Media Mining Digest 236 – May 20, 2016: 3D Plastic Body Parts, AAC Institute, Ada Lovelace, Addiction Movie, ADHD, Aging Debate, Apple Pay, Apps that Track, Arab Youth, Assisted Suicides, Bangalore Rises, Blood Transfusion History, Brain-Computer Interface, Brazilian corruption, Cancer and Exercise, Carbon Tax Concept, Charles Koch, City Failure, Communism Issues, Copy Editor, Coral Loss, Death Cafes, Deliberate Practice, Democracy Now, DNA Background, Drone Assassinations, End of Life Issues, European Union Issues, First Nation Suicides, Food Addiction, Fraud and Forgery, Funding Ventures, Gender Issues, Gentrification, Girl Geeks, Global Citizenship, Gorilla Extinction, Grooveshark Startup Story, Gun Rights, Gymnastic Strength Training, Health Exam Issues, Human Rights, Income Inequality, Independent Media, Islam, Jingles, Luis W Alvarez, Machine Learning, Mao’s Great Leap, Medical Errors, Menstruation, Mexico City Air Pollution, Migration Issues, Ocean Rise, Ozone Hole History, Pakistani Sports Woman, Perceptions, Peter Marshall, Pinkerton, Polygraph, Power Grid Protection, Primary Politics and kidnapped Students, Privacy vs Security, Productivity Ideas, Protein from Bugs, Public-Private Partnerships, Republican Issues, Roman Water Wheels, Rosalind Franklin and DNA, Scalia, Segregation History, Sex Assaults on Campus, Sound Research Issues, Spain’s Civil War, Spam Empire, State Powers, Technology Fixation, Third Wave, Tyrannosaurus Rex, US Federal Reserve Dissection, Vampire Power Sources, Visual Intelligence, Wildfire in Canada, Wireless Sensors, Women and Housework, Wrongful Conviction, Zika Virus

The best 104 podcasts from a larger group of 288 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 300 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

3D Plastic Body Parts 50 mins – “In this episode we talk with Professor Paul McMenamin of Monash University, you know the school down under about his rather unique collection of body parts. You see there made of out plastic and colored with ink jet ink to look like actual cadaver body parts. Join us as we find out how his team at Monash accomplished this and who may benefit.This episode was recorded on the 29th of July, 2014. And if you aren’t squeamish, come check out the video of this interview out on our YouTube channel. “All Things 3D”… If you dare?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AAC Institute 48 mins – “Mission of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Institute – Joyce welcomes Katya Hill, director of the AAC Institute. Established in 2000, the AAC Institute is a resource for all who are interested in enhancing the communication of people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Organized as a 501(c)3 not-for-profit charitable organization, the AAC Institute offers information and provides services worldwide. The AAC Institute promotes the goals of AAC, the AAC Rules of Commitment, and evidence-based AAC clinical practice. This mission is accomplished through service delivery, research, activity organization, information dissemination, and education. Ms. Hill will discuss the mission of this charitable organization.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ada Lovelace 21 mins – “The first computer programmer was a woman named Ada Lovelace. Learn how the daughter of Lord Byron — one of the most famous poets in the Western world — moved out of her father’s shadow and became a herald of the electronic age in this episode.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Movie 46 mins – “Filmmaker, actor Rob Reiner and his son, Nick, get personal in their new film “Being Charlie,” which takes on drug addiction.Rob Reiner directed some of the greatest comedies of the late 20th century. When Harry Met Sally, The Princess Bride. And dramas: Stand By Me, A Few Good Men. But at home, and recently, his own family was joining the American story of drug abuse, addiction, and opioids. Reiner’s son, Nick – 17 times in rehab. Now father and son have joined forces on a movie about the drama of confronting addiction and its roots. This hour: Rob Reiner and Nick Reiner get personal about taking on addiction.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ADHD 57 mins – “With the number of diagnoses and prescriptions on a twenty-year rise, these days, having a kid with ADHD is no longer outside the norm. Still: there’s plenty of disagreement over the nature of the diagnosis itself, when medication can help kids, and when other approaches might be better.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Debate P1 45 mins – “Why face the ravages of time if you can stave off the effects of aging? We look at ways to cheat the clock!” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Debate P2 48 mins – “There’s no scientific consensus on the causes of aging and that has led to some spirited debates. We explore the arguments and learn a little something about ourselves in the process.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apple Pay 24 mins – “Apple is bringing mobile payment systems to the mainstream – making it easy for people to pay with their smartphones. The Current explores why the beginning of the end of cold hard cash is a problem for many privacy and security experts.” At the link find the title, “Apple Pay moves Canada towards a cashless society,” right-click “Download Apple Pay moves Canada towards a cashless society” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apps that Track 6 mins – “Smartphone Tracking Apps, May 9, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Mark Goldstein, Director, Physical Infrastructure” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arab Youth 60 mins – “Donald A. Baer, chief executive officer of Burson-Marsteller, and CFR’s Steven A. Cook join NPR’s Deborah Amos to discuss public opinion trends among Arab youth, including perceptions of economic opportunities, religion, and the self-proclaimed Islamic State. The panelists focus on a recent study of public opinion among 3,500 Arab youth and discuss the findings in terms of the broader political and economic context of the modern Middle East.