Media Mining Digest 186 – June 5, 2015: ADHD Treatment, Alcohol Impairment, American Disabilities Act, Americans in China, Anonymous, Apple Production, Australian Immigrants, Black Neurologist Researcher, Brain Plasticity, Calcium Hydroxide, Catastrophic Environmentalism, China and French Wine, Chinese Tea, Cleveland Police, Climate Policy Costs, Climate Science, Cuba Economy and TPP, Cuban Art School, Cyberspace Hate Crime, Disabled and Institutionalized, Diseases of Aging, Elephants, Engineer Careers, Exclusivity, FIFA, Fighting Causes, Filipino Migrant Workers, Fracking Legislation, Hate Trolling, Infrastructure Overview, ISIS Finances, Job Fairs, John Nash, Loneliness, Lying, Maroons of Jamaica, Megaprojects, Military Suicides, Nepal Earthquake Aid, Nutrition Facts and Fads, Nutshell Studies, OVerdose Deaths, Paris Commune of 1871, Personal Information Sharing, Phantom Pain, Pilot Training, POWs in America, Prescription Drug Costs, Rare Earths, Separation and Divorce, Storytelling, Substance Abuse, T.Boone Pickens on Energy, Tablets in Restaurants, Technology Impact, Teenage Brain, Travelogue Stories, Uganda AIDS

The following audio files come from a larger group of 190 for the week. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted links, below, to get single podcasts.  A zip file of all 61 podcasts converted to 1.5x speed will download here for four months. Older groups of podcasts are discussed at the end of this episode.

ADHD in Childhood 24 mins – “Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, presents with persistent symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity causing impairment in multiple settings. It is a disorder that attracts considerable debate and controversy. The this part of this podcast, focused on the treatment of ADHD, two of the authors of the review, Mina Fazel, consultant psychiatrist at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, and Nienke Verkuijl, specialty trainee at the University of Oxford and Rachel, a parent of a child who has a diagnosis of ADHD.” At the link find the title, “ADHD in childhood – treatment,” right-click “Media files 206512103-bmjgroup-adhd-in-childhood-treatment.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alcohol Impairment 45 mins – “In this episode we talk to Jason Hack about an index to quantify alcohol impairment. We also discuss a change in name and direction at the podcast. Checkout the H Index article. Additionally, download your own starter pack to try out the HII score. Contributors include Matthew Zuckerman and Jason Hack.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Disability Act 56 mins – “Joyce welcomes Rebecca Cokely, executive director of the National Council on Disability (NCD). The Council promotes policies.” At the link find the title, “National Council on Disability and the ADA,” right-click “Media files bender052615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americans in China 60 mins – “It used to be that the American expats in China were the big shots. They had the money, the status, the know-how. But that’s changed. What’s it like to be an American living in China now? And what do they understand about China that we don’t?” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anonymous 23 mins – “This week Anthropologist Gabriella Coleman tells us about the internet’s original Dislike Club, Anonymous. Biella has spent the last eight years hanging out with Anons both on IRC and in IRL. Her new book “Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: the many faces of Anonymous”  is the definitive book on the topic, nothing else comes close.  Biella also gets me to watch V for Vendetta, something I have refused to do out of my fanboy respect for writer Alan Moore (who refused to watch it or put his name on the movie). I wish I could un-see it already.  Also: Commodify your dislike!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Production 14 mins – “Today on the show, how we got from mealy, nasty apples to apples that taste delicious. The story starts with a breeder who discovered a miracle apple. But discovering that apple wasn’t enough.” At the link find the title, “#627: The Miracle Apple,” right-click “Media files 20150527_blog_pmoney.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australian Immigrants 27 mins – “Claudia Taranto travels to Australia where she hears how temporary workers are changing the face of a country founded on the idea of permanent settlement. She uncovers abuses of the temporary migrant visa system and speaks to a group of Filipino welders earning far less than they were promised in their contracts. Claudia also hears from critics who call for a return to a ‘settler society’.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Neurologist Researcher 15 mins – “When neuroscientist Carl Hart meets with his cousin he wonders about what he now knows about psychiatric medication and society, and whether his own life is a success.