Media Mining Digest 233 – Apr 29, 2016: Alzheimer’s Factors, Antibiotic Resistance, Aviation Careers, Bean Diet, Bechtel Corporation, British Monarchs, Broadband on Farms, Campaign Finance Reform, Cannabidiol, Car Technology, Celebrating Failure, China’s Five Year Plan, Citrus Fruit, Class Action Suits, Climate Change Signs, Coal Pollution, College Counseling, Columbia Gold Mining, Community vs Individual Rights, Concussion Test and Sit Ups, Creep Catchers, Cuban Infrastructure, Democracy Now, Design Thinking, Diabetes DIY Treatment, Discrimination by States, Doctors Stories, Drone Kill List, Education Solutions, El Salvador Murders, Equal Rights in Australia, Exercise Insights, Expert Training, Failure Book, Fallacy Begging the Question, Fatherhood, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Financial Technology, Forest Gardens, Fungi and Mushrooms, Geek Tends, Girls and Sex, Guaranteed Income, Guide Dogs on Planes, Hamilton Play, Harriet Tubman, Health Technology, Heart Research, Hiring Process, Humanitarian Aid Dangers, Immunotherapy, Income Tax Transparency, Invisible Problems, Iran Economy, IRS ID Theft, ISIS Most Wanted, Jail Problems, Judaism in America, Library of Congress Hearing, Life Expectancy, Lusitania Book, Mt Tambora Eruption, Obesity Control, Oncolytic Viruses, Opioid Overdose Death, Orwell, Periodical Publishing Trends, Profession Restructuring, Public Radio Disruption, Racism, Ransomeware Attacks, Refugee Debate, Refugee Scams, Research Animal Sex, Rubber Research, Schools with Slave Heritage, Science Sexism, Set Top Box Issue, Singapore, Sleep Revolution, Sound Engineer, Space Medicine, TED Talks, Ted Williams, Theranos Problem, Transcrainial Magnetic Stimulation, Trauma Aftermath, Travel Importance, UN Role Today, Viagra for Women, Voter Psychology, Voting Rights, Wheat Allergies, White Collar Digital Disruption, Women in Politics, Zika Hazards

The best 101 podcasts from a larger group of 292 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 280 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Alzheimer’s Risk Factors 64 mins – “Patricia Spilman, Senior Scientist, Drug Discovery Laboratory, UCLA, and in the Bredesen Lab, Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato In the absence of a truly effective disease-altering treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, methods for decreasing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s become extremely important. Many people were introduced to “familial AD” through reading the book or viewing the film Still Alice written by Lisa Genova. However, many—but not all—of the risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer’s are not genetic and are potentially modifiable; that is, they can be identified, addressed and reduced. Patricia Spilman speaks from results of the scientific work in a laboratory setting to inform you of the top risk factors that are potentially modifiable.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Resistance 30 mins – “Antibiotics have saved millions of lives, but their misuse and overuse is making them less effective as bacteria develop resistance. Despite scientists’ warnings, antibiotic prescriptions in many countries continue to soar and antibiotic use in farming is at record levels. As a result, doctors are now seeing infections they can no longer treat. Are we facing the end of modern medicine? An antibiotic apocalypse that takes medicine back to the Dark Ages? Or will researchers outwit the incredibly clever bacteria and find novel ways to beat resistance?” At the link right-click the “MP4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aviation Careers 72 mins – “Welcome to episode 106 of the podcast where we help you move toward your career goal. Hearing your stories of achieving your career goal keeps us motivated and helps inspire others. Please keep sharing your success stories including your challenges along the way toward your goal. In this episode we answer your questions. You will notice many focus on supporting family while working on completing your ratings, degrees, and finding a job. This can be challenging to say the least but we have some encouraging news: You can do it! We relate some of our own experiences and those of our listeners to help you keep motivated while in the challenging position of supporting a family and moving toward your career goal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bean Diet 30 mins – “For 2016, the International Year of Pulses, our Sackler Institute for Nutrition Science is looking at the many opportunities provided by pulses—edible seeds like dried, lentils, and chickpeas. Pulses provide a non-animal source of protein, appear to be healthy for the gut microbiome, and help replenish the soil where they are grown. In this podcast we’ll talk to scientists studying the benefits of pulses about their research and also how we might solve the challenge of moving these important foods from millions of small-scale farmers in India and Latin America to consumers worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Little Beans, Big Opportunities,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Bechtel Corporation 59 mins – “Author Sally Denton discusses her book, [The Profiteers], which looks at the Bechtel Corporation, the largest civil engineering company in the United States. To read the Bechtel statement on this program, see more information on this program below.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Sally Denton, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436095.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Monarchs 27 mins – “To salute the 90th birthday of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, David Cannadine, eminent professor of History at Princeton University explores the worldwide role and significance of the British monarchy.” At the link find the title, “A Global Queen, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rmfwg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband on Farms 36 mins – “When we launched this podcast in 2012, we kicked it off with an interview from Minnesota’s farm country, Sibley County. We were excited at their passion for making sure every farm was connected with high quality Internet access. After the project took a turn and became a brand new cooperative, we interviewed them again in 2014 for episode 99, but they hadn’t finished financing. They broke ground 2015 and today we discuss the model and the new Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) case study that details how they built it.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finance Reform 38 mins – “When I first met Richard Painter some months ago, I thought he must be the loneliest man in the Republican Party. He’s a conservative, and, of course, I’m not. But he believes, as I do, that there’s too much money in politics. Political insiders know Richard Painter well as President George W. Bush’s White House counselor and chief ethical advisor. He’s now teaching law at the University of Minnesota, and he’s causing heads to turn with a book advocating that we reduce the power of big money in politics. Its title is Taxation Only With Representation: The Conservative Conscience and Campaign Finance Reform. There’s a lot to learn from it, and I urge you to read it, because it is rare today to find a conservative who will admit, as Mr. Painter does, that money corrupts politics, and then makes his case with so much passion and logic. His book is also timely because the issue has reached a boiling point this year. Thousands of people descended on Washington just last week in a movement they call Democracy Spring, deliberately getting arrested to protest on behalf of cleaner politics and a government liberated from Big Money. Every poll I’ve consulted reveals a deep and substantial support in this country for those objectives….