Media Mining Digest 244 – Jul 15, 2016: Anger in America, Astrophysics, Auto Recalls, Bengazi Attack Report, Bernie Sanders Programs, Biological Engineer, Biology and Innovation, Biomedical Engineering, Black American Concerns, Black Lives Matter, Bone Cancer Specialist, Bone fractures, Boomer Retirements, Brain Aging and Circulation, Brexit, British Comedy, Campaign Finances, Cell Biology Researcher, China Water Concerns, Chinese Solar King, Clean Energy Geek Squad, Commons Overview, Community Power, Computational Innovator, Corruption in South Africa, Coyotes America, Crazy Artist, Creativity, Crisis Communications, Crystallography, Data Breach Reports, Decision Making, Discrimination Laws, Disease Research, Dust Bowl Recollections, Entomologist, Environment Researcher, Environmental Engineering, Eton Scholarships, Explosives Researcher, Fasting, Feminist Professor, Food Allergies, Food Waste Fix, Frames of Reference, Government IT Upgrades, Greenpeace Willcox Interview, Grunt Book, Gun Violence Control, Hamilton Play, Hearing Researcher, Hip Replacement, Informationist, Innovate Long and Short, Islam Overview, Ketogenic Diet, Land Fill Mining, Learning Researcher, Market Forces, Mass Spectrometry Expert, Medical Crusaders, Medical Simulation, Memory Researcher, Migrant Student Education, Multitasking Researcher, Music and Race, Neurologist with Dyslexia, Neuroscientist, North Korea Documentary, Open Data, Pain Control, Physical Therapy Researcher, Planetary Systems, Plant Evolution Researcher, Prebiotics Researcher, Referendums, Ribosome, Rust Belt Boy, Social Psychologist, Somalia Recovery, South Africa LGBTI, Speech Researcher, Startup Failures, Sustainability, Terrorist Identification, Thiomersal, Tissue Engineering, Toilet Upgrades, Treatment Options, Turkish Airport Attack, Ultrasound Researcher, Unpleasant Designs, Video Tracking, Vincent Racaniello Virologist

The best 100 podcasts from a larger group of 268 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all of them as a zip file here for the next four months.  A collection of over 9000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so twelve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be downloaded.

Africa Solar Lights 30 mins – “Micro-solar lamps are now lighting parts of Africa that the grid cannot reach. Tom Heap investigates how the solar spread is emulating the wide reach of mobile phones in Africa. There are currently over 100 million kerosene lamps across Africa that are the main source of light in parts of the continent that are either off-grid or where people cannot afford to hook-up to the electricity grid. These lights are polluting, dangerous and expensive. Burning a kerosene light in a small room produces the same detrimental effect as smoking two packets of cigarettes. They are a fire hazard and they can cost as much as 15% of an average salary to fuel in some parts of the continent. Tom heap sets out to discover if a small desktop solar lamp that costs a fraction of the running expenses of a kerosene lamp can improve the health of millions of people and help to lift Africa out of poverty. This week’s programme is produced in conjunction with BBC Newsnight and BBC World’s ‘Our World’ programme. To watch the films made to accompany the programme visit the Newsnight and Our World websites.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Immigrant Stories 72 mins – “This fall, Beyond the Book marks its tenth year as podcast series. On the occasion of the Independence Day holiday in the United States, we reach into the BTB archives for a 2006 Miami Book Fair panel discussion, “Family Secrets, Family Truths: American Immigrant Stories.” Speaking with CCC’s Chris Kenneally ten years ago were Michael Patrick MacDonald, author of All Souls and Easter Rising: An Irish American Coming Up from Under; Maria Elena Salinas, Univision TV news anchor and author of the memoir, I Am My Father’s Daughter: Living A Life Without Secrets; and Sasha Su-Ling Welland, author of the memoir, A Thousand Miles of Dreams.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anger in America 46 mins – “How To Strike A Balance Between ‘Anger and Forgiveness’4 -Philosopher Martha Nussbaum with a deep meditation on anger and forgiveness. She join us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astrophysics 54 mins – “Today we present a discussion from The World Science Festival in Brisbane held in March 2016 which saw four of the world’s top astrophysicists come together to chew over some big questions… and possible answers regarding the universe, its origin, where it’s going, and its possible future. Gravity waves, cosmic microwave radiation, dark matter and dark energy flow freely in this entertaining discussion.” At the link right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Auto Recalls 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bengazi Attack Report 46 min – “The long-awaited House Benghazi Report finds no new evidence of wrongdoing by Hillary Clinton. We’ll read the fine print and look at the big picture.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bernie Sanders Programs 60 mins -”In an exclusive interview with C-SPAN, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks about the presidential campaign and his plans to take his progressive message to the convention in Philadelphia and beyond November.” At the link find the title, “Bernie Sanders Discusses the Presidential Campaign, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446561.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Engineer 35 mins – “Dr. Celeste Nelson is an Associate Professor in Chemical and Biological Engineering, as well as Molecular Biology at Princeton University. She is also a Member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Breast Cancer Research and Cancer Metabolism and Growth Programs. Celeste received her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and conducted postdoctoral research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory before joining the faculty at Princeton. Celeste is the recipient of many awards and honors during her career. She has received the Princeton School of Engineering and Applied Science Distinguished Teacher Award, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, the Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Technology Review TR35 Young Innovator Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in Molecular Biology. She is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “322: Creating 3D Structures in Culture to Study Tissues and Organ Development – Dr. Celeste Nelson,” right-click “Media files 322_Celeste Nelson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology and Innovation 61 mins – “Dr. Richard Jefferson is the Chief Executive Officer of an independent, non-profit institute called Cambia. He is also Professor of Science, Technology & Law at Queensland University of Technology and Director of an open, public innovation resource called The Lens. In addition, Richard is a founder of the biological open-source initiative called Biological Innovation for Open Society. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Genetics from the College of Creative Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara and went on to complete his PhD in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Richard completed postdoctoral research at the Plant Breeding Institute in Cambridge and then worked as a Molecular Biologist for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations before founding Cambia. Richard has received many awards and honors during his career, and just to name a few, he was named an Outstanding Social Entrepreneur by the Schwab Foundation, he was among Scientific American’s List of the World’s 50 Most Influential Technologists and World Research Leader for Economic Development in 2003, he received the American Society of Plant Biologists (ASPB) Leadership in Science Public Service Award, and Medalist of the Center for Science and Policy Outcomes. Richard is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “259: Developing The Lens for Transparency in Innovation – Dr. Richard Jefferson,” right-click “Media files 259_Richard_Jefferson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biomedical Engineering 28 mins – “European Inventor of the Year, Chris Toumazou, reveals how his personal life and early research lie at the heart of his inventions. As Chief Scientist at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at Imperial College London, Chris inspires engineers, doctors and other scientists to create medical devices for the 21st century. Applying silicon chip technology, more commonly found inside mobile phones, he tackles seemingly insurmountable problems in medicine to create devices that bridge the electronic and biological worlds – from a digital plaster that monitors a patient’s vital signs to an artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. His latest creation, coined a ‘lab on a chip’, analyses a person’s DNA within minutes outside the laboratory. The hand-held device can identify genetic differences which dictate a person’s susceptibility to hereditary diseases and how they will react to a drug like warfarin, used to treat blood clots.” At the link find the title, “Chris Toumazou, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qg67b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black American Concerns 37 mins – “On Monday, June 27, I paid a visit to New York Public Library’s Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture to help a large gathering of the Schomburg’s devoted friends and visitors say goodbye — very reluctantly — to Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad. He’s been the beloved director of the Schomburg for the past five years and has done much to expand the reach and the influence of the Harlem institution that devotes itself to researching and disseminating the history of African-Americans. But Muhammad is also a scholar and he is now eager to evaluate everything he has gleaned about the contemporary concerns of black America from a new vantage point. He’s on his way to join Harvard University’s faculty as a professor of history, race and public policy at the Kennedy School of Government. This young historian is uniquely well suited to ponder the contradictions of the past, the present and the future. Muhammad grew up on Chicago’s Southside, he’s the great grandson of Elijah Muhammad, who led the Nation of Islam for decades and he’s the son of a Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist and an educator. I first interviewed Muhammad in 2012 about the founding paradox of our country, that our constitution promised “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” despite the entrenched institution of slavery. In June, in front of a live audience at the Schomburg, Khalil Gibran Muhammad and I picked up where we left off, discussing how critical it is to know the past in order to challenge our turbulent times, and reshape our future.