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Plasticity 39 mins – “I first talked with with Dr. Edward Taub the inventor of Constraint Induced (CI) Movement Therapy back in early 2008 (BSP 28). CI Therapy is a revolutionary rehabilitation method based on the principles of brain plasticity. Evidence supporting its effectiveness has mounted since we last talked. Unfortunately, because it is so different from traditional physical therapy, it requires special training and it is still not covered by many major insurance companies. The Veteran’s Administration recognizes it as the preferred treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) but they currently have no therapists trained in the method. I have a recorded a new interview with Dr. Taub, which I have split into two parts. The rest of the interview will be posted next month. This month’s episode (BSP 119) focuses on how CI Therapy works and also provides a brief historical overview of the neuroscientific discovery of brain plasticity.” At the link right-click “audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calcium Hydroxide 6 mins – “As is often the case with a compound that has long been in use, calcium hydroxide is rich in alternative names. Its best known common description, slaked lime, suggests that it is lime (more properly known as calcium oxide) that has drunk its fill. ‘Milk of lime’ refers to its state before drying, when it is also known as limewater. ‘Hydrated lime’ merely describes its formation by adding calcium oxide to water, while the rather entertaining ‘pickling lime’ shows up one of its less well known uses. Throw in builders’ lime, lime cake, slack lime and choona and you can see that this is an etymological feast….” At the link right-click “Download: CIIE CalciumHydroxide.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catastrophic Environmentalismc 36 mins – “Mother Nature can do a lot of damage. Tornadoes, hurricanes, floods, and droughts destroy landscapes and ruin lives. But what happens when humans are the ones creating these disasters? This episode of Distillations explores the many ways humans have provoked nature’s destructive forces purposefully and inadvertently through history. Our journey begins in Oklahoma, a state that now has more earthquakes than California. Reporter Anna Stitt talks to the people affected by these new quakes and finds out how their lives have changed. Then we talk to historian Jacob Darwin Hamblin about his latest book, Arming Mother Nature: The Birth of Catastrophic Environmentalism. He tells us how Cold War military planners sought to use the environment as a weapon and in the process discovered how vulnerable our planet really is.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese and French Wine P1 36 mins – “The voice of the ToE episode announcer revealed! (her name is Mathilde)  and she joins our host for this two part series about the intersection between France and China and wine. The story of the red obsession of Wealthy Chinese has been told many times, but what is going to happen when China’s elusive emerging middle class gets wine fever? Can wine transmit cultural values? Can it transcend consumerism?  In this installment Benjamen and Mathilde traverse France to discover this vino nouvelle vague.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (If that doesn’t work click on the Subscribe: RSS button and download from there.) For P II (37 mins) go here, find the title, “Art De Vivre (II of II),” right-click “Media files toe43artdevivre2a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Tea Change 21 mins – “Christina Larson discusses the impact of climate change on tea in China. [and] Roundup of online news stories.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cleveland Police 48 mins – “ It got so bad in Cleveland that the Feds came in. After years of black Clevelanders complaining about police and abuse. With a Cleveland cop taking two seconds to shoot a 12-year-old dead. After officer Michael Brelo climbed on the hood of a car and pumped 15 rounds through the windshield — after the chase. After more than a hundred other shots. Now the Department of Justice has levelled a consent decree on Cleveland’s police. This is how you’ll do. It’s very detailed. It’s tough. This hour On Point: The new Cleveland standard of policing. Could it, should it, be a model for the nation?” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Policy Costs 47 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg is a Danish author and political scientist, and President of the Copenhagen Consensus Centre. He’s best known for his 2001 book, The Skeptical Environmentalist, in which he controversially claimed that overpopulation, declining energy resources, species loss, certain aspects of global warming are unsupported by the evidence. Lomborg isn’t a sceptic in the climate change denial sense – his stance is more that “man-made global warming is real – it just isn’t the end of the world.” Lomborg spoke to the Guardian’s Keep It In The Ground campaign recently about the economics of climate change, emissions targets, fracking, and green energy. Reacting to Lomborg are ​Dr Chris Hope​ from the Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge, M​ark Maslin,​ professor of climatology at University College London, and A​dam Vaughan,​ editor of the Guardian’s Environment site.