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabidiol 42 mins – “Marijuana has been a hot topic since states like Colorado and Washington have legalized the plant. In the discussion surrounding marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the plant’s principal psychoactive cannabinoid, has gotten most of the limelight. But there’s another cannabinoid that deserves attention: Cannabidiol, also known as CBD. Let’s get one thing clear right off the bat: Supplemental CBD is derived from industrial hemp, which is perfectly legal throughout the U.S. (unlike marijuana). It’s a close chemical analog to endocannabinoids, naturally occurring compounds within the human body, and it interacts with some of the same neuronal receptor-sites that the human body’s own endocannabinoids would interact with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Technology 46 mins – “Everybody talks about the future of self-driving cars, but the reality of almost self-driving cars is already here. In our laps. On the road. Lots of cars — and not just fancy Teslas — are now rolling out with an array of semi-autonomous powers that almost do the driving. They’ve got cameras and radar sensors and night vision. They’ll steer you, keep you in your lane, brake for you, park for you, look out for you. This hour On Point, Car Talk‘s Ray Magliozzi and more on the almost self-driving car is here.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Celebrating Failure 59 mins – “Astro Teller, director of Alphabet’s moonshot factory, X, describes how smart bets on world-changing innovations are aided by a culture that celebrates only the most audacious projects and rewards teams for showing the courage to find the biggest flaws. He also discusses how innovation can be systematized regardless of business type, resources or role at your company.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the right side of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China’s Five Year Plan 60 mins – “Experts discuss China’s domestic economic policies and provide their perspectives on China’s influence in Asia and around the world.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Citrus Fruit 46 mins – “…The citrus fruits we find in the grocery store today are all descended from four highly promiscuous ancestors: the citron, the pomelo, the pepeda, and the mandarin. From their origins in northern India, southwestern China, and Malaysia, these prized golden fruits accompanied travelers along the Silk Road, migrating to the Middle East and, eventually, Europe and the Americas. Over time, citrus colonized the world, transforming local cuisines in the process: the citron was incorporated into Jewish religious ritual; sour oranges became the dominant flavor of medieval European cuisine; and orange trees laid the foundation for California’s second gold rush.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Class Action Suits 21 mins – “The modern class action was created on a typewriter in the back of a car. (Sort of.) Now, thousands of these lawsuits are filed every year. How did we get here? Is this really a good way to do things?” At the link find the title, “#696: Class Action,” right-click “Media files 20160415_pmoney_podcast041516v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Signs 60 mins – “Signs climate has entered abrupt shift. Includes Dr. James Hansen’s video abstract of new science. Special report on smoke pollution from Indonesian peat fires by correspondent Yew Jin Lee, with 3 experts. Sample from “Unwelcome Guests” #726 “The Flight from Death”.” At the link right-click Lo-Fi near the download options.

Coal Pollution 7 mins – “It is estimated pollution causes 3 million deaths each year worldwide, mostly caused by heart and lung diseases. Most deaths occur in developing countries with China and India at the top of the list. The biggest source of pollution is from the burning of coal, mostly in power plants. The estimate is 400,000 deaths each year in China caused by the burning of coal. China is moving away from coal as a source of energy, although the process is likely to take decades to complete. India continues to build coal-fired power stations.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Counseling 45 mins – “Freshly minted graduates will soon take their degrees and set out into the workplace. But the path from college to career is not as obvious as it once was. Over the last few decades, unemployment among young college graduates has gone up while wages have gone down. Today, nearly half are underemployed. Add the burden of student debt and life post-graduation can seem pretty scary. A longtime chronicler of higher education says it doesn’t need to be that way. In a new book, he lays out a blue print for navigating the transition. A panel of experts joins him – and us – to discuss life after college.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Columbia Gold Mining 4 mins – “But over the past decade, as gold prices have soared, cartels have increasingly turned to illegally mining the metal to earn cash. In Peru and Colombia, they’re now making more money exporting illegal gold than cocaine. Eighty percent of the gold mined in Colombia and up to 90 percent of the gold mined in Venezuela is produced illegally. That’s according to a recent report from The Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime, which outlines the impact this crush of illegal mining is having on displaced communities, forced-labor miners and sex workers who are trafficked to serve this burgeoning industry. “When you arrive in these illegal mines, you just realize that there is like a chain of victimization,” the report’s author, Livia Wagner, said in an interview with PRI’s The World….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community vs Individual Rights 53 mins – “Journalist Colin Woodard says there’s a theme running through disagreements in American history: the struggle between individual rights and the good of the community. It started when the Mayflower limped onto shore and continues in today’s political rancor. Woodard argues though that democracy works best when we find the “sweet spot” between libertarianism and collectivism. Wednesday, he joins us to talk about these two impulses in our character and the risks of moving too far to either extreme.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Concussion Test and Sit Ups 27 mins – “American doctors say they’re just five years away from a pitch-side blood test to spot concussion – which is an injury caused by a bang to the head or a sudden, strong jolt to the brain. It’s a hot topic at the moment as experts debate when sportspeople should and shouldn’t be allowed back onto the pitch after a head injury. At the moment doctors still have to rely on looking out for symptoms such as vomiting, blurred vision, loss of balance or disorientation when considering a diagnosis of concussion. But researchers at the Orlando Regional Medical Centre in Florida have detected two substances which are released into the blood stream after a brain injury. Through this finding they hope to develop a simple blood test – a bit like those used by diabetics to test their glucose levels. Emergency physician Dr Linda Papa says that type of test could be just five years away and could help to decide whether to scan a patient’s brain. …The sit up – which has long been a mainstay of military and leisure exercise programmes – is having a makeover. Stuart McGill is a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He’s recently written the book, the Back Mechanic, and has been researching the impact of sit ups on the spine for many years. He says that the ‘standard’ sit up – where the hands are placed behind the head and the lower spine is ‘pushed’ into the floor – puts the back under a lot of strain. This increases the risk of injury and potential back pain – and those with thicker spines like rugby players being particularly at risk. Professor McGill suggests instead that the hands should be placed, palm-down, under the lower back, and bending just one leg – keeping the other straight. Only then should the head be lifted up, by a tiny amount…. ” At the link find the title, “Concussion Test,” right-click “Media files p03rngfw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creep Catchers 17 mins – “They call themselves Creep Catchers. And, across the country, they’re taking the law into their own hands by posing online as minors to lure in would-be sexual predators. They say police aren’t doing enough to expose people who abuse children.” At the link find the title, “’Creep Catcher’ vigilantes confront alleged pedophiles, say police not doing enough – Apr,” right-click “Media files current_20160418_48266.