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assisted Suicides 60 mins – “The law allows me to kill myself, but what if I have a progressive illness and reach a stage when I long to end my life but cannot do so unaided. Isn’t it needlessly cruel and illogical that as the law stands, no friend or family member or doctor can then help me die without risking prosecution and a possible jail sentence? No it isn’t, say those who oppose legalising assisted suicide. Think of the pressures that would build once it became a legally sanctioned option – not least the pressure to extend the category of those whom it is permissible to help kill beyond the terminally ill to the old, the frail and even the mildly depressed ….We were joined by a panel of experts in 2011 to debate the motion “Assisted suicide should be legalised”. Arguing in favour of the motion were Emily Jackson, Professor of Law at the London School of Economics; Mary Warnock, moral philosopher, life peer and former Member of House of Lords Select Committee on Euthanasia; and the late Debbie Purdy, a right-to-die campaigner who in 2009 won a landmark ruling to clarify the law on assisted suicide. Arguing against the motion were Lord Carlile QC, barrister, Liberal Democrat peer and chairman of Care not Killing; Baroness Finlay, Professor of Palliative Medicine at Cardiff University; and Richard Harries, former Bishop of Oxford and author of ‘Questions of Life and Death: Christian Faith and Medical Intervention’. The debate was chaired by journalist and broadcaster Sue Lawley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bangalore Rises 40 mins “Ask natives of Asia’s two giants, China and India, what they think of the other, and not infrequently, the jokes and stereotypes fly. At least some people in each country seem to enjoy secretly — or not so secretly — looking down on the other. So when an Indian official took the stage at a Chinese-sponsored high-tech conference in San Francisco last fall, made a joke about Chinese having to check with the teachings of Chairman Mao before they could answer a simple question, and then made the case for “why India Rocks, Bangalore roars, and Silicon Valley will soon be Bangalored,” some of the Chinese members of the audience were practically sputtering….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Transfusion History P1 30 mins – “In part one of a special author interview, Dr. Holly Tucker talks about her new book, “Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution.” Tune in to learn more about the startling history of blood transfusion.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blood Transfusion History P2 30 mins – “In part two of this interview series, Dr. Holly Tucker discusses the research methods behind her new book, “Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution.” Listen in to learn more about the controversial history of transfusions.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain-Computer Interface 60 mins – “Could the future of electronics be the human body? We explore efforts to turn your body into a technological interface.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Corruption 49 mins – “Last month in Brazil, the lower house of the country’s National Congress voted to impeach the president, Dilma Rousseff. There are the legal grounds for the move — alleged cooking of the government books. And then there are the political motives, which as many observers have pointed out, are what’s really driving the impeachment. Those have to do with a massive corruption scandal at Petrobras, the state owned oil company. Add to that a severe recession, and many Brazilians are not happy with how their country is being run. Guest host Lisa Desjardins gets an update on the political crisis in Brazil from our panel of guests.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Cancer and Exercise 26 mins – “How targeted exercise can help fight cancer. By the time you hit midlife, odds are you or someone close to you will be touched by cancer. Cancer remains a potentially lethal lottery and everyone’s experience is different. But appropriate exercise under professional supervision – before, during, or after treatment – seems to substantially improve your odds. Catalyst meets a group of cancer patients that is experiencing extraordinary benefits from prescribed targeted exercise programs “ At the link right-click “download video: mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax Concept 63 mins Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “HOWARD HIGMAN MEMORIAL PLENARY: How Free Enterprise Can Solve Climate Change” with Robert Inglis and a moderator. At the link find and right-click the number 1400 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charles Koch (2 parts) 92 mins – Charles Koch discusses his journey, from engaging in manual labor as a youth to attending MIT and working as a consultant. Having learned the principles of classical liberalism through his education and work, he now applies those principles to building and managing Koch Industries. He attributes much of his success to creating value for others and operating with integrity. …In Part II of our interview with Charles Koch, he covers politics and the role of corporations in our society. Koch, making the case to end corporate welfare, tells us what he admires about Bernie Sanders and why he is less sanguine about President George W. Bush. He also believes technology can be used to promote free market ideals over democratic socialism, especially for the younger generation.” At the link find the titles, “Good Profit Part I” and “…Part II,” then right-click “Media files 20160318-2.mp3” and “Media files 20160318.mp3” and select “Save Links As” from the pop-up menus.

City Failure 47 mins – “Fixing Michigan- from Flint’s water crisis to failing schools in Detroit. Are state takeovers the answers or the problem? The president was in Michigan yesterday, in Flint, telling that beleaguered city “I’ve got your back,” after all the water woes we’ve heard about there. Meanwhile in Detroit, teachers walking off the job this week in almost all the city’s schools, complaining about mold and rats and afraid they won’t be paid. When cities and school districts get in trouble, it’s hard to get out. Michigan’s cities tell that story. This hour On Point: Detroit, Flint, and lessons from the troubles in Michigan.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communism Issues 76 mins Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Communism Won Some Battles but Lost the War,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find and right-click the number 1514 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Copy Editor 10 mins – “’Copy editing for The New Yorker is like playing shortstop for a Major League Baseball team — every little movement gets picked over by the critics,” says Mary Norris, who has played the position for more than thirty years. In that time, she’s gotten a reputation for sternness and for being a “comma maniac,” but this is unfounded, she says. Above all, her work is aimed at one thing: making authors look good. Explore The New Yorker’s distinctive style with the person who knows it best in this charming talk.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Loss 44 mins – “Coral reefs are crucial to ocean ecosystems — providing food and shelter to a quarter of all marine life. They also support food stocks that feed more than a billion people. This year, reefs around the world are threatened like never before: At Christmas Island near Australia, scientists estimate more than 80 percent of all the coral is now dead. And at the Great Barrier Reef, a similar story is unfolding: More than half of the reef’s coral has died. Scientists point to warming ocean temperatures and successive El Nino events as causes. For this month’s Environmental Outlook, the threat to coral reefs worldwide and what it will take to save them.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy included in the blog archive.

