Media Mining Digest 146 – 29 August 2014: Alzheimer’s Prospects, Audience Hacking, Autism and Vaccines, Beef Production, Camels in US, College Majors, Conservation Tech, Digestion, Disease Processes, Education System, Engineer Mentors, Fat and Sugar, Fat Discussion, Fats and Carbs, Feeding the Planet, Ferguson Missouri, Fracking Issues, Fractals, French Fries, Grapes of Wrath, Grass to Bread, Gut Biome, Hacking IKEA, Jaguars, Makeshift Economy, Meat Eating, Medicare Part D, Micronutrients, Milk and Cheese, Monarch Butterflies, News Literacy, Nutrition Issues, Nutrition Science, Pickles and Ketchup, Problem Identification, Protein Sources, Resveratrol, Salt Seasoning, Sugar Overview, Unseen, Xanadu Project

The following audio files come from a larger group of 219 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 44 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Alzheimer’s Prospects 60 mins mins – “Alzheimer’s Disease is a growing health and economic concern worldwide, prompting innovative efforts to better understand the disease and translate that understanding into effective interventions… Visit the Academy’s Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia Initiative for more info.” At the link find the title, “Alzheimer’s Disease: Prospects for a Cure,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audience Hacking 15 mins – “This is a repurposed episode originally published at the Podcast Reporter podcast show, in which we interview Jonny Andrews of AudienceHacker.com. The interview took place at the first annual Podcast Movement conference.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism and Vaccines 57 mins – “Episode 25 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Dr. Paul A. Offit, author of “Autism’s False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure.” The scientific evidence shows no connection between vaccines and autism yet opponents of vaccination continue to encourage parents to refuse to vaccinate their children against potentially life threatening diseases. In this episode we consider the evidence for vaccine safety and examine the factors that fuel the on-going controversy. Children are already dying from preventable diseases like measles and hemophilis influenza (Hib) meningitis, so it is vital that parents be informed about the unnecessary risks faced by unvaccinated children.” At the link right-click next to “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beef Production 30 mins – “How did the hamburger become a staple American food? A Thought for Food considers the science and history of the key ingredient, beef.” At the link find the title, “Meet the meat,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Camels in US 4 mins – “…In another program, I talk about Dromedary camels that the US Army imported into Texas in 1856. Those, it turned out, were only part of more widespread move to bring camels to America — or perhaps I should say bring back. Camels originated in the west, migrated to Asia some four million years ago; then they finally died out here only 10,000 years ago — probably hunted to extinction. Llamas, Alpacas and Vicunas are actually forms of camels….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clouds 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from October 3, 2010, Keith & Russ talk with Sarah Brooks, Associate Professor in Texas A&M’s Department of Atmospheric Science. Sarah explains the basics of cloud formation and cloud seeding. She also discusses how pollution can inadvertently affect cloud formation, and ultimately, weather. And Sarah & Russ engage in a brief, but lively, debate on whether clouds and water vapor contribute to climate change.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Majors 17 mins – “Sure, some college degrees lead to higher paying jobs than others. But what’s shocking — at least, it was shocking to us — is just how big the gap can be. The most lucrative majors typically lead to jobs with salaries over $100,000 a year. The least lucrative lead to salaries of around $30,000. On today’s show, we run the numbers. We talk to people who majored in the most- and least-lucrative subjects. And we hear from an economist who says, when it comes to income, choosing a major is more important than choosing a college.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Tech 51 mins – “New technologies are now giving conservationists abilities that would have been unimaginable just a few years ago. Using remote sensors, satellite mapping and drones, scientists and activists can now monitor deforestation and endangered wildlife in real time. And a new Wiki-leaks-style website is being used to target the kingpins of wildlife smuggling. But like many technologies, these new tools have risks. Tracking devices in the hand of poachers, for example, could prove devastating to endangered elephants. Join Diane and a panel of [3] guests for a discussion on how technology is transforming conservation efforts worldwide.”At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Digestion 23 min – “How do we know what’s really good for us in an age of information overload? The first installment in our new podcast series on nutrition follows the journey of food from the table through the digestive tract to begin to get to the bottom of that big question.” At the link find the title, “My dinner with my dinner,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Processes 52 mins (two parts) – This two-part program is an overview of the disease process. “…In this first section, the panel considers the evolution of viruses, the spillover of pathogens from animals to humans, and some cultural practices that increase the rate of this phenomenon. The discussion is moderated by award-winning author David Quammen. The panelists are Dr. Ian Lipkin, Captain Daniel B. Jernigan, and author Maryn McKenna. In the [second] section, the panelists discuss factors involved in preventing outbreaks from reaching pandemic scales. The SARS virus and SARS-like virus that appeared earlier… in Saudi Arabia provide interesting case studies for considering containment policy.” At the links (Part 1; Part2) you can listen, not download; however, a copy of each is included in the blog archive.