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuban Infrastructure 119 mins – “Life in Cuba, Facebook Bots, UC Davis’ mistakes, Google Changelog, Magic Leap, and more…” (Cuba only covers the first 24 mins.) At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Now 72 mins – “…In 1996 Amy Goodman started a radio show called “Democracy Now!” to focus on the issues that were underreported or ignored by mainstream media. This year the show is celebrating its 20th anniversary and is the only public media in the U.S. that airs simultaneously on satellite and cable television, radio and the Internet. Goodman will share stories about the remarkable leaders and crusaders that have appeared on her show and the lasting impact they have all made in the ongoing fight for peace and justice.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Design thinking 54 mins – “Bernard Roth, co-founder and academic director of Stanford University’s d.school, [design school] shares design-thinking tools for reframing life’s stubborn problems and unlocking solutions. Professor Roth, author of the book “The Achievement Habit,” also engages audience members in exercises meant to cut through the excuses we tell ourselves that hold us back from accomplishing our goals.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes DIY Treatment 38 mins – “In this week’s episode we met a woman whose pancreas is changing medicine. Dana Lewis has Type 1 diabetes, and when it was clear that medical manufacturers were behind on creating the device she needed to manage her disease, she hacked together her own artificial pancreas. Now, over 50 people have built versions of Dana’s system, OpenAPS (Open Artificial Pancreas System).” At the link click the circle with three dots on the sound bar, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination by States 44 mins – “In 1993, President Bill Clinton signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law. But the Act didn’t apply to the states. So in the decades that followed, more than 20 states passed their own so-called “Religious Freedom” laws. The latest is Tennessee, where lawmakers last week approved a bill that allows therapists to refuse treatment to LGBT clients. Similar bills have passed in Kansas and Mississippi. Supporters say these laws protect first amendment rights. But opponents argue they allow businesses to discriminate against LGBT persons. Guest host Indira Lakshmanan and guests discuss debate over controversial religious freedom laws in the states.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Doctors Stories 39 mins – “Note: In this week’s episode we asked doctors about the patients who changed their lives. It was a basic question, and an obvious one – so obvious that we weren’t prepared for how good the responses would be. The stories were powerful and intimate, and a peek into the world we don’t always see. A big part of a doctor’s job is listening. They listen to our symptoms, pain and life situations. They listen for what patients aren’t telling them. They listen to heartbeats. But give them a mic, like the Annals of Internal Medicine did, and you’ll find out they also have plenty to say. This week we hear from three doctors in what we call a “Doctor Story Slam” – like a poetry slam, except with more stethoscopes and medical degrees. We often hear about how doctors change patients’ lives. We wanted to know: how do patients change their lives? These are the kind of stories you never hear during your routine check-ups….” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Kill List 25 mins – “The so-called U.S. kill list determines who’s targeted with drone strikes. Names on the list are secret. Malik Jalal, a tribal elder in Pakistan, says he’s escaped drones attacks and believes he’s on the list. Jalal is pleading for help to clear his name.” At the link find the title, “Pakistani man Malik Jalal asks to be taken off US drone ‘kill list’ – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160419_75308.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Solutions 30 mins – “Today on Sea Change Radio we continue our discussion with Zoe Weil, education reformer and environmentalist.The post Zoe Weil: Sustainable Education, Part II appeared first on Sea Change Radio.” At the link find the title, “Zoe Weil: Sustainable Education, Part II,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-04-19.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

El Salvador Murders 47 mins – “NPR’s Kelly McEvers went to El Salvador — to find out how violent street gangs are terrorizing a whole country for the podcast “Embedded.” She joins us. Plus, the latest on Brazil’s political crisis.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equal Rights in Australia 56 mins – “Newly appointed Sex Discrimination Commissioner Kate Jenkins addresses the National Press Club.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Kate Jenkins, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_KateJenkins_2004_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise Insights 49 mins – “When it comes to fitness and exercise…Sal di Stefano wants to give it to you straight, no bullshit. “The fitness industry is one of the most full-of-shit industries you’ll ever run into.” …After 18 years as a personal trainer, di Stefano knows all the myths propagated by the fitness industry: … He was fed up with it, and decided to start the MindPump podcast with two other personal trainers to start dispelling these myths. …Proper exercise will improve the way your brain functions. …The Best Exercise For Your Brain …For the biggest cognition boost, di Stefano recommends complex movement, as opposed to repetitive movement like running, since by moving in multiple ways, you’re encouraging the brain to adapt and grow. Harder Does Not Mean Better and Stronger – The fitness magazine headlines scream “Beast Mode!” and “the hardest workout you’ll ever do.” But although intensity is an important factor in improving cognition via exercise, higher intensity is not the be-all and end-all. The human body responds well to appropriate intensity, but it also responds to frequency. In fact, frequency may be more important for longevity, long term health, and cognitive function than simple intensity… Note: “intensity” is an individual assessment. What’s high intensity for a sedentary office worker is low for a professional athlete, to use one extreme example. So how hard should you work out? Challenge yourself, but you don’t want to feel like you just got beat up. If you can barely move for two days, or you need to take a nap after a workout session, you’ve overdone it….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Expert Training 55 mins – “For more than thirty years psychologist Anders Ericsson, an expert on the field of professional development, has studied the people who stand out as specialists in their fields. In fact, Ericsson’s research was used as the basis for Malcolm Gladwell’s “10,000 Hour Rule” – which essentially states that it takes on average 10,000 hours of doing something to become an expert. In reality, Ericsson’s research shows that there is nothing magical about the number of hours you put in, but over time he has come to understand that we are all capable of extraordinary feats. In this interview, Ericsson explains what the research actually says about the infamous “10,000 hour rule” and how that number can be greatly decreased (or increased) depending on the type of practice you are doing. Specifically, by utilizing deliberate practice with the help of a trained professional, one can drastically improve their results. Deliberate practice can be applied equally well to everything ranging from business skills and sales to sports and music…and it works! Anders recently wrote an incredible book on the topic titled, PEAK: Secrets From The New Science Of Expertise. If you like the interview, you’ll love the book!” At the link right-click ‘Download” and select “Save Link As” the pop-up menu.

