Media Mining Digest 162 – 19 Dec 2014: Aging Gracefully, Alcoholism in America, Appliance Repairman Work, Archeology and Death, Bacteria Eating Worm, British Health Issues, Campus Sex, Capitalism, Car Services, Cartooning Work, Commerce and Research, Computer Virus Doctor, Customizing Technology, Day Care Operation,Dementia Management, Digital Revolution, Doctoring the Poor, Elder Mistreatment, Engineering Design, Environmental Issues, Estate Planning, Fairy Tales, Farming Work, Gentrification, Greener Living, Hospice Nurse Work, Hunter S. Thompson, Intellectual Property, ISIS Power, Jobs to Seek, Journalism in DC, Land Transfer to States, Lightbulb History, Macular Degeneration, Marie Marvingt, Mars Mission, Medical Education Pitfalls, Meditation, Mr Rodger’s Legacy, New York City Growth, Obesity, Open Data Issues, Pain Management, Paramedic Work, Perfumer Work, Pet Cremations, Plant Life Stewardship, Police Shootings, Presidential Power, Prostate Cancer Story, Racism Dialogue, Racism in America, Redskins, Refugee Integration, Regrets, Saint Petersburg Paradox, Satellites, Screenwriter Work, Shackleton, Sharing Economy, Slights of Hand, Socialism Decline, Sound and Hearing, Spanish Moss, Stuxnet Worm, Surface Pro 3, Torture, ToyTalk, Waitering Work

The following audio files come from a larger group of 172 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 71 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aging Gracefully 87 mins – One of a series of lectures for nurses interested in Geriatric Nursing. Produced by the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. This session looks at the physical and mental issues we confront as we age and practical considerations in dealing with them. The sound quality could be better. At the link find the title, “Resist Rust: Advice for Successful Aging from the Land of Oz,” right-click the down-pointing arrow to the right and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcoholism in America 46 mins – “Facts are facts. Reality is reality. Except, it seems, when Americans address each other matters of race and responsibility. That’s become obvious in the wake of protests that came out of Ferguson and Staten Island. One reality sees racism as still a living poison that leads to police killings and job discrimination, and a concept of “white privilege” that keeps African Americans at a constant disadvantage.  In the other reality, white privilege is a fiction — and a bad excuse — for individual and even group failure. This hour, On Point: talking race: Where is that conversation, and where is it going?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Appliance Repairman Work 21 mins – “On this episode of Slate’s Working, David Plotz talks to appliance repairman John Lefever about learning to fix new appliances and what it’s like to work in a stranger’s home five times a day.” At the link find the title, “The ‘How Does An Appliance Repairman Work?’ Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14112401.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Archeology and Death 14 mins – “Annalee Newitz comes to terms with grief while exploring the remains of a mysterious ancient city. Annalee Newitz is the editor of io9, and author most recently of Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will Survive a Mass Extinction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacteria Eating Worm 57 mins – “Hosts Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter reveal that a soil-dwelling nematode can recognize and respond to a bacterial quorum sensing molecule through a sensory neuron.” The nematode is the widely-researched C. elegans and the concepts presented are cutting edge. That part of the podcast starts about the 23 minute mark but adds to material presented at the beginning. At the link right-click “download TWiM#93 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Health Issues 15mins – “The UK’s austerity programme has disproportionately affected children and people with disabilities, says David Taylor-Robinson, a senior clinical lecturer in public health at the University of Liverpool. He us to discuss why the evidence shows the vulnerable are hit hardest by the cuts to public services, despite the UN conventions on human rights giving children and people with disabilities special protection. Read his full editorial….“ At the link find the title, “Great leap backwards – austerity measures are hitting the vulnerable hardest,” right-click “Media files 180885926-bmjgroup-great-leap-backwards-austerity.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campus Sex 51 mins – “A story in last month’s Rolling Stone magazine described the gang rape of a student at a University of Virginia fraternity house. The university responded by suspending all fraternities and a criminal investigation was launched. But in recent weeks, key elements of the alleged victim’s story have been questioned and could not be verified by other news organizations. Advocates say the firestorm around the story has led to blaming the victim and sets back efforts to address campus sex assault. Diane and guests discuss a controversial Rolling Stone article and what it means for journalism standards, the rights of victims and those accused.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Capitalism 27 mins – “In the wake of the global economic crisis, what does capitalism mean to us today? Stand-up comedian Colm O’Regan visits the Kilkenomics Festival of economics and comedy in Kilkenny, Ireland, and heads to New York to ask what people really understand about capitalism.