Education System 51 mins – “As kids head back to school, it’s time to look at the future of education and what people are doing to solve today’s biggest problems. Sal Khan discusses how he’s reinventing education with more than just online videos. Author Amanda Ripley tackles the increasing fear of many American parents that their kids are falling behind. Psychologist Dave Anderegg gives us his remedy for the problem: stop stigmatizing nerdiness. Plus, we learn about the founder of Montessori Method, and much more.” At the link find the title, “8.23.14 – Schooling the System – The Whole Education Special,” right-click “IHUB-082314-FullShow.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Mentors 83 mins – “Electrical engineer Meagan Pollock explains how engineers can be more effective role models. We also learn about promoting equity in the workplace, discover how digital movie projection technology is used to improve medical care, and consider whether or not software engineers deal with entropy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fat and Sugar 26 mins – “Though fat and sugar are often seen as the bad guys in the world of nutrients, the truth is our body needs them to survive. Begin to explore those most maligned compounds in the third edition of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Fire in Your Belly,” right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Fat Discussion 30 mins – “Trans fat, saturated fat, hydrogenated oil—such terms are plastered on food labels across the country. But what do any of them really mean? Find out all about fat in this episode of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “A Fat Lot of Good,” right-click on “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fats and Carbs 88 mins – “The Egg Nutrition Center is hosting this webinar, entitled Carbohydrate and Saturated Fat: Emerging Research and New Schools of Thought to discuss the body of scientific research behind low carb diets in the treatment of dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome; discuss diagnostic tools that are used to evaluation cardiometabolic risk and how these markers are effected by diet; debate both sides of the saturated fat story; recognize common myths associated with heart health, and discuss evidence-based nutrition counseling and communication.” At the link you can only watch the video – no download, but the visual aids are helpful. An audio copy is included with the blog archive. Confusing terms used during the webinar include MUFA’s and PUFA’s.

Feeding the Planet 44 mins – “Author Alan Weisman considers the meaning and means of achieving a sustainable future in this excerpted coverage of a talk he presented at the Academy.” At the link find the title, “Can We Feed the Planet?” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Missouri 47 mins – “A deep read on Ferguson, Missouri and what we’re seeing about race, class, hope and fear in America.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Issues 51 mins – “Each year an estimated 35,000 oil and natural gas wells are processed using hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. More than 15 million people live within a mile of a well that’s been drilled since 2000. The explosive growth in this industry has left scientists struggling to keep up, but research is beginning to mount related to how fracking is affecting the earth. A recent study connected fracking to increased earthquakes in Oklahoma and Stanford scientists are raising new concerns about contaminated drinking water. Please join us to discuss what we know about the environmental effects of fracking.”At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Fracking Review 30 mins – “Even the most casual followers of energy policy have become aware of the controversy surrounding the massive expansion of fracking in this country over the past decade…This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise speaks with Neela Banerjee, a journalist who covers energy and environmental policy for the Los Angeles Times, to get an update on the latest developments in natural gas exploration. She talks about the fight to keep drinking water safe around the 77,000 natural gas wells throughout the country, and the controversy surrounding the use of unpermitted diesel fuel in the fracking process.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fractals 31 mins – “Art, Science, Math and Culture: In this podcast, art historian Nina Samuel, biologists Brian Enquist and James Brown, and ethnomathematician Ron Eglash discuss the prevalence and power of fractals from the perspectives of their various disciplines.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

