Media Mining Digest 166 – 16 Jan 2015: Aging, Agroinnovations, Air and Water Drones, Benjamin Franklin, Broadband Public vs Private,Carbon Capture Tactics, Carbon Shock, Climate and Health, Climate Change Cows, Climate Reality Project, Climate Warming, Colored Bunnies, Common Resources, Consumer Price Index, DACA Program Impact, Electric Cars, Energy Production, Farming in Town, Ferguson Grand Jury, Fermentation, Food and Climate, Food Wastage, Frogs, Grief Managemenet, Guantanamo, Honeybee Status, Human Guinea Pig, Indigenous Tribe Value, La Raza, Living with Nature, Mapping Markets, Military Accountability, Money and Love, Muslim Spy, Ocean Monitoring, Paraquat, Penn Station Sucks, Physical Therapy, Pig Farm Photos, Prison Population, Racial Demographics, Rainwater Harvesting, Ransomware Story, Richard III Grave, Skydiver Pilot, Slow Television, Suicide Prevention, Vertical Farm in Chicago

The following audio files come from a larger group of 198 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 52 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Aging 50 mins – “‎Dive into how life is changing for everyone — from toddlers to octogenarians. First, Leslie Martin and Howard Friedman discuss a decades-long study that tracked a group of people as they aged, and the surprising trends they saw about who really lives the longest. Then, Dane Stangler and Elizabeth Isele push us beyond the “25-year-old in a hoodie” stereotype to look at the growing number of entrepreneurs over 50 — and what they’re creating. Plus, UC Berkeley professor Alison Gopnik explains why children can be much better problem solvers than their parents.” At the link find the title, “1.10.15 – Through the Ages,” right-click “IHUB-011015-FullShow.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Agroinnovations 40 mins – “Frank summarizes many of the interesting ongoing projects in the arduino for agriculture space, and expands the horizons of the topic to include other hardware/software suites with the potential to improve our ability to monitor the natural world.  These include Google’s modular smartphone Project Ara, Apitronics, Ninja Blocks, ManyLabs, and SODAQ.  Also included is a breakdown of Public Lab projects Infragram, Spectral Workbench, and Mapknitter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air and Water Drones 30 mins – “Biohackers modify their vision to see more colours by Ian Woolf. Ian Lyons explains how to start flying quadcopter drones, Dominic Fretz talks about OpenROV underwater drones….” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benjamin Franklin (2 parts) 58 mins – “Benjamin Franklin, through the person of Ralph Archbold, met with me in Franklin Court where his home and printshop were located, in Philadelphia. We met on July 18, 1994. We discussed his early life, his inventions and his role in the cessation from England and the formation of the United States. We began our conversation when I first asked him when he first came to Philadelphia. The book Benjamin Franklin and Ralph Archbold recommend is “The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin.;” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for part 2 here.

