Media Mining Digest 180 – Apr 24, 2015: Adam Smith Background, Aging Disease, Aid Worker Targets, America Unbalanced, American Indian Ruins, Angelou by Smiley, Annual Physicals, Bouncing Bombs, Brain trauma, Burgundy vs Bordeaux, China Pollution Issues, Civil War Women, Computer Vision, Constitution Interpretations, Copy Editor, Drought in California, Economics Lecture, Egg Unboiling, Energy Management, Energy Storage, Female Leader, First Nations Female Homicides, GABA, Genetic Medicine Startup, Government Secrecy, Health Care Business, Hydrogen Power, Italian Cooking, Job Growth, Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage, Large Hadron Collider, Lead Ammunition, Lincoln Assassination, Martin Luther King Jr, Muslim Relations, National Security Issues, Nature of Things, Nature-Deficit Disorder, Navigation on Land, Negro Justice, Neighborhood Revival, Neurology and Behavior, Newspaper Future, Nietzsche, Nora Ephron, North Korea, Nuclear Threat, Nutrition and Longevity, Occupy Movement, Ocean Ecology, Oklahoma Earthquakes, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Opportunity Makers, Oxytocin, Pavlov, Peripheral Artery Disease, Plant Directed Behavior, Plato on Knowledge, Play Is Important, PMS Controversy, Power Choice, Predator Nation, Prison Entrepreneur, Productivity, Psychopath Identification, Public Broadcasting, Future, Public Shaming, Public Speaking, Rachel Maddow, Residential Solar, Right to Work Laws, Rosalyn Carter, Rwanda IT, Salmon Future, Salmon in the Trees, Samurai Spirit, San Antonio Mayor, Sandra Day O’Connor, Saudi Arabia, Science Talk, Seed Libraries, Self Publishing, Shari’ah Law, Sharing Economy, Stockmarket Future, Target Date Funds, Trade and Commerce, Vanguard Funds, Video Game Gender, Volcanoes

The following audio files come from a larger group of 205 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 93 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

Adam Smith Background 64 mins – “Vernon Smith and James Otteson talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Adam Smith in front of a live audience at Ball State University. Topics discussed include Smith’s view of human nature, the relevance of Smith for philosophy and economics today, and the connection between Smith’s two books, The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Aging Disease 52 mins – “We all try to fight it: the inexorable march of time. The fountain of youth doesn’t exist, and all those wrinkle creams can’t help. But modern science is giving us new weapons in the fight against aging. So how far are we willing to go? Hear when aging begins, a summary of the latest biotech research, and how a lab full of youthful worms might help humans stay healthy. Also, a geneticist who takes a radical approach: collect the DNA that codes for longevity and restructure our genome. He finds inspiration – and perhaps genes as well – in the bi-centenarian bowhead whale. But what if age really is mind over matter? A psychologist’s extraordinary thought experiment with septuagenarian men turns back the clock 20 years. Will it work on diseases such as cancer as well?” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aid Worker Targets 20 mins – “Vincent Cochetel was held hostage for 317 days in 1998, while working for the UN High Commissioner on Refugees in Chechnya. For the first time, he recounts the experience — from what it was like to live in a dark, underground chamber, chained to his bed, to the unexpected conversations he had with his captors. With lyricism and power, he explains why he continues his work today. Since 2000, attacks on humanitarian aid workers have tripled — and he wonders what that rise may signal to the world.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Unbalanced 19 mins – “Ten days after 9/11, a shocking attack at a Texas mini-mart shattered the lives of two men: the victim and the attacker. In this stunning talk, Anand Giridharadas, author of “The True American,” tells the story of what happened next. It’s a parable about the two paths an American life can take, and a powerful call for reconciliation.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Indian Ruins 52 mins – “The Lost World of the Old Ones Thursday, Doug’s guest is author and mountaineer David Roberts. Roberts first wrote about the prehistoric people of the American Southwest 20 years ago. He says that when he finishes a book, he generally leaves the topic for the next project. But he could never get the “Old Ones” out of his head. So he continued to explore remote canyons and precarious cliffs to find the remains of their lives. Roberts’ new book chronicles his journeys and what he’s learned about “The Lost World of the Old Ones.’” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Angelou By Smiley 35 mins – “Author and broadcaster Tavis Smiley shares the story of his 28-year friendship with renowned author, poet and activist Maya Angelou, the subject of his new book, “My Journey With Maya.’” At the link find the title, ”Tavis Smiley: My Journey With Maya,” right-click “Media files IM_20150411.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Annual Physicals 51 mins – “According to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 92 percent of Americans believe it’s important to see their doctor at least once a year for a head-to-toe physical examination. About 45 million Americans do just that. Conventional wisdom deems the annual physical to be valuable for early detection of disease and general well-being. But many doctors and medical researchers have begun to question the efficacy of an annual physical. They say it’s too costly for the U.S. health care system. And some go so far as to say it’s worthless for the patient. We look at rethinking the annual physical exam.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Bouncing Bombs 4 mins – “Today, archivist Robert Marlin tells us about bouncing bombs. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. It’s nighttime, May 16, 1943: British pilots fly 19 modified Lancaster bombers into German territory. Their raid was meant to degrade Germany’s industrial capacity. And it quickly became legendary. And for good reason: they’d just launched the first “bouncing bombs” into German dams.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (See the blog topic, “Duxford War Museum,” for more story.)