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 25 mins – “I’m holding in my hand what has been called “one of the most daring books of the 21st century,” a “book for the ages,” “bracing,” “unrelenting.” The title is Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul, and it breathes with prophetic fire. Its power comes because the author does not begin with “pristine principles or with assumptions about our inherent goodness.” Rather, its view of democracy, as he writes, “emerges out of an unflinching encounter with lynching trees, prison cells, foreclosed homes, young men and women gunned down by police and places where ‘hope, unborn, had died.’” Democracy in Black is rich in history and bold in opinion, and inconvenient truths leap from every page. For example, and I’m quoting the book again, “black people must lose their blackness if America is to be transformed. But of course, white people get to stay white.” The book opens in Ferguson, Missouri, with the author talking to three, dynamic young black women, newly born to activism, and it closes in the intimacy of the reader’s heart, where each of us wrestles with the question of whether we can indeed change the habits of racism and create together a new politics based on a revolution in values. The author is Eddie Glaude Jr. Glaude was raised in the Deep South, in Moss Point, Mississippi, and still remembers the Ku Klux Klan burning a cross at the fairground. He’s now a professor of religion and African-American studies at Princeton University, where he also chairs the Center for African-American Studies. This is his third book, and he’s a member in good standing of the black establishment, which he rigorously calls to account in Democracy in Black.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Lives Matter 50 mins – “Mukul Devichand and Mike Wendling travel around the United States, talking to Black Lives Matter activists, the parents of young black men shot by police, civil rights elders like the Rev. Jesse Jackson, and police officials. In an election year that will be crucial to the country’s future, can Black Lives Matter change America?” At the link find the title, “Black Lives Matter: The Story of a Slogan, Jan, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03gzyf1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Cancer 46 mins – “Dr. Wakenda Tyler is an Associate Professor in Orthopaedic Oncology and Metabolic Bone Disease and Adult Reconstruction at the University of Rochester Medical Center. She was awarded her M.D. And M.P.H. from John Hopkins University and completed residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Wakenda then completed a fellowship in musculoskeletal oncology at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center before joining the faculty at the University of Rochester where she is today. Wakenda is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “290: Treating Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors – Dr. Wakenda Tyler,” right-click “Media files 290_Wakenda_Tyler.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bone Fractures 88 mins – “The treatment of bone fractures has changed a great deal from the days of plaster casts. See what tools are available to doctors now to help bones mend. Recorded on 05/17/2016. (#30988)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boomer Retirements 64mins – “…This episode focuses on dealing with the loss of crucial information as seasoned engineers retire. Many baby boomers have not saved enough for retirement, and so are deciding to work longer. Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce published a 2011 study on STEM careers, noting that 10 years after graduation, 46 percent of STEM graduates have left the field. While the clamor for more engineering graduates continues, a number of authorities claim there is no engineering labor shortage. A 2013 article from National Defense Magazine explained that the “engineering shortage” is not a myth, although the engineers who commented on the article seemed to feel otherwise. The concern over retiring baby boomers dates back a while, with a July 2000 article (pdf) from Monthly Labor Review discussing the substantial effects to be felt by U.S. employers. Jeff references a white paper (pdf) from The Integrity Group that discusses the effect of Baby Boomer retirement on the energy industry. Harvard Business Review published a 2014 article examining the costs associated with retiring experts. A Bloomberg article from earlier this year discussed steps taken by defense and aerospace company BAE to prepare for upcoming retirements within their engineering ranks. Paying workers more money can overcome their reluctance to assume jobs they would not otherwise consider, suggests a Twin Cities Pioneer Press article. Jeff notes that many Baby Boomers are in no hurry to leave the job market. Many companies cope with the loss of retiring engineers by hiring them back on a part-time or flex-time basis. An infographic (pdf) from Kelly Services forecasts engineering job growth through 2023. Interested listeners can look up forecasts for engineering employment offered by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Aging and Circulation 45 mins – “Dr. Jeff Iliff is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University, as well as an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Jeff received his PhD in Physiology and Pharmacology from Oregon Health and Science University. Afterward, he conducted postdoctoral research, and later served on faculty, at the University of Rochester Medical Center before returning to OHSU where he is today. Jeff is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “268: Clearing Out Brain Clutter: A Glimpse into the Glymphatic System – Dr. Jeff Iliff,” right-click “Media files 268_Jeff_Iliff_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 76 mins – “The UK has made the momentous decision to leave the EU. Intelligence Squared staged an emergency event to discuss the ramifications. A panel including Douglas Carswell, Jonathan Freedland, Josef Janning, Liz Kendall, Anand Menon and Adair Turner will examined: Who will be the next prime minister to steer us through the rocky negotiations with the EU that lie ahead? What kind of deal can we expect to get? Will the EU play tough with us in order to stop anti-EU contagion spreading to other member states? Or will Brexit be the wake-up call Europe needs to achieve real reform? Will the Brexit camp be able to deliver on its promises – on immigration, NHS spending etc? If not, will there be a backlash from the voters? Will we lose Scotland? Will George Osborne’s dire warnings about the economy be borne out? Is the second referendum which some Remainers are petitioning for a real possibility?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 48 mins – “Global financial markets show some signs of steadying this morning following Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. The vote last Thursday sparked a global market drop of $3 trillion. Yesterday U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew offered assurances that although the U.K. and the EU is in uncharted waters economically and politically, the U.S. is not facing a related financial crisis of its own. Still, it’s clear that Britain’s likely more distant relationship with European Union countries leaves the U.S. more removed as well – as least temporarily….” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Meaning 50 mins – “This show has a “chickens coming home to roost” feel to it, but maybe in a positive way. It was supposed to be about the recent British vote to leave the EU, but evolved into something larger. Surprise, surprise.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

British Comedy 30 mins – “The Frequency of Laughter is a six-part history of radio comedy, covering 1975-2005, presented by journalist and radio fan Grace Dent. In each episode she brings together two figures who were making significant radio comedy at the same time, and asks them about their experiences. This is a conversational history that focuses on the people who were there and the atmosphere within the BBC and the wider comedy world that allowed them to make great radio – or not. This final edition features Justin Edwards and Jan Ravens looking at radio comedy in the early 2000s. Justin is now known for his work on In And Out Of The Kitchen and Radio 4 Extra’s Newsjack, but got his first series in 2003 as part of the sketch team The Consultants. Jan’s association with radio comedy dates back to the early 1980s when she became the first-ever female radio comedy producer, but became beloved of the Radio 4 audience for her work on Dead Ringers, which started in 2000. Grace asks them about the atmosphere within the Radio Comedy department and within the BBC; they discuss the difference between topical comedy and satire, and whether the Radio 4 audience necessarily wants either; and they discuss the contribution a good sound engineer can make to a programme.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign Finances 27 mins – “The road to the White House requires stamina and plenty of money. Economist and US Citizen, Linda Yueh, makes a hypothetical run for Congress in the 5th district of Virgina, to find out why it costs so much money to run for office and the increasing importance of the internet in a campaign. On the way she gathers a campaign team, meets her voters and learns about the importance of pizza in politics.” At the link find the title, “Linda For Congress, Feb, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03hc9n2.mp3”and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cell Biology Researcher 46 mins – “Dr. Patrick Lusk is an Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University. He received his B.S. and Ph.D. in Cell Biology from the University of Alberta and went on to conduct postdoctoral research at The Rockefeller University before accepting his current position at Yale. Patrick is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, ”312: Having Fun Studying the Fundamental Mechanisms of Nuclear Transport in Cells – Dr. Patrick Lusk,” right-click “Media files 312_Patrick Lusk_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Water Concerns 30 mins – “China has powered its development with water. When it needed energy for industry it built the largest hydro-electric dams in the world. When the farmland and factories of northern China were threatened with drought an enormous canal was built to pipe supplies from the south. China has the engineering skill, the capital and the will to challenge the limits that nature sets on development. But the exploitation of China’s water resources has come at a great cost, forcing millions from their homes, polluting natural lakes and rivers and pushing rare animal species to the brink of extinction. Isabel Hilton, editor of the China Dialogue website, assesses the progress of China’s water revolution and asks where its water will come from in the future. Can large-scale engineering continue to provide the answers or must government teach industry and the public to live within their means?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Solar King 27 mins – “Meet Huang Ming, the Chinese inventor who describes himself as, ‘the number one crazy solar guy in the world’. One of the prize exhibits of his museum in northern China is a vintage solar panel. It’s a water heater, installed by President Jimmy Carter on the roof of the West Wing of the White House. Back in 1979 the installation was meant to symbolise a new solar-powered future for America. Instead, oil prices fell and Ronald Reagan removed the White House panels. 