Media Mining Digest 246 – Jul 29, 2016: Addiction Story, Aged Care, Algorithms to Live By, Antibiotic Quantum Dots, Arm Fractures, Autism History, Bacterial Resistance, Barcelona Tourism Problem, Battle of Reading, Battle of the Somme, Benghazi Report, Big Breakthroughs, Blind Help Rules, Blind People on Stage, Body on the Moor, Border Patrol Crimes, Brexit, Cancer, Chef Thing, Childhood Neurology, China in Africa, Chinese Economic Bubble, CIA Trends, Clothing Crutches, Coastal Flooding, College Trends, Conservation Movement, Constipation, Coyotes, Creativity, Cult Leader, Deep Canvassing, Depression Treatment, Desert Storm Legacy, Disability Discrimination, Disabled Devices, Disaster Equipment, Disaster Medicine, Donald Trump, Drug Abuse Issues, Educational Issues, Electric Grids, Energy Poverty, Eyes-On-Cops, Fact Checking, Fitness History, Food Waste Control, Four Seasons Restaurant, Future Possibilities, Gender Medicine, Haptic Conference, Health Workers Communication, Indian Publishing, Internet History, Internet Sale Locations, Jules Feiffer, Manufacturing Globally, Marijuana Impact, Mark Twain, Math Rant, Medical Team Performance, Middle Class Finances, Minimum Wage, Mississippi Pioneer Woman, Mississippi Scale Model, Mobile Phone Videos, MOOC on Cancer, Narcissism Effect, National Parks, Nitrogen Conservation, Noncomplementary Behaviors, PACE Trial Controversy, Panama Papers, Performance Enhancing Drugs, Personal Learning Network, Photonic Chips, Picric Acid, Police Incidents, Police PR, Police Torture in Chicago, Police Viewpoint, Policing in America, Population Growth, Price Fixing, Psychosis, Racism Panel, Renewable Energy, Robert Scoble, School of Life, Shark Conservation, Student Debt, Syrian Refugees, Test Pilot, Textbook Publishing, Tin Ears, Universal Basic Income, Veterans Affairs Modernization, Vulcanology, Welfare Programs

The best 106 podcasts from a larger group of 302 for the week are shown below. Double or ctrl-click individual highlighted titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 1o,000 similar podcasts grouped by topic can be downloaded piecemeal here,  but you will be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least welve of those will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and will take  awhile. The first entry of that collection is a text file listing all the titles for quick searches and researching.  All these abstracts have also been assembled alphabetically in three free large volumes at this link and are updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 325 sources so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded.

Addiction Story  18 mins – “Scoring a fix is cheap and today’s heroin is strong. But that’s just part of the reason why America got hooked. Today on the show, we trace the roots of America’s heroin epidemic with a dealer, a user, and a DEA agent.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160713_pmoney_podcast071316.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aged Care  57 mins – “The National Press Club hosts an Aged Care Forum on the topic ‘The Aged Care Conundrum: Meeting The Care Needs of an Ageing Population Without Blowing the Budget’. Featuring Paul Sadler, Lee Thomas and Ian Yates.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Aged Care Forum, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_AgedCare_1307_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Algorithms to Live By  65 mins – “Brian Christian, Author, The Most Human Human; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions Tom Griffiths, Professor of Psychology and Cognitive Science, UC Berkeley; Co-author, Algorithms to Live By: The Computer Science of Human Decisions All our lives are constrained by limited space and time, limits that give rise to a particular set of problems. What should we do, or leave undone, in a day or a lifetime? How much messiness should we accept? What balance of new activities and familiar favorites is the most fulfilling? These might seem like uniquely human quandaries, but they are not. Computers, too, face the same constraints, so computer scientists have been grappling with their version of such issues for decades. The solutions they’ve found have much to teach us. In this interdisciplinary work, author Brian Christian and cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths show how the algorithms used by computers can also untangle very human questions. They explain how to have better hunches and when to leave things to chance, how to deal with overwhelming choices and how best to connect with others. From finding a spouse to finding a parking spot, from organizing one’s inbox to understanding the workings of memory, Algorithms to Live By transforms the wisdom of computer science into strategies for human living.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antibiotic Quantum Dots  26 mins – (starts 1:00) This programmable antibiotic might keep pace with quickly evolving superbugs. Unlike most drugs – it’s not derived from biological sources. It’s a tiny version of the semiconductors in everything from TVs to iphones to solar panels. This “antibiotic” is made of nanoparticles, known as quantum dots. CU Biofrontiers scientists Prashant Nagpal and Anushree Chatterjee explain their new invention. Shrinking Ozone Hole – (starts 15:24) The ozone hole is finally growing smaller – we’ll find out why and how long it will take to completely “heal” the ozone hole from Birgit Hassler, a researcher with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a partnership between the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arm Fractures  87 mins – “Take a look at some of most common bone and joint injuries. Dr. Utku Kandemir explores the shoulder and elbow and Dr. Nicole Schroeder looks at the wrist. Recorded on 05/24/2016. (#30989)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism History  49 mins – “A big fresh take on autism that begins with Patient Zero.” At the link find the title, “Autism: A History, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486149845.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacterial Resistance  27 mins – “Claudia Hammond focusses on the attempts to discover new antibiotics, and alternative therapies for combating bacterial infection. Most of the antibiotics we use were discovered in the mid-20th century, but as the threat of drug resistant infections increases, the race is on to find new organisms that make novel medicines. We have only identified a tiny fraction of the microbes living on Earth and are “bioprospecting” for useful ones in wildly different locations. Antibiotics are not the only weapon in the war against bacteria. A hundred years ago, a class of virus that infect and destroy bacteria were discovered. They’re called bacteriophages. Phage therapies were used throughout the era of Soviet Russia, and still are in some countries, including Georgia. Phage researcher Prof Martha Clokie told us whether phage therapy might be coming to the UK. With expert comment from James Gallagher, BBC News health reporter. “ At the link find the title, “Fighting Antimicrobrial Resistance, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0422f38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barcelona Tourism Problem 27 mins – “Barcelona is one of the most visited cities in Europe, but has it become a victim of its own tourism success? Millions of tourists visit every year, crowding the narrow streets and public spaces, bringing noise and anti-social behaviour to once peaceful residential neighbourhoods. Local businesses have given way to tourist tat and multinational chains, and some residents are being driven out as apartments are rented to tourists. Tourism is a huge economic boost for Barcelona, but as well as those who are benefiting, Pascale Harter meets locals who are taking to the streets in noisy protests about the impact on their neighbourhood. Are they right to blame home-sharing websites like Airbnb? And all eyes are on Barcelona’s mayor Ada Colau, a former activist and one of the key representatives of the so-called “new politics” in Spain. Can she resolve a tension being felt by cities around the world – between the economic opportunities of tourism and keeping the soul and character of the city that its residents cherish.” At the link find the title, “The Battle for Barcelona, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p041cf12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of Reading  20 mins – “When we left off, the Danes had occupied Reading, fortified it for several days, and then sent a detachment West along the river Kennet… In response, Ealdorman AEthelwulf of Berkshire had raised the local Fyrd, killed one of the Danish lords, and for the first time in a very long time, at Englefield, the West Saxons defeated the Danes in the field of battle.” At the link right-click “Download” from the pop-up menu.