Failure Book 115 mins – “Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Dickson DespommierGuest: Stuart FiresteinStuart joins Vincent and Dickson to talk about his sequel to Ignorance, a book called Failure, which seeks to make science more appealing by revealing its faults.” At the link right-click beside “Download [on] TWiV 385” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fallacy Begging the Question 35 mins – “If you believe something is bad because it is…bad, or that something is good because, well, it’s good, you probably wouldn’t use that kind of reasoning in an argument, yet, sometimes, without realizing it, that’s exactly what you do. In this episode three experts in logic and rationality explain how circular reasoning leads us to “beg the question” when producing arguments and defending our ideas, beliefs, and behaviors.” At the link right-click beside “Direct download:…” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fatherhood 46 mins – “Journalist Ron Fournier turns the tables on himself for a soul-searching meditation on fatherhood now. What it is. How it’s changing. Ron Fournier was a big time Washington reporter who wasn’t paying full-enough attention as a father. When he figured that out, he changed. Recommitted. Came to see his children on their own terms. Especially his young son Tyler– a marvelous boy, a boy with Asperger syndrome. They hit the road. Learned about life and each other. And the American presidency. At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 18 mins – “Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder is a debilitating, lifelong condition that cuts across Canadian society. But it hits very hard inside indigenous communities and could be why many indigenous offenders seem stuck in a revolving-door with the justice system.” At the link find the title, “Proposed bill takes FASD into account when sentencing offenders – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160415_58463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Technology 8 mins – “The emergence of fintech companies has put traditional banking services under threat. But that doesn’t mean banks are going to disappear, says Stanley Pignal” At the link find the link, “Special report: International banking, May, 2015,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forest Gardens 70 mins – “What is a food forest or a forest garden. A quick review of the seven layers of a forest: Canopy, Sub Canopy, Shrub, Herbacious, Vine, Ground Cover, Rhizome – Roots… Things that are different from typical food forestry:The layers are scaled down; The number of support species are reduced; There are few “sacrificial plantings” They don’t require swales or chickens but both are welcome; Small ponds and barrels are easily fed with roof catchment. Special Considerations that Open Your Options Up: Shape isn’t critical, do what works; Put in more irrigation then you think you will ever need; Consider ponds, please consider ponds; Think about power (solar first but grid is better then nothing); You can plant a LOT closer and a LOT more dense then you think; If you have animals design in their nutrient flow; In a larger space build “glades” and maximize the edges; Build structures for your vines they can otherwise dominate a small system; Fertilize (organically) a lot early on; Mulch and chop and drop like crazy….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi and Mushrooms 64 mins – “Peter McCoy is an original founder of Radical Mycology, a grassroots organization and open-source movement that teaches the skills needed to work with mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological resilience. Peter is the lead cultivation expert for the Amazon Mycorenewal Project and Open Source Ecology and the author of the new book, Radical Mycology: A Treatise on Seeing and Working With Fungi. Hey joins us today to answer to discuss what he calls “The Missing Fungal Functions” – how fungi can and should be integrated into all aspects of life. He also answers questions like, what is the ecological significance of the fungal kingdom? What are some ways the people commonly disrupt the fungal communities in their soil and plants? What is going in in the world of cultivating mycorrhizal fungi? What are endophytic fungi that live inside of plants and can we cultivate those? And above all for those of us that just want to grow mushrooms, what would be the easiest way to start a mushroom farm?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geek Trends 94 mins – “The Creator of Tetris Alexey Pajitnov, the animator who brings life to vintage photos Alexey Zakharov, Leo and Padre answer your tech questions.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girls and Sex 45 mins – “It’s always been hard for parents to talk to their kids about sex. But author Peggy Orenstein says, particularly with daughters, it’s more important than ever. For her new book, “Girls & Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape”, Orenstein interviewed over 70 girls and young women — and from the pressures of social media to the impact of online pornography — what she found disturbed her. Orenstein says that while girls have more opportunities today than ever, when it comes to sex, they’re getting mixed messages. Diane and her guests discuss the complicated and contradictory messages young girls are getting about sex. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guaranteed Income 36 mins – “A lot of full-time jobs in the modern economy simply don’t pay a living wage. And even those jobs may be obliterated by new technologies. What’s to be done so that financially vulnerable people aren’t just crushed? It may finally be time for an idea that economists have promoted for decades.” At the link click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guide Dogs on Planes 20 mins – “In order to fly, guide dogs must have the correct paperwork, but EasyJet admit to us that they got it wrong recently with one passengers and his dog. They apologise and say they’ll be more flexible in future. And when does helping become interfering? We’ve come across a new situation where well-meaning strangers are tapping on your smart phones, thinking they’re off when actually you’re using a privacy setting called a screen curtain. So what should you do? Tom Walker reports.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton Play 47 mins – “It’s hard to say Alexander Hamilton anymore without hearing music. Hip hop music fused with American revolutionary history from the super smash Broadway hit show “Hamilton.” “Bastard, orphan, son of a whore,” sings his fatal enemy Aaron Burr. But Alexander Hamilton was a founding father with a huge impact on the design of the new nation. And the Tupac of his day, some now say. There’s a wild fever for the show. Up next On Point: Hamilton mania and American history.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harriet Tubman 12 mins – “Harriet Tubman is set to be the new face of the twenty dollar bill. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced yesterday that President Andrew Jackson’s image will move to the back of the bill, and for the first time in a century a woman’s face will appear on the front of American paper currency. It’s the first time ever that an African-American will hold the spot. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson joins us to talk about what it means to have abolitionist Harriet Tubman on one of the most widely circulated bills in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Health Technology 60 mins –What if doctors no longer played God and you became CEO of your own health? What if medicine were tailor-made for your own DNA? What will the world be like when people start living to 150 – or even forever?If only the wealthy can afford super-longevity, will the growing gap between rich and poor lead to a new form of social inequality? These are some of the questions Intelligence Squared explored in The Future of Health: When Death Becomes Optional. Massive change is already under way. New tools, tests and apps are taking healthcare away from the professionals and into the hands of the individual. Wearable devices which monitor our fitness and activities are already ubiquitous. Before long they will be superseded by ‘insideables’ – chips planted just under our skin – and ‘ingestibles’ – tiny sensor pills that we swallow. The plummeting cost of DNA profiling means we will soon be entering the era of truly personalised medicine – the right drug for the right person at the right time – instead of the same drug for everybody. All this means that we will be