Broadband Public vs Private 37 mins – “ver since the last time I spoke with Blair Levin on Episode 37, I have wanted to have him back for a friendly discussion about public or private ownership of next generation networks. Though Blair and I entirely agree that local governments should be free to decide locally whether a community broadband network investment is a wise choice, he tends to see more promise in partnerships or other private approaches whereas we at ILSR tend to be concerned about the long term implications of private ownership of essential infrastructure. In what may be the longest interview we have done, Blair and I discuss where we agree and how we differ. We weren’t looking to prove the other wrong so much as illustrate our different points of view so listeners can evaluate our sides. Ultimately, we both believe in a United States where communities can choose between both models — and some may even seek solutions that incorporate both. Blair Levin was the FCC Chief of Staff when Reed Hundt was Chair and was instrumental in forming Gig.U. In between, he did a lot of things, including being Executive Director for the FCC’s National Broadband Plan. He is currently with the Metropolitan Project at Brookings.” At the link right-click “…download this Mp3…” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Capture Tactics 51 mins – “Changing Climate – Changing World looks at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally. In Part 4 of this series, climate leader Dr. Peter Joseph of the Climate Reality Project returns to give us an update about concepts that aim to fight global warming and climate change by putting a price on carbon emissions and offering rewards for reducing carbon pollution….” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.
Carbon Shock 43 mins – Mark Shapiro, author of Carbon Shock, discusses the impact, solutions and related costs of each in this interview. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Shock 43 mins – Mark Shapiro, author of Carbon Shock, discusses the impact, solutions and related costs of each in this interview. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate and Health 51 mins – “I talk with Linda Marsa, award-winning health and science journalist and the author of a new book: Fevered: Why a Hotter Planet Will Hurt Our Health  — And How We Can Save Ourselves. In Fevered… Linda Marsa reveals how some of today’s most pressing public health issues are related to climate change — and are only going to get worse in coming years….” At the link right-click the play button at the bottom of the book cover and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Cows 35 mins – “…Part 6 of Changing Climate – Changing World: CAN COWS HELP REVERSE CLIMATE CHANGE? …My guest is veteran journalist Judith Schwartz, author of Cows Save the Planet: And Other Improbable Ways of Restoring Soil to Heal the Earth. Judith is at the leading edge of the movement that recognizes the importance of soil— for issues as close to home as our nutrition and as vast and global as climate change—as well as the potentially positive role of cows in that equation. Could it be that the answers to some of our most challenging global problems involve neither advanced technologies nor the lion’s share of our national treasuries, but the humble layer of soil beneath our feet? In Cows Save the Planet, Schwartz responds with an informed and enthusiastic “yes.” The problem, however, is that we’re losing topsoil somewhere between ten—in the United States—and forty—in China and India—times faster than we’re regenerating it. Schwartz illustrates how focusing on soil restoration will allow us to chip away at the seemingly insurmountable problems we currently face.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Reality Project 26 mins – “I speak with Dr. Peter Joseph, an emergency physician trained by Al Gore to educate the public about global warming as a Climate Reality Project presenter… just after Three Mile Island nuclear accident, he co-founded the San Francisco Bay Area chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility, an organization of doctors dedicated to educating the public and world leaders about the horrendous medical consequences of nuclear war. He served as president of the chapter and on the National Board of Directors for 6 years, helping to start chapters in California and New York. PSR later participated in the 1985 Nobel Peace Prize as the US affiliate of the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming 4 mins – “ You don’t have to look hard to find evidence that the earth is warming up. In fact, you have to look pretty hard to find something that suggests that the earth isn’t warming up.,, “Contrarians will often point to 1998, which was by some estimates the warmest year on record prior to 2014,” says Michael Mann, a leading climate researcher at Penn State University. “And they’ll say ‘look, we haven’t broken a record in more than 15 years, global warming must’ve stopped.’” Of course, that argument goes out of its way to ignore all the other evidence on climate change. It also ignores the many well-understood reasons why surface temperatures aren’t just going up in a smooth, unbroken line. But this week’s news from the Japanese Meteorological Agency makes it even harder to make the argument that the earth isn’t warming.