Battle of the Somme  32 mins – “This week, a special issue on conflict. The psychological toll of war, how to count the dead, and predicting conflict in the 21st century.” At the link find the title, “Nature Podcast: 14 July 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Benghazi Report  58 mins – “Republican members of the House Select Committee on Benghazi release their report on the September 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, in which four Americans died, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens.” At the link find the title, “House Benghazi Committee Republicans Release Report on 2012 Attack, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.447191.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Breakthroughs  11 mins – “Throughout history, speculation has spurred beautiful, revolutionary science — opening our eyes to entirely new universes. “I’m not talking about science that takes baby steps,” says Eric Haseltine. “I’m talking about science that takes enormous leaps.” In this talk, Haseltine passionately takes us to the edges of intellectual pursuit with two ideas — one that’s already made history, and the other that’s digging into one of humanity’s biggest questions with admirable ambition (and a healthy dose of skepticism from many).” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Help Rules  19 mins – “In response to a recent programme discussion on how blind people should accept and then dispense with help, sighted listeners contacted In Touch asking for information on the best techniques and tips when giving help. Should you open doors or count steps? And how should you guide? Amie Slavin, blind since the age of 23, and Julie Smethurst give their views on the best ways sighted people can offer help, and some practical do’s and don’ts.” At the linkr ight-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind People on Stage  20 mins – “Notes on Blindness, a new film based on the true story of an academic losing his sight has just come out in the UK. So In Touch uses the film’s release to discuss the portrayal of blind people in film, TV and on the stage. Peter White is joined by Emily Davison, Kevin Mulhern and Red Szell, and they swap good and bad examples, and talk about problems and solutions.” At the link right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Body on the Moor  27 min – “On 12 December 2015, a man’s body was found by a moorland track on Saddleworth Moor in northern England. He had nothing on him showing his identity. No-one knew who he was. And he had died from a rare kind of poisoning. Who was this man? Where did he come from? Why has nobody reported him missing? Their biggest lead was brought to the mortuary within the body itself. It was inside his left leg. And it’s a clue which took the inquiry to Pakistan. Police believe he took his own life but did he travel nearly 4000 miles to die in this particular place?” At the link find the title “The Body on the Moor, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p0417qqd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Patrol Crimes  54 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the title, “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit 19 mins – “Brexit is like a breakup. So today, a divorce story in two acts. We hear from both sides: The people who voted to leave, and the Europeans being left.” At the link find the title, “#711: Hooked on Heroin, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_pmoney_podcast070816.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit  45 mins – “On this episode of Slate Money, hosts Felix Salmon of Fusion, Cathy O’Neil of mathbabe.org, and Slate’s Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann. Topics discussed on today’s show include: -UK Property funds are in trouble post-Brexit -What it means for interest rates to be negative. -Italian banks are in crisis.” At the link find the title, “The Fallout Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files SM7860674935.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Explained  67 mins – “The United Kingdom’s vote to exit the European Union has given new momentum to euroskeptic, nationalist, and anti-immigration movements elsewhere in Europe. While many of the policy impacts of the referendum will not be known for a while yet, the vote has pointed, in stunning fashion, to the rising public anxiety over immigration levels and concerns over governments’ ability to manage flows and foster successful immigrant integration. On this webinar, MPI Europe President Demetrios Papademetriou, who is also President emeritus of MPI, and experts associated with MPI’s Transatlantic Council on Migration discuss the political and policy lessons that can be learned from Brexit and applied to debatesin both Europe and North America, including how to address concerns over immigration, identity, and immigrant integration while managing migration in a globalized economy. The discussion will also touched on a Transatlantic Council report, Understanding and Addressing Public Anxiety About Immigration.” At the link right-click “Download(loading)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  22 mins – “One of our first guests on the show last fall was the young poet Max Ritvo. Ritvo, 25, has spent years living with Ewing’s Sarcoma, an incurable cancer. Meanwhile he’s gotten married, taught at Columbia University, and performed in an improv comedy group. His first book of poetry, Four Reincarnations, comes out this fall. One work from that book, “Poem to My Litter,” was just published in the New Yorker. But Ritvo is more than his accomplishments. He’s someone who reminded us that there are many different ways to look at death, and dying, and some of them make you actually laugh at loud. He came back to visit us a few weeks ago on what he called his “farewell tour.” Even in his final days, Max says he keeps his sense of humor alive. “When you laugh at something horrible, you’re just illuminating a different side of it that was already there. If you make something sad funny you’re much more likely to remember it. It’s a mnemonic device that makes our suffering rhyme with joy.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Case  59 mins – “Mary Elizabeth Williams, Journalist; Author, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer In conversation with Peggy Orenstein, Author This program is part of our Good Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Journalist Mary Elizabeth Williams was one of the first people in the world to get a new form of treatment for her stage 4 cancer diagnosis that’s revolutionizing cancer care: immunotherapy. In October of 2015, her treatment protocol became the first immunotherapy combination approved by the FDA; it’s the same treatment that former President Jimmy Carter underwent. In her witty, wry, and deeply moving new memoir, A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles: A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer, Williams shares her personal journey with malignant melanoma in her early forties and how—thanks to cutting-edge science—she was restored back to health with no signs of disease.” At the link right-click Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  29 mins – “Advances in genomic medicine indicate that pediatric cancers may be quite different from their adult counterparts. Hear from experts on why this might be and what scientists are doing to understand it better.” At the link find the title, “Understanding the Biological