living longer, healthier lives. Some of the world’s top scientists believe that ageing itself can be treated as a disease, and the race is on to find a ‘cure’. Google and other Silicon Valley giants are pouring billions into longevity research, hoping that they can find the elusive cause of ageing and deactivate it, putting an end to the age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease and Alzheimers that we tend to die of. If they succeed, the first person to live to 150 may have already been born. And an elite handful of very wealthy tech entrepreneurs have even more ambitious dreams: to make death just another medical problem which technology will sooner or later disrupt….We were joined by Dr Daniel Kraft, Faculty chair for the Medicine and Exponential Medicine program at Singularity University; João Pedro de Magalhães, senior lecturer at the University of Liverpool, where he leads the Integrative Genomics of Ageing Group; and Professor Tony Young, the NHS’s National Clinical Director for Innovation (known as ‘the NHS’s disrupter-in-chief’). The event was chaired by documentary maker and award-winning science journalist. Dr Michael Mosley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Research 49 mins – “We talk to Dr. Greg Marcus, the Director of Clinical Research for the UCSF Division of Cardiology about heart disease and how things like smart watches might help us learn more about it.” At the link find the title, “129 Greg Marcus – Understanding Heart Disease With Big Data,” right-click “Media files 0ad2ddf8-5fc8-47f5-b12b-f8343d7d27cd.mp3” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hiring Process 21 mins – “When you’re an employer looking at a giant stack of resumes, you have to find some way to quickly narrow the field. How do you do that fairly? And what happens when your good intentions backfire?” At the link find the title, “#697: Help Wanted,” right-click “Media files 20160422_pmoney_podcast042216v3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Aid Dangers 45 mins – “When humanitarian aid workers go to an area devastated by war, disease, or natural disaster, they put their own lives in danger. But in recent decades, the risks they face have grown: The leading cause of death for medical humanitarians and other aid workers used to be traffic accidents. Today it’s violent attacks. Now the doctor behind the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative is sounding the alarm. He says our modern age of terror has threatened the principle of neutrality at the heart of humanitarian work, and that formalized training is more essential than ever for those providing aid to people caught in complex conflicts worldwide. Dr. Michael VanRooyen discusses this urgent moment for what he calls ‘the world’s emergency room’.”. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Immunotherapy 36 mins – “Immunotherapy—using the body’s own immune defenses to fight cancer—has already shown significant promise. Now, the latest research says new immunotherapy drugs could dramatically increase survival rates for difficult-to-treat cancers like deadly melanomas, and may be effective in dozens of other cancers including those driven by viruses. This news comes as Vice President Joe Biden’s nationwide “moonshot” initiative to beat cancer is gaining momentum, and spurring more private funding for research. A look at promising developments in the treatment of cancer using immunotherapy.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Income Tax Transparency 24 mins – “The British PM, David Cameron, admits he owned shares but sold them off. It’s the kind of admission political leaders are being forced to make in the wake of the Panama Papers. What if politicians’ tax returns were put on public display automatically?” At the link find the title, “Should elected officials have to make their tax returns public? – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160415_56600.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Health 26 mins – “Ian Anderson and Romlie Mokak discuss a new analysis of health indicators across 28 indigenous populations, with implications for future health services planning worldwide.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous health: The Lancet: April 20, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20april.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Invisible Problems 56 mins – “Physicists tell us that perhaps there are parallel universes. Is there a parallel universe of the heart, where we might find the real values that make us tick? Maybe it’s not law and government that makes a Good Society, maybe it’s something far deeper.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of the Heart, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas 20160413_62189.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Economy 59 mins – “Valiollah Seif discusses Iran’s economy. – The C. Peter McColough Series on International Economics brings the world’s foremost economic policymakers and scholars to address members on current topics in international economics and U.S. monetary policy. This meeting series is presented by the Maurice R. Greenberg Center for Geoeconomic Studies.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS ID Theft 103 mins – “IRS Commissioner John Koskinen and officials from the Treasury Department and the Government Accountability Office testify at a Senate Finance Committee hearing on cybersecurity and taxpayer information.” At the link find the title, “Hearing on Cybersecurity and Taxpayer Data, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438604.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Most Wanted 27 mins – “Chloe Hadjimatheou tells the astonishing story of a group of young men from Raqqa in Syria who chose to resist the so-called ‘Islamic State’, which occupied their city in 2014 and made it the capital of their ‘Caliphate’. These extraordinary activists have risked everything to oppose ISIS; several have been killed, or had family members murdered. IS has put a bounty on the resistance leaders’ heads forcing them to go into hiding. But the group continues its work, under the banner ‘Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently’. Chloe meets the group’s founders, who are now organising undercover activists in Raqqa from the relative safety of other countries. Producer: Rob Walker Editor: Richard Knight” At the link find the title, “‘Islamic State’s’ Most Wanted, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03rndlv.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jail Problems 47 mins – “Inside a major push to reduce jail populations and fix racial disparities in the justice system. Eleven major cities are all in.Criminal justice issues all over lately. A new report out of Chicago on all-too-obvious trust and race problems with the Chicago Police. Bill Clinton, grilled on his 1990s anti-crime push and our packed prisons. Black Lives Matter raging, ever since Ferguson. A new initiative looks to go local for a fix. To our local jails. They too are packed with the poor. And the channels in and out have everything to do with the big picture. Up next On Point: race, poverty and fixing jail.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judaism in American 59 mins This month, Jewish communities across the country celebrate Passover, a holiday that marks the end of the Israelites’ enslavement by the Egyptians. Only about 2% of the U.S. population is Jewish, but the influence of American Jews far outweighs their relatively small demographic size. In this episode of BackStory, the Guys explore the history of Judaism in America, from George Washington’s famous letter to the Jewish congregation of Newport, Rhode Island, to efforts to establish a Jewish city of refuge, near Buffalo, New York in the l820’s, and the importance of delis in Jewish American culture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library of Congress Hearing 80 mins – “President Obama’s nominee to be the next librarian of Congress, Carla Hayden, testifies at a Senate Rules and Administration confirmation hearing. If confirmed, she will succeed James Billington who served from 1987 to 2015.” At the link find the title, “Librarian of Congress Nominee Carla Hayden Confirmation Hearing, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.439503.