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Number Crunched,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141209-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Services 51 mins – “The growing popularity of online car services is boosting Uber’s bottom line. The app-based taxi service is now valued at 41 billion dollars. But Uber is hitting serious roadblocks here and abroad. Two California district attorneys sued the company for allegedly misleading consumers about background checks. And a passenger in India accused an Uber driver of raping her. Many are calling for stricter oversight and more controls on what app-based car services do with passengers’ personal information. Others say too much regulation could squelch much-needed innovation. Diane and her [5] guests discuss the future of Uber and online car services.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Cartooning Work 32 mins – “On this episode of Working, David Plotz talks with Washington Post cartoonist Tom Toles about the importance of finding humor in the news and why he draws 24 cartoons each week.” At the link find the title, “The How Does A Cartoonist Work? Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14111101_ep6_Toles.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commerce and Research 31 mins – “A discussion on copyright and scholarly collaboration platforms with: Sybil Wong, Vice President, Business Development Oxbridge Biotech Roundtable (OBR) Recorded in London….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Virus Doctor 50 mins – Jeff Halash from Tech Nut PC.com talks to Ken Dwight-The Virus Doctor about virus control, detection, elimination and evolution. His site includes free information, a newsletter and links to online courses he teaches and a book he produced. At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Customizing Technology 20 mins – “How customers use a piece of technology can change what the product is. And what the product is can change the business model for the company. It’s a constant dance between the customers and the sellers. Today on the show, three short stories about this dance. For more on these stories check out: Free Voice-Control Software Helps Tiny Start-Ups Build Big Ideas and You Can Create A Hit Video Game About Anything. Even Making Toast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.”

Day Care Operation 16 mins – “On this episode of Working, David Plotz talks to day care manager Dannae Sewell about balancing different expectations for child development, and how to tailor care to each child’s needs.” At the link find the title, “The ‘How To Run a Day Care Center’ Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14120103_sewell.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Management 58 mins – One of a series of lectures for nurses interested in Geriatric Nursing. Produced by the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. This session deals with management of dementia in the elderly without the use of drugs. Frequent reference is made to University of Iowa materials which appears to be this site but most of the materials mentioned may be more easily obtained from this PDF. At the link find the title, “Decision Support and Dementia,” right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Revolution 52 mins – “It’s the most dramatic technical development of recent times: Teams of people working for decades to produce a slow-motion revolution we call computing. As these devices become increasingly powerful, we recall that a pioneer from the nineteenth century – Ada Lovelace, a mathematician and Lord Byron’s daughter – said they would never surpass human ability. Was she right? We consider the near-term future of computing as the Internet of Things is poised to link everything together, and biologists adopt the techniques of information science to program living cells.” (5 guests) At the link right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctoring the Poor 27 mins – “On Ep. 2 of Working, David Plotz talks with Dr. Meri Kolbrener about how treating poor families in Washington, D.C. requires both technical skill and intense empathy.” At the link find the title, “Working: Dr. Meri Kolbrener,” right-click “Direct download: Working_Kolbrener.mp3,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elder Mistreatment 56 mins – One of a series of lectures for nurses interested in Geriatric Nursing. Produced by the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. This session deals with economic, physical and psychological issues of the elderly, some of which cannot be resolved because they are still of sound mind and body. At the link find the title, “Elder Mistreatment,” right-click the down-pointing arrow to the right and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineering Design 95 mins – “We talk with electrical engineer Chris Gammell in this episode, discussing design tradeoffs, parametric part searches, and the manner in which design work is being altered by component manufacturers.” At the link at episode 71 and right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Issues 57 mins – “Today we’re joined by Zoë Carpenter, reporter for The Nation, who will discuss her recent article on the impact of oil contributions in the Louisiana Senate Race between Mary Landrieu and Bill Cassidy, “The Invisible Oil in Louisiana’s Senate Race.” We’ll also talk with Harriet Rowan, staff reporter for the Richmond Confidential, an online news service produced by the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley, about Chevron’s multi-million dollar influence on local elections in Richmond, California.