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Colored Bunnies 52 mins – “How could a children’s story about two fluffy bunnies cause uproar? In 1958, author and illustrator Garth Williams published The Rabbits’ Wedding, about a black rabbit and a white rabbit who love each other. Segregationists in Alabama, championed by a state senator, demanded the book be banned. But the state library director held her ground. The battle is at the center of a new play premiering at Pioneer Theatre Company. Thursday, playwright Kenneth Jones and others join us to talk about Alabama Story.” At the link right-click the play button beside the “Listen” button a d select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Resources 36 mins – “I am so very honored to have interviewed Elinor Ostrom. In 2009, Ostrom became the first woman to receive the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited Ostrom “for her analysis of economic governance,” saying her work had demonstrated how common property could be successfully managed by groups using it.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumer Price Index 14 mins – “On today’s Planet Money, we go shopping with George Minichello. George is one of hundreds of federal employees who goes to stores all over the country and record the prices of thousands of different things. A bag of romaine lettuce. A boy’s size-14 collared shirt made of 97 percent cotton. A loaf of white bread. Their work drives the consumer price index, a key economic indicator known to its friends as CPI. The index measures inflation in the U.S., and it influences everything from Social Security checks to the price of school lunches to how big your raise will be next year.” At the link find the title, “#222 Planet Money: Why The Price Of Lettuce In Brooklyn Matters,” right-click “npr_130767171.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Program Impact 67 mins – “Given the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s unique position at the convergence of the immigration and education fields, the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy has sought to capture the ways in which local educational institutions, legal service providers, and youth advocates have responded to DACA’s first phase. ….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Cars 109 mins – “Are electric cars going to save you money? We look at all electric and plugin hybrids, charging habits and being energy independent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.
Energy Production 50 min – “From WOMAD 2014, Robyn Williams chairs a discussion about the generation of energy. A massive worldwide change is underway. The economics and structure of energy generation is being transformed from one of expensive, wasteful, polluting, distributed power under the control of large utilities, to cheaper, efficient, clean power generated locally and sometimes owned by the community….” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Production 50 min – “From WOMAD 2014, Robyn Williams chairs a discussion about the generation of energy. A massive worldwide change is underway. The economics and structure of energy generation is being transformed from one of expensive, wasteful, polluting, distributed power under the control of large utilities, to cheaper, efficient, clean power generated locally and sometimes owned by the community….” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Town 49 mins – “Climate change. Floods and droughts. Plummeting biodiversity. Malnutrition and obesity. Rising rates of cancer and other diseases. This program continues our series Changing Climate – Changing World, and takes a look at how our changing climate is changing the world we live in, locally and globally. Part 3 continues to look at how climate change and a growing scarcity of fossil fuels will impact our food system and features two examples of adaption to these coming changes. I talk with Eric Toensmeier, permaculture pioneer and author of Paradise Lot -the story of two plant geeks who created an edible garden oasis on a tenth of an acre in the city of Holyoke, Massachusetts and found their sweethearts along the way.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Grand Jury (2 parts) 58 mins – “The shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed 18 year old black teenager, in Ferguson, Missouri, on August 9, 2014, by a since retired white Ferguson, Missouri, police office, Darren Wilson, is the subject of…two Radio Curious interviews devoted to this topic. Our guest is Law Professor James A. Cohen, who has tried over 100 criminal jury trials and teaches criminal law and related topics at Fordham University Law School in New York City.  Professor Cohen and I review the evidence, including Wilson’s spoken testimony, the written police reports and medical reports presented to the St. Louis, Missouri, grand jury, by District Attorney Robert McCulloch.  His office exclusively organized and presented that evidence, which “with some exceptions,” according to Prosecutor McCulloch, was “made public” shortly after he announced that the grand jury failed to return criminal charges against former Officer Wilson, on November 24, 2014…We began our conversation with a brief history of grand juries, originally organized in England to protect the people from wonton acts of the King…The books that Professor Cohen recommends are those written by Anders Ericsson: “The Road To Excellence: The Acquisition of Expert Performance in the Arts and Sciences, Sports, and Games” and “Development of Professional Expertise: Toward Measurement of Expert Performance and Design of Optimal Learning Environments.’” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu for Part 1. For Part 2 do the same here.