Death Cafes 25 mins – “A Death Cafe is a place for lively conversations that confront fears of dying. What began in a basement in the UK is now an international movement in 35 countries, with meetings across Canada. The Current explores the slightly darker take on cafe culture.” At the link find the title, “Death Cafes spark international conversation on fear of dying,” right-click “Download Death Cafes spark international conversation on fear of dying” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deliberate Practice 42 mins – “We’ve all heard of the 10,000 Hour Rule (popularized in Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers — that it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master a skill and become an expert. Turns out 10,000 is not a magic number, it’s just a big number. In Episode 128, Jesse talks to an expert on becoming an expert, Dr. Karl Anders Ericsson, Conradi Eminent Scholar and Professor of Psychology at Florida State University, and author of the new book Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise.  Although Gladwell drew on Dr. Ericsson’s research, they never spoke before Outliers was published. Dr. Ericsson believes the most important element of mastering a skill was lost in translation: deliberate practice….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Now 53 mins – “Amy Goodman, host of [Democracy Now!], discusses the influence of corporate media outlets on journalism and American politics.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Amy Goodman, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436394.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Background P1 36 mins – “What is DNA and where did it come from? We’ll take a look at what we know about the building blocks for life as we know it.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Background P2 36 mins – “Now that we know all about DNA, let’s talk about how we can use it in technology. From diodes to computer storage, we explore the uses of DNA.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Assassinations 60 mins – “Jeremy Scahill, Investigative Reporter; Co-founder, The Intercept; Author, The Assassination Complex: Inside the Government’s Secret Drone Warfare Program; Twitter @jeremyscahill…Bestselling author Jeremy Scahill and his colleagues at the investigative website The Intercept reveal what they call stunning new details about America’s secret assassination policy. When the U.S. government discusses drone strikes publicly, the implicit message from the Obama administration has been characterized as “trust, but don’t verify.” The Intercept called this into question when it obtained a cache of secret slides that provide a window into the inner workings of the U.S. military’s kill/capture operations in Afghanistan, Yemen and Somalia. These documents raise serious questions about the central role that assassination plays in counterterrorism policy.” At th elink right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

End of Life Issues 72 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Navigating End of Life Choice in America,with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1816, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Union Issues 75 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “EU Sings “Breaking Up is Hard to Do,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1715, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Nation Suicides 9 mins – “It’s been a month since a suicide crisis in Attawapiskat was declared. The community has yet to receive permanent mental health workers to manage the crisis. NDP critic Charlie Angus is calling for a permanent solution to solve this emergency.” At the link find the title, “Charlie Angus calls for permanent solution to address Attawapiskat suicide crisis,” right-click “Download Charlie Angus calls for permanent solution to address Attawapiskat suicide crisis” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Addiction (2 parts) 156 mins – “Michael Prager, Author, Fat Boy Thin Man Nicole Avena, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Florida Robert H. Lustig, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Endocrinology, UCSF Eric Stice, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Oregon Research Institute Vera Ingrid Tarman, MD., MSc., FCEP, CASAM, Medical Director, Renascent Elissa Epel, Ph.D., Associate Professor, UCSF Department of Psychiatry Ashley Gearhardt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan This program is an update from our previous Food Addiction program; all panelists will offer updated information. Addiction is about brains, not just about behaviors. We all have the brain reward circuitry that makes food rewarding; it’s a survival mechanism. In a healthy brain, these rewards have feedback mechanisms for satiety or “enough.” For some, the circuitry becomes dysfunctional such that the message becomes “more.” Michael Prager, author of Fat Boy Thin Man, will begin the discussion telling his very personal story of recognizing and then seeking treatment for his food addiction. Leading researchers and clinicians will discuss many aspects of this important topic.” At the link for Part 1 (64m) right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same here for Part 2 (92m).