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Expectancy 44 mins – “Wealthy people typically live longer than poor people: this idea has long been studied and supported by research. But new work is deepening our understanding of differences in life expectancy across the U.S. A study published yesterday tells us not only that the gap in lifespan between the rich and poor has increased notably in recent years, but that for poor Americans, where you live in the U.S. plays a key role in determining how long you live. And new work from The Washington Post adds another layer, pointing to decaying health and earlier death for white women in particular. Life expectancy in America: how it’s linked to income, location and gender.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Lusitania Book 53 mins – “When it set sail from New York on May 1, 1915, the Lusitania bore a full manifest of passengers and the ingenuity and hubris of its era. It was immense and luxurious, the fastest civilian ship in service. It was also under threat. The Germans declared that British ships sailed “at their own risk,” a risk the Lusitania’s operators perilously defied. They claimed theirs was the safest ship at sea. Tuesday, the writer Erik Larson joins us to recount the disastrous tale of the Lusitania’s last crossing…Erik Larson is the author of the books In the Garden of Beasts, Thunderstruck, The Devil in the White City, and Isaac’s Storm. His latest book, Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania was recently released in paperback.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mt Tambora Eruption 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the impact of the eruption of Mt Tambora, in 1815, on the Indonesian island of Sambawa. This was the largest volcanic eruption in recorded history and it had the highest death toll, devastating people living in the immediate area. Tambora has been linked with drastic weather changes in North America and Europe the following year, with frosts in June and heavy rains throughout the summer in many areas. This led to food shortages, which may have prompted westward migration in America and, in a Europe barely recovered from the Napoleonic Wars, led to widespread famine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Control 49 mins – “Mary O’Connell explores the “Adverse Childhood Experiences” or ACE study and how its findings are being integrated into medical practice today.” At the link find the title, “All In The Family, Part 1, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160407_80330.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oncolytic Viruses 57 mins – “Something a bit different this episiode. Last month, we joined Jesse Noar, host of the excellent Bacteriophiles podcast to record an episode about oncolytic viruses (viruses that blow up cancer cells). We hope you enjoy it, then head on over to microbe world and subscribe to Jesse’s podcast.” At the link find the title, “Episode 20 – Bacteriophiles with Jesse Noar,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Overdose Deaths 25 minshttp://ecorner.stanford.edu/podcasts/4053/Celebrating-Failure-Fuels-Moonshots – “B.C. has declared a state of emergency over fentanyl deaths. Opioid abuse is so severe in Canada that more people die of opioid overdoses than in car crashes. And many of those addictions start not with an illicit street purchase but with a prescription.” At the link find the title, “B.C. declares public health emergency after 200 overdose deaths in 2016 – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160421_26748.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Orwell P2 and P3 106 tot mins – “He was one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us ‘big brother’, ‘thoughtcrime’, ‘doublethink’, whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance?” At the link find the title, “The Orwell Tapes, Part 2, Apr, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160411_97386.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for “The Orwell Tapes, Part 3, Apr, 2016” and “Media files ideas_20160418_67912.mp3”.

Periodical Publishing Trends 49 mins – “Oh, To Be in England, Now That April’s There!” This month, the book business sets course for London and the city’s annual Book Fair. Copyright Clearance Center hosts special book fair programming on “The Next Wave” for Open Access publishing and examines “The Data Dilemma.” You are invited to join the discussion about Rights Licensing, Big Data, Open Access and more! In 2016, in a lively, interactive discussion with CCC’s Chris Kenneally, thought leaders and executives from across the scholarly publishing world addressed how revolutionary changes – propelled by Open Access business models – have begun to touch every aspect of publishing. New customers. New operations. New compliance requirements. New problems.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Profession Restructuring 47 mins – “Tech disruption heads for the professions. Doctors, lawyers, accountants now face real digital competition. We know what’s happened to so many blue collar jobs in America. If they haven’t gone abroad, they’ve been automated away. Taken over by machines. Now that same smart machine takeover is lining up to hit the professions, say my guests today. To hit lawyers and doctors. Accountants, consultants, architects, educators, journalists. All they say, are lined up to take a hit. It may be good for spreading knowledge around.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Public Radio Disruption 49 mins – “With an aging listenership and the rise of podcasts, the future of NPR is thrown into question. Bob digs into the recent conversation about how the public broadcasting giant is reacting to changes in the industry, and what member stations want from the network. Then, a work of lewd satire has strained Germany’s understanding of free speech — and highlighted an uneasy relationship with Turkey. And, twenty-five years ago, the testimony of Anita Hill turned the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Clarence Thomas into must-see TV. A new HBO movie, “Confirmation” portrays the history, and reopens old wounds. Plus: the curious world of the novelization industry.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 4 mins – “Stephen Jay Gould revisits the old arguments for racism — a subject we’ve tried to deal with on moral, not rational grounds, as if race equity couldn’t stand up to logic. Well, that’s a serious miscalculation. Gould deals with two common threads of argument, one based on genealogy, one on geography. Genealogy dominated the arguments as 19th-century thinkers tried to keep white supremacy intact. One notion was that, after God created perfect Adam and Eve, all branches of the human species deteriorated. Some branches deteriorated more than others. The other idea was that Biblical creation produced only the white race. Other races were produced by separate and lesser creations…. Since the Biblical accounts were written by tribes of the Eastern Mediterranean, that’s where 19th-century scholars thought the human species arose. When the first australopithecine skull turned up in South Africa, in 1924, scientists, who’d been looking for human origins in Asia, rejected the find. But Asia provided nothing old enough to be first, and Africa kept yielding very old human remains. Science finally had to concede the human species arose in Africa. Still, as late as 1962, a noted anthropologist wrote, “If Africa was the cradle of mankind, it was only an indifferent kindergarten. Europe and Asia were our principal schools.” He was voicing a last-ditch, thinly-veiled claim that it was the northern races who learned to be fully human.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1150,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomeware Attacks 46 mins – “At first it seemed like the nightmare of a very unlucky few. But now the wave of “ransomware” attacks on computers across America is growing. In all of last year, says the FBI, companies paid $25 million in ransom to retrieve data locked up by remote ransomware pirates. In the first three months of this year that number is over $200 million and mounting. And it’s not just big companies being attacked. It’s home computers, phones, more. This hour On Point, the ransomware nightmare.” At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Debate 90 mins – “U.K. Independence Party Leader Nigel Farage and author Mark Steyn debate former U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Louise Arbour and historian Simon Schama on dealing with the global refugee crisis in the semi-annual Munk Debate in Toronto” At the link find the title, “Munk Debate on the Global Refugee Crisis,” Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.437079.