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Science 56 mins – “In her new book, Driving the Future, Margo Oge (Former Director, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, United States Environmental Protection Agency) portrays a future where clean, intelligent vehicles with lighter frames and alternative power trains will produce zero emissions and run at 100+ mpg. With electronic architectures more like that of airplanes, cars will be smarter and safer, will park themselves, and will network with other vehicles on the road to drive themselves. Offering an insider account of the partnership between Federal agencies, states, environmental groups, and car manufacturers that led to the historic deal, she discusses the science of climate change, the politics of addressing it and the lessons learned for policymakers.” At the link right-click “DownloadMP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Art School 23 mins – “On January 3rd, 1961, Che Guevara suggested to Fidel Castro that they go play a round of golf. They drove out to what was then the ritziest, most elite country club in Havana. It was empty—almost all the members had fled during the revolution—and Fidel and Che romped around the bucolic green acres while their official photographer snapped publicity shots. As they played, they realized that the grounds of the country club were spectacular. They knew they had to do something with the property. There, with golf clubs in hand, they decided they would build an art school.” (A 90 min Hulu movie is at this link.) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Economy and TPP 47 mins – “On this week’s episode of Slate Money, data scientist Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann welcome special guest Cardiff Garcia of the blog FT Alphaville to discuss the criminal guilt of the banks, the reality of the Cuban economy and the fight over the trade deal none of us can read.” At the link find the title, “The Off the Books Edition,” right-click “Media files SM15052301_money.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberspace Hate Crimes 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 234, April 22, my interview with Prof. Danielle Citron of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. Danielle has written the definitive study of the range of activities that constitute “hate crimes” on the Internet. Focusing on activities ranging from “revenge porn” to cyber-stalking, Danielle takes a critical look at the law and norms around this behavior today. Given that policymakers, speech platforms and even law enforcement are struggling to ascertain the scope of these problems and how they should be addressed.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled and Institutionalized 60 mins – “This week we’re talking about the use – and appalling misuse – of genetics in pursuit of human perfection. We’ll speak to Claudia Malacrida, sociology professor and eugenics researcher, about her book “A Special Hell: Institutional Life in Alberta’s Eugenic Years.” And we’ll talk to Hannah Brown, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Adelaide, about the ethical issues raised by the creation of a genetically modified human embryo.” At the link find the title, “#319 A Special Hell,” right-click “Media files Science for the People 319 A Special_Hell.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diseases of Aging 85 mins – “Eliseo J. Pérez-Stable MD discusses a shift in how we care for older and frail patients with distinct focus on quality of life. Hear how this new outlook shapes they way we diagnose, treat, and manage dementia, osteoporosis, and urinary disfunction as well as recognizing dementia and preventing the risk of falls. Recorded on 03/11/2015. (#29283)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Elephants 53 mins – “When author Vicki Constantine Croke saw an illustration of an elephant and rider on a precarious cliff ledge from 1943, she wanted to know more. It was of “Elephant Bill” Williams, an Englishman who was a gifted trainer and champion of elephants in Burma. His work made headlines though when the Japanese invaded, and his “Elephant Company” managed a daring escape over treacherous mountain terrain. Monday, Croke joins us to tell the story of Williams, the animals he loved and the lessons they taught him about courage and trust.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Liten” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Engineer Careers 79 mins – “We talk with aeronautical engineer Patrick Riordan about the challenges of developing and navigating a career road map, Archimedes’ lever, and the Star Trek method for being perceived as a miracle worker.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exclusivity 50 mins – “On this episode of Marketplace Weekend, we take a look at exclusivity in the economy, our lives and our wallets. Lizzie speaks with Jon Taffer, best known as host of the reality series “Bar Rescue” on Spike about how to build an exclusive bar. Joshua Tilliman, better known as Father John Misty, talks about the exclusive radius clauses in his contracts. Later, Dr. Molly Coye, chief innovation officer at UCLA Health, talks with Lizzie about the changing landscape of healthcare and whether it’s making medicine more accessible, and personal finance columnist Michelle Singletary discusses the best ways to build and maintain a good credit score. Plus, Marketplace’s Tracey Samuelson talks about spoilers (and how to avoid them) and preserving an exclusive story.