Basis of Pediatric Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 160721_cancer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment  56 mins – “The second in our two-part series on Cancer in the Granite State. President Obama announced “a cancer moonshot” in his State of the Union address earlier this year, with increased funding for research and treatment in the hopes of accelerating the search for a cure. We look at advances in cancer treatment recently, including promising methods such as immunotherapy. We also examine the latest research and developments in the search for a cure. Plus, we delve into the financial and emotional stresses of dealing with the disease.” (4 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chef Thing  166 mins– “Chris Young is an obsessive tinkerer, inventor, and innovator. His areas of expertise range from extreme aviation (world-record goals) to mathematics and apocalyptic-scale BBQs. Above all, he is one of the clearest thinkers I know. In this interview, we discuss a great many things, including his wild story and lessons learned from rainmakers like Bill Gates, Gabe Newell, Neal Stephenson, and many more. More topics we tackle: How he managed to get jobs working for the best in the world…despite having no credentials. Advice — and incredible questions — from self-made billionaires. Why raw foodism isn’t always what it’s cracked up to be. How geniuses show disappointment and ensure you correct yourself. The “emoji egg” breakfast. And much more…If you only have 5 minutes, I highly recommend listening to Chris’s secret to working with hard-to-reach people….” At the link find the title, “#173: Lessons from Geniuses, Billionaires, and Tinkerers,” right-click “Media filesChris_Young.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Neurology  28 mins – “Self-taught Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Faraneh Vargha-Khadem has spent decades studying children with developmental amnesia. Her mission: to understand how we form memories of the events in our past, from things we’ve experienced to places we’ve visited and people we’ve met. She talks to Jim about the memories we lay down during our lives and the autobiographies stored in our brains that define us as individuals. Faraneh was also part of the team that identified the FoxP2 gene, the so called ‘speech gene’, that may explain why humans talk and chimps don’t. Plus Faraneh discusses how her Baha’i faith informs her scientific thinking.” /at the link find the title, “Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p03zw168.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China in Africa  88 mins – “Throughout the 2000s, Chinese demand for primary goods like oil, iron, copper, and zinc helped Africa reduce poverty more than it had in decades. Even so, China’s total investment in the continent’s natural resources has been smaller than many imagine, and, with growth shifting away from manufacturing and toward consumption, China’s appetite for raw materials will continue to diminish. China’s shifting economic growth model aligns with sub-Saharan Africa’s imminent labor force boom, presenting a significant opportunity for both sides. Maximizing mutual gain will depend on China and Africa cooperating to address a host of challenges: Can African countries limit the flow of Chinese migrants and foster domestic industries? Will Chinese investors adopt global norms of social and environmental responsibility? Where does the West fit in? On July 13, 2016, the John L. Thornton China Center and the Africa Growth Initiative (AGI) at Brookings launched Senior Fellow David Dollar’s new report, “China’s Engagement in Africa: From Natural Resources to Human Resources.” Dollar presented key findings from the study, and AGI Director Amadou Sy moderated a discussion with Dollar, Ambassador Oliver Wonekha of Uganda, and Wenjie Chen of the International Monetary Fund on the larger issues of China’s trade and investment in Africa, how it has benefited the continent, what could make it more effective, and lessons for the next phase of engagement.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Economic Bubble  75 mins – “China’s economy has achieved astonishing growth over the past three decades, but it may be undergoing its most serious test of the reform era. In his newly published book, “China’s Guaranteed Bubble,” Ning Zhu argues that implicit Chinese government guarantees, which have helped drive economic investment and expansion, are also largely responsible for the challenges the country now faces. As growth slows, corporate earnings decline, and lending tightens for small and medium-sized businesses, the leverage ratios of China’s government and its corporations and households all have increased in recent years. How desperate is China’s debt situation, and what can be done to avert a major crisis? On July 11, the John L. Thornton China Center at Brookings hosted Ning Zhu, deputy dean and professor of finance at the Shanghai Advanced Institute of Finance, Shanghai Jiaotong University. Zhu presented key findings from his research into Chinese sovereign, corporate, and household debt, and also introduced potential remedies to return China to the path of long-term sustainable growth. Following the presentation, Senior Fellow David Dollar moderated a discussion with Zhu before taking questions from the audience.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Trends  63 mins – “Whether in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, or Latin America, the United States faces security threats on a number of fronts and by an array of actors, including extremist networks, rogue states, and emerging powers. The Central Intelligence Agency is charged with understanding these ongoing security challenges to the United States while also identifying emerging issues that will affect the nation’s security in the future. CIA has to evolve and innovate in order to effectively address today’s pressing problems without losing sight of those over-the-horizon issues. On July 13, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence hosted the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency John O. Brennan for an address on the emerging threats facing the United States and the CIA’s strategy for meeting those challenges. Brookings Senior Fellow and Co-Director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence Gen. John Allen (USMC, Ret.) introduced Director Brennan, and Senior Fellow and Director of The Intelligence Project Bruce Riedel moderated a discussion following the director’s remarks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Crutches 61 mins – “Do clothes have the power to transform us? Lulu and Hanna bring us seven stories that explore how clothes can change us in quiet but surprising ways. We have help from Yowei Shaw, Chenjerai Kumanyika and Colin Dwyer. At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coastal Flooding  57 mins – “Crumbling flood control infrastructure, rising sea levels and lack of natural barriers leave the Bay Area open to devastating flood events. Many critical elements of the Bay Area’s infrastructure, including airports, hospitals, water treatment plants, and the headquarters of major employers are built at or below sea level. That means a severe storm or major flood could knock out huge parts of the regional economy, causing long-term damage to the Bay Area’s economic health. Failure to act presents potentially devastating consequences to the businesses and individuals that call the Bay Area home, as well as to California’s economy. Today we’ll talk about solutions to these problems with Jeremy Lowe, a coastal geomorphologist with 30 years of experience in tidal wetland restoration and sea-level-rise adaptation planning, and John Bourgeois, Executive Project Manager, CA Coastal Conservancy. Both gentlemen are feature in a new mini-documentary, The Water At Bay.