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugee Scams 18 mins – “There is nothing stopping immigration consultants from charging a fee to Syrians who want to come to Canada. But those who offer their consulting and legal services for free question the ethics. The CBC’s Laura Lynch brings us this story.” At the link find the title, “Immigration consultant fees to help Syrian refugees come to Canada unethical, say critics – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160419_84089.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Animal Sex 24 mins – “As many as 80 per cent of the mice used in biomedical research are male. And of the ten major drugs pulled from the shelves over the last 20 years, eight have posed greater health risks for women. The Current explores the push for more balanced research.” At the link find the link, “Of Mice and Women: Scientists push to fix gender gap in lab rats for research – Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160420_99686.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rubber Research 44 mins – “Could the lowly dandelion solve a crisis? If Key Gene CEO Dr. Arjen van Tunen and associates are correct, this yard pest may be the basis of sustainable and highly profitable rubber production. A growing middle class worldwide has produced a need for high-quality rubber, mostly for tires. Rubber tree (the genus Havea) plantations in Southeast Asia are threatened by climate change, disease, and sustainable harvesting is costly and labor intensive. However, the dandelion produces latex, just not in huge amounts. Scientists at KeyGene have identified a high production version in Kazakhstan and combined its genetics with those of the larger, common dandelion. The result is a plant that could revolutionize the rubber industry and provide a new high-value, easy-to-grow crop for farmers. Environmental impacts are also discussed. In the process, the scientists at KeyGene also identified genes related to apomixis, the ability to produce seeds without fertilization, essentially clones of the parent. Understanding these genes could dramatically change agriculture, as any plant could potentially be made to produce clonal seeds from the mother plant. In the second part of the podcast, correspondent Vern Blazek talks to Dr. Curt Hannah who answers a listener question about corn varieties and just how much genetic variation there is in modern modern hybrids. Plus some thoughts on the Borlaug CAST Agriculture Communications Award” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Schools with Slave Heritage 48 mins “In 1838, Georgetown University sold 272 of the school’s slaves who worked the Jesuit owned plantations in Maryland. They were put on a ship in Alexandria, Virginia and sent to New Orleans. Georgetown needed an influx of cash to keep it afloat – and the sale, for over 3 million dollars in today’s dollars – did just that. Today, college campuses across the country are struggling with issues of race and the legacy of slavery. At Georgetown, confronting this history includes tracking down the descendants of these slaves sold nearly one hundred and eighty years ago. Diane and her guests discuss how Georgetown University once relied on the slave trade and efforts to reconcile with its past.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Science Sexism 23 mins – This month we discuss Why science is sexist by Nicola Gaston. That science is sexist isn’t a question Nicola Gaston entertains – it is. Rather, she wants to know why a field that prides itself in being rational should behave so illogically.We discuss the research she presents on unconscious bias, in both men and women. And we talk about whose responsibility it is to address the problems of sexism, and what indeed they should do to address them. Hear an extract from the book, an interview with Nicola Gaston, and the views of the Chemistry World team in this month’s podcast.” At the link right-click “Download: Why science is sexist.mp3” at the sound bar and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Set Top Box Issue 30 mins – “Consumer advocate Mark Cooper and economist George Ford discuss the Federal Communication Commission’s proposal to open the set-top box market to competition by allowing consumers to buy their own set-top boxes.” At the link find the title, “Communicators Discussion on Set-Top Boxes, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.438900.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Singapore 9 mins – Description of Singapore by The Economist. At the link find the title, “Special report: Singapore, Jul 2015right-click “Download File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Revolution 45 mins – “As co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post, for many years Arianna Huffington led a fast-paced, under-slept life. Then one day, she fainted from exhaustion, seriously injuring herself. With that she began a journey to learn about the importance of sleep — and why our current culture seems to prize sleep deprivation as a symbol of busyness and achievement. In a new book, she argues for a total overhaul of our relationship with sleep, and points to the many areas in which its value is being rediscovered, from education to politics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Sleep Revolution 60 mins – “Arianna Huffington, Co-founder and Editor in Chief, the Huffington Post Media Group, Author, The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time In Conversation with Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook In today’s 24/7 fast-paced world, the hunger for sleep is only getting stronger. Sleep deprivation affects our health, decision making, and relationships both personally and professionally. Huffington takes on sleep from every angle and offers the latest scientific recommendations and expert tips to achieve a better night’s sleep.” At the linkr ight-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Sound Engineer 71 mins – “Matthew Wood is the supervising sound editor at Skywalker Sound. He has worked on all three of the Star Wars prequels and also was the voice of numerous characters such as Bib Fortuna, Ody Mandrell, Seboca, and Magaloof. Matthew was the voice actor for General Grievous. Wood also received two Academy Awards nominations for Sound Editing.” At the link click on “Download options,: right-click Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Medicine 30 mins – “Sheyna Gifford has an unusual claim to fame—she is the first doctor ever to work on Mars. Not the planet Mars, of course, but Mauna Loa, a volcano in Hawaii, whose dusty, rust coloured landscape is probably the closest on earth to the red planet. She is serving on the Hi-Seas programme, a mission run the University of Hawaii and funded by NASA, whose purpose is to simulate a three year voyage to Mars and back. Since last August Gifford and six other scientists have been living in a 1000 square foot solar powered dome, which they rarely leave. The project is treated as a real mission to Mars so the crew have all the supplies for their year long stay and, because of the time delay between Mars and Earth, they cannot speak to the outside world. They can, however, communicate by email, so Sheyna sent The BMJ this voice file to answer 15 of our questions.” At the link find the title, “Doctors in spaaaaaace, Apr 2016,” right-click “Play Nowand select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

TED Talks 49 mins – “Thirty years ago, a famous architect and designer summoned three hundred of his friends to Monterey, California to discuss technology, entertainment and design. In the years that followed, these “TED Talks” featured influential speakers to an invitation-only audience. But in the late 1990s, the conference was struggling and on the verge of collapse. Then in 2001, publishing entrepreneur Chris Anderson bought it and began posting TED Talks online. The speeches went viral and today, those videos are being watched millions of times a day. Diane talks with the president of TED about making knowledge accessible, and the do’s and don’ts of public speaking.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Ted Williams 28 mins – “Richard Ben Cramer’s masterful profile of Ted Williams from 1986 is often cited as one of the greatest magazine stories of all time. It’s about a sports idol who wanted fame but hated celebrity, who shouted louder than anyone but demanded privacy, who wanted to be the best at everything, always, and thus wanted to be immortal. Former Esquire editor David Hirshey joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the enigmatic and bigger-than-life Teddy Ballgame and the journalist who finally uncovered his essence.” At the link find the title, “What Do You Think of Ted Williams Now?” right-click beside “Enclosure:…” at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Problem 44 mins – “Slate Money with Margit Wennmachers on Theranos, Silicon Valley, and German company culture.” At the link find the title, “The Dubious Values Edition, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM3191131755.