Media Mining Digest 124 – 28 Mar 2014: African Innovation, Assembly Lines, Book Publishing, British Health Care Program, Bubble Houses, Car Arrival Impact, Car Buying, Chesapeake Energy Scandal, Chicken Industry, Children Books, CIA vs Senate, College Costs, Crowd Control, Dreyfus Affair, Drone Training, Electronic Medical Records, Electronics Design, Empire State Building, Fast Freezing, Government Hacking, Government Surveillance, Green Color History, Heathen School, Herbert Hoover, iPad U, Ireland Famine, Lime Prices, Liquid Biopsies, Lyme Disease, Malaysia Flight 370, Maple Sugar, Matternet, Medals of Honor, Media Corruption in India, Millenium Villages Project, Navajo Military, Pakistan, Palliative Care, Performance Reviews, Peru, Quatrefoil, Repair Cafe, Research Gate, Russia Today Program, Serendipity, Shia-Sunni Conflict, Sleep, Solar Energy Research, Soldering, Stop and Frisk, Subdural Haematoma, Success, Telecommunications Act, Terrorism in Cities, Ukraine Famines

The following audio files come from a larger group of 163 for this week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts. A zip file of all 55 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months.  Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

African Innovation 8 mins – “Are the simplest phones the smartest? While the rest of the world is updating statuses and playing games on smartphones, Africa is developing useful SMS-based solutions to everyday needs, says journalist Toby Shapshak. In this eye-opening talk, Shapshak explores the frontiers of mobile invention in Africa as he asks us to reconsider our preconceived notions of innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assembly Lines 25 mins – “The assembly line was invented 100 years ago. It’s time to invent the disassembly line…  The world’s first assembly line was developed at the Ford Motor Co. in 1913, making this its centenary year. We think of it as the moving production line—it’s what we see Charlie Chaplin racing against in the movie Modern Times and Lucy and Ethel in the I Love Lucy episode in a chocolate factory. But according to a new book, that’s just one of five key developments, and in some ways it’s the least important of them.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Publishing 36 mins – “…  how exactly do you go about publishing books—and make no mistake, these are physical books, not e-books—that might have an audience of one, without losing your shirt.” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Health Care Reform 45 mins – “Each year at the Nuffield Trust Health Policy Summit, The BMJ hosts a breakfast roundtable. It has been one year since the Health and Social Care Bill for England was enacted, and the reconfiguration of the NHS continues, so this year we asked our panel to give the bill an end of year report. Taking part were: John Richards – Southampton Clinical Commissioning Group; Nigel Edwards – CEO Nuffield Trust; Jennifer Dixon – CEO Health Foundation; Terence Stephenson – president Academy of Medical Royal Colleges; Maureen Baker – Chair RCGP; Hugh Taylor – Chairman Guys and St Thomas’ Foundation Trust; Nick Hicks – CEO COBIC Ltd; Jeremy Taylor – National Voices; Tim Ferris – VP for population health management, Partners Healthcare, MA;
Nick Timmins – Senior Associate Nuffield Trust” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bubble Houses 25 mins – “…The process was called “airform.” First, a big slab of concrete was poured in the shape of a giant coin. Next, they inflated a giant balloon in the shape of a grapefruit, with the flat side down. This balloon was tied down to the foundation using steel hooks.  After the balloon was inflated it was coated in a fine powder. And then it was cover with a magical substance called gunite – the product of water and dry cement mix combined at a high pressure and shot out of a gun….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Arrival Impact 24 mins – “On the streets of early 20th Century America, nothing moved faster than 10 miles per hour. Responsible parents would tell their children, “Go outside, and play in the streets. All day.” And then the automobile happened. And then automobiles began killing thousands of children, every year.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Buying 18 mins – “…In survey after survey, people rank buying a car as one of their least favorite experiences. Why hasn’t anyone figured out a better way to sell cars? Why can’t you just go to a car store and shop for cars from a bunch of different manufacturers? Why don’t cars have real price tags — with real prices, that people actually pay? Today on the show: Why car buying is so unpleasant, and what your local legislators may be doing to keep it that way.” At the link find the title, “#435: Why Buying A Car Is So Awful,” right-click “Media files npr_290246994.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chesapeake Energy Scandal 30 mins – “…Imagine how you’d feel if instead of paying you the usual $5,000 a month, your employer suddenly whittled your paycheck down to $500 a month – in order to pay for your boss’s new private jet. Well, that’s pretty much how thousands of landowners who leased their land to natural gas giant, Chesapeake Energy feel right about now. When we think of the downside of the natural gas boom in this country, we usually think of the potential of environmental harm. But as residents in places like Pennsylvania and West Virginia are discovering, financial hazards lay in the weeds as well….” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicken Industry 52 mins – “Just a handful of companies raise nearly all the meat consumed in America, and among them, Tyson Foods is king. According to the journalist Christopher Leonard, Tyson wrote the blueprint for modern meat production. He says there’s no better way to understand how our food is produced than to know how the company works. In a new book, Leonard explores how Tyson mastered the economics of factory farming to rise to the top, and how it transformed rural America and the middle class economy in the process. He joins us Monday to talk about it….” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children Books 46 mins – “News from the snuggly world of children’s bedtime books lately.  