Brain Trauma 24 mins – “In this episode, we discuss what is known about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), an increasingly discussed issue due to its effects on current and former football players. We discuss who else CTE affects, what is happening in the brain of affected individuals, and how more research is needed to solve this serious problem.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Burgundy vs Bordeaux 60 mins – “On March 23rd Intelligence Squared brought together Britain’s two giants of wine writing, Hugh Johnson and Jancis Robinson, to go head to head in a debate on the world’s two greatest wines. Every audience member will be given a glass of each wine to help them decide which of the two should win the crown.” You can listen at the link, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China Pollution Issues 56 mins – “What do major fashion retailers and designers like HM, Target, Gap and Levi have in common? They are all working with the Natural Resources Defense Council NRDC to create clothing that uses less water and energy to produce, transport, and care for. Through implementation of the NRDC’s Clean By Design program, these corporate partners utilize their tremendous buying power as a lever to reduce the environmental impacts of their suppliers abroad. Clean by Design focuses on improving process efficiency to reduce waste and emissions and improve the environment. Tune in to hear Dr. Linda Greer discuss the program in detail, and learn how consumers can influence the growing sustainable apparel movement.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil War Women 52 mins – “American women in the Civil War era could not own property. In fact, if they were married, they were property – the property of their husbands. They also could not vote and certainly could not run for office. But they made a mark on the nation’s history nonetheless. Some became journalists, nurses or activists. Others wielded influence behind the scenes as political spouses – women who had the ears of powerful men. In a new book, NPR’s Cokie Roberts delves into the lives of these Washington women and shows how their passion and intelligence influenced the times. Join Diane and Cokie for a discussion of 19th-century wives of presidents and congressmen.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Computer Vision 18 mins – “When a very young child looks at a picture, she can identify simple elements: “cat,” “book,” “chair.” Now, computers are getting smart enough to do that too. What’s next? In a thrilling talk, computer vision expert Fei-Fei Li describes the state of the art — including the database of 15 million photos her team built to “teach” a computer to understand pictures — and the key insights yet to come.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Interpretations 52 mins – “It’s the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. As the country reflects on his death and legacy, the author of a new book says one basic fact of Lincoln’s life cannot be overlooked: where he is from. Legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar argues that Lincoln’s home in Illinois was key to his views on slavery and secession, making geography central to Lincoln’s contributions to the U.S. Constitution. It’s just one example of how America’s distinct regional differences shape the law of the land. We take a Constitutional road trip with Akhil Reed Amar.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Copy Editor 47 mins – “Subject. Verb. Object. What’s so hard about that? But the English language, our grammar rules, our punctuation, the endless guidelines and exceptions have been giving school children nightmares since the first edition of the Merriam Webster dictionary was published in 1828. “That” vs. “Which”. “Me” vs. “I”. Luckily, Mary Norris, a top level copy editor at the New Yorker, has spent her life worrying about dangling participles, the Oxford comma, and what’s next in the dangerous days of texting and twitter. This hour, On Point: the New Yorker’s Comma Queen on life and grammar.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drought in California 51 mins – “The drought in California is considered to be the worst since temperature and rainfall records were first kept in the late 1800s. With a population of almost 39 million and an important agricultural sector, the effects in California are widespread. Climate scientists point out the current drought is not limited to California. And although unprecedented in modern times, research suggests that in past centuries the region experienced droughts lasting for decades. We look at the drought in the West and what we can learn from ancient weather patterns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is in the blog archive.

Economics Lecture 92 mins – “Tyler Cowen and Jeffrey Sachs discuss the resource curse, why Russia failed and Poland succeeded, charter cities, Sach’s China optimism, JFK, Paul Rosenstein-Rodan, whether Africa will be able to overcome the middle income trap, Paul Krugman, Sach’s favorite novel, premature deindustrialization, and how to reform graduate economics education.” At the link click “Download” and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Egg Unboiling 6 mins – “The familiar change that takes place when we boil an egg – the runny egg white goes rubbery and becomes opaque- occurs because heat causes the proteins that make up the egg white to change their shape – or denature. Now, University of California, Irvine, scientist Greg Weiss has found a way to reverse the process or “unboil” an egg. And this could be a very useful technique for mass-producing proteins that we need to study, or for medical use, as he explained to Chris Smith…” At the link right-click “Download as MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Management  7 mins – “Too much solar and wind power. Really? Is that possible? It’s a good problem to have, because if we’re going to beat climate change, we’re going to need way more low-carbon energy than we get now. But it’s still a problem for Germany. Germany has brought on record amounts of wind and solar generating capacity in the last few years, helping it now meet more than a quarter of its electricity demand with renewable sources, and building toward its goal of 80 percent by 2050. But that also means it’s having to deal with problems that the rest of us who are farther behind can barely even see coming. Like, occasionally, too much intermittent wind and solar power for the electricity grid to handle without a lot of juggling.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Storage 8 mins – “Wolfram Walter is a man obsessed with things electric. …His home is his development lab, and when he’s not wiring up his vehicles, he’s working on the latest iteration of an invention that he thinks will help solve what might be the biggest problem in Germany’s energiewende — its historic transition from fossil fuels and nuclear power to mostly solar and wind power. Just a few years in, the country already gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. But those sources aren’t always available, which limits their effectiveness. Wolfram Walter with his first home solar storage system, which he built when he was unhappy with any of the others he could find on the market. Barely a year after he started testing it out in his own house the Sonnenspeicher/Sun Storage system won an award for innovative renewable product of the year in Germany. …It’s a metal box about the size of a small refrigerator. Hook it up to solar panels on your roof, Walter says, and “you have a power plant working 24 hours day, 365 days a year.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Leader 14 mins – “Dame Stephanie Shirley is the most successful tech entrepreneur you never heard of. In the 1960s, she founded a pioneering all-woman software company in the UK, which was ultimately valued at $3 billion, making millionaires of 70 of her team members. In this frank and often hilarious talk, she explains why she went by “Steve,” how she upended the expectations of the time, and shares some sure-fire ways to identify ambitious women…” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nations Female Homicides 24 mins – “More women and girls from Canada’s Aboriginal population go missing or are murdered than any other section of society. Joanna Jolly reports from the city of Winnipeg. At the link find the title, “DocArchive: Canada’s Red River Murders – 8 Apr 2015,” right-click “docarchive_20150409-0430b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GABA 25 mins – “This week we kick off the first episode in our “Know Your Neurotransmitters” series.   