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Estate Planning 44 mins – “One of the most commonly overlooked elements of financial planning is estate planning. Most doctors know how important this is but never take the time to address this critical issue of planning. In this episode, we talk with Brian Shelley about estate planning tools and strategies that doctors should consider as they are building wealth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fairy Tales 51 mins – “Fairy tales are everywhere you look today. And they aren’t necessarily for children. In a new English translation of the first Brothers’ Grimm collection, Cinderella’s stepsisters slice off part of their feet to fit a golden slipper. And the evil queen in the Snow White story is her biological mother. Films and TV shows feature well-known stories with modern twists. And many new fairy tales are aimed at a mature teen audience. It seems we have come full circle. Fairy tales were once the realm of adults until Victorians began routinely publishing illustrated collections for the very young. Diane and her [3] guests discuss the history of fairy tales and why they still resonate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Farming Work 27 mins – “On this episode of Working, David Plotz talks to fruit grower Eddie Rankin about GoldRush apples, the value of farmers’ markets, and how farmers switched to “softer” pesticides.” Reference is made to SkyBit as an aid to Integrated Fruit Management. At the link find the title, “The ‘How Does A Farmer Work?’ Edition,“ right-click “Direct download: working14120804_working.mp3” and select “Save link As” form the pop-up menu.

Gentrification 50 mins – “This weekend, Lizzie O’Leary talks with Krissy Clark and Lindsay Foster Thomas of Marketplace’s Wealth and Poverty desk, about York & Fig, a project focusing on gentrification. Michael Bashaw of Whole Foods explains how the chain chooses locations, and Lizzie and Trulia economist Jed Kolko go to Starbucks…on opposite sides of the country. Ben Johnson explains how to understand gentrification using Google Maps. And, how does gentrification impact your personal finances?” At the link find the title, “Gentrification,” right-click “Media files weekend 20141205, pod 64.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greener Living 47 mins – “We all want make to our mark. And all of us are doing that. In trash. Even the best of us – even the recycling-est of us — leave a path of trash wherever we go. The paper coffee cups we crumple up and toss in the can. The tubes of toothpaste we squeeze dry but then send down the garbage chute. The wrappers and the straws and the plastic containers that get used once, and then are refuse.  And what about wrapping paper? We’re weeks away from creating a collective mountain of fresh new wrapping paper rubbish. There’s a way out of the trash path, but it takes some thinking, and then it takes some doing. And some people are proving it can be done. This hour, On Point: trashing the trash can.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospice Nurse Work 30 mins – “David Plotz talks to a hospice nurse about caring for the elderly, dealing with families in the process of grieving, and what it’s like to give a bath to a person who has just died.” At the link find the title, “The ‘How Does A Hospice Nurse Work?’ Edition “ right-click “Direct download: The_How_Does_A_Hospice_Nurse_Work_Edition.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Thu, 23 October 2014

Hunter S. Thompson 59 mins – “Guest host Stephen Colbert celebrates a classic by gonzo journalist Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. We hear three chapters from his 1972 book chronicling his drug-fuelled road trip to cover a motor-cycle race, which winds up being what he called “a savage journey to the heart of the American dream.” The readers are Alec Baldwin, Anthony Rapp, and Michael Imperioli.” At the link find the title, “Bad Boy: Celebrating Hunter S. Thompson,” right-click “Media files 180854058-selectedshorts-bad-boy-celebrating-hunter-s-thompson.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intellectual Property 67 mins – “Why do people create and innovate? And how does intellectual property law encourage, or discourage, the process? In this talk Jessica Silbey — Professor at Suffolk University Law School — discusses her recent book, The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators, and Everyday Intellectual Property, which investigates the motivations and mechanisms of creative and innovative activity in everyday professional life. Based on over fifty face-to-face interviews, the book centers on the stories told by interviewees describing how and why they create and innovate and whether or how IP law plays a role in their activities. The goal of the empirical project was to figure out how IP actually works in creative and innovative fields, as opposed to how we think or say it works (through formal law or legislative debate). Breaking new ground in its qualitative method examining the economic and cultural system of creative and innovative production, The Eureka Myth draws out new and surprising conclusions about the sometimes misinterpreted relationships between creativity, invention and intellectual property protections.