The world of our first reading to little ones one and two and three and four years old.  The world of “Good Night Moon” and “The Runaway Bunny.”  From an old trunk of “Good Night Moon” author Margaret Wise Brown, a new trove of songs and poems.  She died in 1952.  She’s back.  And a new study saying in the thousands of children’s books published last year, still few with children of color.  What are we reading to our littlest ones these days?  Are we reading? This hour On Point:  what we seek and share in young children’s books.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA vs Senate 46 mins – “…Senator Dianne Feinstein, chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee, has defended the U.S. intelligence establishment through thick and thin, even when things looked pretty bad. She’s defended N.S.A. mass surveillance. Called Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing “an act of treason.”  But this week, it is Senator Feinstein unloading on the C.I.A.  Charging the C.I.A. has spied on the Senate to keep torture charges out of view. Charging that this intelligence agency has breached the separation of powers.  Serious charges. The C.I.A. is punching back. This hour On Point: the C.I.A. and Senate Intelligence Committee go to war….” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Costs 11 mins – “How did college get so expensive, and do families have the information they need to manage costs? Stanford University economist Caroline Hoxby and former college dean Marcia Cantarella discuss.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowd Control 27 mins – “Fighting for Freedom: A special programme on the safety of public protest and the dilemmas faced by those who police them.” At the link find the title, “HealthC: Fighting for freedom 19 Mar 14,” right-click “Media files healthc 20140319 2000b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dreyfus Affair 4 mins – “It was a case of military injustice that threatened government stability and shaped the future of human rights. The Dreyfus Affair is a tangled story of espionage, deceit, abuse of power, warring political factions, and the future of France in the twentieth century. It’s also a story of bad mathematics.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Training 14 mins – “Looking to reboot your career? How about going back to school for an MBA, or video-game programming, or power engineering, or drone piloting? Yep, NBC News reported recently that the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration “predicts that 10 000 commercial drones will be operating in the U.S. within five years.” Camera drones alone are expected to be a [US] $5 billion industry.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Medical Records 4 mins – “… If we want to make electronic medical records work, do we have to introduce a third party, a scribe, to arbitrate patients’ complaints about what the electronic medical record is doing to their relationship with their doctor?”
You can listen and read at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Electronics Design 57 mins – “Want to learn how to get from idea to schematic, through layout, all the way to physical boards? Elecia spoke with Chris Gammell about his Contextual Electronics course to teach the missing steps between what an EE learns in college and what an design engineer’s job entails.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Empire State Building 17 mins – “… On July 28, 1945, an airplane crashed into the Empire State Building. A B-25 bomber was flying a routine mission, chartering servicemen from Massachusetts to New York City….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flash Freezing 24 mins – “When we started reporting a fantastic, surreal story about one very cold night, more than 70 years ago, in northern Russia, we had no idea we’d end up thinking about cosmology. Or dropping toy horses in test tubes of water. Or talking about bacteria. Or arguing, for a year. Walter Murch (aka, the Godfather of The Godfather), joined by a team of scientists, leads us on what felt like the magical mystery tour of super cool science. Are you ready? We’re not sure we’ve recovered.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Hacking 78 mins – “Governments around the world are hacking into IT-systems, with deep implications for privacy, IT-security, the legal process and geopolitics. Should governments actually have the ability and the right to hack, and to weaken global communications networks? And do conventional concepts such as privacy and communications secrecy sufficiently capture the status quo, or do we need a new constitutional right for IT-security as proposed by the German court? In this talk Axel Arnbak — Berkman fellow and researcher at the Institute for Information Law, University of Amsterdam — explores three real-life cases to unpack the implications of government hacking.” At the link right-click “Download the MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 36 mins – “…Wizner: We’re trying to plant our flag at the point where science and technology and civil liberties intersect. The rapid developments in science and surveillance technologies really do have an impact on a whole range of rights, not just privacy, and we want to have the institutional expertise to be able to identify what those issues are and shape sophisticated responses. So the project has lawyers, but not only lawyers. We have two full-time computer scientists on our staff who are technologists, who are experts in encryption, secure communications, surveillance technologies. And they’ve been able, not only to help us respond with more intelligence, I would say, to the intelligence surveillance scandal, but also to help identify issues that we might not have intuitively understood to be civil liberties issues….” At the link find the title, “Snowden’s Legal Counsel: Forget About Orwell, Worry About Kafka,” right-click  “Media files