37 years on and it’s China, not the US that’s embracing the idea of a solar-powered economy. Huang Ming, an engineer, prominent political figure and businessman is leading the way with his foundation of Solar Valley. In 800 acres of land south of Beijing he employs 3000 people in solar research, development and manufacture. Peter Hadfield visits Solar Valley to see the fruits of the sun, from a solar-powered yurt to the world’s biggest solar-powered building. He asks if Huang Ming can persuade his nation to turn its back on coal and oil and angle its face toward the sun. Producer: Alasdair Cross.” At the link find the title, “The Sun King of China, May 2016,” right-click “Media files p03t1tkw.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clean Energy Geek Squad 31 mins – “When you have a computer problem, you call tech support. When you have a ghost problem you call Ghostbusters. But who do you call when you have a clean energy problem? In this episode of Direct Current – An Energy.gov Podcast, Matt calls up the Clean Energy Solutions Center, a “help desk” that provides free expert advice on clean energy policy to governments all over the world. Allison talks to Nicky Phear, a professor who cycles hundreds of miles across Montana to teach her students about climate change. Nicky just received a big award at the C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium for her education work, and she’s basically an all-around awesome person. And Dan tries to convince Paul that there is a better way to measure energy — starting with the humble burrito.” At the link right-click “Download file” andselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commons Overview 28 mins – “Tim Harford presents the last in the series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’. Tim explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. He compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link find the title, “Common Tragedy, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r7nqx.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Community Power 30 mins – “There’s no doubt that ‘People Power’ can transform a community, when keen volunteers come together to collectively improve their lot. But what happens when People Power can be measured in watts and volts? Communities up and down the country are taking the power back – literally – from the Big 6, and starting a variety of schemes to generate their own energy. They’re reducing their bills, strengthening community spirit – and helping the UK towards its renewable energy targets at the same time. And in January of this year, the government got fully on board with the movement too, publishing the first ever UK Community Energy Strategy. But just how easy is it to do? Can philanthropic locals really compete with the might of the UK Energy industry? And how does the money stack up? Tom Heap investigates.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computational Innovator 54 mins – “Dr. Stephen Wolfram is the Founder and CEO of Wolfram Research. In addition, he is the creator of the Wolfram Language, the computational platform Mathematica, and the computational knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha, as well as the author of the bestselling book A New Kind of Science. Stephen attended Oxford University and he received his PhD in Theoretical Physics from the California Institute of Technology. Afterward, he joined the faculty at Caltech and became the youngest recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship. Later, he founded the Center for Complex Systems Research and joined the faculty at the University of Illinois. Shortly afterwards, he founded his current company Wolfram Research and has made substantial advances in mathematics, physics, and computation. Stephen is here with us today to tell us all about his experiences along the way in life and science.” At the link find the title, “283: Strategic Scientist Creating Computation Automation and Innovation – Dr. Stephen Wolfram,” right-click “Media files 283_Stephen_Wolfram_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in South Africa 27 mins – “South Africa’s President Zuma is in deep trouble. Accusations of corruption and unexplained ministerial appointments have fuelled widespread suspicions that the South African state has been “captured”. At the heart of this accusation are the Gupta brothers – a secretive family of Indian-born entrepreneurs. From modest beginnings in the 1990s, the Guptas’ South African business empire grew dramatically. Boosted, it is said, by their alleged influence over state contracts, political appointments and President Zuma himself. In this edition of Assignment, Michael Robinson tells the story of “Guptagate” – how one of the fiercest political storms since the ending of apartheid has swept South Africa and its increasingly embattled President.” At the link find the title, “Capturing South Africa, May, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03w82hm.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes America 53 mins – “Wednesday we’re talking about a homegrown American success: coyotes. The country has been at war with the iconic species since white settlers first reached the heartland plains. But coyotes, according to biologist Dan Flores, not only survived our assault on them, they simultaneously expanded their range across the continent and into our cities. Flores joins us Wednesday to explore the coyote’s fascinating story of resilience and adaptability and how it parallels our own version of Manifest Destiny. Dan Flores is the A.B. Hammond Professor Emeritus of Western History at the University of Montana and the author of ten books on aspects of Western US history. His new book is called Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Artist 13 mins – “These days you can find William Kitt in a small, bright solarium on the corner of 150th Street and Edgecombe Avenue in Manhattan, where he lives. Most hours on any day he sits here, sketching over a desk cluttered with colored pencils and pastels. What you could not know from looking at Kitt, a slender, laughing man who wears a beret and surrounds himself with drawings, is that he spent decades living on the streets. Kitt says he spent 34 years of his life being homeless and maddened by drug-induced hallucinations. Now he lives in an apartment owned by a housing nonprofit called Broadway Housing Communities, which was founded in 1983 and owns seven buildings housing over 600 tenants. Like most supportive housing projects, Broadway Housing Communities provides apartments and medical, psychiatric or other services to people who, like William Kitt, have physical or mental health problems or are low income. Kitt, now 65, has leased a room from this Broadway Housing property on Edgecombe Avenue for the past 13 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity 28 mins – “A talk for the online lecture series TED in 2006 launched Sir Ken Robinson’s ideas to a global audience. He spoke about creativity in schools for 20 minutes, and the video has been watched more than any other TED Talk, with 27 million views so far. In conversation with Sarah Montague, he argues that modern teaching is a product of industrialisation, putting children through a factory model that prepares them for working life. But if we truly value innovation and creativity, why isn’t it taught? For the programme, Sir Ken returns to the former Margaret Beavan Special School in Liverpool, where he spent his primary school years in the 1950s, after contracting polio at four years old. He’s since advised governments and businesses around the world on how to harness creativity, and believes if schools were radically different, giving creative subjects equal status, children would find their true talents.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Communications 14 mins – “On October 22, 2014 shots rang out downtown Ottawa, killing Corporal Nathan Cirillo as he stood guard at the National War Memorial. This unthinkable act devastated and sparked fear in citizens’ minds, causing a frenzy of conversations and rumours. Where did the assailant flee and where was he headed? Was there also an active shooter at the Rideau Centre? As these very questions and numerous other claims flooded the Internet, Ottawa Police Service (OPS) had already undertaken a number of crisis communications measures, with public safety as its number one priority. Anat Cohn, corporate communications specialist at Ottawa Police Service, recently sat down with our producer Ashlea McGrath at MARCOM Professional Development Annual Forum to discuss her experience in crisis communications on that tragic day in 2014, and the vital role social media played in helping OPS communicate with the public at such a crucial moment.” At the link right-click “Direct download: MarComm_ep.mp3 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crystallography 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to Professor Elspeth Garman about a technique that’s led to 28 Nobel Prizes in the last century. X- ray crystallography, now celebrating its 100th anniversary, is used to study the internal structure of matter. It may sound rather arcane but it’s the reason we now know the structure of hugely important molecules, like penicillin, insulin and DNA. But while other scientists scoop up prizes for cracking chemical structures, Elspeth works away behind the scenes, (more cameraman than Hollywood star), improving the methods and techniques used by everybody working in the field. If only it was as simple as putting a crystal in the machine and printing off the results. Growing a single crystal of an enzyme that gives TB its longevity took Elspeth’s team no less than fifteen years. No pressure there then when harvesting that precious commodity.” At the link find the title, “Elspeth Garman, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qhl4d.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 23 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Decision Making 59 mins – “Dr. Simon DeDeo is external faculty at the Santa Fe Institute and Assistant Professor at Indiana University in Complex Systems and in Cognitive Science. He completed his undergraduate studies in Astrophysics at Harvard University and received a Master’s Degree in Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics from Cambridge University. Simon went on to receive his PhD in Astrophysical Sciences from Princeton University and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Tokyo, the University of Chicago as a Kavli Fellow, and also at the Santa Fe Institute as an Omidyar Fellow. Simon is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “307: The Science Behind the Formation and Future of Human Societies – Dr. Simon DeDeo,” right-click “Media files 307_Simon_DeDeo_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Discrimination Laws 66 mins – “Last week, the court decided one of this term’s blockbuster cases — a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated.On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — He takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBT rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disease Research 28 mins – “In October 2013, Jeremy Farrar was appointed Director of the Wellcome Trust – UK’s largest medical research funding charity. The Trust funded £750 million’s worth of health-related research – about the same as the government’s Medical Research Council. This means Jeremy Farrar is a major figure in British science. Since 1996, the doctor and clinical scientist had run the Wellcome-funded Oxford University Clinical Research Unit in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam – a British-Vietnamese collaboration specialising in infectious diseases such as malaria, HIV, TB and avian flu. He lost close friends and colleagues when the SARS pandemic took off in East Asia in 2003, and dealt with the first cases of the dangerous H5N1 bird flu when it arrived in Vietnam the following here. In conversation with Jim Al-Khalili, Dr Farrar talks about the personal and professional impact of those experiences and of his feelings of impotence as a doctor treating HIV/AIDS patients as a junior doctor in London in 1980s. With his international perspective and his hands-on experience of the deadly potential of infectious diseases, he talks to Jim about the great health challenges faced by the world in the coming decades.” At the link find the title, “Jeremy Farrar, Jul, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qjl4g.