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right-end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FIFA 48 mins – “Nobody who pays attention thought the world of international soccer was squeaky clean. Bribes and kickbacks have been the stories that have swirled for years. But even so, the dramatic arrests in Switzerland last night of top officials of FIFA, soccer’s governing body, were startling. Big figures hustled out of a five-star hotel, indicted by the USA. Forty-seven counts. Racketeering, bribery, money laundering, fraud. A $150 million scandal alleged. And criminal proceedings opened on the World Cup hostings awarded to Russia and Qatar. This hour On Point: corruption and soccer.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fighting Causes 27 mins – “Millions of people paid to watch the Mayweather Pacquiao boxing match. Why? On this episode, we talk with English professor and cage fighter Dr. Jonathan Gottschall.” At the link right-click your desired audio download under “Download Options” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Filipino Migrant Workers 50 mins – “Claudia Taranto travels to the Philippines where 10% of the population work overseas. She travels to the coastal town of Mabini where many citizens have gone to Italy for work. She hears from the children left behind, including 10-year-old Jen who lives with her 80-year-old grandmother. Claudia asks whether the Philippines have become over-reliant on work abroad and if there is any prospect of breaking the cycle.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Legislation 51 mins – “Over the past decade, new technologies have fueled an oil and gas boom in the U.S., but hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” has triggered a backlash in some cities and towns. In November 2014, Denton, Texas banned fracking within its city limits. But this spring, the state passed a law that prevents local communities from banning fracking. And now, Oklahoma has passed a similar law, which the governor could sign today. Supporters of these laws say they ensure landowners aren’t deprived of their property rights. Critics argue they take away a community’s right to protect the health and safety of its citizens. We look at both sides of the debate over state laws that outlaw local bans on fracking.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Hate Trolling 27 mins – “In 2007 writer, programmer, and horse trainer Kathy Sierra quit the internet because of misogynist hate trolling. She stayed off the social web for 7 years but last year she came back to see what Twitter was like. She tells us why she only lasted a few weeks and her theory about why so many women are targets online. Plus Danielle Keats Citron explains how we could use the law to drain the cesspool.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Overview 61 mins – “Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter discusses America’s transportation infrastructure. She was interviewed by Rodney Slater, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation from 1997 to 2001.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Rosabeth Moss Kanter,” right-click “Media files program.400175.MP3-STD.mp3”

ISIS Finances 27 mins – “The story of how Islamic State, a small band of fanatical jihadi fighters, became the world’s richest terror army.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Fairs 69 mins – “We are back from Sun N Fun and had a wonderful time. One thing I am very excited about is the ability to participate in the first annual Job Fair. I spent many hours speaking with applicants and wandering around to the various job booths. Through observation and interaction with applicants I was reminded how We are back from Sun N Fun and had a wonderful time. One thing I am very excited about is the ability to participate in the first annual Job Fair. I spent many hours speaking with applicants and wandering around to the various job booths. Through observation and interaction with applicants I was reminded how some do not understand how to prepare for a job Fair. If you are considering attending a job fair I want to share with you some advice and a list of actionable items I feel will be helpful.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Nash 47 mins – “Remembering a beautiful mind: Nobel –prize winning game theorist John Nash . We’ll look at his game theory. His schizophrenia. His genius.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Loneliness 27 mins – “After moving to New York alone, writer Olivia Laing discovered the truth about loneliness. She says it is a gift.  Eric Klinenberg explains why more and more people are choosing to live alone and why cities like New York must invest in housing stock that singletons actually want to live in, the type of housing they have in Scandinavian countries.  In Denmark when someone dies alone, and no-one claims the body, the authorities put an ad in the newspaper calling forPossible Relatives. This is also the title of a photo-book by Danish photographer Tina Enghoff.  She tells us about the pictures she took of the apartments after the dead were removed. Some of these bodies went undiscovered for months.