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Trends  56 mins – “Nationwide, many smaller institutions are struggling to survive due to dwindling enrollment, rural locations, and doubt about the inherent value of a liberal education. We talk with two New Hampshire college presidents to find out how they’re facing these new economic realities and an uncertain future.” (3 guests) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservation Movement  28 mins – “Despite decades of conservation work, in zoos and in the field, the rate at which species are going extinct is speeding up. Georgina Mace has devoted her Life Scientific to trying to limit the damage to our planet’s bio-diversity from this alarming loss. For ten years she worked on the Red List of Threatened Species, developing a robust set of scientific criteria for assessing the threat of extinction facing every species on the planet. When the list was first published, she expected resistance from big business; but not the vicious negative reaction she received from many wildlife NGOS. Her careful quantitative analysis revealed that charismatic animals, like the panda and the polar bear, are not necessarily the most at risk.” At the link find the title, “Georgina Mace, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files p040hcxr.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constipation  17 mins – “In this episode, we discuss self-care of constipation including bulk-forming laxatives, hyperosmotic laxatives, emollient laxatives, lubricant laxatives, saline laxatives, and stimulant laxatives.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 046-OTC_constipation.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coyotes  55 mins – “One of nature’s success stories, coyotes have expanded from the Great Plains to most of North America, even living happily in urban parks. IDEAS producer Dave Redel reflects on the science and mythology of the wily coyote.” At the link find the title, “Coyotl’s Song,Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160713_82373.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Creativity  22 mins – “…how (or if) humans can discover our greatest creative potential. Someone might be a brilliant novelist if they could find the time to write. In the right societal context and presented with good opportunities, a given person might change the course of modern dance, or unlock mysteries of particle physics, or become a great general. Today, there are thousands of self-help books, websites, counselors and consultants all promising to help people find their creative essence. These resources claim to offer insights about successful, effective and creative people and about how we can apply them in our own lives. Still, back in the middle of the 20th Century this idea that someone could even study or learn about something as elusive as creativity was as far-fetched as the pearly gates tale. At the time, creativity was seen as nebulous and unconscious, perhaps not accessible at all to scientific inquiry. Then, in the early 1950s, the Institute of Personality Assessment and Research (IPAR) at the University of California, Berkeley began developing new and different ways to analyze personalities. The scientists at IPAR attempted what many thought was impossible: to study creativity in a methodical and scientific way, working to determine what specific personality traits make certain people creative. IPAR invited creative people of all kinds to come to Berkeley and be studied, from authors of fantasy novels to research scientists and female mathematicians. They attracted literary stars including Truman Capote and William Carlos Williams. One of their biggest and most successful studies, however, involved an array of famous architects….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cult Leader  55 mins – “The story about Edward Wilson, better known as the infamous religious cult leader Brother XII, a wayward 1920s Theosophist at the centre of one of the most bizarre interludes in Canadian history.” At the link find the title,”The Dream of Brother XII, Tue, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_15632.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Canvasing  63 mins – “Oddly enough, we don’t actually know very much about how to change people’s minds, not scientifically, that’s why the work of the a group of LGBT activists in Los Angeles is offering something valuable to psychology and political science – uncharted scientific territory. The Leadership Lab has been developing a technique for the last eight years that can change a person’s mind about a contentious social issue after a 20-minute conversation. This episode is about that group’s redemption after their reputation was threatened by a researcher who, in studying their persuasion technique, committed scientific fraud and forced the retraction of his paper. That research and the retraction got a lot of media attention in 2015, but the story didn’t end there. In the show, you will meet the scientists who uncovered that researcher’s fraud and then decided to go ahead and start over, do the research themselves, and see if the technique actually worked.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 080-Deep Canvassing.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression Treatment  55 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 2, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160627_88772.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desert Storm Legacy  119 mins – “By most metrics, the 1991 Gulf War, also known as Operation Desert Storm, was a huge and rapid success for the United States and its allies. The mission of defeating Iraq’s army, which invaded Kuwait the year prior, was done swiftly and decisively. However, the war’s impact on soldiers who fought in it was lasting. Over 650,000 American men and women served in the conflict, and many came home with symptoms including insomnia, respiratory disorders, memory issues and others attributed to a variety of exposures – “Gulf War Illness.” On June 16, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings and Georgetown University Medical Center co-hosted a discussion on Desert Storm, its veterans, and how they are faring today. Representative Mike Coffman (R-Col.), the only member of Congress to serve in both Gulf wars, delivered an opening address before joining Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow at Brookings, for a moderated discussion. Joel Kupersmith, former head of the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs, convened a follow-on panel with Carolyn Clancy, deputy under secretary for health for organizational excellence at the Department of Veterans Affairs; Adrian Atizado, deputy national legislative director at Disabled American Veterans; and James Baraniuk, professor of medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Discrimination  58 mins – “Age and and Disability Discrimination Commissioner Susan Ryan addresses the National Press Club in Canberra.