winship-wizner-podcast-MP3-for-Audio-Podcasting.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green Color History 53 mins – “…From the Green Mountain Boys in colonial America, to the Irish Brigade’s emerald-green flags in the Civil War, and the green superheroes fighting crime in 1970s comic books, this episode captures the varied and verdant ways green has worked its way into our history and culture….” At the link right-click the down arrow on the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heathen Schools 51 mins – “In Cornwall, Conn., in the early 19th century, a group of Protestant missionaries created a unique school they thought would save the world. Derisively known as “the heathen school,” the project recruited boys from Native American nations and around the world, including China and Hawaii. The multicultural school prospered for years and several graduates became famous. But in a new book, historian John Demos reveals the school’s disruptive impact and how it set off a chain of events that culminated in the Trail of Tears.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Herbert Hoover 58 mins – “George Nash, editor of The Crusade Years 1933-1955: Herbert Hoover’s Lost Memoir of the New Deal Era and Its Aftermath, talked about what is referred to as “the missing link” in the the Hoover memoirs. In the memoir, the thirty-first president provides his political philosophy, his analysis of the Depression, and his views on World War II. Mr. Nash talks with Calvin Coolidge biographer Amity Shlaes.” You can listen/watch at the link, but not download (for free — 99 cent download)); however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

iPad U 14 mins – “Tablets are changing the world of computing in lots of ways—they’re cutting into the markets for laptops and e-readers both; they’re clearly the direction that newspaper and magazine publishers need to pursue; and they’re already babysitters of our toddlers par excellence pace a Spectrum feature less than a year ago that claimed that smartphones would play that role. There’s also been a lot of talk of tablets replacing textbooks on college campuses. But despite a lot of talking the talk, there’s been very little walking the walk. One institution taking some firm strides down that path is Lynn University, a private school of about 2000 students in Boca Raton, Florida….” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jewish History 51 mins – “Historian Simon Schama’s latest book, “The Story of the Jews,” is also a five-part documentary series airing on PBS. Schama talks with guest host Frank Sesno about his chronicles of the 3,000-year-old history and what being Jewish means to him. Simon Schama, professor of art history and history, Columbia University. He is the author of 16 books and the writer-presenter of more than 40 documentaries on art, history and literature.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however,
the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Ireland Famine 54 mins – “Hunger and starvation are more often the result of human action rather than nature’s caprice. Philip Coulter visits Ireland to tell the story the great famine of the 1840s.” At the link find the title, “The Great Hunger, Part 2 – Ireland,”  right-click (here or there) “Download The Great Hunger, Part 2 – Ireland” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lime Prices 6 mins – “The price of limes in the U.S. is skyrocketing, and that could have something to do with Mexico’s drug war. Gustavo Arellano explains why. He writes the syndicated column ‘Ask a Mexican.’ ” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liquid Biopsies 6 mins – “I first heard the words “molecular pathology” from my professor of pathology as a medical student in Alabama in about 1955. I heard them again only rarely for the next 40-50 years. But now, because of giant leaps in technology, mostly gene-oriented, it is the hottest topic in medicine. The concept of liquid biopsy — using blood as the cancer sample — serves as a metaphor for the entire field.” At the link you must first register for a free account and can then listen, only; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Lyme Disease 51 mins – “Each year an estimated 300,000 Americans are diagnosed with Lyme disease, and many say this number is likely to be low because not all cases are reported. Those cases that are reported are concentrated in the Mid-Atlantic states into New England and in the Upper Midwest. The disease is associated with a number of debilitating symptoms including fever, joint pain and headaches. Antibiotics can usually be effective an treatment but not always. Guest host Frank Sesno and [4] panelists discuss the challenges of diagnosing and treating Lyme disease.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Malaysia Flight 370 132 mins – “The Malaysia Airlines B777 is still missing. We may never know what happened. The only winners here are the big cable news outlets, which are reaping huge viewing numbers by continuing to sensationalize the investigation. Apparently, a steady string of “aviation experts” is helping to hold our interest… even if the credentials of some of these so-called “experts” is highly questionable.” An experienced pilot talks about the aircraft, its parts and the incident for the first thirty minutes of his podcast, followed by incidents with other aircraft. An insider’s viewpoint! At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maple Sugar Industry 46 mins – “It’s sugar season in the maple forests of the U.S. and Canada. We’ll look at the secrets of the maple syrup industry, and how it’s dealing with climate change.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Matternet 12 mins – “Amazon’s talk of package delivery drones may just be pie-in-the-sky, but start-up Matternet has already begun testing a delivery-drone network in developing countries.” At the link right-click “Download Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medals of Honor 80 mins – “Twenty-four Army veterans were awarded the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The recipients were found to have been wrongly denied the nation’s highest military award because of prejudice. The ceremony was attended by the three living recipients and family members of those no longer alive.” At the link you can watch/listen;  however, the file is included in the zip collection noted in the
introduction to this episode.