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dust Bowl Recollections 27 mins – “A fierce drought in Oklahoma’s ‘No Man’s Land’ – a region that was the heart of the 1930s Dust Bowl – stirs up dust storms, memories and myths. In this parched terrain of ghost towns and abandoned ranches, the wells are running dr” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. , but the stories continue to flow.” At the link find the title, “Dust Bowl Ballads, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040f864.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entomologist 42 mins – “Dr. Erin Hodgson is an Associate Professor and Extension Entomologist at Iowa State University. She received her undergraduate training in Biology and Botany and her M.S. in Entomology from North Dakota State University. Erin was awarded her Ph.D. in Entomology from the University of Minnesota, followed by a postdoctoral research position also at the University of Minnesota. Erin served on the faculty at Utah State University before joining the faculty at Iowa State where she is today. Erin has received many awards and honors in her career, including the Editor’s Choice Award from the Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, the Iowa State University Outreach and Extension New Professional Award, and multiple awards from the Entomological Society of America for her educational and outreach efforts. In addition, Erin is co-host of the “Soybean Pest Podcast” with her colleague Matt O’Neal. Erin is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “333: Investigating Insidious Insects in the Field of Agricultural Pest Management – Dr. Erin Hodgson,” right-click “Media files 333_Erin_Hodgson_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environment Researcher 36 mins – “Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University. Ben received his undergraduate training in Biology at Harvard University and went on to receive his M.S. in Crop and Soil Sciences from Cornell University and his Ph.D. in Geology and Geophysics from Yale University. Afterward, Ben conducted postdoctoral research as a Research Associate with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Hydrological Sciences Branch and the University of Maryland. He served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Diplomacy fellow in the U.S. Department of State Office of Global Change before joining the faculty at Johns Hopkins. Ben has received the Meritorious Service and Superior Honor Awards from the U.S. State Department, the Peer Award for outstanding Research Associate from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, and has been named a PopTech Science Fellow. Ben is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “296: Forecasting Climate Variability to Improve How We Cope with Change – Dr. Benjamin Zaitchik,” right-click “Media files 296_Ben_Zaitchik_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Engineering 82 mins – “…Environmental engineers plan, design and manage projects associated with environmental protection or remediation. Our guest for this episode is Bronwyn Bell, an environmental engineer from Western Australia with extensive experience in the Mining & Resources economic sector. An unfortunate early experience with Super Glue, while building a popsicle stick bridge, convinced Brownyn that she’d rather not be a civil engineer. Subsectors within the environmental engineering field include wastewater treatment, air pollution control, waste disposal, recyling, and public health management. Bronwyn managed to make spending time at a nearby beer brewery an integral part of her engineering studies. Our guest has worked in coal mines, iron mines, and diamond mines… and has also visited a number of gold mines. Kimberlite is an igneous rock that may contain diamonds. Alluvial diamond mining is usually associated with smaller-scale mining operations. Browyn has done a lot of work in the Pilbara region of Australia, which contains some of the Earth’s oldest rock formations. Tailings are the materials that remain after ore is processed to remove its more valuable components… Bronwyn notes that a good environmental solution is often a good financial solution, as waste reduction aids both. One of our guest’s projects received financial relief due to the presence of Asian green mussels.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from pop-up menu.

Eton Scholarships 27 mins – “Each year some of the poorest pupils in the country enter the hallowed corridors of Eton on full scholarships. Penny Marshall meets some of those applying for places and follows them and those they inspire as they prepare for exams that could change the course of their lives. Andrew Isama reflects on the move from one of Liverpool’s toughest comprehensives to the cobbled square, 15th century chapel and Olympic rowing lake at Eton. He says that preconceptions about the school get turned on their head when scholarship pupils like him arrive: far from being with boys who eat pate and listen to classical music he was surprised to find out just how normal his fellow pupils were: “People had the same interests as me.” The Headmaster at Eton, Simon Henderson, wants more bursaries for boys from disadvantaged backgrounds, so that anyone with the necessary talent can be financially supported at the £35,000-a-year school. Penny joins him and some of the pupils to find out what they hope to gain from the experience. The transition can be a difficult one and some struggle with the move to an institution which has educated 19 British prime ministers, including the present incumbent. But Andrew Isama believes that the influx of scholarship pupils like him also helps those who have come from privileged backgrounds – “A lot of them have never been exposed to anything else. They want to be successful but to do that they have to know how to get on with a range of people.” At the link find the title, “An Eton Experience, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ly7ym.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Explosives Researcher 28 mins – “Jackie Akhavan, Professor of Explosive Chemistry, tells Jim al-Khalili all about the science of explosives. She explains exactly what explosives are and how to make them safer to handle. She started by working on how to make fireworks safer and has been involved in research with bees to see whether they can be used smell different types of explosives. Her current project involves testing the rocket fuel that will be used in Bloodhound, the British designed and built supersonic car that aims to reach a speed of 1,000mph. Her work involves finding out how to best detect explosives in airports and elsewhere, teaching security professionals how to differentiate between false alarms and the real thing. She also works on explosives used in warfare and discusses the ethical issues involved.” At the link find the title, “Jackie Akhavan, Sep, 2014,” right-click “Media files p02qft7t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fasting 35 mins – “Here are some things that the legendary bodybuilder Bernarr Macfadden believed in: Fasting to cure cancer. Fasting to cure asthma. Fasting to cure – here’s an interesting one – emaciation. “I mean, there’s the old idea of starve a fever, feed a cold,” said Mark Adams, who wrote a book about Macfadden called Mr. America. “For Macfadden it was starve a fever, starve a cold, starve a sore throat, starve cancer, starve kleptomania.” The alternative medicine enthusiast shook up the health scene in the early 1900s with his magazine, “Physical Culture.” He focused on exercise and cleanses and fasting, sometimes up to seven days, and brushed off modern medicine as “murderous science”.Macfadden’s ideas had a brief moment of popularity in the 20s and 30s but lost luster around World War II. Around the time penicillin started saving lives, alternative medicine – especially a starvation diet – didn’t seem as appealing a cure. Almost a century later, updated and repackaged as the “ketogenic diet”, one of Macfadden’s starvation cures is making waves again. “We know it works,” said Eric Kossoff, a pediatric neurologist at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center in Baltimore.“There are lots of different theories about how it works.” The ketogenic diet is not the same as fasting – instead it’s an extremely high-fat, low-carbohydrate regimen that essentially tricks the body into thinking it’s starving. And the diet has made inroads into the medical community for treating epilepsy in children.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminist Professor 19 mins – “Myra Strober became a feminist on the Bay Bridge, heading toward San Francisco. It is 1970. She has just been told by the chairman of Berkeley’s economics department that she can never get tenure. Driving home afterward, wondering if she got something out of the freezer for her family’s dinner, she realizes the truth: she is being denied a regular faculty position because she is a mother. Flooded with anger, she also finds her life’s work: to study and fight sexism, in the workplace, in academia, and at home. Strober’s generous memoir captures the spirit of a revolution lived fully, from her Brooklyn childhood (and her shock at age twelve when she’s banished to the women’s balcony at shul) to her groundbreaking Stanford seminar on women and work. Strober’s interest in women and work began when she saw her mother’s frustration at the limitations of her position as a secretary. Her consciousness of the unfairness of the usual distribution of household chores came when she unsuccessfully asked her husband for help with housework. Later, when a group of conservative white male professors sputtered at the idea of government-subsidized child care, Strober made the case for its economic benefits. In the 1970s, the term “sexual harassment” had not yet been coined. Occupational segregation, quantifying the value of work in the home, and the cost of discrimination were new ideas. Strober was a pioneer, helping to create a new academic field and founding institutions to establish it. But she wasn’t alone: she benefited from the women’s movement, institutional change, and new federal regulations that banned sex discrimination.” At the link find the title, “MIT Press Podcast- Sharing the Work, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files MITP_Strober.