Fraud and Forgery 60 mins – “This week we’re taking a look at two very different types of white collar crime — financial fraud and painting forgery — and how we use investigation and science to detect them. We’ll speak to Jennifer Fiddian-Green, a partner at Grant Thornton and lead of their National Forensic and Dispute Resolution Advisory practice, about forensic accounting and the ways we try to discover fraud. And we’ll talk with Dr. Jehane Ragai, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry with the American University in Cairo, about her book “The Scientist and the Forger: Insights into the Scientific Detection of Forgery in Paintings”.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Funding Ventures 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “How to Raise Money for Your Brilliant Idea,”with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1113, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Issues 74 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “Gender Fluidity,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1866, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gentrification 19 mins – “Neighborhoods are constantly changing, but it tends to be the people with money and power who get to decide the shape of things to come. New York City has an especially long history with change driven by landlords and real estate investors. Today, change is taking the form of gentrification, but in the 1960s, the neighborhood of East New York became a nexus of what has since become known as white flight. The first developer to set his sights on East New York was John Pitkin back in 1835. Pitkin would lose his fortune in a cotton market crash, but not before launching this neighborhood into existence with housing and industry. The Long Island Railroad came a year later, and with it factories to process foods from Long Island’s farms. The distinctive low-rise residential architecture that defines the area followed, then more rail lines connecting the area to Manhattan and the rest of Brooklyn. East New York became a thriving middle-class hub for the European immigrants working in local factories. It was, in many ways, a conventional white suburb, at least for a time….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title, “Turf Wars of East New York,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girl Geeks 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs, titled “Girl Geeks Unite!” with four guests and a moderator. At the link right-click 1714, right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Citizenship 75 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs, titled “Educating Students to be Global Citizens,” with four guests and a moderator. At the link right-click 1718, right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gorilla Extinction 47 mins – “An award-winning new documentary takes us inside the deadly, high-stakes struggle to save the home of the last mountain gorillas.“Virunga” is an astonishing new documentary about corruption, compassion, and the imperiled gorillas and people of the Congo . The film is named after a national park in the Congo, where some of the world’s last mountain gorillas live. It’s the story of an oil company and local rebels trying to control their land and fearless Congolese park rangers, an intrepid investigative journalist and soft-spoken Belgian warden fighting to protect it. This hour on point, “Virunga” and the gorillas of the Congo.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grooveshark Startup Story 54 mins – “When a group of college kids in Florida set out to change the music industry, they did not anticipate quite how disruptive they would be. Their mission was a noble one: bring an end to online piracy by offering cheap, convenient, and legal access to music. Their execution, however, was less than thorough. And when you’re dealing with protective music labels, forgetting to dot an “i” or cross a “t” can mean being one lawsuit away from the swift and unceremonious death of your company. This is the story of Grooveshark, the people who built it, and the relationships that were tested during its rocky road to growth—and eventual demise.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Rights 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “The 27 Words in the Second Amendment” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1312, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gymnastic Strength Training 192 mins – “…My guest this episode isChristopher Sommer (GymnasticBodies on Instagram/Facebook), former US national team gymnastics coach. He is also the founder of GymnasticBodies, a training system that I’m currently testing (and have no affiliation with). As a world-renowned Olympic coach, Sommer is known for building his students into some of the strongest, most powerful athletes in the world. During his extensive 40-year coaching career, Coach Sommer took meticulous notes on his training techniques—his wins and failures—so that he could translate the best elements into a superior exercise system for both high-level and beginner athletes. His four decades of careful observation led to the birth of Gymnastics Strength Training™ (or GST). In this episode, we cover A TON, including: The 3-5 exercises everyone should be doing (you’ve never heard of some of them); His opinions of kipping exercises, such as the kipping pull-ups common in CrossFit; What bodyweight goals non-gymnasts should target; Which exercises to remove from the gym entirely, at least in the first 6-12 months of training; How to optimize biceps strength and mass with straight-arm work….” At the link find the title, “The Secrets of Gymnastic Strength Training, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files Tim_Ferriss_Show, Coach_Sommer.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Exam Issues 40 mins – “Do we need periodic general health checks? It is the single most common reason US patients seek care and accounts for 10% of all primary care visits with a cost of about $10 billion per year. Dr. Deborah Grady explores when adults need asymptomatic checkups and why periodic exams may not be the best use of resources or time. Recorded on 03/01/2016. (#30674)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights 27 mins – “Human rights may aspire to be universal – they should belong to everyone, everywhere – but there has been resistance to them on philosophical or theological grounds by powerful states and world religions. Lawyer Helena Kennedy looks at these issues and the rise of the human rights movement since 1948.” At the link find the title, “Are Human Rights Really Universal? May, 2016,” right-click “Media filesp03tmylk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Income Inequality 78 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “US Income Inequality & the American Dream,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1516, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Independent Media 44 mins – “Last Saturday night Jason Rezaian, the former Iran bureau chief for the Washington Post, appeared at a correspondents’ dinner and joked that the audience there sure beat solitary confinement. It was a light-hearted moment underscoring a serious, growing issue. In July of 2014 Rezaian was arrested in Tehran and imprisoned until January of this year. His plight became a symbol of the many risks journalists face around the world. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, 72 reporters were killed for doing their jobs. Nearly 200 are unjustly jailed. Today, we look at the dangers of journalism and the reality of censorship.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam 73 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Views and Voices of Islam,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1512, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jingles 34 mins – “Jingles are traditionally defined as short songs about a product that are written for TV or radio, but—with songs like Poo-Pourri’s “Imagine Where You Can Go” being released on the internet—does the traditional definition need to be expanded? Listen as Tim Taylor, author of “The Sounds of Capitalism” and Helen Zaltzman, the host of The Allusionist, take us through the century long history of ad music, and examine what jingles sound like in the internet age.” At the link find the title, “10: Jingle Brains, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Luis W Alvarez P1 30 mins – “Luis Alvarez was a physicist whose broad interests connected him to some of the 20th century’s most influential moments, including the bombing of Hiroshima and the assassination of JFK. His diverse work led to the nickname “the wild idea man of physics.