Media Corruption in India 27 mins – “Does ‘paid media’ threaten democracy? Shilpa Kannan investigates corruption in India where there are 250 radio stations, 850 TV channels and 93,000 newspapers and magazines.” At the link find the title, “Docs: India – Press for Sale 18 Mar 2014,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140318-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Millennium Villages Project 84 mins – “Jeffrey Sachs of Columbia University and the Millennium Villages Project talks with EconTalk host about poverty in Africa and the efforts of the Millennium Villages Project to fight hunger, disease, and illiteracy. The project tries to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in a set of poor African villages using an integrated strategy fighting hunger, poverty, and disease. In this lively conversation, Sachs argues that this approach has achieved great success so far and responds to criticisms from development economists and Nina Munk in her recent EconTalk interview.” Over 80 comments follow. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navajo Military 8 mins – “The Navajo Nation promised its veterans housing to thank them for their service. But many are still struggling to live in substandard conditions. The Los Angeles Times‘ Cindy Carcamo explains.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistan 60 mins – “Hinckley Forum: War and State Building – Pakistan in Comparative Perspective by T.V. Paul, James McGill Professor of International Relations, McGill University, Montreal; Leading scholar of international security, regional security and South Asia.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Palliative Care 33 mins – “End-of-life care and palliative care are very tired together. To palliate, means to make less severe, without removing the cause. End stage cancer is a great example of palliative care. At some point, some cancers don’t respond to treatment, and the decision has to be made to stop trying to “remove the cause” and treat the patients symptoms or “make less severe” – hence palliation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Reviews 51 mins – “Performance reviews are perhaps the most hated workplace ritual we have. A recent survey found nearly 90 percent of employees think they’re a waste of time. And it’s not only those being evaluated who feel that way, but also managers and even the HR professionals who run the process. Some high profile have scrapped their appraisals, yet most still rely on them to determine promotions and bonuses and provide accountability.” (Three guests) You can listen at the link, but not download; however, the audio file is included in the zip collection noted in the introduction to this episode.

Peru 54 mins – “Machu Picchu – World Heritage site, testimony to the Inca civilization;
Wild grass could supply genes to combat wheat root disease; Gold and the Incas – Lost World of Peru” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quatrefoil 17 mins – “…The quatrefoil has been re-interpreted and re-contextualized in a phenomenon to which architectural and art historians refer as “iconographical drift.” The associations with the shape are  constantly shifting depending on where it’s used, who is using it, and what purpose it is used for. Yet no matter where it’s used, it implies the same thing:  fanciness….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Repair Cafe 8 mins – “Putting people who like to fix things together with those who need something fixed makes everybody happy. And that’s what the Repair Café movement is all about…” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Gate 20 mins – “…Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google Plus, Orkut, Ning…How many social networks do we need? And do we need ones for specific professions? Police? Engineers? Scientists? In the case of scientists, at least, in 2008, a virologist at Harvard, Ijad Madisch, and two colleagues decided they did. They founded ResearchGate, which, though it sounds like CNN’s name for a plagiarism scandal, is a social network with, they claim, more than 3 million members. They aim to change how researchers find each other, collaborate, and publish. They aim, in fact, for ResearchGate to win a Nobel Prize. My  aim is to find out from Madisch how ResearchGate is coming along so far. He joins us by phone from Germany. ” At the link right-click “download podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Today Progam 51 mins – ” The effort to preserve journalistic freedom during the Crimean crisis. Plus, Bob Garfield issues a special report on the streaming video revolution.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serendipity 16 mins – “Yahoo’s CEO, Marissa Mayer, ignited a firestorm earlier this year when she ordered the company’s entire workforce back into the office, banning telecommuting throughout the organization. Other CEOs rushed to condemn her action, and only a handful of management experts defended it in the interests of spurring innovation. One was John Sullivan, who on this show pointed out that Google—the company Mayer worked at for many years—doesn’t allow telecommuting  and works hard to ensure workers come together, in the hallways, at the coffee bar, and in the cafeteria, to spur their innovative collaborations. Sullivan said, And the Google data shows, incidentally,…its interaction between engineers and finance, engineers and design, engineers and production or marketing. Those are where the interactions—they’re called “serendipitous interactions” or “casual interactions”—that’s where the collaboration and the innovation comes from.” At the link right-click “Download podcast” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Shia-Sunni Conflict 27 mins – “Since the beginning of the Arab Spring, the Middle East has experienced a proliferation of new TV channels keen to spread religious and political messages to audiences. There are new media stars – TV evangelists and religious leaders. But some of what is broadcast has been described as openly sectarian, provocative and even blasphemous. We look at two countries where this kind of broadcasting proliferates – Iraq and Egypt – and try to uncover the reasons for it, and the possible consequences.