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Allergies 46 mins – “Auto recalls. Volkswagen and Takata airbags are just the biggest in a long list. Recalls are on the rise. Millions affected. We look at why and what’s going.we’re going to look at auto recalls. From airbags, to ignitions, to roll-away Jeep Grand Cherokees, automakers have racked up record recalls in recent years. One hundred million cars and trucks. And many – maybe yours – are still on the road, unrepaired.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow below the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Fix 30 mins – In 2011 a major report involving 400 experts from 35 countries issued stark warnings about the future food supply. The Foresight report stressed in order to feed a growing world population there was an urgent need to produce more food sustainable but also to deal with waste. It claimed globally 30% of food is never eaten. So did anyone listen? The amount of food waste has often been raised but Kat Arney goes in search of the game changers , to find out who’s making effective changes to stop good food being binned while people are still hungry. She explores the widening gleaning movement – volunteers primed to hoover up the crops left in the farmer’s field – to those changing the food production chain. She hears how recent weather events, the economy and food scandals have forced changes in supply and use of food. So will that change stick for good?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frames of Reference 60 mins – “What shapes the way we perceive the world around us? A lot of it has to do with invisible frames of reference that filter our experiences and determine how we feel. Alix Spiegel and Hanna Rosin interview a woman who gets a glimpse of what she’s been missing all her life – and then loses it. And they talk to Daily Show correspondent Hasan Minhaj about which frame of reference is better – his or his dad’s.” At the link find the title, “Frame of Reference, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160707_invsb_frame.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government IT Upgrades 29 mins – “Representative Will Hurd (R-TX), chair of the House Subcommittee on Information Technology, discusses cybersecurity and data security in federal government agencies, as well as a recent report card issued by his subcommittee on the subject.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Representative Will Hurd, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.446572.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Greenpeace Wilcox Interview 55 mins – “We talk to Peter Willcox, Captain for Greenpeace for over 30 years and author of Greenpeace Captain: My Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet.” At the link find the title, “139 Peter Willcox – Adventures in Protecting the Future of Our Planet,” right-click “Media files 1ea31114-7caa-4b84-9932-938fb2c0ff21.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Grunt Book 50 mins – “We welcome best-selling science writer Mary Roach back on the show to talk about her latest book Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” At the link find the title, “138 Mary Roach – The Curious Science of Humans at War,” right-click “Media files 225dd023-9ed4-4516-bba8-2403d8562312.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence Control 50 mins – “Democrats in the House of Representatives staged a dramatic sit-in this week to protest inaction on gun legislation, but are they just preaching to the choir? This week, we look at bridging the gap over guns in America and how the media can better understand both sides. Plus, new algorithms claim to provide more accurate models for policing and sentencing, but they actually might be making things worse.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hamilton Play 58 mins – “Author Ron Chernow discusses his 2004 book, [Alexander Hamilton], which has been adapted into the Broadway musical, “Hamilton.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Ron Chernow, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.436397.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Researcher 39 mins – “Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng is Director of the Center for Hearing Research and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering, Cognitive Sciences and Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery at the University of California Irvine. He received a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Science and Technology of China and his Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering at the Institute of Physiology Academia Sinica in Shanghai. Fan-Gang then went on to earn his PhD in Hearing Science from Syracuse University. He served as a research Associate at the House Ear Institute and an Associate Professor at the University of Maryland before joining the faculty at UC, Irvine where he is today. Fan-Gang is a member of the Acoustical Society of America, The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Association for Research in Otolaryngology, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Fan-Gang is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “254: Sound Science in Restoring Hearing with Cochlear Implants – Dr. Fan-Gang Zeng,” right-click “Media files 254_Fan-Gang_Zeng_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Replacement 13 mins – “2.46 million people in England have osteoarthritis of the hip, and many of those go on to eventually have a hip replacement – which is now widely considered one of the most commonly performed and successful operations in the world. Jessamy Bagenal, clinical fellow with The BMJ, talks to Nick Aresti, a specialist registrar in trauma and orthopaedic surgery and one of the authors of a clinical update on hip osteoarthritis, recently published on thebmj.com. At the link find the title, “Having hip osteoarthritis, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 272759006-bmjgroup-having-hip-osteoarthritis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Informationist 48 mins – “On a recent Copyright Clearance Center webinar, an audience of researchers, data scientists and statisticians from the health care professions, pharmaceuticals and biotechnology across North America and Europe as well as in Israel, Korea, Russia and India, learned about a novel use-case of applying text mining tools – during and after patient rounds in a hospital. With a mobile tablet computer, Jonathan Hartmann of Georgetown University Medical Center employs an innovative approach to aid physicians’ decision-making on their daily visits to their patients’ bedsides. Hartmann text mines in real-time from MEDLINE and other sources to extract critical information. In his unusual role as “the Informationist,” Hartmann is bringing a traditional medical practice into the 21st century. Jonathan Hartmann is the Senior Clinical Informationist and Head of Data Management at Georgetown University Medical Center. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology from Kent State University and a Master of Library Science degree also from Kent State University.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovate Long and Short 28 mins – “Tim Harford weaves together economic ideas with remarkable personal histories in some unusual locations. The presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less speaks to an audience from a shop window on London’s Regent Street, and turns his attention to heated pants and the business of innovation. He tells the moving story of Mario Capecchi, whose struggle to get funding for his experiments tells us much about where new ideas come from, and how to foster them.” At the link find the title, “Tim Harford: Hotpants vs The Knockout Mouse, Jan, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6k9s.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Islam Overview 54 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Institute for Philosophy and Religion, and the Boston University Center for the Humanities. Our speaker is Charles Kimball, Presidential Professor and Director of Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma. Professor Kimball’s lecture is titled “Faith, Doubt, and the Future of Islam.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ketogenic Diet P2 117 mins – “Dr. Dominic “Dom” D’Agostino (@DominicDAgosti2) is an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, and a senior research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC). He has also deadlifted 500 pounds for 10 reps after a seven-day fast. Many of you sent enthusiastic follow-up questions after the last conversation we had, so Dom took the time to answer your most popular questions. In particular, he focused on ketosis, ketones, and the ketogenic diet — so you can consider it the ketosis master class (especially if you combine both episodes, though this one does stand alone). It takes a few minutes for Dom to warm up — so be patient! If you have an interest in these types of metabolic therapies, whether for performance enhancement, endurance, weight loss, or fighting cancer, diabetes, or any number of other maladies, you will find a gem within this episode.” At the link find the title, “#172: Dom D’Agostino — The Power of the Ketogenic Diet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “#172: Dom D’Agostino — The Power of the Ketogenic Diet, Dom_Dagostino_part_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Land Fill Mining 30 mins – “Tom Heap discovers landfill mining: finding value in what’s been thrown away. He visits Belgium to meet the first prospectors digging for treasure in trash. For years rubbish has been thrown away and sent to landfill sites, but now there are moves to look at what’s been discarded as a resource. Metals, plastics, ceramics and minerals are all buried under ground. As waste in landfill decomposes it emits gases. All are rich pickings and valuable to those looking to recycle and reuse the waste we’ve thrown away as scientists and engineers look to close the circle of waste” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Researcher 44 mins – “Dr. Kay Tye is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She received her undergraduate degree from MIT in Brain and Cognitive Sciences and her PhD in Neuroscience from the University of California, San Francisco. Afterward Kay conducted postdoctoral research at Stanford University before joining the faculty at MIT. Kay has received many awards and honors during her career, including the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Young Investigator Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, and the MIT Whitehead Career Development Professorship, New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator Award, and has just been named a McKnight Scholar, just to name a few. Kay is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “279: Rewarding Research on the Influence of Emotion and Motivation on Learning and Behavior – Dr. Kay Tye,” right-click “Media files 279_Kay_Tye_Final.