Jesse is joined by Dr. Matthew Broome – Senior Clinical Research Fellow in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford – to talk about the neurotransmitter GABA.  Dr. Broome explains how GABA (or gamma-Aminobutyric acid for those who love a good tongue-twister) works, where it comes from, and how it affects our brains and bodies. We’ll also learn about the dangers of alcohol withdrawal, how trying to remember things could actually make us more forgetful, and the strange-but-true symptoms of Alice in Wonderland Syndrome.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Medicine Startup 56 mins – “Sean George, president and chief operating officer of genetics-information company Invitae, explains how the rewards of entrepreneurship come from facing the major challenges along the way. In this insightful talk, the serial entrepreneur also underscores the necessity of a team’s focus on mission to see a venture through adversity.” At the link hover over “Podcast,” then right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Target As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Secrecy 52 mins – “Since the dawn of time, leaders have tried to control access to information. Even in the early days of the democratic United States, the founding fathers struggled to define how open a society the new country should be. In this debate, Thomas Jefferson won the day and the American government, by and large, favored openness over secrecy. But Frederick A.O. Schwarz Jr., the author of the new book “Democracy In The Dark” says the U.S. government has shifted far from this founding principle and that we are currently living in a “secrecy era” in which a lack of transparency threatens to undermine democracy. He joins Diane in studio to talk about the culture of secrecy in American government.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Health Care Business 54 mins – “The practice of medicine has been subsumed by the business of medicine. This is great news for healthcare shareholders — and bad news for pretty much everyone else.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogen Power 7 mins – “People have been fantasizing about hydrogen cars forever. It was the car of the future before the Prius and the Tesla were the car of the future. And it still is. …my companions and I are talking about the reason we’re here, Germany’s energiewende, perhaps the most radical energy transition ever undertaken. By the middle of this century, Germany plans to nearly eliminate fossil and nuclear power and get 80% of its electricity from renewable sources, including wind, solar, hydropower and biomass. It’s a response to the dangers of climate change, nuclear accidents and reliance on foreign sources of energy. Already, just a few years in, the country gets more than a quarter of its electricity from renewables. And by many measures, the energiewende has been a remarkable success. But I’m also getting a reality check on it. “We’re still right at the very beginning of a new energy system in Germany,” Weise tells me. And there are huge challenges ahead.”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Italian Cooking 48 mins – “When Jody Scaravella’s mother and grandmother passed, he missed their cooking. Italian. Old country. The real deal. Nothing watered down or homogenized, but cooking that brimmed with the original flavors and culture of his Italian ancestry. The cooking of a grandmother or, in Italian, the “nonna.” So Scaravella opened his own restaurant, on Staten Island, and put the word out to all of New York that he wanted real Italian grandmothers – nonnas – to come and do the cooking.  And they did. Now they’re with us. This hour On Point:  Italian cooking, nonna-style.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Growth 46 mins – “It’s been a big string of strong months for job creation in the USA. Most everybody expected more of the same when the new jobs numbers for March came out on Friday. A quarter million new jobs created was the confident ballpark. More good news. Instead, the actual number posted by the Labor Department Friday was half that. Just 126,000 new jobs.  That’s a big pothole in the economic recovery story. What’s going on?  A lot depends on this. This hour On Point: the jobs pothole, and what’s really going on with work, wages and the US economy.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kid Camp and Islamic Marriage 55 mins – Two stories, the first about life in a camp for kids with difficult diseases. The second about complications during the arrangement of an Islamic marriage. At the link find the title, “Snap #609 – Eye Of The Beholder,” right-click “Media files npr_398701555.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Large Hadron Collider 51 mins – “Two years ago the team at Cern operating the Large Hadron Collider astounded the world with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Now, after a refit and upgrade almost doubling its power, they have their sights set on capturing dark matter, and making scientific history for a second time. But what will they find? The Guardian’s Ian Sample and Nicola Davis are joined by Mike Lamont, operations group leader at CERN; Jon Butterworth, professor of physics at University College London; and Daniela Bortoletto, professor of physics at the University of Oxford.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lead Ammunition 30 mins – “…We have known for a long time that lead is a neurotoxin that poses health and safety risks, and we have seen over the past several decades corresponding efforts to remove it from toys, paint, gasoline, and other household items. But lead is still quite commonly found in the ammunition used in hunting, and as a result lead enters into the food chain for animals like the highly endangered California Condor. So why hasn’t lead been removed from ammunition?….” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln Assassination 47 mins – “To mark the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, author and historian James Swanson looks back at the event that shocked the nation.” At the link find the title, “James Swanson on the Lincoln Assassination,” right-click “Media files IM_20150412.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King, Jr  58 mins -”Cornel West, editor of The Radical King, talked about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, radical political thinking, a side of the late civil rights leader that the author argues has been diminished and sanitized. Mr. West spoke with Khalil Gibran Muhammad, dire ctor of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.” At the link find the title, “After Words: Cornel West,” right-click “Media files program.392229.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Muslim Relations 64 mins – “Former State Department advisor for Afghanistan and Pakistan and best-selling author Nasr delivers a sharp indictment of America’s flawed foreign policy and outlines a new relationship with the Muslim world. Drawing on his in-depth knowledge of the Middle East and firsthand experience in diplomacy, Nasr offers a powerful reassessment of American foreign policy that directs the country away from its failing relationships toward more productive, and less costly, partnerships. Michael Nacht, Ph.D., Professor and former Dean, Goldman School of Public Policy, U.C. Berkeley;  Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, Obama Administration – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Security Issues  68 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times senior writer Schmitt has covered the military, terrorism and national security affairs for two decades. He is currently covering the evolving story of the FBI Investigation that led to the resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus. He co-authored Counterstrike: The Untold Story of America’s Secret Campaign Against Al Qaeda. Since the September 11 attacks, he has made many reporting trips to Iraq and Afghanistan to cover American military operations there. He has also reported on counter-terrorism operations in Pakistan, Mali and Southeast Asia.  