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation 45 mins – “As someone with autism spectrum disorder, John Elder Robison knows what it’s like to feel emotionally removed from situations. Robison tells Fresh Air‘s Terry Gross that throughout his life people have told him, “There’s this emotional language you’re missing. There are stories in people’s eyes. There are messages.” Robison didn’t fully understand what they meant until he received transcranial magnetic stimulation, a noninvasive procedure in which areas of the brain are stimulated with electromagnetic fields to alter its circuitry. Neurologist Alvaro Pascual-Leone, who treated Robison, explains TMS as a “tool that allows us to introduce a small amount of current into specific parts of the brain without having to use surgery to do so. … By introducing current in it, we can probe the function of certain parts of the brain [and] we can even modify how different parts of the brain work.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trauma Aftermath 55 mins – “Trauma is not a story about the past — it lives in the present: in both the mind and body. Left untreated, it has no expiration date, whether it’s trauma arising from childhood abuse or PTSD suffered as an adult.” At the link find the title, “All In The Family, Part 3, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160421_33467.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Importance 45 mins – “Acclaimed writer, psychologist, traveler Andrew Solomon the importance of getting out- way out- into the world.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

UN Role Today 61 mins – “Esther Brimmer, CFR’s adjunct senior fellow for international institutions, discusses the evolution of the United Nations over the past seventy years and its role in the world today, as part of CFR’s Academic Conference Call series.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the right end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Viagra for Women 19 mins – “Last August, Flibanserin — or “Addyi” — became the first FDA-approved drug aimed at treating sexual dysfunction in women. Sprout, the company that developed the so-called “female Viagra” was understandably excited, and even more so the next day when they were bought by pharmaceutical giant Valeant, for one billion dollars. But after a rocky year, Valeant announced Monday that they had dismissed the entire sales force associated with Flibanserin and would reintroduce the drug later in the year. When Flibanserin first hit the shelves last year, we took a deep dive into its marketing message and the nebulous world of prescription drugs and female desire.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voter Psychology 42 mins – “The historian Rick Shenkman is editor and publisher of the indispensable website History News Network. I’m a fan and recently had the pleasure of reading his latest book, Political Animals: How Our Stone-age Brain Gets in the Way of Smart Politics. Shenkman himself possesses quite a highly evolved brain, but he nonetheless admits he has his own share of stone-age brain cells. However, there is no club in his hand at the moment, just this book, which frankly, packs all the wallop he needs. If you want to know why this is the year of Trump, you’ve got to read it. If you want to know why millions of Republicans still believe Barack Obama is a Muslim, you’ve got to read it. Even if you want to hold on and remain an optimist, you’ve got to read it. This week, I sat down with Rick Shenkman to talk about the brain of the American voter, and what is firing its synapses during this extraordinary primary season.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Voting Rights 63 mins – “Previously, Michael Waldman traced the ongoing argument on gun rights from The Bill of Rights to the current day. Now, in The Fight to Vote, Waldman takes a succinct and comprehensive look at an even more crucial struggle: the past and present effort to define and defend government based on “the consent of the governed.” From the writing of the Constitution, and at every step along the way, as Americans sought the right, others have fought to stop them. This is the first book to trace the entire story from the Founders’ debates to today’s restrictions: gerrymandering, voter ID laws, the flood of money unleashed by the nonprofit Citizens United, making voting difficult for the elderly, the poor and the young, by restricting open polling places.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wheat Allergies 48 mins – “Dietary reactions to wheat are on the rise, and science is grasping for answers. One approach to work around the genetic basis of the reaction, and that is well understood. With that information, scientists like Dr. Chris Miller at the Kansas Wheat Innovation Center are searching for innovative solutions. Current concepts seek to breed modern wheat with other historical varieties featuring low reactivity. Future methods suggest that genetic engineering and gene editing might be especially effective solutions to the problem. Co-Hosted by Kevin Klatt, Graduate Student in Molecular Nutrition, Cornell University Twitter: @Nutrevolve” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Collar Digital Disruption 47 mins – “We know what’s happened to so many blue collar jobs in America. If they haven’t gone abroad, they’ve been automated away. Taken over by machines. Now that same smart machine takeover is lining up to hit the professions, say my guests today. To hit lawyers and doctors. Accountants, consultants, architects, educators, journalists. All they say, are lined up to take a hit. It may be good for spreading knowledge around. But the fallout? Up next On Point: when machines take on the professions.” (2 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 56 mins – “Emily’s List founder Ellen Malcolm discusses the rise in elected women in public office. She is interviewed by Representative Maxine Waters (D-CA).” At the link find the title, “After Words with Ellen Malcolm, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.434090.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women in Politics 67 mins – “Previously, Michael Waldman traced the ongoing argument on gun rights from The Bill of Rights to the current day. Now, in The Fight to Vote, Waldman takes a succinct and comprehensive look at an even more crucial struggle: the past and present effort to define and defend government based on “the consent of the governed.” From the writing of the Constitution, and at every step along the way, as Americans sought the right, others have fought to stop them. This is the first book to trace the entire story from the Founders’ debates to today’s restrictions: gerrymandering, voter ID laws, the flood of money unleashed by the nonprofit Citizens United, making voting difficult for the elderly, the poor and the young, by restricting open polling places.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Hazards 46 mins – “New warnings from the federal Centers for Disease Control this week that the mosquito-born Zika virus is scarier and more dangerous even than we thought. Birth defects. Brain problems in full-grown adults. Sexual transmission. The mosquito that can carry it is all over the Gulf Coast and can range as far north as New York. Zika is coming, say the headlines.  A potentially devastating health crisis, we’re told. Are we ready?” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select ‘Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus Study 45 mins – “In the last one to two years the Zika virus has infected more than a million people. Most have mild or no symptoms, but a pregnant woman can transmit the virus to her developing fetus leading to possible birth defects, stunted brain development and premature birth. The mosquito which can carry this virus is in about 30 states. Health officials say there’s no crisis now but that preparedness is essential. In February the Obama administration asked Congress for $1.9 billion in emergency funding, but so far, Congress has yet to act. Please join us to talk about the health risks posed by Zika and efforts to contain its spread.”(4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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