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Listening Better 28 mins – “Tim Harford (the Financial Times’ ‘Undercover Economist’ and presenter of Radio 4’s More or Less) is joined by Malcolm Gladwell, David Kilcullen and Gillian Tett for a new series, ‘Pop-up Ideas’. Following on from his earlier Radio 4 series ‘Pop-up Economics’, Tim and the others use key ideas in anthropology and the social sciences to tell fascinating stories about how we – and the world – work. The talks are recorded in front of an audience at the Southbank Centre in London. Malcolm Gladwell, staff writer at the New Yorker and best-selling author of books such as The Tipping Point and Outliers, tells an extraordinarily powerful story about how listening more carefully might have shortened the Vietnam War. One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Killcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as ‘revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West’, talks about how future instability will emanate from rapidly-growing coastal megacities. The financial journalist Gillian Tett describes how her background in anthropology led her to predict the financial crisis in 2008. Tim Harford explores the concept of ‘The Tragedy of the Commons’ – a term coined by the American ecologist Garrett Hardin in a hugely influential 1968 essay. Tim compares Hardin’s work to that of the American political economist Elinor Ostrom, to reflect on the impact of mankind on the world around us.” At the link find the title, “Malcolm Gladwell: Listening in Vietnam, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6k3f.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Market Forces 58 mins – “The historian Niall Ferguson examines institutions outside the political, economic and legal realms, whose primary purpose is to preserve and transmit particular knowledge and values. In a lecture delivered at the Royal Society of Edinburgh, he asks if the modern state is quietly killing civil society in the Western world? And what can non-Western societies do to build a vibrant civil society?” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Spectrometry 44 mins – “Charles is a Professor of Physics at Washington University in St. Louis. He received his PhD in Physics from the University of California, Berkeley and has been on the faculty at Washington University since 1970. Charles has received many awards and honors during his career, including election as Fellow of the Meteoritical Society and a Fellow of the St. Louis Academy of Science. He has been awarded the NASA Principal Investigators Award, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Award, and recently the James B. Eads Award honoring engineering or technology from the St. Louis Academy of Science. Charles is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “273: Tales of Ion Detection: The Making of a Mass Spectrometry Mastermind – Dr. Charles Hohenberg,” right-click “Media files 273_Charles_Hohenberg_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Crusader 26 mins – “The engineer who uncovered the lead crisis in Flint, Michigan – where the water was toxic enough to give kids brain damage – doesn’t even live in Michigan. His name is Marc Edwards, and he teaches engineering at Virginia Tech, more than 500 miles away. Marc started investigating water pollution in Flint last August. But he got his start more than a decade ago, in Washington, DC, when he discovered high levels of lead in that city’s water. In DC no one would listen to him. He lost lucrative contracts and spent thousands of dollars – of his own money – sampling the water to prove it was contaminated even when the government insisted it was safe. In the end, he prevailed and the water was cleaned up. But not before thousands of kids were exposed to dangerously high amounts of lead. This week, we talk to Edwards about his crusade to make our water safe. Getting the science right turned out to be just the beginning of a fight. The harder part was figuring out how to convince people he was right.” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Simulation 50 mins – “Dr. Roger Smith is the Chief Technology Officer for the Nicholson Center for Surgical Advancement at Florida Hospital. He is also Graduate Faculty at the University of Central Florida, and President of Simulation First. Roger received his B.S. in Applied Mathematics, a M.S. in Statistics, a Master’s and Ph.D. in Business Administration, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science. In addition to his current appointments, Roger has held a number of exciting positions in academia, industry, and government sectors, including serving as an Instructor at Texas Tech University, Senior Engineer at General Dynamics, Technical Director of Mystech Associates, Technical Director of STAC, Professor at Florida Institute of Technology, Vice President of BTG Corporation, Vice President and Group Chief Technology Officer of Titan Corporation, Professor at Full Sail University, Chief Engineer at SPARTA Inc., Chief Technology Officer for U.S. Army Simulation, Training, and Instrumentation, Research Scientist for Texas A and M University, and Professor at Adventist University of Health Sciences. He has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named one of the top academic researchers in the world in Technology and Innovation Management from the International Association for Management of Technology, the Des Cummings Innovation Award from Florida Hospital, the Swartz Innovation Award from the Orlando EDC, and the PEO STRI Commander’s Award for Public Service. Roger is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “332: Creating Cutting-Edge Surgical Simulations – Dr. Roger Smith,” right-click “Media files 332_Roger Smith_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Researcher 50 mins – “Dr. Henry “Roddy” Roediger is the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis as well as the Dean of Academic Planning in Arts and Sciences. He received his PhD in Psychology from Yale University. Roddy has served as a faculty member at Purdue University and Rice University as well as a visiting faculty member at the University of Toronto before joining Washington University in St. Louis. He has received many awards and distinctions, including the William James Fellow Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Psychological Science in 2012, the Howard Crosby Warren Medal from the Society of Experimental Psychologists in 2008, and the Arthur Holly Compton Faculty Achievement Award from Washington University in St. Louis in 2008, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Science. He was also previously elected to serve as the President of the Association for Psychological Science, the Midwestern Psychological Association, and the Experimental Division of the American Psychological Association. Roddy is joining us today to tell us about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “061: Mastering Memory and Applying Findings to Improve Memory and Understand how Cultures Remember their Past – Dr. Henry Roediger, Jun, 2014,” right-click “Media files 061_Roddy_Roediger_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Student Education 67 mins – “The educational needs of immigrant students in primary and secondary schools pose a growing challenge for policymakers and educators, whether in countries such as the United States, where nearly 10 percent of students are learning English, or in Germany, which is dealing with record numbers of asylum seekers. Many local schools lack the resources and capacities to meet the needs of these students, particularly given that many have limited or interrupted formal education, coupled with low or no proficiency in the language of instruction. Speakers on this webinar discuss the need for supplementary funding to support the educational needs of migrant-background students and provide an overview of the mechanics of school funding for migrant-background students in the four focal countries examined in the report. They also discuss how schools use those funds to provide specialized services, and highlight the most salient choices facing policymakers who seek to use supplementary funding mechanisms to better support effective, high-quality educational services for children from immigrant and refugee families.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multitasking Researcher 45 mins – “Dr. David Strayer is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Utah and Director for the Center for the Prevention of Distracted Driving. He received his Masters degree in Experimental Psychology from Eastern Washington University and his PhD in Experimental Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Afterward, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and worked briefly as a Member of Technical Staff at GTE Laboratories before joining the faculty at the University of Utah. David has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Sciences, receiving the Interdiscipliniary Teaching Grand Award from the Psychology of Traffic, and being awarded the University of Utah Distinguished Scolarly and Creative Research Award. David’s research has also been featured among Discover Magazine’s 100 Top Science Stories in 2003 and 2005. He has also giving briefings to the US House and Senate on distracted driving issues. David is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “190: Steering Our Attention Towards Issues in Distracted Driving – Dr. David Strayer,” right-click “Media files 190_David_Strayer_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music and Race 27 mins – “Britain’s music scene today is a rich, multi-cultural feast that draws on talent from all corners of society. Unless, that is, your passion is classical music. In Britain, and across Europe, performers, composers, teachers and institutions remain resolutely, predominantly white. Why should this be, and is this a concern?” At the link find the title, “Black, White and Beethoven, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03ybr0n.