As Pentagon correspondent, he covered the Persian Gulf War from Saudi Arabia and Kuwait and also reported from Haiti and Somalia. Domestic reporting included covering Congress, following financial and business news, demographic and immigration issues, commercial aviation and the travel industry. Come hear his inside view on the conflicts and challenges facing the U.S. in the post-9/11 world and the latest on the breaking news of the day.” Eric Schmitt, New York Times National Security Senior Reporter; Stephen Zunes, Professor, Department of Politics/Middle East Studies, University of San Francisco – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature of Things  70 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy hosts Harvard scholar and prolific author Greenblatt, who has crafted a stunning historical account and a thrilling story of discovery. Nearly 600 years ago, a cannily alert man took a thousand-year-old manuscript off a library shelf and soon realized it was the last surviving manuscript of Lucretius’s epic, On the Nature of Things. This rediscovery unearthed ancient but dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of tiny atoms in eternal motion. Those ideas helped inspire the Renaissance and later influenced the scientific thought of Galileo, Freud, Darwin and Einstein, and the writing of Montaigne, Shakespeare and Thomas Jefferson.” Stephen Greenblatt, Author, The Swerve; Professor of English and American Literature, Harvard University. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature-Deficit Disorder 69 mins – “Louv’s best-selling book Last Child in the Woods sparked a national debate that spawned an international movement to reconnect kids to nature. He coined the term “nature-deficit disorder,” influenced national policy and helped inspire campaigns in more than 80 cities, states and provinces throughout North America. Now, Louv delivers another powerful call to action, this time for adults, offering a new vision of the future, in which our lives are as immersed in nature as they are in technology. Richard Louv, Journalist; Author, The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Navigation on Land 55 mins – “You Are Here…but how do you know exactly where you are? And then how do you know how to get from there…to somewhere else? Dave Redel explores new ideas about why some people are wizards at navigation, while others get completely lost.” At the link find the title, “You Are Here. Feb 23, 2015,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150223_24137.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negro Justice 62 mins – “The Negro and Equal Justice – Poole, Cecil F., 1914- Clemency secretary to Governor Brown of California, 1959-61; United States Attorney; U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit judge, 1979″ At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neighborhood Revival 17 mins – “Theaster Gates, a potter by training and a social activist by calling, wanted to do something about the sorry state of his neighborhood on the south side of Chicago. So he did, transforming abandoned buildings to create community hubs that connect and inspire those who still live there (and draw in those who don’t). In this passionate talk, Gates describes his efforts to build a “miniature Versailles” in Chicago, and he shares his fervent belief that culture can be a catalyst for social transformation in any city, anywhere.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurology and Behavior 60 mins – “Unlock the deepest mysteries of the human brain with the man Richard Dawkins has dubbed the “Marco Polo of neuroscience.” Ramachandran reveals intriguing and profound insights into the evolution of the human brain tracing back the strange links between neurology and behavior. With innovative approaches to answer age-old questions, Ramachandran takes on exciting and controversial topics including new directions for treating autism. Dr. V.S. Ramachandran, Director, Center for Brain and Cognition, UC San Diego; Author, The Tell-Tale Brain: A Neuroscientist’s Quest for What Makes Us Human” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Newspaper Future 65 mins – “The average San Franciscan is more likely to get their media from a screen than from a paper, so it’s no surprise that newspapers and magazines are shutting down all around us; the editorial space and the way we consume news has changed. What will editorial look like years from now? Will curated content really be king? Can non-digital publications stay afloat? Leading digital experts will share their experiences, honest thoughts and predictions for the future of publishing.” Clara Jeffery, Editor in Chief, Mother Jones; Mark Johnson, CEO of Zite; Laney Whitcanack, Chief Community Officer, Federated Media; Chris Taylor, Deputy Editor, Mashable; Peter Ha, Managing Editor, TechCrunch – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nietzsche 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy explores ideas in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Will to Power, including connecting Nietzsche’s focus on self-overcoming to Abraham Maslow’s theory of self-actualization. Schickel will investigate her favorite Nietzschean insights, followed by a Socratic dialogue with George Hammond and an open discussion with the audience. Denise Schickel, Nietzsche fan.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 65 mins – “Acclaimed director of Julie & Julia and  writer of When Harry Met Sally, Ephron offers her hilarious observations and insights into the past, present and future, sharing everything she hasn’t (yet) forgotten. She reflects on what women really think when they reach a certain age and what she’s learned along the way. Nora Ephron, Film Director, Sleepless in Seattle; Screenwriter; Author, I Feel Bad About My Neck and I Remember Nothing ; In conversation with Jane Ganahl, Author; Co-founder, Litquake” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea 67 mins – “North Korea shocked the world when it recently threatened nuclear war with the U.S. and announced it was severing the armistice signed in 1953 signifying the end of the Korean War. What does this threat mean for the U.S., and particularly for those living on the West Coast? Experts well acquainted with North Korea weigh in on both the political climate and military threat in the short as well as the long term. Please bring your questions. Philip Yun, Executive Director, Ploughshares Fund; Former Senior Member of U.S. Delegation and Negotiator, Peace Talks with North Korea; David Straub, Associate Director, Korean Studies Program, The Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; Former U.S. State Department Officer for Korean Affairs; Dr. Gloria Duffy, President and CEO, Commonwealth Club – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Threat  66 mins – “Three distinguished statesmen discuss their vision for international security in these precarious times. Secretaries Shultz and Perry and Senator Nunn will assess the current state of nuclear threats, including Iran’s drive to build a bomb, the North Korean nuclear weapons program, and future prospects for limiting the spread of nuclear materials and eventually eliminating nuclear weapons.” George Shultz, Former U.S Secretary of State under President Reagan; William Perry, Former U.S. Secretary of Defense under President Clinton; Sam Nunn, Former U.S. Senator, Georgia (1972-96), Co-Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Nuclear Threat Initiative; Philip Taubman, Consulting Professor, Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation; Former New York Times Washington Bureau Chief; Author, The Partnership: Five Cold Warriors and Their Quest to Ban the Bomb – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition and Longevity 88 mins – “Two new studies supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered a link between nutrition and increased immunity while aging, giving new meaning to the phrase, “You are what you eat.” Join Dr. Robert J. Marshall as he discusses the scientific connections between nutrients, regeneration and disease prevention.” Robert J. Marshall, Ph.D., CCN, DACBN. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Occupy Movement  64 mins –  “#OWS, pepper spray, book sharing, tents, mic checks and protest signs: Since September, the Occupy movement has staked a claim in every Facebook feed, almost every news program and in literally more than 100 major cities in the United States alone. Using the tools of collective assembly, occupiers have mobilized thousands in their fight for global change and against the richest 1 percent, but so many people are still less than sure what Occupy is all about. What have been the strategies and intent of this people-powered movement? Now that they have the world’s attention, what are they going to do with it? What is driving the movement forward?” Iris Brown, Organizer, Occupy Oakland ; Nadim Haidar, Nonviolent Direct-Action Trainer; Travelling Occupier, Denver, Boulder, Santa Fe, Oakland; George Lakoff, Cognitive Linguist & Professor, UC Berkeley; Jean Quan, Mayor, Oakland; Melissa Griffin, Columnist, San Francisco Examiner; Co-Host, Necessary Conversations- Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Ecology 62 mins – “Science and policy are not the only tools to improve ocean sustainability – entrepreneurs and investors are coming together to fashion solutions that empower coastal communities and preserve biodiversity. Using the SOCAP model of impact investing, these opportunities will be brought to life through a Ghanaian tech entrepreneur working with tilapia farmers, as well as the investor perspective which provides a framework for evaluating these complex market-based approaches to sustainability. Alloysius Attah, Founder and CEO, Farmerline; Kevin Jones, Founder, Good Capital; Convener, SOCAP; Monica Jain, Founder, Fish 2.0; Executive Director, Manta Consulting; Jeff Leifer, CEO, Circadian Media Lab – Moderator”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oklahoma Earthquakes 47 mins – “Until 2008, the state of Oklahoma averaged one or two earthquakes magnitude 3.0 or greater a year. Then the lid blew off those numbers.  Rising year by year. To 20. Then 42. Then hundreds. Last year, Oklahoma had 585 earthquakes that size. This year, it’s on track for more than 700. Walls shake. Bricks fall. It’s nerve-wracking. And, say experts, it’s all about how the state’s energy companies go after oil and gas. And huge volumes of water being pumped deep in the earth. Now the earth is moving. This hour On Point: the earthquakes of Oklahoma.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids 32 mins – “In episode #32, Dr. Michael Lewis, President of the Brain Health Education and Research Institute, joins us to discuss the positive impacts that Omega-3 fatty acids can have on the health and maintenance of the human brain… Dr. Lewis has several years of experience developing programs for the military involving the use of omega-3 fatty acids to treat traumatic brain injury.  He has been a pioneer in the clinical use of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention, acute treatment, and rehabilitation of brain issues from physical to psychological trauma, including concussions, stroke, PTSD, and more. His insights  have impacted thousands of lives, and he is passionate about continuing to find improved solutions to the age-old problem of brain injury.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opportunity Makers  10 mins – “We all want to use our talents to create something meaningful with our lives. But how to get started? (And … what if you’re shy?) Writer Kare Anderson shares her own story of chronic shyness, and how she opened up her world by helping other people use their own talents and passions.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oxytocin  22 mins – “As part of our Science and the Seven Deadly Sins series, Dr. Paul Zak discusses his work studying the relation of hormones to human behavior. Specifically, his research focuses on oxytocin’s role in regulating generosity and greed.” At the link find the title, “Greed: Hormones and Moral Behavior, Jul 2013,” right-click “Media files greed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pavlov 60 mins – “This week, we’re learning about the life and work of a groundbreaking physiologist whose work on learning and instinct is familiar worldwide, and almost universally misunderstood. We’ll spend the hour with Daniel Todes, Ph.D, Professor of History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University, discussing his book “Ivan Pavlov: A Russian Life in Science.’” At the link find the title, “#307 Pavlov,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 307 Ivan_Pavlov.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peripheral Artery Disease 65 mins – “Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a condition that results from blockage of arteries in the extremities, affecting between 8 and 12 million Americans and growing. Patients with PAD have 3 times the risk of a heart attack or stroke. Risk factors include hypertension, diabetes, smoking, age and menopause – 25 percent of women between the ages of 55 and 74 may have PAD and the rate is even higher for men. Many PAD sufferers have severe disabilities, with potential need for amputation. This disease is under-diagnosed and undertreated, and a concerted effort is needed to educate the public and physicians, and to accelerate research to develop new treatments. Michael S. Conte, M.D., Professor and Chief, Division of Vascular Surgery, UCSF

Plant Directed Behavior 18 mins – “What if human consciousness isn’t the end-all and be-all of Darwinism? What if we are all just pawns in corn’s clever strategy game to rule the Earth? Author Michael Pollan asks us to see the world from a plant’s-eye view.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plato On Knowledge 60 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy delves deep into Plato’s dialogue on knowledge. Mink will focus on the Platonic ideas that underlie the search for truth in a jury trial, which led to the development of the common law on hearsay. Mink’s analysis will be followed by a Socratic dialogue with Hammond and an open discussion with the audience.James Mink, Litigation Attorney; Classics Aficionado” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Play Is Important  55 mins – “Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination and Invigorates the Soul – Have you played today? Brown explores the power and importance of play, drawing from his own clinical research, as well as the latest developments in neuroscience, social science and behavioral studies. Looking at the science of play, Brown expands on it and brings it into a broader context, maintaining that it ignites the tools one needs to succeed, whether on the playground or in the boardroom. Stuart Brown, M.D., Founder, the National Institute for Play, Co-author, Play: How it Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul (with Christopher Vaughan)” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PMS Controversy 15 mins – “Everybody knows that most women go a little crazy right before they get their period, that their reproductive hormones cause their emotions to fluctuate wildly. Except: There’s very little scientific consensus about premenstrual syndrome. Says psychologist Robyn Stein DeLuca, science doesn’t agree on the definition, cause, treatment or even existence of PMS. She explores what we know and don’t know about it — and why the popular myth has persisted.