking of the mound ended, leaving the chamber intact.” Two parts: at the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu for part one. Do the same here for part two.

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Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) and a pdf list are here. Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (362 podcasts) and a pdf list are here, and 591 for Jul-Dec here.  For 2011 a list and 5 segments 184 podcasts. For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed  in this PDF and are zipped here as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 160 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A PDF list of feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads to remove  duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used to boost playback speed to 1.5x. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thanks for visiting.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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