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Luis W. Alvarez P2 30 mins – “The second part of the Luis Alvarez episode covers his time as part of the Manhattan Project designing detonators for atomic bombs. Beyond his controversial work, Alvarez also contributed to particle physics, mystery solving and paleontology.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 66 mins – “What is machine learning? How is it transforming our lives and workplaces? What might the future hold? Pedro Domingos of the University of Washington and author of The Master Algorithm talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the present and future of machine learning. Domingos stresses the iterative and ever-improving nature of machine learning. He is fundamentally an optimist about the potential of machine learning with ever-larger amounts of data to transform the human experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mao’s Great Leap 36 mins – “When scuffles broke out at a Donald Trump rally in March, it made national headlines. Imagine what it would be like to see political factions of tens of thousands battling each other in cities across the country, inflicting serious injuries and death. That’s what happened in the late 1960s in China when Mao Zedong, the leader of the Communist Party, urged students and later workers to take to the streets to denounce and root out those who had strayed from the Socialist path. The movement, known as the Cultural Revolution, lasted for years and led to escalating violence, but it was little understood at the time since China was largely closed to Western observers. Our guest, historian Frank Dikotter, has plumbed newly-opened Chinese archives to get a deeper understanding of the Cultural Revolution – the motives of its leaders, the scale of the violence and its lasting effects on the country. Dikotter argues in his new book that the turmoil destroyed the credibility of the Communist Party and laid the basis for economic reforms that transformed the country. Dikotter is chair of humanities at the University of Hong Kong. One of his 10 books on China won the BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. FRESH AIR contributor Dave Davies spoke to him about his new book, “The Cultural Revolution: A People’s History.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Medical Errors 44 mins – “More than 250,000 Americans a year die from medical errors, including misdiagnoses, communications breakdowns, medication mistakes and botched surgeries. That’s according to a new study by a Johns Hopkins University surgeon and researcher who says that if medical errors were a disease, it would be the third leading cause of death in America. We discuss the scope of the problem and what can be done to improve patient safety.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Menstruation 11 mins – “It’s true: talking about menstruation makes many people uncomfortable. And that taboo has consequences: in India, three out of every 10 girls don’t even know what menstruation is at the time of their first period, and restrictive customs related to periods inflict psychological damage on young girls. Growing up with this taboo herself, Aditi Gupta knew she wanted to help girls, parents and teachers talk about periods comfortably and without shame. She shares how she did it.” At the link click “Downloads,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico City Air Pollution 5 mins – “On a bad day, you cannot see forever in Mexico City. That’s how it has been lately, ever since the city government rang the alarm bells over its air pollution, as it surpassed the recommended ozone limits set by the World Health Organization. It was the first time such alarms went off in more than a decade. …What’s happening? Air quality has generally improved in Mexico’s capital over the last 20 years or so. Back then, locals used to say that living here was like smoking two packs of cigarettes a day. Memories are also fresh from the 1980s, when the air was particularly bad. “We saw birds that suddenly fell down. They fell out of the sky and they were dead,” says Gabriela Alarcón, who researches pollution at the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness, a think-tank in Mexico City. Since then, officials have pushed out big refineries, banned leaded gas, and built more public transportation. It all made a difference, for a while. But now things seem to be backsliding. By this time last year, 75 percent of the days had been considered bad air days. So far this year, it’s more than 80 percent….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Issues 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “International Migration,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1116, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Rise 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “CLIMATE SERIES: When the Oceans Rise,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1518, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ozone Hole History 16 mins – “Jonathan Shanklin was sifting through a backlog of data when he made the startling discovery of a hole in the ozone layer above Antarctica. In this podcast, he and others recall events in the mid-1980s and discuss how the ‘ozone hole’ became the poster child for environmentalism. Originally aired 17/05/2013.” At the link find the title, “REBROADCAST: Nature PastCast – May 1985, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistani Sports Woman 27 mins – “…When our guest was a girl growing up in the tribal area of Pakistan, she dressed like a boy to be able to live with some sense of freedom. To become a weightlifter and enter competitions in Pakistan, she entered as a boy. And instead of using her name – Maria Toorpakai – she used the name Genghis Khan. Her parents support women’s rights and have taken great risks to teach in the tribal areas, in spite of the Taliban bombing their schools. As for Maria, when she became a teenager, she gave up weightlifting for squash and gave up pretending she was a boy. She became the first tribal Pakistani girl to represent the country in international squash tournaments and came in third in the world junior women’s championship. But because the Taliban forbids sports and being a woman athlete is an even greater transgression, she basically went into hiding until she was accepted at a new squash academy in Canada founded by a former world squash champion. She’s now 25 years old and is the only female in international competition ranked in the top 50. She’s written a new memoir called “A Different Kind Of Daughter.” Terry spoke to her last week….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perceptions 30 mins – “Caltech theoretical physicist Sean M. Carroll talks about his new book The Big Picture: On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself. (Dutton, 2016)” At the link find the title, “Sean M. Carroll Looks at The Big Picture, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Peter Marshall 87 mins – “Gilbert and Frank are joined by actor, singer and former “Hollywood Squares” host Peter Marshall, who shares irresistible stories about Redd Foxx, the mob, Glenn Ford, Uncle Miltie’s “apparatus” and Charlie Weaver’s (and Vincent Price’s!) sexual proclivities. Also, Peter croons with Bing, tours with Bob Hope, gets roasted by Orson Welles and runs afoul of John Wayne. PLUS: Al Jolson schmoozes! Phil Silvers does “Who’s on First”! Gilbert ticks off Marlon Brando! Peter and Nanette Fabray hit a nudie bar! And the definitive version of the Paul Lynde/Golddiggers story!” At the link find the title, “#102: Peter Marshall,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/12243/3279488/ece0e824-31d3-4b2e-87fa-7189f714da2b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pinkerton 21 mins – “Allan Pinkerton fell into detective work when he discovered a gang of counterfeiters in Illinois. In 1861, he helped thwart a plot to assassinate Abraham Lincoln, which may have led Lincoln to later tap Pinkerton to organize the first Union espionage.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polygraph 6 mins – “For years, New Hampshire has been unable to recruit enough prison officers. Despite spending thousands of dollars on recruitment and advertising, prisons here operate with 70 fewer officers than they need to meet “critical staffing” levels. While correctional facilities across New England face the same shortage, New Hampshire is the only state in the region that requires candidates to pass a polygraph test: a practice Congress banned among private employers 30 years ago. The New Hampshire Department of Corrections says the test is essential for preventing abuse and coercion behind bars. But recruitment staff say that test also eliminates many applicants who are otherwise qualified.