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Power Choice 64 mins – “Rising interest in clean power is presenting electric monopolies with competition for the first time. Marin Clean Energy now gives consumers an alternative to PG&E, and San Francisco and Sonoma are preparing their own programs to offer consumers new options for powering their homes. Monterey and Santa Cruz counties are considering jumping on the consumer choice bandwagon, which is growing nationally. In San Francisco, Shell Oil won the contract to deliver electricity generated from 100 percent renewable energy. But city supervisors are worried that the customer base is lacking. Opponents such as the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers claim that higher rates would burden the community and point out that such local efforts are not required to generate new clean energy. How could community choice change the shape of electricity supply in San Francisco and other communities? Join us for a discussion of disruption, innovation and consumer choice. Kim Malcolm, Director, CleanPowerSF; Shawn Marshall, Mill Valley Council Member; Executive Director, Local Energy Aggregation Network; Marcie Milner, Senior Regulatory Manager, Shell Energy North America; Hunter Stern, Business Manager, Brotherhood of Electrical Workers” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predator Nation 62 mins – “Could the global economic meltdown of the last few years have been prevented? Ferguson believes the crisis was no accident. After Inside Job won the 2011 Academy Award for Best Documentary Film, Ferguson started his acceptance speech by charging that there was a lack of accountability of the finance industry and Wall Street, pointing out that three years after the horrific crisis started not a single financial executive had gone to jail. Predator Nation continues to examine the important issues raised in Inside Job, arguing that an out-of-control finance industry took advantage of a deregulated atmosphere and purposely got rich at the expense of others. Through his extensive interviews with financial insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation; Kirk O. Hanson, Director, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University and Commonwealth Club Silicon Valley Advisory Council Member – Moderator insiders and government officials, Ferguson exposes the “corrupted networks” that caused the economic collapse and offers a plan of action to help our country get back on track. Charles Ferguson, 2011 Academy Award Winning Documentary Filmmaker, Inside Job; Author, Predator Nation”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Entrepreneur  16 mins – “Frederick Hutson is an entrepreneur whose biggest early venture landed him in prison for nearly five years—distributing marijuana through UPS and FedEx. While in prison, he realized that a lot of the problems of everyday prison life could use a business solution. And then, he got out. Today on the show, a businessman goes to prison, and decides he is going to disrupt the biggest captive market in America.” At the link find the title, “#610: The Prisoner’s Solution, Mar 2015,” right-click “Media files npr_392889455.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity 49 mins – “Laura Roeder – Social media is for real. To be honest, I wasn’t a believer. I think social media often times just adds to the noise. But after speaking with our guest this week, I realized that what I think doesn’t really matter. Social media is here and it’s a necessity for any business these days. Even more importantly is the specific way you interact on social media, what you share, how you share it, and what your strategy is. Love it or hate it, it’s time to step up your social media game. This week we interview entrepreneur and social media expert, Laura Roeder.” At the link find the title, “Episode 182 – Laura Roeder – Social Media is for Real,” right-click “Media files Episode_182_Laura_Roeder.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychopath Identification 68 mins – “What Is a Psychopath? – Ponder this chilling fact: Chances are, you’ve already met at least one psychopath. Psychopathy is a diagnostic term used to classify men and women who, due to an ingrained antisocial lifestyle, display prominent interpersonal problems and a marked lack of empathy and conscience, pose a unique danger to society. They’re not all in prisons, either. The great majority live in our communities. Murthy will explain how psychopaths can be diagnostically identified and how they are biologically different from the rest of us. Hari Murthy, Psychological Assessment Services Coordinator, San Quentin State Prison” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Broadcasting Future 67 mins – “Come meet the leaders of PBS and KQED. Ask them their plans for future programming and let them know your thoughts. Kerger is president and CEO of PBS, the nation’s largest non-commercial media organization, with more than 350 member stations throughout the country. Boland oversees KQED Public Media, including KQED Television – one of the nation’s most-watched public television stations during primetime, with more than 1.5 million households viewing per month – as well as KQED Radio, the most-listened-to public radio station in the country, reaching more than 745,000 listeners each week.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Shaming 59 mins – “Public shaming is back. Once done in town squares, the subjects of our ridicule locked in pillories and unable to avoid the rotten fruit and insults we hurled at them, now the shaming takes place on the internet. No longer our neighbors, the new targets are strangers and celebrities, and instead of courts meting out justice, it is the aggregate outrage of well-meaning people on Twitter just like you. Listen as author Jon Ronson describes his new book, “So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed,” in which he spends time with people who have had their lives ruined by modern, web-based public shamings in an attempt to reveal to each of us what can happen when, alone but together, we obliterate people for unpopular opinions, off-color jokes, offensive language, and professional faux pas.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Speaking 19 mins – “Public speaking has moved out of the limelight in recent years as online marketing continues to gain prominence in the industry. The Conversation Agent, Valeria Maltoni, talks about the value of public speaking, how she uses public speaking to establish herself as an authority in her industry, and how you can get over your stage jitters and do it, too. Connect with Valeria and Alex on Twitter @ConversationAge and @TechAlly, respectively.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rachel Maddow  68 mins –  “Rhodes Scholar, AIDS activist, civics geek, “blindly partisan” and even the “grand doyenne of liberal demagoguery” according to Gawker – Rachel Maddow has been called many things over the years, but until now, “author” has not been one of them. This year the sassy and smart-as-a-whip host of MSNBC’s politico program, The Rachel Maddow Show, joins the literary fold and takes on what she believes to be the debate between civilian life and the war machine in her new book, Drift. Join us for an organ intro, popcorn munchies, and an exclusive interview with Rachel Maddow.” Rachel Maddow, Host, The Rachel Maddow Show; Author, Drift in Conversation with Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, Author; Screenwriter; Accordionist”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Residential Solar 52 mins – “Residential solar is surging in the U.S. The price of the average solar panel is down more than 60 percent in the past five years, and more and more solar customers are earning credit for the extra energy they produce for the grid. But that practice – known as “net metering” – has some utilities worried about the future. In a number of states, utilities are fighting to cut back on net metering, as concerns grow about the cost of maintaining the grid and adapting to the changing energy picture. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, we look at what the surge in solar could mean for consumers…and for the future of the electric grid.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Right to Work Laws 51 mins – “Over the weekend, a few thousand union members gathered outside the statehouse in Wisconsin. They were there to voice their opposition to so called right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, which is expected, Wisconsin would become the 25th state with right-to-work laws on the books. These laws ban workers from having to pay union dues. Organized labor leaders say it’s another blow to their diminishing numbers. Supporters say the laws attract business and are good for economic development. Guest host Tom Gjelten and our guests discuss right-to-work laws and the future of unions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is included in the blog archive.