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Susan Ryan, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_SusanRyan_0607_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Devices  44 mins – “The manufacturers of Whill Model M, a new high-tech, compact wheelchair, boast that its tight turning radius and ability to handle any terrain will allow users to go anywhere you want. The only thing limiting accessibility? The price tag. Today we’re looking at the widening gap between innovation and affordability in the mobility device market. Then, it’s a lifesaving medication for millions of people – so why are so many trying to find alternatives to the effective, easy to use EpiPen?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Equipment  45 mins – “This is part one of a special double episode on wilderness EMS is full of great tips and discussion on what austere wilderness medicine has to teach every responder… Host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and his co-host Sam Bradley are joined by a group of wilderness EMS experts to talk about this topic.This week on the show we have a group of excellent panelists on the subject of wilderness EMS as it relates to what the Urban medic can take from it. We have Kevin Reiter from WildSafety.com, Dr. Seth Hawkins from Hawk Ventures which supports a wide range of Wilderness EMS programs, including the flagship Carolina Wilderness EMS Externship program. also joining us is Dr. Ben Abo, DO, MPH an ER Doc and Wilderness EMS specialist, and paramedic David Fifer, NRP who is a wilderness search and rescue specialist with RedSTAR Wilderness Response Team, which lives online at redstarmedical.org. . We also have the regular Disaster podcast guest USAR doc, Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group.” At the link right-click “Download” ndselect”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Medicine 32 mins – “In this episode of the Disaster Podcast hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic, and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Andi Tenner, MD, MPH, FACEP, from UCSF Medical Center’s ER. She is on the faculty as well at UCSF Medical School and is an experienced emergency room physician and world medical responder. Andi comes on the show to talk with us about ER preparedness and how the docs and nurses in Orlando dealt with the tragic nightclub shooting patients brought to Orlando Regional Medical Center (ORMC). Any hospital ER could have been struck by this patient overload situation if the incident happened close to their doors. Find out Andi’s thoughts on how every ER and facility needs to prepare now for these types of disaster situations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Donald Trump  51 mins – “In 1996, New Yorker staff writer Mark Singer was assigned a profile of Manhattan businessman Donald Trump, and it wasn’t long before Singer realized this was no ordinary subject. The piece has been called one of the best pre-campaign portraits of Trump there is, but Trump wasn’t impressed. He wrote Singer a note to call him A TOTAL LOSER whose WRITING SUCKS! Well, Singer’s at it again with a book that revisits his deeply reported, psychological portrait, and he joins us Tuesday to talk about it. Mark Singer has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1974. His books include Funny Money and Somewhere in America. His latest is called Trump and Me At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Abuse Issues  41 mins – “Today we travel to a future where all drugs are legal. In this episode we discuss the history of drug laws, why some drugs are legal and others aren’t, and what would happen if we just let everybody lose to do whatever they want.” At the link find the title, The Altered State, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Issues  58 mins – “The American Enterprise Institute’s Gerard Robinson, who formerly served as Florida education commissioner and Virginia education secretary, discusses his career and education policy in the U.S.” At the eink find the title, “Q&A with Gerard Robinson, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444499.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electric Grids  20 mins – “How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid. You can find lots more information, graphics and videos on our blog for this episode. How does power get to the people who use it? In this episode we talk about one of the greatest engineering accomplishments of the 20th century — something we use every day, but often take for granted: the electric grid. We talk to an expert about how power travels to our electric sockets, and hear about how one city — hit with major power outages during Superstorm Sandy in 2012 — is preparing for the next storm with something called a microgrid.” At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Energy Poverty  87 mins – “Energy is necessary for essential services ranging from heating and cooking to transportation, education, and healthcare. Today, an estimated 1.2 billion people around the world lack any access to electricity, and another 2.7 billion rely on the traditional use of biomass for cooking. Pollution from traditional sources such as biomass not only contributes to global warming but also causes respiratory diseases that kill over 3.5 million people each year, more than double the annual deaths attributed to malaria. Addressing global poverty requires taking steps to address energy poverty, but the best model for doing so is widely debated. Is centralized distribution the best way forward, or should energy projects focus on distributed generation? Can large-scale deployment of wind turbines and solar panels meet the needs of rural communities in the developing world? What role should nuclear power and fossil fuels play in expanding grid access? On May 24, the Energy Security and Climate Initiative (ESCI) at Brookings hosted a debate on solutions to increase energy access between Daniel Kammen, Class of 1935 distinguished professor of energy at the University of California, Berkeley, and Ted Nordhaus, co-founder and research director of the Breakthrough Institute. ClimateWire Editor Lisa Friedman moderated the discussion and audience Q&A.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyes on Cops  18 mins – “The scenes of violence caught on video recently have been a painful reminder of the strained relations between the public and the police in our country. This friction is not new. What is new is the technology: cameras and smart phones that record and transmit the violence live or within minutes. In Minnesota, the person who captured the aftermath of an officer-involved shooting was in the car with the victim. In Baton Rouge, the videos were made by bystanders. And in Dallas, the first images we saw of the sniper shootings came from people on the ground, in the crowd. But there’s also an organized movement of people who consider it their jobs to police the police and they, too, are recording. Some people call them “cop watchers.” In light of recent events we’re revisiting a story we brought to you last year. It’s a look at the cop watching movement in Texas – including in a suburb of Dallas where tensions over the practice already were on the rise.” At the link find the link “Update: Eyes on Cops, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Eyes-on-cops.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fact Checking  45 mins – “If you’re on Facebook, chances are tragic shootings and a hotly contested political climate have turned your social media feed into a forum for emotions, a place for sharing support, airing opinions and spreading lots and lots of misinformation. On today’s show, how Buzzfeed aims to combat internet hoaxes and fake news through their own tried and true method – an online quiz. And this summer’s hottest filming location – Nantucket?  