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Power Grid Protection 54 mins – “Ted Koppel’s new book, “Lights Out,” he asserts that a major cyberattack on America’s power grid is not only possible but likely, that it would be devastating, and that the United States is shockingly unprepared. Koppel warns that a well-designed attack on just one of the nation’s three electric power grids could cripple much of our infrastructure, and the federal government, while well prepared for natural disasters, has no plan for the aftermath of an attack on the power grid. On today’s episode of Go Green Radio, we’ll talk with Scott Aaronson, the Managing Director for Cyber and Physical Security for the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), and discuss what the electric power industry is doing to protect the nation’s power grid.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Primary Politics and Kidnapped Students 46 mins – “The alliance between Ted Cruz and John Kasich to stop Trump was over before it began, but it’s just the latest in a long history of political plots. We examine the shadowy history of election scheming, and trace the origins of the notion that the people, not politicians, should get to pick the president. Plus, how the haunting disappearance of 43 students in Mexico may finally prompt a reckoning with institutionalized violence and corruption. Also, disturbing collusion between super PACs and presidential campaigns, and drawing meaning from the deep, dark world of the comments section.” At the link find the title, “In The Shadows, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm042916pod.mp3′ AND SELECT “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy vs Security 61 mins – “Michael Chertoff, executive chairman and cofounder of the Chertoff Group; Adam Segal, director of CFR’s digital and cyberspace policy program; and Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., New York’s district attorney, join L. Gordon Crovitz, partner at NextNews Ventures, to discuss the trade off between privacy and security in the debate over government access to encrypted data, and the implications for business, counterterrorism, and user security. The panelists consider the recent legal case between Apple and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productivity Ideas 64 mins – “In his new book Smarter, Faster, Better: The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business, Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg presents eight key points that illustrate the reasons that some people and some companies are more productive than others. Coupling statistics from neuroscience and psychology coupled with real-world stories from CEOs, FBI agents and airplane pilots, Duhigg explains how the most productive people and organizations view the world and their choices differently and how this ultimately influences their heightened levels of productivity. Join Inforum for a thought-provoking discussion with Duhigg about the science of productivity and learn how you can be more productive and successful in your personal and professional lives.

Protein from Bugs 44 mins – “Some say eating insects could save the planet, as we face the potential for global food and protein shortages. It’s a common practice in many parts of the world, but what would it take to make bugs more appetizing to the masses here in the U.S.? Does it even make sense to try? Many young companies are betting on the potential of crickets; You can now find flour, pasta, cookies, and even cocktail bitters made from them. A panel of experts tackles the arguments for and against eating insects — the practice known as entomophagy — and the cultural and environmental issues involved.” (Three guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy included in the blog archive.

Public–Private Partnerships 65 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Business & Government Can Work Together,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1716, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Issues 62 mins – “Sara Robinson is a Seattle-based futurist and veteran blogger on culture, politics, and religion. She’s a consulting futurist and on the national board of NARAL. Find her recently launched blog — Future Imperfect — at sararobinson.net Culture of Truth is a political satirist, posting his weekly Bobblespeak Translations for those who have missed the Sunday Morning Talk Shows. @bobblespeak Moonshinepatriot.blogspot.com Tonight is Trump Night at VSS.” Sara Robinson and Culture of Truth Virtually Speaking Sundays,, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files sara-robinson-and-culture-of-truth-virtually-speaking-sundays.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roman Water Wheels 4 mins – “Today, we try to make sense of an old Roman power plant. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them. Anyone who’s ever studied the history of technology has seen a drawing of 16 Roman water wheels, two abreast, arranged in stair-steps down a hillside. Historians have isolated that one mill like a sore. The common wisdom says that the Romans, who kept slaves, had no need of water power. This must be a lone oddity….” At the link right-click Click here for…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosalind Franklin 27 mins – “The men who are usually credited with discerning DNA’s structure won the Nobel Prize in 1962, but they used Rosalind Franklin’s research. In 1952, she captured the best DNA image available at the time, and the Nobel winners used it without her knowledge.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scalia 78 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado ConferenceConference on World Affairs titled, “Scalia,” with three panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1565, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Segregation History 42 mins – “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship – Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Sociology, and titled “Foundational Violence: U.S. Settler Colonial Articulation of Racialized and Gendered Citizenship.” Our speaker is Evelyn Nakano Glenn, Graduate School Professor and founding Director of the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley.” At the link right-click “Download this story” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Sex Assaults on Campus 74 minsPanel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,ROUNDTABLE: “Til it Happens to You Ending Sexual Assault on College Campuses,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1119, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sound Research Issues 57 mins – “I’m honored to post Show # 250 (!), March 4, my interview with Sam Brylawski of the Library of Congress’ National Sound Preservation Board, co-author of the ARSC Guide to Audio Preservation. Sam is one of the pioneers of audio sound preservation, and one of its foremost experts, having been the President of the Association of Recorded Sound Collections (ARSC) and editor of the Encyclopedic Discography of Victor Recordings. Sam’s work focusing on preserving our collective sound history is extraordinarily important, as this history is at persistent risk of disappearing through degradation of obsolete sound preservation formats, like wax cylinders and metal plates. In our discussion, we focused on the challenges facing our world’s sound history, from funding to copyright law. I’ve known Sam for over 10 years, and this show was long overdue. I hope that you enjoy the show!” At the link right-click “Download”and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spains Civil War 75 mins – “Adam Hochschild, Author, Spain in Our Hearts -Monday Night Philosophy follows award-winning author Adam Hochschild deep into the three crucial years in the 1930s when the Spanish Civil War dominated headlines in America and around the world. Volunteers rushed to help Spain’s democratically elected government fight off an uprising by right-wing army officers heavily backed by Hitler and Mussolini. Adam Hochschild brings alive a group of men and women who lived through this painful and dramatic period: a few are familiar figures like Hemingway and Orwell; others, until now, have been completely unknown.