Fermentation (2 prts) 69 mins- “Many of your favorite foods and drinks are probably fermented. For instance: Bread, Cheese, Wine, Beer, Mead, Cider, Chocolate, Coffee, Tea, Pickles, Sauerkraut, Kimchi, Salami, Miso, Tempeh, Soy Sauce, Vinegar, Yogurt, Kefir, Kombucha. A few years ago, when Sandor Katz’s first book, “Wild Fermentation” came out, I interviewed Sandor on Wildoak Living. The book galvanized and fueled a revival of the ancient art of fermenting foods. Since then, Sandor Katz has continued to practice, study and teach about fermentation around the globe and this year, published what’s likely to become the fermentation bible: The Art of Fermentation – An in-depth exploration of essential concepts and processes from around the world. Sandor is the major force behind a national revival of an almost lost culinary art form.  He is also profoundly changing the way that we think about food, health and food safety. Fermentation makes foods more nutritious, as well as delicious. Microscopic organisms – our ancestors and allies – transform food and extend its usefulness. Fermentation is found throughout human cultures. Hundreds of medical and scientific studies confirm what folklore has always known: Fermented foods help people stay healthy.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu for Part 1. Do the same for Part 2, here.

Food and Climate 53 mins – “…a look at the impact of climate change on food – how we may create a food system that is resilient enough if fuel grows scarce, weather gets more severe, and traditional supply chains are hampered. I talk with Philip Ackerman-Leist, farmer, college professor and author of Rebuilding the Foodshed: How to Create Local,  Sustainable and Secure Food Systems.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Wastage 51 mins – “Up to 40 percent of food in the United States today goes uneaten. With it, we throw away more than $ 160 billion and huge quantities of natural resources. But while wasted food rots in landfills and emits greenhouse gases, millions of Americans face hunger and global demand for food continues to rise. From farming and distribution to restaurants and homes, experts say there are opportunities for improvement at every level of the food supply chain. For this month’s Environmental Outlook: the causes and consequences of food waste, and how to change our path.[4 guests]” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Frogs 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from Nov. 7, 2010, Keith and guest co-host Eli Greenbaum of the UTEP Department of Biological Sciences, talk with David Blackburn, an evolutionary biologist from the University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute.   Blackburn studies the vast diversity of frogs and amphibians, including of the fragmentation of frog species in the Sahara.  It’s a fascinating conversation!” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grief Management 48 mins – “One thing we know about life that is terrible and true:  it ends.  We don’t get a choice about that.  And sooner or later, that end comes to people that we love.  And then, we grieve.  In the past two months, that’s been my path.  A much-loved partner, lost.  And plenty of grief.  But for all the personal pain of it, grieving is an utterly universal experience.  It comes to us all, essentially, at some point, over a parent, a lover, a friend, a child.  It is one of the most human experiences.  We are looking for some wisdom in this hour on how to make it through.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guantanamo 55 mins – “The American prison at Guantanamo has come to stand for so many moral trade-offs the United States has made in the years since 9/11. George Bush filled it but did not empty it. Barack Obama promised to close it but has not followed through. Congress has made it complicated. Even prisoners cleared for exit have been going nowhere. Now, inmates at Guantanamo have turned again to hunger strike. In return, they are force-fed. Held without charges. It needs to end, to close, said the president again last week. But how?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honeybee Status 58 mins – “The Wall Street Journal reports that U.S. beekeepers lost 1 in 3 honeybees during the winter of 2012, and this is cause for alarm. Declining bee populations have been making news recently, and this is much more than an endangered species story. Certain crops we take for granted are dependent upon bee pollination to grow. Among these are: apples, almonds, blueberries, watermelon, cherries, peaches, avocados, cucumbers, cranberries, onions, blackberries, grapefruit, oranges, raspberries, cantaloupe, pumpkins, pears, and plums. If you want to help ensure these crops remain bountiful (and, hence, affordable), tune in today as Ted Dennard, CEO of Savannah Bee Company, joins us to discuss this crucial topic.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Guinea Pig 9 mins – “Drug development happens in stages – pre-clinical, phase I, II, III, and so on. But how much do trial participants know about what has happened before their enrolment to test for safety, and how much should they be told? Holger Pedersen from Denmark was one trial participant who tried to find information about the drug he was on, and was…” At the link find the title, “Being a human guinea pig,” right-click “Media files 185075625-bmjgroup-being-a-human-guinea-pig.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Tribe Value 18 mins – “’The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle,” says Mark Plotkin, “It’s the isolated and uncontacted tribes.” In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest’s indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and elect “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