We’ll speak with New England director Jay Craven about shooting a historical film off the cape on a shoestring budget and college students as crew.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fitness History  52 mins – “For years, Daniel Kunitz lived the life of the mind. His body though “became a trash depot.” Then he started running, which led to swimming, weightlifting, and eventually CrossFit. His health and his life steadily improved. Kunitz’s personal quest got him wondering how fitness culture has changed through the years. Why were the Greeks so buff? Why do guys do dumbbell curls? How have women changed exercise as we know it? Kunitz joins us to share what he’s learned about the evolution of fitness. Daniel Kunitz has served as editor in chief of Modern Painter, as well as an editor at the Paris Review and Details. His writing has appeared in Vanity Fair, Harper’s, and New York magazine. His new book is Lift: Fitness Culture, from Naked Greeks and Acrobats to Jazzercise and Ninja WarriorAt the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Waste Control  4 mins – “As the world’s population increases, so does the demand for food. One way to keep up with demand would be, logically, to just produce more food. Some argue that a better strategy would be to simply stop wasting so much food. Granite Geek David Brooks writes about food waste for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss his findings….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Four Seasons Restaurant  22 mins – “For two decades, the Four Seasons was the epicenter of culture in America. Jackie Onassis, Henry Kissinger, and Nora Ephron were just some of the regulars at the New York City restaurant, but the real stars were the creative power brokers in publishing, fashion, architecture, and advertising who convened in the massive, elegant bar room to make the decisions about what books we read, wine we drank, and clothes we wore. In his 1979 feature on the Four Seasons, former Esquire editor in chief Lee Eisenberg coined the phrase “power lunch”—to the everlasting envy of food critics. One such critic, the acclaimed Alan Richman, joins podcast host David Brancaccio this week to discuss the closing of what Richman considers the greatest restaurant in American history, what made it unique, and why it belonged to a vanishing world.” At the link find the title, “America’s Most Powerful Lunch, by Lee Eisenberg, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Enclosure: http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13153/3848240/Americas-Most-Powerful-Lunch-by-Lee-Eisenberg.mp3and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Possibilities  55 mins – “How does the inner science of ourselves intersect with the outer science of the universe? A Stratford Festival Forum on the theme of discovery with Janice Gross Stein, Dr. Joe MacInnis, and Jay Ingram.” At the link find the title, “The Discovery of Other Worlds, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160707_87060.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Medicine  39 mins – “We talk to Marek Glezerman, professor emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology and currently chairman of the Ethics Committee at the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University about his book Gender Medicine: The Groundbreaking New Science of Gender- and Sex-Based Diagnosis and Treatment.” At the link find the title, “141 Marek Glezerman – The Science of Gender Medicine, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 5836c8d1-b1fd-427b-8fca-d27801b78d5b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Haptic Conference  21 mins – “We get a feel for how the latest advances in haptic technologies are bringing us all closer together With the annual Eurohaptics conference as a backdrop, Nicola Davis delves into the world of ‘touch’ and haptic technology. Guided by the tech-savvy Timandra Harkness and UCL’s Dr Helge Wurdemann, we discuss how these technologies will change the worlds – both real and virtual – we all live in. We also hear from Professor Blake Hannaford, Dr Fernando Bello, Professor Hiroyuki Kajimoto, and Professor Stephen Brewster.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Workers Communication 37 mins – “Dr Louise Aronson is Professor of Medicine at University of California San Francisco and directs the Northern California Geriatrics Education Centre and UCSFs Medical Humanities. Having graduated from Harvard Medical School and completed her residency at UCSF she has gone on to become a multi award wining writer and has contributed to a variety of outlets including The New York Times, JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine. This is an fantastic conversation with someone who is truly changing how we communicate as physicians.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Publishing  54 mins – “Ganesh V is the Author of the book The Underage CEOs, which traces the stories of 11 entrepreneurs from small towns and Tier II cities of India. Ganesh is an engineer who worked in the area of marketing communication, and now is a writer with interest in travel, music, culture, lifestyle, health, communities, parenting and entrepreneurship.In this interview, we talk about Ganesh’s writing, his journey as an author, the process he followed to write the manuscript, experiences with publishing and finally, the feedback from readers and his upcoming book….” At the link find the link “Ganesh V Author of The Underage CEOs, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 4814284-ganesh-v-author-of-the-underage-ceos.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet History  47 mins – “It’s a remarkable ecosystem that allows each of us to exercise control over our lives. But how much control do we truly have? How many of our decisions are really being made by Google and Facebook and Apple? And, perhaps most importantly: is the Internet’s true potential being squandered?” At the link click the circle with the dots, rightclick “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Sale Location  5 mins –Jim Luty joins J.D. Dhein to discuss Internet Purchase Exchange Locations. When you purchase something online and you need to meet the seller, why not go to your local police station?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jules Feiffer  48 mins – “Jules Feiffer has been drawing and writing—comic strips, children’s books, plays—since the 1940s. His illustrations brought “The Phantom Tollbooth” to life, and his satirical cartoons for The Village Voice ran for more than four decades. Now in his 80s, Feiffer says he is doing some of his best work—in a totally new genre for the artist: graphic novels. His newest is a noir thriller titled “Cousin Joseph,” the prequel to 2014’s “Kill My Mother.” Cartoonist Jules Feiffer joins Diane to talk about his late turn to graphic novels, what satire can mean for the nation and feeling like a kid at 87.