Spam Empire 15 mins – “Chances are you’ve received an email with a subject line like this “The hottest method to please your beloved one” or this “Want to get good health for low prices?” Emails offering “low cost med pills!” You’ve probably wondered — who is sending these emails? Does anyone actually click on these links? What happens when they do? On today’s show — we go deep inside the world of spam to answer these questions with the help of cyber-security reporter Brian Krebs and researcher Stefan Savage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

State Powers 79 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs title, “States: Underappreciated Laboratories of Democracy,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1912, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Fixation 77 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled, “Technology is a Fetish,” with four panelists and a moderator. At the link find 1114, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Third Wave 60 mins – “America Online Co-founder Steve Case looks at what’s next for the Internet in his book, [The Third Wave: An Entrepreneur’s Vision of the Future]. Mr. Case is interviewed by Representative John Delaney (D-MD).” At the link find the title, “After Words with Steve Case, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.437190.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tyrannosaurus Rex 41 mins – “Why does the tyrannosaurus continue to fascinate us? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week is David Hone, a palaeontologist at Queen Mary University of London, and the author of The Tyrannosaur Chronicles.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Federal Reserve Dissection 60 mins – “Lawrence R. Jacobs is Walter F. and Joan Mondale Chair for Political Studies at the Humphrey School for Public Affairs, the University of Minnesota, and co-author of both Health Care Reform and American Politics (Oxford) and Class War? (Chicago). The US Federal Reserve is one of the most powerful institutions in the world, unfettered by institutional or political checks. Captive to the finance industry, it has become a source of inequality and financial uncertainty. Professor Jacobs describe how this came to be and how a true central bank could be organized and regulated, as presented in Fed Power: How Finance Wins, a book he co-authored with Desmond King.” At the link find the title, “Fed Power: How Finance Wins, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files fed-power-how-finance-wins.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vampire Power Sources 41 mins – “Since a quarter of residential energy use is consumed by gadgets that are “off”, Kevin and I discuss how to measure and cut back on that power consumption with a few connected devices. We also talk about Apple’s rumored Home app for HomeKit, the launch of OpenThread, the open source version of Nest’s Thread protocol and the new Almond router from Securifi. We also touch on HP Enterprises‘ hop into the internet of things and Hitachi’s new formal IoT group. Then we go to Rich Brown, who is the executive editor of CNET’s smart home and appliance coverage, to discuss how the news site set up a smart house in Louisville, Kentucky, the site’s favorite gadgets and how the Amazon Echo has democratized access to the smart home. The big theme of our conversation was compromise, as in, if you want a smart home you are going to have to make compromises.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Visual Intelligence 51 mins – “How observant are you? What things are you missing out on that could have a huge impact on your life. In this episode we speak with Amy Herman about her new book, Visual Intelligence: Sharpen Your Perception, Change Your Life. In this episode you will learn how to create your own luck by becoming a better observer. You will also learn how to identify your “blind spots” and turn them in to opportunities. This information comes directly from Amy’s groundbreaking “The Art of Perception” course which teaches doctors to observe patients instead of their charts, helps police officers separate facts from opinions when investigating crimes, and trains professional from the FBI, State Department, Fortune 500 companies, and the military to recognize the most pertinent and useful information. If you would like to learn more, visit Amy at ArtfulPerception.com.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Aftermath 21 mins – “The people of Fort McMurray are determined to rebuild and come back. But it’s a daunting challenge. Hard to even think about as the wildfire still burns. The Current hears from others who have rebuilt in Slave Lake, Alta. and Kelowna, B.C.” At the link find the title, “’Be patient’: Advice for rebuilding Fort McMurray from wildfire survivors, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160506_42755.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Aftermath 7 mins – “Several officials toured Fort McMurray neighbourhoods to survey the aftermath of the wildfire first hand. Wood Buffalo Fire Chief Darby Allen said 85 per cent of Fort McMurray is still intact. CBC’s Briar Stewart was on that tour and shares her insight.” At the link find the title, “‘Couldn’t have done any more’: Fire chief gives tour of Fort McMurray fire damage,” right-click “Download ‘Couldn’t have done any more’: Fire chief gives tour of Fort McMurray fire damage,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Car Retrieval 11 minsHuman kindness is overflowing in Fort McMurray with people helping those in need any way they can. Eldon Hankins from Edmonton is trying to do his part, putting long hours on the road to reunite people with their cars.” At the link find the title, “Driven to help: Eldon Hankins reunites Fort McMurray’s abandoned cars with owners,” right-click “Download Driven to help: Eldon Hankins reunites Fort McMurray’s abandoned cars with owners,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Evacuation 46 mins – “After another challenging day for firefighters and other first responders, evacuees face another overwhelming day to escape the ravenous flames. But questions arise over the pace of evacuation and the paucity of routes available to get out of the city.