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurologist with Dyslexia 48 mins – “Dr. Kenneth Heilman is the James E. Rooks, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Neurology and Health Psychology at the University of Florida College of Medicine. He is also Director of the Memory Disorders Clinics, the Center for Neuropsychological Studies, and the Behavioral Neurology-Neuropsychiatry Fellowship Program at the University of Florida. Ken received his M.D. from the University of Virginia and continued his training in Internal Medicine at the Cornell University Medical Center. Afterward, he served as Captain in the Air Force and was Chief of Medicine at NATO Hospital in Izmir, Turkey during the Vietnam War. When Ken returned, he completed his Neurology Residency and Fellowship at Harvard University an then joined the faculty at the University of Florida. Ken is the recipient of a University of Florida Research Foundation Professorship, the Clinical Research Award from the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the Behavioral Neurology Society Outstanding Achievement Award. He has also authored multiple books including The Believer’s Brain which published last year. He is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “320: Dedicating His Attention to Cognitive Disorders in the Clinic, the Classroom, and through Conducting Research – Dr. Kenneth Heilman,” right-click “Media files 320_Ken_Heilman_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neuroscientist 41 mins – “Dr. Heather Berlin is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Visiting Scholar at the New York Psychoanalytic Society. She received her undergraduate education at the State University of New York, Stonybrook and her Master’s degree in Psychology from The New School in New York. Heather was awarded a PhD in Experimental Psychology and Neuropsychology from Magdalen College within the University of Oxford and an MPH from Harvard University. Afterward, she accepted a National Institute of Mental Health postdoctoral fellowship in Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine where she later joined the faculty. Heather has received many awards and honors during her career, including the Clifford Yorke Prize from the International Neuropsychoanalysis Society, the Phillip M. Rennick Award from the International Neuropsychological Society, and Young Investigator Awards from both the American Neuropsychiatric Association and the National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder. Heather is with us today to talk about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “286: Capturing Creativity and Investigating Improvisation in the Brain – Dr. Heather Berlin,” right-click “Media files 286_Heather_Berlin_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Documentary 21 mins – “Filmmaker Vitaly Mansky shot the documentary in North Korea with consent, but it still became an indictment of the regime — now the country is trying to suppress it.” At the link find the title, “North Korea documentary ‘Under the Sun’ reveals inner workings of propaganda machine, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160630_24175.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Data 28 mins – “Sir Nigel Shadbolt, Professor of Artificial Intelligence at Southampton University, believes in the power of open data. With Sir Tim Berners-Lee he persuaded two UK Prime Ministers of the importance of letting us all get our hands on information that’s been collected about us by the government and other organisations. But, this has brought him into conflict with people who think there’s money to be made from this data. And open data raises issues of privacy. Nigel Shadbolt talks to Jim al-Khalili about how a degree in psychology and philosophy lead to a career researching artificial intelligence and a passion for open data.” At the link find the title, “Nigel Shadbolt, Apr, 2015,” right-click “Media files p02qhmyk.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 87 mins – “Dr. Sanjay Reddy provides a brief introduction to acupuncture. He explores the “eastern” concepts of health and gives an overview of the applications of acupuncture to pain. He also looks at herbal supplements, exercise, mediation and other ways to help manage pain. Recorded on 03/03/2016.” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Management 58 mins – “Americans constitute 4.6% of the world’s population and consume 80% of the world’s opioids and 99% of the world’s hydrocodone. There are five times more Americans with opioid substance use disorder than addicted to heroin. How did we get here and what can we do about it? Recorded on 03/17/2016. (#30801)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Therapy Researcher 32 mins – “Dr. Shirley Sahrmann is a retired Physical Therapist and Professor emeritis of Physical Therapy, Cell Biology and Physiology, and also of Neurology at Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine….Dr. Sahrmann’s research interests are in development and validation of classification schemes for movement impairment syndromes as well as in exercise based interventions for these syndromes. Her books, Diagnosis and Treatment of Movement Impairment Syndromes and Movement System Impairment Syndromes of the Cervical and Thoracic Spines and the Extremities, describe the syndromes and methods of treatment. She maintained an active clinical practice specializing in patients with musculoskeletal pain syndromes until her retirement in July 2012. Shirley he has served on the APTA Board of Directors and as president of the Missouri Chapter. In addition to her numerous national and international presentations, Dr. Sahrmann has been a keynote speaker at the World Confederation of Physical Therapy, and at the Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and Danish national congresses.” At the link find the title, “071: Painstakingly Classifying and Treating Movement Impairment with Physical Therapy – Dr. Shirley Sahrmann,” right-click “Media files 071_Shirley Sahrman_Final.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planetary Systems 32 mins – “Ian Sample talks to Stuart Clarke about his new book exploring exoplanets and alien worlds, and how to find another Earth. Many of the thousands of alien worlds discovered around distant stars are unlike anything in our solar system. Some face perpetual hurricane-force winds; others have not one, but two suns. But some of these planets do have striking similarities to those in our own cosmic neighbourhood. Could an Earth-like planet capable of harbouring life be one of our next discoveries? Stuart Clark’s new book, The Search For Earth’s Twin, explores these themes, and he joins me in the studio.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Evolution Researcher 58 mins – “Dr. Spencer Barrett is the University Professor, Canada Research Chair, and Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Toronto. He completed his Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Botany from the University of Reading in England and received his PhD in Botany from the University of California, Berkeley before joining the faculty at the University of Toronto. Spencer has received many awards and honors during his career, including being named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, a Fellow of the Royal Society of London, a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and an Extraordinary Professor by the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. He has also received the Lawson Medal from the Canadian Botanical Association, Premier’s Discovery Award for Life Sciences and Medicine from the Ontario Government, and the Sewall Wright Award from the American Society of Naturalists, among others. Spencer is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “281: Science with Style: Studying Plant Reproductive Biology – Dr. Spencer Barrett,” right-click “Media files 281_Spencer_Barrett_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prebiotic Researcher 36 mins – “Dr. Maria Marco is an Associate Professor in The Department of Food Science & Technology at The University of California, Davis. She received her BS at The Pennsylvania State University and her PhD in Microbiology at the University of California, Berkeley. She went on to work as a postdoc and then as a project scientist at NIZO food research and TI Food & Nutrition in The Netherlands before accepting a faculty position at UC, Davis where she is today. Maria is with us today to tell us all about her journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “329: Feeding Our Understanding of the Benefits of Bacteria in Human Health – Dr. Maria Marco,” right-click “Media files 329_Maria_Marco_Final_copy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Referendums 21 mins – “A referendum may seem like grassroots in action. But detractors argue it lets elected officials off the hook. The Current looks at if referendums are a clumsy, dangerous tool for deciding complex issues or fundamentally respectful of the people’s will.” At the link find the title, “Post-Brexit results, is governing by referendum democratic? Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160629_15855.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ribosome 28 mins – “All the information that’s needed for life is written in our DNA. But how do we get from DNA code to biological reality? That’s the job of the ribosomes – those clever molecular machines that are found in every living cell. And in 2008 Venki Ramakrishnan was awarded the Nobel Prize for determining their structure. Jim talks to Venki about the frantic race to crack the structure of the ribosome, probably the most important biological molecule after DNA; why he thinks the Nobel Prize is a terrible thing for science; and his new job as President of the Royal Society.” At the link find the title, “Venki Ramakrishnan, Mar, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03lc21m.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rust Belt Boy 21 mins – “This week, The Bookshelf features Paul Hertneky, who grew up near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania at a time when the steel industry kept many families afloat. His town, Ambridge, was a place full of the working class people including immigrant families from all over Europe that found themselves down on their luck when the steel industry fell apart. In his new memoir, Rust Belt Boy, Hertneky writes about how this town left an indelible mark and still has a pull on him, even now as he lives hundreds of miles away in Hancock, New Hampshire. Scroll down to read Paul Hertneky’s top five reading recommendations and read the transcript of his conversation with All Things Considered host Peter Biello.” At the link right-click th eplay button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Psychologist 32 mins – “Dr. David Pizarro is an Associate Professor in Psychology at Cornell University and Chief Science Officer at BeWorks which applies scientific thinking to marketing and operational challenges in business. He also hosts the Very Bad Wizards podcast that explores human morality. David received his B.S. From Pacific Union college and his M.S., M.Phil, and Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Yale University. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of California, Irvine before joining the faculty at Cornell University where he is today. David is a Fellow of the American Psychological Society in Behavioral and Brain Sciences and served as the Nannerl Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at UNC, Chapel Hill and Duke University last spring. David is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “291: How and Why We Judge the World: The Science of Morality Discussed – Dr. David Pizarro,” right-click “Media files 291_David_Pizarro_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Somalia Recovery 28 mins – “One of the world’s most influential counter-insurgency experts, David Kilcullen, whose ideas were described by the Washington Post as “revolutionizing military thinking throughout the West”, talks about the time-bomb of rapidly-growing coastal mega-cities. “It took all of human history until 1960 for the world to get 3 billion people,” he says. “But the latest estimate is that we’re going to add the same number of people in just the next thirty years – and they’ll all be going into cities, on coastlines, in the developing world”. Through the story of a Somali commander he met in Mogadishu, David tells how the urban overstretch that tore Mogadishu apart in the 1990s, with frightening consequences, is happening in cities all over Africa, Asia and Latin America.” At the link find the title, “David Kilcullen: Feral Cities, Jul, 2013,” right-click “Media files p02r6q3q.