French Fries 22 mins -“In this installment of A Thought for Food’s consideration of the cheeseburger, we analyze the king of side dishes, the French fry.” At the link find the title, “Best Thing Ever,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grapes of Wrath 27 mins – “The classic novel, a parable of America’s Great Depression, as applied to the US today. Mark Mardell considers John Steinbeck’s novel The Grapes of Wrath.” At the link find the title, “ DocArchive: Grapes of Wrath Revisited,” right-click “Media files docarchive 20140819-0905a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grass to Bread 37 mins – “The second installment of A Thought for Food’s systematic analysis of America’s sandwich, the cheeseburger, looks at bread—one of the strangest and most interesting products humanity has ever invented.” Mention is made of a seminal book by the Sinclairs about the history of agriculture. At the link find the title, “Going to seed,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gut Biome 37 mins – “The genome of the bacteria that colonize our bodies vastly dwarfs our human genome! How will this new finding change how we understand our health? Dr. Martin Blaser, Director of the Human Microbiome Program at the NYU School of Medicine; Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, Associate Professor of Medicine at New York University Medical Center; and Dr. Lawrence Brandt, Professor of Medicine and Surgery at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine discuss the consequences of our co-evolution with bacteria and debate the implications for medical research. Christine Gorman, Senior Editor for Health and Medicine at Scientific American, moderates.” At the link find the title, “Hats Off to Bacteria,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hacking IKEA 20 mins – “Because IKEA products are available in so many countries and use metric measurements, a worldwide “hackerati” has been able to thrive. You see hacks posted from Australia, Russia, Israel and Dubai. Someone even posted a hack of a French country house library in an actual French country house. He used 60 Billy and Benno bookcases….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jaguars 51 mins – “Jaguars are the world’s third-largest wild cat – after tigers and lions. They have distinctive black rosettes on their fur and can weigh up to 250 pounds. Jaguars have been eradicated from 40 percent of their historic range. Today they live along a corridor from Argentina to Mexico. Their future is threatened by illegal hunting, deforestation and a loss of prey. One of the world’s leading big cat experts is responsible for creating a jaguar preserve in Central America, the first of its kind. In a new book, he shares why he’s committed to giving a voice to jaguars and how they helped him find his own voice.” At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Makeshift Economy 46 mins – “We’ll look at workers trying to live and make a living in the age of TaskRabbit and computer-driven work schedules.” At the link right-click on “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Eating 30 mins – “The final installment of our step-by-step analysis of the cheeseburger culminates in a question that’s both very simple and tremendously complex—should we eat meat?” At the link find the title, “Eating Animals,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micronutrients 25 mins – “Scurvy was once the scourge of the seven seas, but it turned out to have a simple solution: Vitamin C. In the second installment of our nutrition series, learn all about the power of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients.” At the link find the title, “Tiny Amounts,” right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Milk and Cheese 23 mins – “For the third installment of our dissection of the humble cheeseburger, A Thought for Food considers a Paleolithic super food that’s still popular worldwide—cheese.” At the link find the title, “Bad Milk Gone Good,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monarch Butterflies 47 mins – “This year’s monarch butterfly migration is the smallest ever recorded. We’ll ask why. It’s a big story. Plus: how climate change is creating new hybridized species.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Literacy 51 mins – “Americans are getting their news from more places than ever before. Besides traditional sources, we are turning to social media, email and even late-night TV to find out what’s happening in the world. And we are increasingly able to target news based on our interests and ideology. Some journalists worry the sheer volume of all that information is affecting our news literacy. They say we need to think critically about our daily media diet and ask more questions about who is producing and sourcing the news we consume and why. Diane and her [4] guests discuss how to sort fact from fiction in the digital age.” At the link you can only listen, not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Nutrition Issues 23 mins – “Nutrition is notoriously tricky to get a handle on, with conflicting reports and unsubstantiated fads all over the place. So why can’t science get to the bottom of what’s right—and right for you? For one, it has a lot to do with things called biomarkers.” At the link find the title, “How Do We Know What We Know?,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Science 70 mins (3 parts) – In Part 1 of 19 mins “Nutrition science can help make the world a healthier, happier place, but how do researchers know where to start? In Part 2 of 29 mins “Scientists, health professionals, and food industry representatives discuss the process of putting the Research Agenda for Nutrition Science into action.” In part 3 of 22 mins “Scientists, health professionals, and food industry representatives discuss the importance of addressing global nutrition needs from a multidisciplinary perspective.” At the