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray evacuee says people felt like ‘sitting ducks’ as fire approached, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160505_99858.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Fighting 34 mins – “Within a day of orders that all residents had to leave Fort McMurray, three firefighters from St. Albert near Edmonton, joined hundreds of others to help extinguish a city on fire. They share their experience with The Current.” At the link find the title, “‘A lifetime of firefighting in an hour:’ Firefighters recall tackling Fort McMurray fire,”right-click “Download ‘A lifetime of firefighting in an hour:’ Firefighters recall tackling Fort McMurray fire” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Fire Fighting 21 mins – “Firefighters are always needed in Alberta. It’s estimated there are 40 fires across the province right now. As veteran firefighters, to new recruits, to water bomber crews continue to fight the Fort McMurray fire, we look at the toll this fire has taken.” At the link find the title, “‘Fire shooting sparks and debris’: Meet frontline firefighters in Fort McMurray,” right-click “Download ‘Fire shooting sparks and debris’: Meet frontline firefighters in Fort McMurray,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Hospital Evacuation 10 mins – “David Matear oversaw the medevac of Fort McMurray’s hospital – from newborns, to critical care, to long-term care patients – in one-and-a-half-hours. Hospital staff moved more than 100 patients to safety, with the raging fire in view of the ER doors.” At the link find the title, “Fort Mac hospital evacuation was ‘calm’ as flames raged close,” right-click “Download Fort Mac hospital evacuation was ‘calm’ as flames raged close,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Reconstruction 22 mins – “In the wake of devastation, it’s only human to vow to rebuild. But how to rebuild once the flames in Fort McMurray are gone is a complicated question. The Current ask what can be learned from other cities that rebuild after disaster strikes.” At the link find the title, ‘Don’t give up’: Lessons for Fort McMurray’s long road ahead to rebuilding,” right-click “Download ‘Don’t give up’: Lessons for Fort McMurray’s long road ahead to rebuilding,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Sandwiches 10 mins – “For some, amidst the damage and desolation of the Fort McMurray wildfire was a chance to step up and help others. Meet “Belt Drive Betty” and how her sandwiches and sensitivity saved the day for famished firefighters on the frontlines.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray sandwiches: ‘Belt Drive Betty’ feeds over 2,000 first responders” right-click Download Fort McMurray sandwiches: ‘Belt Drive Betty’ feeds over 2,000 first responders” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire School Evacuation 23 mins – “Principal Lisa Hilsenteger made a quick decision that saved the lives of fifteen stranded students at her Fort McMurray school. As the school bus headed towards a closed road, she made a decision to head back into the belly of the beast to get out.” At the link find the title, “Fort McMurray school principal-turn-hero evacuates 15 stranded students to safety,” right-click “Download Fort McMurray school principal-turn-hero evacuates 15 stranded students to safety” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Toxic Effects 11 mins – “Not much is known about the effects of sustained exposure to ash and debris on frontline firefighters. But what is known is there are health risks. The Current speaks to a researcher concerned for Fort McMurray residents returning to burnt homes.” At the link find the title, “Fire safety researcher concerned of toxicity risks in Fort McMurray,” right-click “Download Fire safety researcher concerned of toxicity risks in Fort McMurray” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wireless Sensors 8 mins – “As a former biology teacher and now product manager at PASCO Scientific, Mike Blasberg has witnessed a transformation in how students collect data in the science classroom. Mike joins us to talk about the evolution of sensors, how we can use a smartphone to collect and analyze data, and discusses the capabilities and features of the new wireless sensors available from PASCO scientific.” At the link right-click “download” on top of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women and Housework 15 mins – “Melinda Gates stayed mostly silent for years as her husband, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, became the richest man in the world. Now, as co-founder of the foundation, Ms. Gates is a woman of influence empowering women and girls in the developing world.” At the link find the title, “Melinda Gates on the ‘ingenuity’ of women in the developing world,” right-click “Download Melinda Gates on the ‘ingenuity’ of women in the developing world,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wrongful Convictions 49 mins – Panel discussion at the University of Colorado Conference on World Affairs titled,Justice: Shining a Light on Wrongful Convictions,” with four panelists. At the link find 1115, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika in Rio 23 mins – “The Zika virus is a serious cause for concern in Rio weeks before the Summer Games kick off. So serious, it has many wondering if Olympic glory is worth the risk, calling to cancel or move the Games — for the sake of athletes and to prevent Zika`s spread.” At the link find the title, “Zika concerns prompt call to cancel Rio Olympic Games,” right-click “Download Zika concerns prompt call to cancel Rio Olympic Games,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Mosquito Control 57 mins – “Zika virus, a pathogen transmitted by mosquitoes, has seemingly established itself in South America and the Caribbean and is now threatening the U.S. Cases have been reported in Florida, Illinois, Texas and Hawaii in patients having traveled to Central and South America, where they acquired the virus through mosquito bites. Our guest today, Joseph Conlon, technical advisor for the American Mosquito Control Association, will discuss how the virus could spread and what we can do to minimize our risks. We’ll also discuss what effect, if any, climate change has on mosquito-borne illnesses.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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