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Manufacturing Globally  177 mins – “Now the world’s second largest manufacturing economy since falling behind China in 2010, the United States relies on a robust manufacturing sector, which accounts for almost nine percent of American jobs. But manufacturing is constantly evolving as a result of changing technological capabilities, leadership approaches, and policy incentives. With the world economy more interconnected than ever before, solutions to the challenges facing the manufacturing industry take on an increasingly global perspective. On July 7, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted expert panelists for a half-day conference on the global context of modern manufacturing. Which innovations in leadership and workforce development have been successful around the world? How can effective policy initiatives foster manufacturing growth? What lessons can America learn from abroad? The conference marks the fifth annual John Hazen White Forum on Public Policy, which convenes leaders from academia, business, and government to discuss and identify solutions to the United States’ most pressing challenges.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Impact  106 mins – “Four states and D.C. have legalized recreational marijuana, and more may do so this fall. But legalization is just the beginning of policy development. After legalization come commercialization and regulation—processes sure to be influenced by corporations and interest groups. How will lobbying and corporatization affect the structure and regulation of the licit marijuana market? And how should policymakers respond? On June 16, the Center for Effective Public Management at Brookings released two papers examining these issues. Authors and Brookings Senior Fellows John Hudak, Jonathan Rauch, and Philip Wallach were joined by experts from government, private industry, the non-profit sector, and academia to assess the papers’ findings that state-level regulation can help rein in special interests and that big corporations can bring benefits as well as risks.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Twain  52 mins – “Monday, we’re telling the story of what author Richard Zacks calls Mark Twain’s “raucous and redemptive round-the-world comedy tour.” Twain was once America’s highest paid writer, but he was also a remarkably bad businessman. In 1895, with his career on the rocks and with what today would be millions in debt, Twain embarked on a 5-continent speaking tour he hoped would save him. Zacks joins Doug to talk about Twain’s wildly popular humor, his missteps, and what drove his quest for redemption. Richard Zacks is a journalist and author. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, and Harper’s Magazine among many others. His books include Island of Vice: Theodore Roosevelt’s Quest to Clean Up Sin-Loving New York and Pirate Coast: Thomas Jefferson, the First Marines, and the Secret Mission of 1805. His new book is called Chasing the Last Laugh: Mark Twain’s Raucous and Redemptive Round-the-World Comedy Tour At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Math Rant  66 mins – “Only one actually caller, but lots of great audience questions in this “call in” episode! We discussed power supplies, formal EE education, IC die photos, old calculators, math and more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Team Performance  49 mins – “My friend, Chris Hicks, is an emergency physician and trauma team leader in Toronto, Canada. His niche and research work revolves around human factors, team performance, and stress management for individuals and teams. We brought him down to give a grand rounds lecture; this is a recording of that lecture.” At the link right-click “Download” for the lecture and select “Save Link As” from the pop up menu.

Middle Class Finances  30 mins – “Neal Gabler’s cover story about the hidden financial struggles of the middle class sparked a firestorm of attention. Here, we talk with him about the personal story behind his revolutionary confessional, and how it feels to live the truth.” At the link find the title, “Redefining Success: Neal Gabler on the Secret Shame of the Middle Class, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files PNC3277711169.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage  10 mins – Discussion about minimum wage debates in many countries. At the link find the title, “Money talks: Minimum-wage mania, Jul, 2015,” right-click “Media files money_talks__minimum-wage_mania.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Pioneer Woman  47 mins – “A woman’s life on the American Frontier: we’ll open an old memoir of homesteading on the Mississippi Delta.” At the linkf ind the title, “One Pioneer Woman’s Story Of Life On The Mississippi Delta, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_486064589.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Scale Model  20 mins – Early in 1927, it began to rain in the Midwest. It kept raining all spring, and the Mississippi River became the collection point for this rainfall and the previous winter’s snowpack. As early as February, levees were strained, and started to give way. Over the course of the next three months, 145 levees would fail, and 27,000 square miles across ten states were put underwateThe total number of dead from this tragic event is unknown, but likely upwards of a thousand. In April, then Secretary of Commerce (and future President) Herbert Hoover, spoke to the American people by radio, calling the event “the most dangerous flood our country has ever known.”The following year, Congress took the first important step in regulating the Mississippi River and its tributaries by passing the Flood Control Act of 1928, which empowered the Army Corps of Engineers to study and alter the nation’s river systems—the Mississippi especially. The Army Corps would build infrastructure to corral and maneuver the river in order to control it. This was a task of enormous scale—much bigger than anything the Corps had undertaken before—and so they wanted a way to test out their building projects to make sure that they would work. The Army Corps began constructing crude models, mere ditches cut in the dirt with water flowing through them. These showed promise in their ability to predict flooding, and the effects of proposed dams. So the Army Corps of Engineers began building more sophisticated models….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow just under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Phone Videos  14 mins -.”The deaths of Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Philando Castile in Falcon Heights, Minnesota, were both captured on video. So were the deaths of Walter Scott, Eric Garner, and so many others. That’s not new. But technology has become more and more sophisticated, and so have the bystanders using it, primed by grim history to turn the camera on, and, increasingly, involve an audience. We explore the role of Facebook Live in the events of the last week and offer you our Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, for guidance on how to film the police, wisely and within your rights. Brooke speaks with journalist Carlos Miller of Photography is Not A Crime, former police officer and current law professor Seth Stoughton, and Jennifer Carnig, former communications director for the New York Civil Liberties Union. Find the ACLU’s apps for recording police action here.” At the link find the title, “Breaking News Consumer’s Handbook: Bearing Witness Edition, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm071116podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MOOC on Cancer  52 mins – “Dr Momna Hejmadi, Dr Andrew Chalmers and Dr Lorenzo Caggiano summarise some of the latest developments in cancer research. This lecture was delivered as part of our MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), ‘Inside Cancer: how genes influence cancer development’. https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/inside-cancer.” (Over 200 free courses with many topics are also available at that link.) At the link find the title, “Inside Cancer, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805869-uniofbath-inside-cancer.