link find the three titles, “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Activating the Agenda,” “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Mobilizing the Community,” and “A Research Agenda for Nutrition Science: Why and How?” right-click their “Downloads” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pickles and Ketchup 29 mins – “The fourth installment of our systematic breakdown of a cheeseburger deals with ketchup and pickles, two attempts to give vegetables the power to defy time.” At the link find the title, “Veg Everlasting,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Problem Identification 31mins – “When you’re dealing with complex systems, failure is going to happen; it’s a given. What we do after that failure, however, strongly influences whether or not that failure will happen again. The traditional response to failure is to seek out the person responsible and punish them accordingly — should they be fired? Retrained? Moved to a different position where they can’t cause such havoc again? John Allspaw, SVP of technical operations at Etsy and co-chair of the O’Reilly Velocity Conference, argues that this “human error” approach is the equivalent of cutting off your nose to spite your face. He explains in a blog post that at Etsy, their approach it to “view mistakes, errors, slips, lapses, etc., with a perspective of learning.” To that end, Etsy practices “blameless postmortems” that focus more on the narrative of how something happened rather than who was behind it, and that remove punishment as an outcome of an investigation….” At the link right-click on the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protein Sources 34 mins – “ Experts discuss innovations in food science and programming that are aimed at sustainably producing adequate protein for the global population. Population growth and changes in dietary practices globally have led to a tremendous rise in the demand for animal-source foods. While consuming the required amount of protein is fundamental to human health, supplying protein to meet increasing worldwide needs can lead to environmental and health problems. This podcast is brought to you by the Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science.” At the link find the title, “The Problem with Protein,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Resverotrol 45 mins – “A few years ago, Resveratrol—a compound found in red wine and dark chocolate, among other foods—made a splash in the news as an anti-aging wonder and was soon after seized upon by marketers. But the truth is that research is still in its early stages. Dr. Joseph Baur leads us through the science behind the hype.” At the link find the title, “Getting Behind the Resveratrol Hype,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salt Seasoning 30 mins – “Salt is one of the most important and versatile ingredients in foods around the world. We like it, we need it, but are we getting too much of it these days? Get the big picture on this unique compound in episode six of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Rock Steady,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sugar Overview 39 mins – “The battle of wills to resist the last cupcake isn’t the only one being waged over sugar. In fact, sugar—or fructose to be more precise—is one of the most hotly contested subjects in the world of nutrition. Find out why in the fifth edition of our nutrition series.” At the link find the title, “Sugar in the morning,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unseen 28 mins – “The prolific British science writer Philip Ball discusses his latest book Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen: This week on the podcast the Guardian’s Pascal Wyse meets science writer Philip Ball to delve into the role of the unseen in the evolution of science and culture. Throughout history, the world of the unseen has been fertile ground for both the ignorant and the enlightened. Ball’s book Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen is an exhaustive exploration of invisibility, from Plato’s ideas about the “ether”, via dark energy and matter to “invisibility cloaks” made from nano-materials.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Xanadu Project 49 mins – “Ted Nelson is a pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He is the founder of Project Xanadu and coined the terms “hypertext” and “hypermedia.’” More details are in this Wired article and wiki about Nelson. At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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An alphabetic encyclopedia of 3500 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , added to weekly, and can be downloaded as a 20+ GB zipped file or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is there too,  and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 180 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with Feedreader3 and Juice. The feeds are available in this opml file which Feedreader and Juice can import. A list of the feeds is hereFree Commander is used to compare old with new downloads and remove duplicates. MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Thank you for visiting.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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