Rosalyn Carter 71 mins – “Rosalynn Carter: Ending the Mental Health Crisis – Former First Lady Carter is an icon and an advocate for mental health, early childhood immunization, human rights and conflict resolution through her work at The Carter Center in Atlanta. Carter will discuss her decades working in the mental health field. Following the program, she will also sign copies of her new book, Within Our Reach: Ending the Mental Health Crisis.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda IT  20 mins – “As part of the BBC’s Richer World season, Alan Kasujja travels to three countries in his native east Africa to meet young Africans determined to build a better future. In the second programme, Alan travels to Rwanda, a country notorious for the genocide that took place there in 1994. Yet a bright new future beckons for some of its youth, as young female schoolteacher Jessie trains them in the high technology that promises to transform the nation.” At the link find the title, “DocArchive: My Africa – Rwanda 17 Feb 15,” right-click “Media files docarchive_20150217-0300b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salmon Future 64 mins – “The fight to restore salmon runs in the Pacific Northwest involves billions of dollars in public funds and politicking all the way up to the White House. This twisted story is captured in a new documentary airing on PBS this spring. Also this spring, a federal judge is expected to hand down a decision that will shape federal salmon policy in the Columbia River Basin. What impact will that decision have on the area’s ecosystems and economies? Can any lessons be applied to the fierce confrontations between fisherman, farmers and environmentalists in California?  Phil Isenberg, Chair, Delta Vision Task Force
James Norton, Filmmaker,  Salmon: Running the Gauntlet; Jonathan Rosenfield, Ph.D., Conservation Biologist, The Bay Institute

Salmon in the Trees 62 mins – “Most of us will never visit the vast wilderness of Alaska, so the phrase “Salmon in the trees” may seem a bit whimsical.  But in the Tongass rainforest, there really are salmon in the trees. Come to our Earth Day event to meet the award-winning conservation photographer Gulick, see her astounding photos, and hear what’s it’s like to live for months in the wilderness hoping to have a near-bear encounter.Amy Gulick, Conservation Photographer; Author”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samurai Spirit 53 mins – “The Japanese samurai were a class of warriors who dominated Japan’s military, political and social culture for almost a thousand years. Ferocious warriors, they have become known as much for their “spirituality” as for their lethal swordsmanship. Hall, author of the Encyclopedia of Japanese Martial Arts, will discuss the training methods used by the samurai, which taught both martial skills and spiritual/psychological armoring. These methods, evolved over hundreds of years, have been preserved in a number of classical martial arts schools in Japan today. Join us for a fascinating look at martial arts and the spirit of the samurai. David A. Hall, Ph.D., Author; Professor; Ordained Buddhist Priest”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Antonio Mayor 67 mins – “San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro electrified the Charlotte audience during his keynote speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention, reminding the audience that “The American dream is not a sprint, or even a marathon, but a relay!” Castro’s rise began in San Antonio, encouraged and inspired by his Mexican-American single mother, a political activist. Mayor Castro has prioritized creating economic and educational opportunities for his constituents, because he knows it can change the course of your life. Indeed, both Mayor Castro and his twin brother, Texas Congressman Joaquin Castro, went to Stanford University and Harvard Law School. Come hear from the man many say is a rising star of the Democratic Party.”  At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sandra Day O’Connor 66 mins – “In a rare public appearance, Justice O’Connor will discuss the need for a better-informed citizenry as well as her life, career, and views on the role of the U.S. Supreme Court. O’Connor, the first woman appointed to the Supreme Court, strongly believes that America suffers from a lack of civic education, and that is hurting Americans’ capacity to solve 21st century challenges. To revitalize civic education, she founded iCivics, which uses innovative methods such as video games to engage young people in learning about government and civic participation. Since 2009, iCivics has reached over 1.5 million young people and sparked a national discussion about this important cornerstone of our democratic heritage.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, Former Justice, U.S. Supreme Court in conversation with Dr. Mary Bitterman, President, Bernard Osher Foundation; Past Chair, Commonwealth Club’s Board of Governors. At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia 67 mins – “House has spent the last 30 years writing about Saudi Arabia — as diplomatic correspondent, foreign editor, and then publisher of The Wall Street Journal. Through observation, anecdote, extensive interviews and analysis she navigates the maze in which Saudi citizens find themselves trapped and reveals the mysterious nation that is the world’s largest exporter of oil, critical to global stability, and a source of Islamist terrorists. Join us for an in-depth examination of what all this portends for Saudi Arabia’s future, and for our own. Karen Elliott House, Author, On Saudi Arabia: Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines – and Future; Robert Rosenthal, Executive Director, Center for Investigative Reporting – Moderator” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia History 56 mins – “Chan will give a presentation about the fascinating exhibit, “Roads of Arabia: Archeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia”, which is at the Asian Art Museum until January 18. The San Francisco Chronicle described the exhibit as a “mesmerizing and astonishing journey to the Arabian Peninsula.” Some of the more ancient objects were discovered as recently as 40 years ago.” Dany Chan, Assistant Curator for Exhibition Projects, Asian Art Museum; Philippa Kelly, Educator, Author, Dramaturg At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science Talk 61 mins – “The scientific literature is one of humanity’s greatest creations – a complete record of the ideas, experiments and discoveries of generations of researchers across the globe. While most of this corpus is now online, it remains as inaccessible to the public as it was centuries ago – with the physical limitations of print journals replaced by expensive publisher pay walls. Eisen, a leader in the movement to reinvent scientific communication, will discuss the origins of this absurd system, why it still exists, how the “open access” movement he helped to launch is finally bringing it to an end.Michael B. Eisen, Ph.D; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Associate Professor, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley; Co-founder, Public Library of Science” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Libraries 47 mins – “We all know what a library is. But do you know seed libraries? Not the corporate seed catalogs that plenty of people have already been scouring this season, to get their gardens going. But a seed library, where ordinary citizens – gardeners – check seeds in and out. Check them out when it’s planting time. Bring seeds back when you’ve harvested. To keep and celebrate the local, the regional, in veggies and more. To keep and celebrate diversity – bio-diversity – at a time when Big Food pushes toward monocultures. This hour On Point: the populist push in local seed libraries, to save the world.