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Power 47 mins – “ISIS is the richest terrorist organization ever, with an estimated more than $1 billion in assets.  We’ll look at ISIS’ business model and how to disrupt it. We call them terrorists they act like thugs but they are in their perverse way business people. To the Islamists overrunning Syria and Iraq and beheading hostages money matters. ISIS the so-called Islamic State in Iraq and Syria is rolling in it thanks to the oil fields they control the extortion rackets they run and the hostages they sell for dollars. Not even Al Qaeda has that kind of cash.  It’s the group’s lifeblood so how does the US cut it off. Can it?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jobs to Seek 14 mins – “The most important asset a company has in today’s world is the creative power of its workers. But that talent economy might not last forever, warns Roger Martin, author of “Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works.’” At the link find the title, “What Threatens the Talen Economy,” right-click “HUB-121314-E.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism in DC 59 mins – “Ann Compton talked about her 41-year career covering the White House. She talked about covering presidents from Gerald Ford to Barack Obama and shared her personal experiences with these men and her opinions on their administrations. As the only television reporter with President Bush on September 11, 2001, she also spoke about how the day unfolded.” At the link you can listen/watch, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Land Transfer to States 42 mins – “Utah legislators passed a bill two years ago demanding the federal government hand over millions of acres of public land to the state. With the deadline for that transfer looming, an economic report came out last week showing the plan could be financially viable—or it shows the land transfer is “half baked,” it depends which side you’re on. Thursday, we’re examining the arguments for and against Utah’s public lands campaign. Could it be a boon for the state or is it a reckless and unconstitutional pursuit?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lightbulb History 16 mins – “Hanging in the garage of Fire Station #6 in Livermore, California, there’s a small, pear-shaped light bulb. It is glowing right now. This lightbulb has been glowing, with just a couple of momentary interruptions, for 113 years. You can see it glow in real time. The bulb is a genuine heirloom from the dawn of electric illumination, built by one of its pioneers: Adolphe Chaillet. …Chaillet liked to do a theatrical product demo where he’d have a big theatre marquee-like light bulb bank. In it would be one bulb of his own design, and the rest would be bulbs by competing brands. Then, Chaillet would start slowly dialing up the power. One by one, the competitors’ bulbs would all explode. Every time, Chaillet’s would be the last one shining. One of those tenacious lightbulbs made it to Livermore, California, when a shop owner donated it to the town’s volunteer fire department in 1901….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Macular Degeneration 51 mins – “Macular degeneration is one of the most common causes of blindness in older Americans. Between 10 million and 15 million people in the U.S. have some form of the eye disease. As baby boomers age, doctors expect those numbers to climb sharply. There is no cure, but early diagnosis and treatment can help slow the progression of the disease. A limited number of people have had success improving their vision with the aid of a tiny telescope implanted behind the iris. Others receive drug injections directly into the eye. And there’s promising work being done in stem cell research. [3] Experts talk about the latest in treating macular degeneration.“ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Marie Marvingt 4 mins – “…The year was 1961 when 86-year-old Marie Marvingt cycled 175 miles from Nancy to Paris. She’d been an athlete all her life. In 1908 she was denied entry into the Tour de France because of her gender, so she cycled and finished the entire course by herself. Only a third of the male competitors had managed to finish it. By then, the 33-year-old Marvingt had won prizes in ten or so different sports and was a superb mountaineer to boot. She’d been the first woman to climb many major peaks in the Alps….She became the most decorated woman in France — meanwhile publishing poetry under a pseudonym (Myriel). Then, on her 80th birthday, this woman who’d flown in balloons before the Wright Brothers’ first powered flight, was given a ride in a supersonic Voodoo jet. And, that same year, she earned her helicopter pilot’s license….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mars Mission 47 mins – “It’s a long long way to planet Mars. So think of what the first humans to make the trip — which would take eight months one-way — will have to be ready to handle. Being out there in the cold darkness inside your tin can, loved ones left far behind, no rescue if you get seriously sick or hurt.  The payoff?  Getting there. Perhaps the greatest adventure in human history.  That’s why some Mars projects in the works now are having no trouble recruiting potential astronauts.  