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: The Freedom to Broadcast Hate,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20140315-0932a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep 70 mins – ” BSP 107 is an interview with Penelope A. Lewis, author of “The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest.”  At the topic link right-click (here or there) “Direct download: 107-BSP-Lewis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Energy Research 29 mins – Dr Wonyong Choi discusses the many efforts he and others are making to produce energy from the sun using organic and inorganic approaches, to include those which capture carbon dioxide. At the link right-click the Windows logo at the right side of the screen and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soldering 74 mins – “Phil King of Weekend Engineering returned to give Elecia advice on how to fabricate a board, both in a professional capacity and for garage projects.  EaglePCB is a commercial package which is also available as a free, noncommercial version for small 2-layer boards. Other open source packages mentioned include Kicad and gEDA. Some board fabricators provide free tools that work only with their fab houses (such as ExpressPCB).  Digikey’s SchemeIt  provides a way to get a PDF schematic (and a BOM), but falls down by not providing a way to generate a net list, a critical part of board fabrication…” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stop and Frisk 12 mins – “Different versions of the “stop-and-frisk” policy are playing out in several major cities. Writer Daniel Bergner and educator Gemar Mills discuss how it works in Newark, New Jersey.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Subdural Haematomas 19 mins – “Subdural haematoma is more common in elderly patients, yet the condition is easy to miss in this group. John Young, a consultant geriatrician at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, describes what clinical signs to look out for, and what tests can confirm a diagnosis of subdural haematoma.”  At the link find the title, “Recognising a subdural haematoma in the elderly,” right-click “Media files 139013762-bmjgroup recognising a subdural.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Success 51 mins – “In this hour, TED speakers share ideas about what makes us successful.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow beside “Listen to Full Show” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telecommunications Act 30 mins – “If all had gone according to the plan behind the 1996 Telecommunications Act, we would have lots of competition among Internet service providers, not just cable and DSL but other technologies as well. Alas, the competing technologies never really appeared and various incarnations of the FCC effectively gutted the common carriage requirements at the heart of the Act. Earl Comstock joins us today to explain what they had in mind when they spent years developing the goals and text of the Act….” At the link right-click “…download this MP3 file….” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism in Cities 54 mins – “It used to be that countries waged war against each other on a battlefield. But now cities are the new conflict zone. Hassan Ghedi Santur explores what happens when our neighbourhoods become high value targets.” At the link find the title, “Conflicted Cities,” right-click (here or there) “Download Conflicted Cities” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Famines 54 mins – “Hunger and starvation are more often the result of human action rather than nature’s caprice. Philip Coulter visits Ukraine to tell the story the Holodomor, “hunger extermination”, which took place in the 1930s, an event that shapes Ukraine to this day.” At the link find the title, “The Great Hunger, Part 1 – Ukraine,” and select (there or here) “Download The Great Hunger, Part 1 – Ukraine” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

===============================================================                                                                     ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of about 2500 hyperlinked descriptions in pdf format is here and updated quarterly. Jan-Jun 2013 files in 18 zip segments (832 podcasts) can be downloaded hereand a list of those files here; Jul-Jul Dec 2013 files in 13 zip segments (720 podcasts) downloaded here, and a list here;  Jan-Jun 2012 files in 8 segments (360 podcasts) and a list are here, and Jul-Dec here in 13 parts (593 podcasts).  For 2011 a list and 5 segments  (184 podcasts). For 2010 and earlier 64 podcasts are listed here and zipped  as Part 1 and Part 2. (Dead links in old episodes are due to updating; try a current episode.) Over 180 feeds used to prepare this weekly blog are harvested with Feedreader3. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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