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P1 74 mins – “Program 1 – Options, Directions and Resources – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 12 and April 19. What does it take to publish a book, and how do you choose which route to follow? Discover your options – from traditional to cooperative to true self-publishing – with industry experts who’ve done it themselves. Get a clear direction and insider tips on the variety of strategies, resources and tools available. Lisa Alpine, Publisher, Good to Go Media; Co-author, Self-Publishing Boot Camp Workbook; Peter Beren, Literary Agent; Publishing Consultant; Author, The Writer’s Legal Companion; Carla King, Publisher, Good to Go Media;  Social Media Consultant; Author, Miss Adventuring Series.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P3 79 mins – “Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 12. Bookstores are closing; newspaper book reviews are almost gone; and online options can be overwhelming. What’s an author or publisher to do? Join the discussion with successful authors, who will share their stories of what has worked for them – from building relationships with independent bookstore buyers and distributors to using technology and social media in new ways; from digging into niche markets to selling directly to their fan base. Scott James, Columnist, The New York Times; Author (aka Kemble Scott), SoMa, The Sower; Elizabeth Block, Author, A Gesture Through Time; Recipient, the Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fiction Fellowship; Teresa LeYung Ryan, Author, Love Made of Heart, Build Your Name, Beat the Game: Be Happily Publishedn.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Publishing P2 76 mins – “Self-Publishing, Part Two: The Nuts + Bolts of Making Books – Book publishing is undergoing a sea change. Come and participate in our dynamic and interactive three-part series covering all aspects of self-publishing, taught by front-line experts who have done it themselves Ð and succeeded. Attend one or all sessions of these in-depth seminars. The other events occur on April 6 and April 19. What goes into making a book truly a book? What are the essentials of editing and page layout – and how can they make or break you? Learn from an insider panel of experts about the critical design and production of your book and the ins and outs of available formats, from traditional to e-books and apps. Find out how typesetting can be sexy, and how to create covers that will sell. Lee Foster, Owner, Foster Travel Publishing; Author, The Photographer’s Guide to San Francisco ; Joel Friedlander, Proprietor, Marin Bookworks; Blogger, TheBookDesigner.com; V. Vale, Publisher, RE/Search Publications; Founder, Search and Destroy.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shari’ah Law 74 mins – “What Is Shari’ah and Shari’ah law  in Islam? – Join Ali-Karamali, an attorney with a graduate degree in Islamic law and author of The Muslim Next Door: The Qur’an, the Media, and that Veil Thing, as she demystifies commonly used Islamic terms like “shari’ah” and “shari’ah law” and discusses how the rules of Islam were developed and have been implemented, with examples regarding women, finance and criminal law. Sumbul Ali-Karamali, Author, The Muslim Next Door” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharing Economy 66 mins – “With a slow economy consumers are looking for ways to spend less and waste less. New technologies and innovative business models are changing the way people consume and invest.  Yerdle is opening up the overstuffed garages of old trumpets, unused camping tents, and rarely used power tools to the wider community. Airbnb is making spare bedrooms and empty apartments available to thrifty travelers and homeowners looking to make a profit. Solar Mosaic is taking solar investment to the people to fund community solar projects around the country. Is crowd-funding the future of investment? Does sharing really cut down on waste? How is the sharing economy forcing slow moving tax and regulation models to change with the times? Andy Ruben, Co-founder, Yerdle; Bill Parish, President and Co-founder, Solar Mosaic; Lisa Gansky, Author, The Mesh: Why the Future of Business is Sharing” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stockmarket Future 58 mins – “Investors, economists, and quantitative finance experts discuss how technological innovations have hastened the growth of the markets.” At the link find the title, “Future of the Stockmarket, 2008,” right-click “Media files stockmarket.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Target Date Funds 28 mins – “This podcast was made to accompany the Marketwatch article on combining target date funds with small cap value. A major problem with target date funds (TDFs) is they don’t give enough exposure to the small cap or value asset classes. By simply adding a second position in a small cap value fund or ETF, most of the limitations of TDFs can be overcome. Paul compares the risk and expected additional return of the two-fund portfolio, as well as making sure you are aware of the nature of small cap value as an asset class. Paul suggests you have a copy of  The Four Fund Solution Table  to reference with this podcast.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade and Commerce 49 mins – “‎This week on Innovation Hub, we’re ready for some tradeoffs. We’ve got author William Bernstein explaining how trade has shaped our daily lives, from camels to the compass to that cute new pair of shoes. Former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers talks about what the government is trading away when it doesn’t fund science. Writer Andrew Winston sees if profit-driven companies might give something up in return for a healthier environment. Finally, engineering professor Anne Goodchild looks at the trade-offs of our new delivery economy.” At the link find the title, “4.18.15 Making Trades,” right-click “0418-FullShowWEBMIX.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vanguard Funds 39 mins – “Paul focuses on 10 important advantages that set Vanguard apart from it’s competition. The discussion includes the obvious quantifiable differences, as well as the qualifiable aspects that add to the likelihood of investors reaching their financial goals. Paul adds a huge bonus advantage he thinks will be a surprise to most investors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Game Gender 17 mins – “Maddie Messer is 12, and she loves a good video game. One of her favorites is called Temple Run. In fact, it’s one of the most successful games out there. Temple Run is free to play—if you play as the default character, Guy Dangerous. But playing as a girl character can cost extra. Maddie found out this was true for a lot of games, and she didn’t think that was very fair. Today on the show: a 12-year-old girl takes on the entire video game industry.” At the link find the title, “#615: A 12-Year-Old Girl Takes On The Video Game Industry,” right-click “Media files npr_397387479.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Volcanoes 25 mins – “Island on Fire (04:45): In 1783, a crack opened up in the Earth, began to spew out lava and ash and poisonous gases, and didn’t stop for eight months. The volcano was Laki, one of many volcanoes in Iceland, and the effects of the eruption went global. Laki’s story is one of geology, chemistry, atmospheric science,…” At the link find the title, “Island On Fire: The Story of Laki,” right-click “Media files HowOnEarth-2015-03-31e.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 35+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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