Lying 49 mins – “Lying liars lie.  That’s clear.  But does everyone else lie too? Are we all liars? A new documentary called “(Dis)Honesty – The Truth About Lies” rounds up the research and lays out what we know. Little lies, white lies, big lies, whoppers. What we condemn and what we roll with. It’s quite a smorgasbord. You may think you’re above all that. But are you? And what about the power-brokers who frame our world? What happens when they lie? This hour On Point: the truth about lies.” At the link right-click “Download this story,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maroons of Jamaica 20 mins – “Decades before the first shot was fired in the American revolution a band of runaway slaves known as the Maroons living in the mountains in Colonial Jamaica took on the British Empire and won.  I’ve long been obsessed with the Maroons and so last summer I jumped at the opportunity to visit their compound in Charlestown for the annual celebration of their 1739 victory. I learned the Maroons hope to play a leading role today as Jamaica moves down the path of Marijuana decriminalization and legalization, but some of the folks I met claim the Maroons are still listening to Radio What’s Innit Fo Me?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Megaprojects 64 mins – “Bent Flyvbjerg of Oxford University speaks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the political economy of megaprojects–massive investments of a billion dollars or more in infrastructure or technology. Flyvbjerg argues that such projects consistently end up costing more with smaller benefits than projected and almost always end up with costs that exceed the benefits. Flyvbjerg explores the reasons for the poor predictions and poor performance of giant investment projects and what might be done to improve their effectiveness.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Military Suicides 51 mins – “Suicides in the military have skyrocketed since the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The military’s suicide rate jumped more than 80 percent between 2002 and 2009. One military family is trying to change that. The Grahams lost two sons: one in combat in Iraq and one to suicide. But the Grahams were astonished by the different reactions their deaths received from the Army. The one killed in combat was lauded as a hero, while the other’s death was met with silence. In a new book, Yochi Dreazen, the managing editor of Foreign Policy, shows how this family channeled their grief into working to transform the military’s approach to soldiers with mental illness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Nepal Earthquake Aid 27 mins – “ Aid is pouring in to Nepal in the wake of the recent earthquakes. But in a country where corruption is endemic, will the money go where it is meant to? Simon Cox investigates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutrition Facts and Fads 58 mins – “Alan Levinovitz is an assistant professor of Chinese philosophy and religion at James Madison University and author of The Gluten Lie: And Other Myths About What You Eat. On the show this week we talk to Levinovitz about gluten and gluten-free diets. Should everyone go gluten-free? What does the actual science about it say? Why is a professor of religion is writing about diets in the first place? Listen and find out.” At the right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nutshell Studies 24 mins – “The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore, Maryland is a busy place. Anyone who dies unexpectedly in the state of Maryland will end up there for an autopsy. On an average day, they might perform twelve autopsies; on more hectic day, they might do more than twenty. But there’s one room on the fourth floor that sits apart from the buzz of normal activity. It feels a bit like an art gallery. This room houses the “Nutshell Studies of Unexplained Death….‘” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Overdose Deaths 10 mins – “Josiah ‘Jody’ Rich discusses a research article about methadone treatment for US prisoners.” At the link find the title, “Methadone in prisons: The Lancet: May 29, 2015,” right-click “29may.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paris Commune of 1871 55 mins – “The Paris Commune of 1871 was a model for the revolutions of the 20th century — freedom, liberty, equality. But the violence it unleashed foreshadowed the abuses of state power to come — in the 20th century until today.” At the link find the title, “Fire and Blood: The Paris Commune of 1871,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150528_46899.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Information Sharing 55 mins –There are any number of compelling reasons the US would want to have a good information relationship with other countries, from counter-terrorism and cyber-crime prevention, to simple tax identification. This information sharing is not only necessary to strengthen relations with foreign governments but to protect the country from threats, foreign and domestic. But how does the U.S. government share such personal information with foreign governments?…” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phantom Pain 28 mins – “Rubber hand illusions by Ian Woolf, Tristan Robinson talks about his autonomous robots, Jake Fountain talks about his virtual realities, Joseph Wang talks about the Meta augmented reality headset, Leila Alem talks about her remote mentoring augmented reality service.” At the link right-click “download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pilot Training 51 mins – “Welcome to Episode 84. The goal of this podcast is to inform, entertain, and motivate you to achieve your career goal. We to bring you the viewpoint of all those involved with careers in aviation and aerospace.  Although we primarily focus on the positive aspects of a career in aviation and specifically as an airline pilot we also know that we must represent the challenges of choosing a career in aviation. To help you understand some of the challenges concerning salaries in the piloting career I have with me Ben Mandell author of Don’t Pay Any Flight School More Than $2500 In Advance: The Censored Information The Bad Guys Don’t Want You To Know and Pilots on food stamps: An Inside Look At Why Your Flight Was Cancelled. At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

POWs in America 30 mins – “Reporter Karen Duffin and her father were talking one day when, just as an aside, he mentioned the Nazi prisoners of war that worked on his Idaho farm when he was a kid. Karen was shocked … and then immediately obsessed. So she spoke with historians, dug through the National Archives and oral histories, and uncovered the astonishing story of a small town in Alabama overwhelmed by thousands of German prisoners of war. Along the way, she discovered that a very fundamental question – one that we are struggling with today – was playing out seventy years ago in hundreds of towns across America: When your enemy is at your mercy, how should you treat them? Karen helps Jad and Robert try to figure out why we did what we did then, and why we are doing things so differently now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prescription Drug Costs 51 mins – “Prescription drugs account for one tenth of the nation’s health care spending. Most drug prices have been rising slowly, but the cost of specialty drugs, including those used to treat some neurological diseases, cancers and hepatitis C have become much more expensive. For the most part taxpayers and healthier insured patients are picking up the tab, but some say drug companies need to do more to reduce prices: Please join us to discuss the cost of prescription drugs.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the file is in the blog archive.

Rare Earths 27 mins – “We continue our journey to the center of the cloud, by way of the earth: Rare Earth. China controls 95% of the market for the 17 Rare Earth elements that power our invisible technologies so your host decides to pay a visit to the Ganzhou region, to see the illegal mines in the with his own eyes.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. It has two parts. Part 2 (20 mins) is downloaded from this link.

Separation and Divorce 52 mins – “Divorce turns many children’s lives’ upside down. In the English-speaking world today, only about half of all children celebrate their 16th birthdays with their biological parents still living together. New scientific research indicates that many assumptions about shared custody arrangements can actually undermine a child’s well-being, according to psychologist Penelope Leach. In a new book, the best-selling author argues that what seems fair for the parents is seldom best for the child. She tells us how parents can help their children deal with divorce by putting the needs of the child first.” You can listen at the link but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Storytelling P1 55 mins “Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective.” At the link find the title, “Vestigial Tale, Part 1,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150526_61661.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Storytelling P2 55 mins – “Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective.” At the link find the title, “Vestigial Tale, Part 2,” right-click “Media files ideas_20150527_16956.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Substance Abuse 29 mins – “In a rebroadcast from December 12, 2010, Keith talks with Charles France, Maharaj Ticku Professor of Pharmacology, Professor of Psychiatry, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio.  France studies drugs for their addictive qualities, and examines how animal studies translate to human subjects.” At the link right-click the play buttun beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