La Raza 60 mins – “Janet Murguia, president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza, talks about the state of Hispanics in America and possible changes to U.S. immigration policy. She also discusses her background growing up in a working-class family in Kansas City.” At the link find the title, “Q&A: Janet Murguia,” right-click “Media files program.378680.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Living with Nature 49 mins – “Part 1 of Changing Climate – Changing World is called Learning from Those Who Came Before Us. It takes a look at what we can learn from peoples who not only lived in harmony with nature for 1000s of years right here, in Northern California, but who learned to shape their environment to thrive sustainably. Recent research and books like ‘Tending the Wild’ by Kat Anderson are dispelling the hunter-gatherer stereotype long perpetuated in anthropological and historical literature. We are now coming to see California’s indigenous people as active agents of environmental change and stewardship. Their traditional ecological knowledge is essential if we are to successfully meet the challenge of living sustainably.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Mapping Markets 16 mins – “Matt Kueny, senior business analyst for Miele, Inc., explains how his company uses Esri Tapestry Segmentation data to find niche markets for its high-end appliances.” Services available through ESRI are described here. At the link find the title, “Looking for Customers in All the Right Places,” right-click “Media files user_kueny.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Accountability 51 mins – “America has been at war for the last 13 years, the longest period of warfare in American history. Since 2002, around 2.5 million men and women have served in Iraq or Afghanistan, which is about three quarters of 1 percent of the U.S. population. Many Americans are quick to say they respect the sacrifice our soldiers are making, but most have no real contact or interest in the military. In a cover story for Atlantic Magazine, journalist Jim Fallows argues that this disconnect has led to careless spending, strategic errors and endless wars we can’t win. Please join us [3 guests] for debate over holding our military accountable.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Money and Love 27 mins – “We like to think of our romantic lives as pure and unbothered by the cold business of spreadsheets and tax documents. But serious relationships are both romantic and financial partnerships.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Death, Sex and Money,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150106-0232a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Spy 27 mins – “Noor Inayat Khan was one of the most courageous, unusual secret agents of World War Two. She was determined that even as a Muslim of mixed origin and as someone with Sufi pacifist beliefs, she would commit to the British war effort. Shahidha Bari uncovers Khan’s story.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Codename: Madeleine,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150107-0232a.mp3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Monitoring 10 mins – “’Argo” is a system for observing the temperature, salinity, and currents in the Earth’s oceans. Operational since the early 2000s, the data it provides are used in climate and oceanographic research and a special research interest is to quantify the ocean heat content (OHC). It consists of a fleet of 3600 drifting profiling floats deployed worldwide. Each Argo float weighs 20–30 kg, as oceanographer Philip Sutton, from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, explains to Chris Smith and Simon Morton… “ At the link right-click “Download as mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paraquat 7 mins – “Brian Clegg introduces a weedkiller whose name has entered public consciousness – Paraquat.” At the link find the title, “Paraquat: Chemistry in its element,” right-click “CIIE_Paraquat.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Penn Station Sucks 18 mins – “New Yorkers are known to disagree about a lot of things. Who’s got the best pizza? What’s the fastest subway route? Yankees or Mets?  But all 8.5 million New Yorkers are likely to agree on one thing: Penn Station sucks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Therapy 29 mins – “Bill Bracewell, a doctor of physical therapy practicing in Ukiah, California, for over 35 years, is our guest on this edition of Radio Curious.  He and I visited in the Radio Curious studios on December 15, 2014.  We begin with Dr. Bracewell’s description of physical therapy:  maximize, restore and maintain range of movement. The book Dr. Bill Bracewell recommends is “The Thinking Body,” by Mable Elsworth Todd.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pig Farm Photos 2 mins – “Four California activists are pleading not guilty to charges that they violated Utah’s controversial ag-gag law when they took pictures of a pig farm in Milford. They may be the first defendants prosecuted under the law. The activists with the group Farm Animal Rights Movement were charged in Iron County Justice Court with criminal trespassing and interference with an agricultural operation – class B misdemeanors. Professional photographer Sarah Jane Hardt is one of the defendants. She says she did take photos and video at Circle Four pig farms in September last year, but she contends that she did so from public land. Hardt says she hopes the case goes to trial….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Population 51 mins – “The past 40 years have seen unprecedented growth in the United States prison system. Today, one in 31 adults are either behind bars or on parole or probation. These numbers have led to issues with overcrowding, fostered a boom in the private prison industry, and altered communities around the country. Bipartisan reform efforts have begun to reverse the trend in incarceration. However, at current rates it would take 90 years to bring the prison population back in line with other democracies around the world. We look at mass incarceration in the United States – what’s behind it and why it’s so difficult to address.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Racial Demographics 51 mins – “America is becoming a country with no racial majority. In 2009, for the first time in U.S. history, more minority than white babies were born in a year. Soon, most American children will be racial minorities. The nation’s diversity surge played a key role in Barack Obama’s election as president. Many see these trends as necessary as a much-needed younger minority labor force is already boosting an aging baby boom population. But challenges loom, including clashes over public resources, overcoming a cultural generation gap, and fears over losing privileged status. Diane and her guests discuss how new racial demographics are remaking America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Rainwater Harvesting 59 mins – Brad Lancaster, author of Rainwater Harvesting, talks about how to save water, prevent erosion and flooding in a sustainable way. At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomware Story 4 mins – “What I’ve learned after my Mom got hacked (and her data held for ransom)” At the link right-click the down-pointing soundbar at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Richard III Grave 15 mins – “How One Woman’s Parking Lot Discovery Changed 500 Years of History / Snap Judgment “Underground’” At the link click “Download” and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Skydiver Pilot 32 mins – “Welcome to episode 76. I have received many questions regarding the career of skydive pilot so we thought we would dedicate this episode to the job of skydive pilot. Joining me for this episode is Dennis Downing, a pilot flying skydivers in Zephyrhills, Florida. It seems to be an exciting job and along with my listeners I am very interested in discovering more about career opportunities and what it is like to be a skydive pilot.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slow Television 18 mins – “You’ve heard about slow food. Now here’s slow … TV? In this very funny talk, Norwegian television producer Thomas Hellum shares how he and his team began to broadcast long, boring events, often live — and found a rapt audience. Shows include a 7-hour train journey, an 18-hour fishing expedition and a 5.5-day ferry voyage along the coast of Norway. The results are both beautiful and fascinating. Really.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” or video and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide Prevention 47 mins – “Every year over 1 million people worldwide die from suicide – one about every 40 seconds – according to the World Health Organization – More people die from suicide than from homicide and war combined. The psychological pain leading individuals to take their lives is unimaginable. Their deaths leave families and friends bereft, and often have major ripple effects on communities.” At the link right-click on the play button at the bottom of the book image and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farm in Chicago 60 mins – “Hosts Dickson Despommier and Vincent Racaniello speak with Paul Hardej, founder of Farmed Here, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, Illinois.” At the link right-click “UrbAg 12” beside “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

=======================================================================

ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 5000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 30+ GB zipped file, or individually. A separate folder of C-Span, Diane Rehm, et. al. files that aren’t available at their sites is here, too, and can also be downloaded as a zip file or individually. Over 210 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here MP3 Speed Changer is used on batches of new files to boost playback speed 150%. A speed listening background article is here.  Please comment on any problems with the links and downloads.

Advertisements

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s