People are lining up to get to the Red Planet, and willing to go one way only. What are they thinking? And what would they be getting into? This hour, On Point:  The Mars Adventure. Who wants in, and why.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Education Pitfalls 47 mins – “Listen to Allison and Ryan take a walk down the path from premed to resident and hear how each next stage of the game is filled with unexpected twists and turns! In this episode, Ryan and Allison talk about what you need to expect along your path to becoming a physician (minus the sugar coating!) The idea behind this episode was actually conceived from an article about What medical school doesn’t prepare you for?…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation 50 mins – “How to have the strongest mind in the room with Tony Stubblebine and Erin Frey. This week we talk to the CEO and head researcher of [iPhone] Lift App, an app that helps people create and maintain new habits. With hundreds of thousands of users from across the world, Tony and Erin have a front row view to learning what makes habits stick and why. They have also learned which habits tend to bring out the best in people, or help increase wealth, or help get a good night sleep.  So we wanted to know, what have they found is the most important habit of all? If we could adopt one habit right now to improve our lives, what would it be? And it turns out, there is a fairly definitive answer. Tune in this week to find out what it is!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mr Rodger’s Legacy 51 mins – ““Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” first appeared on PBS in 1968. For the next three decades, Fred Rogers taught children about everything from how crayons are made to how it feels to lose a beloved pet. Now, more than a 10 years after his death, Fred Rogers’ production company is keeping his legacy alive with new shows guided by his philosophy, and even featuring some of his old characters. This includes “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” “Peg + Cat” and the newly released “Odd Squad.” A conversation about the enduring influence of Fred Rogers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

New York City Growth 30mins – “Frank concludes his interview with Dr. Ted Steinberg, ecological historian and author of the book Gotham Unbound: The Ecological History of Greater New York. In this second part of a two-part conversation, Dr. Steinberg explains the origins of the book title, and challenges the notion that New York City can grow without limits in an age of rising sea levels. Climate models predict an 11 to 24 inch rise in sea levels in the coming decades, which spells big trouble for the Big Apple as flooding and other natural catastrophes become a certainty in one of the most built environments on the planet. He breaks down the different plans that have been put forth for mitigating these problems, most of which are costly and unrealistic, while moneyed interests continue to push for an ever-expanding growth horizon for New York City.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity 30 mins – “Keith talks with Ann McDermott, Assistant Director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Center is the only kind in the world, and uses community-based participatory research to better understand the causes of obesity that range far beyond just diet and exercise.  She also tells us about the variety of careers she had during her lifetime, and what led her to enter a 7-year doctoral program when she was in her 40s…a program that led her to her current field.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Data Issues 61 mins – “Countries, states & cities across the globe are embracing the idea of ‘open data’: establishing platforms, portals and projects to share government managed data online for re-use. Yet, right now, the anticipated civic impacts of open data rarely materialize, and the gap between the promise and the reality of open data remains wide. In this talk, Tim Davies — Berkman affiliate and a social researcher focusing on the development of the open government data landscape around the world — questions the ways in which changing regimes around data can reconfigure power and politics, and considers opportunities to re-imagine the open data project, not merely as one of placing datasets online, but as one that can positively reshape the knowledge infrastructures of civic life.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management 87 mins – One of a series of lectures for nurses interested in Geriatric Nursing. Produced by the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire. This session, given to a group of patients and caregivers, covers the types of pain, methods of capturing information about it, drug and non-drug (physical therapy, TENS, mental) approaches to treatment, and other coping concepts. The sound quality could be better. At the link find the title, “Pain, Pain, Go Away,” right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paramedic Work 29 mins – “David Plotz speaks with Jeff Ennis, a flight paramedic out of North Carolina about what it’s like to work 24-hour days, and transporting emergency patients to trauma centers in a helicopter.” At the link find the title, “The ‘How Does a Flight Paramedic Work?’ Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14112604_ennis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perfumer Work 30 mins – “On this episode of Working, David Plotz talks with perfumer Anne Serrano-McClain about starting a perfume business and how to create a mass-market perfume from scratch.” At the link find the title, “The How Does A Perfumer Work? Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14110703_ep5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pet Cremations 45 mins – “If there’s a death in your family and you choose to have your loved one cremated, wouldn’t you expect that the remains that are returned to you belong specifically to your beloved? Of course you would! Would you expect the same if the dearly departed happens to be the family pet? I suspect the answer is still yes. But in the fast-growing pet-cremation business, how do you know that the remains you’re getting back are indeed from your pet? “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Life Stewardship 14 mins – “In this intriguing talk, biologist Ameenah Gurib-Fakim introduces us to rare plant species from isolated islands and regions of Africa. Meet the shape-shifting benjoin; the baume de l’ile plate, which might offer a new treatment for asthma; and the iconic baobab tree, which could hold the key to the future of food. Plus: monkey apples. Biodiversity scientist Ameenah Gurib-Fakim explores the medical and nutrition secrets of the plants of her island, Mauritius.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Shootings 51 mins – “ Demonstrators in Berkeley, California took to the streets last night to express outrage over what they see as long standing racial inequities in the U.S. criminal justice system. The demonstrations in California and those in other cities including New York and Washington, D.C., were sparked, in part, by two recent grand jury decisions not to indict white police officers involved the deaths of unarmed black man. Please join us to discuss news calls for police accountability and demands for racial fairness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Presidential Power 61 mins – “Obama’s detractors have accused him of being an “imperial” president. It’s a theme that runs through the course of American history. Call it tyrannophobia — the fear that any one person or party could wield too much power over the body politic. But also: a strange, even paradoxical fascination with strong leadership. So this time on BackStory, we ask how perceptions of authoritarianism in the United States have changed over time, starting with the earliest colonial revolts of the 1700s against strong-arm agents of the British crown. Are wars a slippery-slope to unchecked presidential powers? Why does Congress complain about executive orders, while passing laws that grant the president so much power? And why were so many of the most renowned presidents also seen by many in their day as dangerous, even tyrannical?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prostate Cancer Story 52 min – “After nine years of fighting to keep his prostate cancer at bay, numerous treatments weren’t working for writer Jeff Metcalf. Doctors told him his days were numbered and with that scary forecast ringing in his ears, Metcalf started “cleaning the garage.” He sifted through old handwritten journals, collected his thoughts, and resolved to write one essay every week for a year. Metcalf joins us Wednesday to talk about those essays, his battle with cancer, and how writing has helped him “pay the piper.” Jeff Metcalf is a professor of English at the University of Utah. His new book is called Requiem for the Living: A Memoir.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Dialogue 46 mins – “Facts are facts. Reality is reality. Except, it seems, when Americans address each other matters of race and responsibility. That’s become obvious in the wake of protests that came out of Ferguson and Staten Island. One reality sees racism as still a living poison that leads to police killings and job discrimination, and a concept of “white privilege” that keeps African Americans at a constant disadvantage.  In the other reality, white privilege is a fiction — and a bad excuse — for individual and even group failure. This hour, On Point: talking race: Where is that conversation, and where is it going?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 59 mins – “Jason Sokol talked about his book, All Eyes Are Upon Us: Race and Politics from Boston to Brooklyn, in which he explores the reputation of the nation’s Northeast region as a place of racial equality and strong support for African-American civil rights. In his book, he argues that in reality, blacks were relegated to living in “ghettos” and working menial jobs until Northern leaders challenged the citizenry to practice what they were preaching. He talked with Michael Myers, executive director of the New York Civil Rights Coalition.” At the link you can listen/watch, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Redskins 27 mins – “Mike Wendling explores the controversy surrounding the Washington Redskins. It’s one of the most popular American football teams but many Native Americans say the name is racist.