T. Boone Pickens on Energy 60 mins- “Part of the Club’s Series on Ethics and Accountability, underwritten by the Travers Family Foundation – The collapse of oil prices has once again driven the American energy industry from boom to bust. However as U.S companies lay down their rigs T. Boone Pickens thinks supply will contract and prices will head back toward $100 a barrel in the coming year. Other observers say slowing economies in China and Europe could tame oil demand and keep prices around $50 or $60 a barrel. What do low gasoline prices mean for the US economy? What does $2 gasoline mean for renewable fuels and cutting carbon emissions? Join us for a conversation with a legendary oilman about powering America’s economy,  pursuing energy independence and the new geopolitics of oil.” At the link find the title, “Episode 3: Climate One Interview with Greg Dalton at the Commonwealth Club,” right-click “Media files 3159364-episode-3-climate-one-interview-with-greg-dalton-at-the-commonwealth-club.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tablets in Restaurants 17 mins – “Service jobs were a refuge for people when robots took factory jobs. Service jobs seemed safe—you needed the human touch. But robots are making headway there, too. They’re checking us in at hotels, renting us cars and ringing us up at the supermarket. Today on the show, we go out for pizza at a place where machines have taken over parts of the server’s job. Waiters are the latest group of workers meeting the machines that might replace them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Impact 61 mins Today we feel the impact of technology everywhere except in our paychecks. In the past, technological advancements dramatically increased wages, but during the last three decades, the median wage has remained stagnant. Machines have taken over much of the work of humans, destroying old jobs while increasing profits for business owners. In this talk, James Bessen — Lecturer in Law at the Boston University School of Law and author of the new book “Learning by Doing: The Real Connection Between Innovation, Wages, and Wealth” — argues that workers can benefit by acquiring the knowledge and skills necessary to implement rapidly evolving technologies and sharing knowledge. Bessen is joined in conversation by Berkman Faculty Associate Karim Lakhani” At the link right-click “MP3” beside “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage Brain 26 mins – “The health podcast from WBUR and Slate explores three ways in which the adolescent mind is radically different from yours and mine. With hosts Carey Goldberg and Rachel Zimmerman of WBUR’s CommonHealth blog. Do you beg your teenager to go to sleep earlier so he or she can function in the morning? Well, it turns out they physically can’t do that, explains Marvin Wang, a pediatrician at Massachusetts General Hospital, who’s on a mission to make middle and high schools start later in the day. Also, why adolescent brain development is the culprit behind so much bad (and sometimes law-breaking) decision-making and reckless behavior. And, a sex therapist talks about how Internet porn can sabotage a teenager’s ability to have a normal romantic relationship.” At the link find the title, “Teenage Zombies,” right-click “Media files checkup15052602_teenage.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travelogue Stories 50 mins – “In the last episode of State of the Re:Union, the team brings you a collection of our favorite stories from the road. [Environmental Illnesses, Superman, Deportee, Blues] Host Al Letson reflects on six years of SOTRU and says goodbye to the show.” At the link find the title, “Travelogue: Volume Two,” right-click “TravelogueVolume2_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uganda AIDS 28 mins – “Dr Peter Mugyenyi runs one of Africa’s largest HIV medical research institutes, the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, which he helped to found in the early years of Uganda’s AIDS epidemic. Uganda was the first African country in which AIDS was identified. Peter explains the realities of HIV treatment in Ugandan clinics today, a decade after effective drugs against the virus started to become more widely available in African countries. Life prospects for hundreds of thousands of Ugandans are much better than they were. Yet an estimated 40% of adults with HIV are not receiving any treatment. The proportion of untreated infected children is even higher. In conversations with Ugandans who are living with HIV, fellow medics and health workers, activists and government representatives, Peter Mugyenyi explores the successes, failures and challenges in getting the best possible treatment to every Ugandan who needs it. That ambition is also a vital part of preventing the continuing transmission of the virus in African countries.” At the link right-click “Download mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

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ARCHIVE

An alphabetic encyclopedia of 6000 of these hyperlinked descriptions is here and updated quarterly. A file of the podcasts is here , updated weekly, and can be downloaded as a 40+ GB zipped file, or individually.  Over 230 feeds used to prepare this blog are harvested with a podcast aggregator. The feeds are available in this opml file which most aggregators can import. A list of the feeds is here.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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