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa LGBTI 27 mins – “In 1994 apartheid ended in South Africa and Nelson Mandela was elected president. He promised in his inauguration speech to “build a society in which all South Africans will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts … a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.” These promises were enshrined in South Africa’s post-apartheid constitution, the first in the world to outlaw all forms of discrimination. In 1994 Motshidisi Pascalina Melamu was born, making her one of the first of the so-called ‘born free generation’. Pasca, as she was known, dreamed of becoming a politician, and studied hard at school. She loved singing, dancing and football. And girls – Pasca was a lesbian. In December last year, Pasca’s body was found in a field. She had been beaten and mutilated. She was one of three LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex) people murdered in a six-week period last year. Hate crimes against the LGBTI community have long been a problem in South Africa, and the government has tried to tackle them. But activists say these recent crimes are just one sign that things aren’t getting better. James Fletcher travels to the townships south of Johannesburg to speak with Pasca’s family and friends, and to ask whether the government is failing LGBTI South Africans.” At the link find the title, “Born Free, Killed by Hate in South Africa, Apr, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03sdkjh.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speech Researcher 44 mins – “Dr. Rupal Patel is a Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders as well as the College of Computer and Information Science at Northeastern University. She is also Director of the Communication Analysis and Design Laboratory and a Co-Founder and Core Faculty member of the interdisciplinary doctoral program in Personal Health Informatics there. She received her B.Sc. in Neuropsychology from the University of Calgary and her M.H.Sc. and Ph.D. in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Toronto. Afterwards, Rupal completed postdoctoral research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and served as a faculty member at Columbia University before joining the faculty at Northeastern University where she is today. Rupal is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “289: Speaking Up About Important Topics in Speech Production and Computer-Assisted Communication – Dr. Rupal Patel,” right-click “Media files 289_Rupal_Patel_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Failures 46 mins – “Something is amiss at 2680 Madison Road. In the thriving Cincinnati neighborhood of Hyde Park, the property is sandwiched between several decades-old Cincinnati staples, and a stone’s throw away from an upscale shopping center. The space is huge, the parking is ample. And yet, the building has been abandoned for five years. Seven different businesses have cycled through the address over the last thirty years. It seems that every business that inhabits its four walls is destined to fail. Alex Blumberg sends StartUp Senior Producer Kaitlin Roberts to his hometown to investigate this peculiar property. With a microphone in hand, she books a ticket to Cin City.” At the link find the title, “2680 Madison Road (Season 3, Episode 10), Jul, 2016” right-click “Media files GLT5501778439.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainability 58 mins – “Laura Knoy took NHPR’s flagship show on the road for a special live edition of The Exchange, featuring a conversation on business and sustainability. The forum took place on Tuesday, June 28th at Labelle Winery in Amherst, and tackled the tough questions facing many in New Hampshire around what’s real and what’s “greenwashing,” and what policies and economic factors stand in the way of more businesses embracing sustainable practices.” (3 guests) At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorist Identification 49 mins – “New York Times reporter Eric Lichtblau discusses the FBI’s investigation of shooter Omar Mateen prior to the Orlando attack, as well as the bureau’s broader efforts to pinpoint suspected terrorists. Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews ‘They May Not Mean To, But They Do,’ by Cathleen Schine. Jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Allen Toussaint’s final recording.” At the link find the title, “Jun, 2016, How The FBI’s Wiretaps & Sting Operation Failed To Stop The Orlando Shooter,” At the link click the three dots in a circle, right-click “Download“ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thiomersal 6 mins – “Since a now retracted, refuted and discredited 1998 Lancet paper purported to show a link between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine, bowel disease and autism, vaccines have been under fire from an increasingly vocal movement. One target of their ire is a preservative found in some vaccines: Thiomersal.” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Thiomersal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tissue Engineering 28 mins – “Jim al-Khalili talks to a scientist who grows human bones in a test tube, Molly Stevens. Molly Stevens does geeky hard core science but her main aim is to help people. Twenty years ago, nobody thought it was possible to make human body parts in the laboratory, but today scientists are trying to create almost every bit of the body. Professor Molly Stevens grows bones. Towards the end of her PHD, a chance encounter with the founding father of tissue engineering and an image of a little boy with chronic liver failure, convinced her that this was what she wanted to do. Ten years on, she runs a highly successful lab at Imperial College London and has been photographed by Vogue.” At the link find the title, “Molly Stevens, Nov, 2011,” right-click “Media files p02qfcj6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toilet Upgrades 30 mins – “There are 2.5 billion people living on the planet without access to basic sanitation. As a result hundreds of children die from diseases such as diarrhoea every day, and women and children risk personal safety when they perform the simplest of human functions. In this week’s Costing The Earth Dr Kat Arney looks at ways to allow everyone to have access to safe, clean, environmentally friendly toilets. She visits a toilet festival in London to find out about toilet designs that can be applied to every environmental condition across the globe: toilets that require no water, toilets that can turn waste into an asset in the form of fertiliser and toilets filled with waste-eating worms in a quest to design a toilet for the 21st Century.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Treatment Options 20 mins – “Guidelines usually assume a rational comprehensive decision model in which all values, means, and ends are known and considered. In clinical encounters, however, patients and doctors most often follow “the science of muddling through. Given that clinical knowledge does not follow the narrow rationality of “if-then” algorithms contained in guidelines, alternatives are desperately needed.” At the link find the title, “Can guidelines be reformulated to account for how doctors actually use information? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 271742098 bmjgroup can guidelines be reformulated to account for how doctors actually use information.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Airport Attack 21 mins – “Suicide bombers attacked Istanbul’s airport on Tuesday, killing dozens and injuring hundreds. Turkey’s prime minister blames ISIS. How did Turkey go from being one of the safest countries in the region to this?” At the link find the title, “ISIS to blame for Istanbul airport bombing, says Turkish prime minister, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20160629_86024.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ultrasound Researcher 58 mins – “Dr. Lawrence Crum is the Principal Physicist and Founder/Former Director of the Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound in the Applied Physics Laboratory, and Research Professor of Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering at the University of Washington. He received his Masters and PhD in Physics from Ohio University and prior to joining the faculty at the University of Washington, Larry held positions at Harvard University, the U.S. Naval Academy, and the University of Mississippi. Larry has received many awards and honors during his career, including the Gold Medal of the Acoustical Society of America. He is Past President of the Acoustical Society of America, the Board of the International Commission for Acoustics, and the International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound. He is preparing to begin as a senior Visiting Fellow at Magdalin College at Oxford University. Larry also has 11 patents and has served as co-founder of 3 medical device companies. Larry is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “230: Signaling the Wave of the Future with Ultrasound Research Applications – Dr. Larry Crum,” right-click “Media files 230_Larry_Crum_final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unpleasant Designs 17 mins – “Benches in parks, train stations, bus shelters and other public places are meant to offer seating, but only for a limited duration. Many elements of such seats are subtly or overtly restrictive. Arm rests, for instance, indeed provide spaces to rest arms, but they also prevent people from lying down or sitting in anything but a prescribed position. This type of design strategy is sometimes classified as “hostile architecture,” or simply: “unpleasant design.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Tracking 5 mins – “If a video designed to recruit people into extremist groups pops up online, it stands to reason that you could just flag it to have it removed and the problem is solved. But that’s not so easy. These videos are easily replicated, so one video could suddenly appear on a variety of websites. It’s time-consuming to track down and try to remove each one. One professor at Dartmouth College has developed software that would help find all those copies. David Brooks is a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at granitegeek.org, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about this new technology.

Vincent Racaniello Virologist 43 mins – “Dr. Vincent Racaniello is the Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University. He received his PhD in Biomedical Sciences from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at MIT before joining the faculty at Columbia. In addition to his academic research career, Vincent is also a co-creator of BioCrowd (a social network for scientists), he runs the Virology Blog at virology.ws, and he hosts the fantastic “This Week in Virology”, “This Week in Parasitism”, and “This Week in Microbiology” podcasts. Vincent is here with us today to tell us all about his journey through life and science.” At the link find the title, “170: Practicing Communicable Science Studying Viruses and Sharing Research with the World – Dr. Vincent Racaniello,” right-click “Media files 170_Vincent_Racaniello_Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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