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Washington Redskins,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20141211-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Integration 54 mins – The United States is a top destination for refugees and takes in some 250 thousand a year. This discussion covers the difficulties caused by cultural, language, and familial disruptions and how the many volunteer organizations cope help refugees make the transition. Three volunteer organizations participated in the talk. At the link right the blue play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Regrets 60 mins – “Every day we make mistakes, and most of the time we just ignore these failings and move forward. But every so often, there is one that makes us pause and take notice. This week, people struggling with those regrets — big and small — that take root and have to be dealt with.“ (Childhood accidents, tattoos , and raising kids.) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saint Petersburg Paradox 4 mins – “…Eighteenth century mathematician Daniel Bernoulli looked at his equation and saw a problem. The math was simple. It was the implications about human behavior that had him puzzled. Bernoulli introduced his problem in a journal of the Imperial Academy of Science of Saint Petersburg, after which it came to be known as the Saint Petersburg Paradox. And like many good paradoxes it involves a game of chance. It’s a great game — you’re guaranteed to win money. The only question’s how much. …Even favorable bets aren’t always perceived as good, something that was implicit in much of the early work on games of chance. Bernoulli reasoned that winning $100 when you’re flat broke means more than winning $100 when you have vast sums stashed in your bank account. Our perceived value, or utility, of additional money decreases the more we have. …And that was Bernoulli’s point….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio …” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satellites 37 mins – “As science educators, we are likely to recognize Sputnik as the first satellite in space.  But what has happened with satellites since Sputnik?  How many satellites are even out there, and how do we rely upon them?  To help answer some of these questions, we welcome Dr. James Clay Moltz to the show.  As author of Crowded Orbits, Dr. Moltz examines the conflict and cooperation in space with the growing number of satellites managed by public, commercial and even private entities.  Listen to the show to learn about our history with satellites in space, what the future of satellites might look like, and what that could mean for our students today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Screenwriter Work 31 mins – “David Plotz talks to screenwriter and executive producer Craig Turk about the value of different types of screenwriters, and how the cast and crew of The Good Wife kept a big season five secret.” At the link find the title, “The ‘How Does A Hollywood Screenwriter Work?’ Edition,” right-click “Direct download: The_How_Does_A_Hollywood_Screenwriter_Work_Edition.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shackleton 54 mins – “ Underwater explorer Dr. Joe MacInnis makes a pilgrimmage to the grave of Sir Ernest Shackleton, on remote South Georgia Island, in the extreme South Atlantic Ocean. He pays homage to the man who completely dominated South Pole exploration.” At the link find the title, “Shackleton’s Grave,” right-click “Download Shackleton’s Grave,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 54 mins – “Who wins, who loses and what’s destined to change if a sharing economy is sustainable: business, society or the state? Featuring economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin, and panelists Bob Rae, Anita M. McGahan, and Janice Stein.” At the link find the title, “The Sharing Economy and The Public Good, Part 1,” right-click “Download The Sharing Economy and The Public Good, Part 1” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 74 mins – “The sharing economy has gained traction and attention in the last few years. Also known as the “gig economy,” “consumer-to-consumer sharing,” and “peer-to-peer marketplaces,” the term “sharing economy” is used to describe a wide variety of exchanges between people, including property, skills, labor, or space. By using an online platform to connect users and providers, this system puts a modern spin on old-fashioned bartering, swapping, borrowing, and trading — and greatly expands the scope and scale of potential exchanges….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Slights of Hand 53 mins – “It’s an all-NEW Snap… When they think they’re all alone, and no one is watching, that’s when they are their true selves. From PRX and NPR, we proudly present “Behind The Curtain.’” (Several true stories about unusual places and people.) At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Socialism Decline 64 mins – “James Otteson of Wake Forest University talks to EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, The End of Socialism. Otteson argues that socialism (including what he calls the “socialist inclination”) is morally and practically inferior to capitalism. Otteson contrasts socialism and capitalism through the views of G. A. Cohen and Adam Smith. Otteson emphasizes the importance of moral agency and respect for the individual in his defense of capitalism. The conversation also includes a discussion of the deep appeal of the tenets of socialism such as equality and the impulse for top-down planning.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Sound and Hearing 59 mins – “From the honking of cars to music blaring out of someone’s bedroom window, the world around us is saturated with sound. But what exactly is sound, and how do we hear it? From mimicking an owl’s wing for quieter aircraft to creating more effective cochlear implants and the science of opera singing, our panel of experts turn up the volume to 11 to answer your questions on anything audible…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spanish Moss 4 mins – “So, how shall we stuff a mattress? We might use cotton or goose feathers, I suppose, but one really good material is a surprise. It’s Spanish moss. Here in this large industrial Gulf Coast city, we see a lot of it. We might well conclude that it’s no more than a parasitic pest on our trees. But it’s not at all. A parasite takes its nutrients from the host. But Spanish moss is neither a moss nor a parasite. It is an independent plant that takes water and nutrients from the air, not the tree. It stores water and it’s very hardy. It can weigh down a branch or block light from tree leaves below. But it normally coexists harmlessly with its tree. Its thin tendrils are maybe a millimeter in diameter. They have a scaly outer hide that protects water-bearing fibers within. If it suffers a long enough drought, the interior fibers dry out and go dormant, but they don’t easily die…. At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stuxnet Worm 28 mins – “Kim Zetter talked by remote video from San Francisco about the Stuxnet computer worm, which she called the “first digital weapon.” Stuxnet, which was discovered in June 2010, sabotaged Iran’s nuclear enrichment program, and some have speculated the worm was created by the U.S. and Israel. It was the first known computer code virus intended to cause physical damage rather than to steal secrets or disrupt operations. Ms. Zetter is the author of Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World’s First Digital Weapon.” At the link you can listen/watch, but downloads cost $.99; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Surface Pro 3 23 mins – “The Microsoft Surface Pro 3 has been released and, according to these lawyers, it finally lives up to the standards of a laptop. It is lighter and more mobile than even the lightest laptop, which makes it better for travel. However, this tablet can download the software and applications that many lawyers use in business like Acrobat, Photoshop, Microsoft Office, while also supporting multiple users. The Digital Edge host Sharon Nelson purchased a Microsoft Surface Pro 3 recently and has put it through the test of whether this tablet can actually replace the laptop she uses for her business. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway invite Nelson’s business partner, husband, and technology expert John Simek on to analyze the statistics of the Microsoft Surface Pro 3 and assess for whom it can replace a laptop computer.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Torture 51 mins – “The Senate Intelligence Committee released a summary of its scathing report Dec. 9 on CIA interrogation practices post- 9/11. The report depicts an agency that used brutal and ineffective methods to elicit information from terror detainees, and misled Congress and the White House about its activities. Reaction has been explosive, falling mostly along party lines. CIA officials say their program yielded valuable counter-terrorism intel and helped weaken Al-Qaeda, contrary to the report’s central findings. And many Republican lawmakers are condemning the report’s release, saying it endangers the lives of Americans at home and abroad. We look at the debate over what’s come to be known as the “torture report.’” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Torture Report 27 mins – “The New York Times a few months ago made the decision to call torture, torture. And frankly I think it’s aided in the clarity of their coverage. You don’t need these extraordinary write-arounds. You can just call it what it is.” -ProPublica’s Eric Umansky. “On Tuesday The Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on CIA torture and the lies surrounding it. Bob speaks to Matt Apuzzo from the New York Times about cases cited in the report where the C.I.A. said its torture tactics thwarted plots and led to the capture of terrorists, but the committee’s report undercut those accounts. Then, Bob speaks to Eric Umansky, the assistant managing editor at ProPublica, who has been cataloging the use of torture terminology used by various news organizations.” At the link find the title, “Special: The Torture Report,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ToyTalk 65 mins – “Host Leo Laporte interviews Oren Jacob, the co-founder and CEO of ToyTalk. Formerly, he spend more than 20 years at Pixar with feature film credits including “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 2,” “A Bug’s Life,” and Supervising Technical Director for “Finding Nemo.'” (ToyTalk is Apple software.) At the link right-click “Audio” beside the down-pointing arrow and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waitering Work 41 mins – “On this episode of Working, David Plotz talks with a veteran waiter about how he does his job, how much he makes, and why waiters are definitely judging their customers.” At the link find the title, “How Does A Waiter Work? Edition,” right-click “Direct download: working14111504_waiter.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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