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Narcissism Effect 26 mins – “It doesn’t take a psychologist to see narcissism in our culture of selfies. But we decided to talk to one anyway. Jean Twenge is a researcher and author of the books The Narcissism Epidemic, and Generation Me.” At the link find the title, “Episode 38: Me, Me, Me, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160708_hiddenbrain_podcast38.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Parks  48 mins – “On Aug. 25, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act that created the National Park Service. One hundred years later, it protects more than 400 parks and monuments, from Yellowstone to Gettysburg and the Stonewall Inn, the first national landmark honoring the fight for gay rights. Still, there are challenges, like a $12 billion maintenance backlog and an ongoing ethics scandal. And some say a lack of funding could threaten America’s rich conservation legacy. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell talks with Diane about her vision for preserving green spaces for the next generation. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Nitrogen Conservation  26 mins – “Sustainable Agriculture (starts 3:06): We couldn’t feed the planet without nitrogen, a vital nutrient for crops. But most soils don’t produce enough of it to feed anywhere near our 7 billion-plus humans on the planet. So, for nearly a century we’ve been applying synthetic fertilizer—mainly nitrogen and phosphorus — to grow crops for animals and people. But we have overindulged, creating vast amounts of waste, in the form of nitrogen pollution of waterways and the atmosphere. State and federal regulations have pressured growers to dramatically reduce fertilizer runoff from their fields. But it’s not been enough. Another approach – call it the carrot versus the stick – is also taking hold. Major food retailers, wholesalers, and producers, such as Walmart, United Suppliers and Unilever are transforming their whole supply chains, making food production less carbon- and nitrogen-intensive. Suzy Friedman, a sustainable agriculture expert with the Environmental Defense Fund, discusses with host Susan Moran how programs such as SUSTAIN help large food companies shrink their environmental footprint.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noncomplementary Behavior  60 mins – “Psychology has a golden rule: If I am warm, you are usually warm. If I am hostile, you are too. But what happens if you flip the script and meet hostility with warmth? It’s called “noncomplementary behavior” — a mouthful, but a powerful concept, and very hard to execute. Alix and Hanna examine three attempts to pull it off: during a robbery, a terrorism crisis and a dating dry spell.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PACE Trial Controversy  93 mins – “Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: David Tuller Vincent speaks with David Tuller about flaws in the U.K’s $8 million PACE trial for chronic fatigue syndrome, and efforts to have the trial data released.” At the link right-click “Download TWiV 397” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers  36 mins – “Frederik Obermaier explains how his German newspaper came to initiate the biggest data leak in the history of investigative journalism.” At the link find the title, “Journalist central to breaking Panama Papers reveals story behind the massive leak, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160715_32225.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Performance Enhancing Drugs  33 mins – “In this episode we talk to Chris Hoyte from RMPDC [Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center] about Lance Armstrong, blood doping, and the biological passport. This is the second part of a two part interview.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Learning Network 34 mins – “Thank you all for ten YEARS of [TechChickTips] podcasting! Maybe we’ll go ten more! In this anniversary episode, we share 10 Bytes of Wisdom for our 10 Years of Podcasting.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photonic Chips  12 mins – “Just 13 years ago, photonic chips were a dream. These chips use light instead of electricity. Today photonic chips are found in the world’s major data centres and allow vast amounts of data to be processed. As a result, networks are faster and more energy efficient. As Ben Eggleton explains, the next frontier is getting photonic chips into smart phones. They bring with them the promise of greatly improved capability, such as the measuring and analysis of blood and saliva, and even the levels of pollution in the air. Photonics are estimated as the basis of a $7 trillion industry in Australia, being 10% of the economy.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Picric Acid  7 mins – “Once you start studying chemistry, you see the world differently. Entirely unrelated things can trigger a series of chemical questions, and some won’t rest until they’ve got to the bottom of them. And so it was that a dress once worn by a famous author set Michael Freemantle digging into the history of picric acid….” At the link right-click “Download: CiiE_Picric_acid.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Incidents  49 mins – “Thousands of protesters took to the streets over the weekend nationwide after three days of fatal gun violence between African-American men and police. In the space of two days, two black men in Louisiana and Minnesota were killed by police. The shootings were caught on video and seen by millions. Then, a day later, a black war veteran killed five officers in a retaliatory sniper attack. Diane and a panel of guests discuss the latest on the shooting investigations, and look at continuing tensions over deadly police force against black Americans and the movement for justice.” (5 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Police PR  31 mins – “The Current hosts a panel discussion on how to best address long-standing tensions between police and minority communities in our country.” At the link find the title, “‘This mistrust is deep’: how to improve relations between minorities and Canadian police, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_30822.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Torture in Chicago  27 mins – “A tale of violence, payback, and how to make things right.” At the link find the title, “#713: Paying for the Crime, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20160720_pmoney_podcast072016a.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Viewpoint  15 mins – “Marc Rainford says growing polarization between law enforcement and those they are intended to serve compromised his ability to effectively police.” At the link find the title, “Toronto police constable quits, says tension with community contributes to decision, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20160714_31340.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing in America  58 mins – “Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Heather Mac Donald discusses her book [The War on Cops], in which she looks at policing in America. She is interviewed by John Jay College professor Delores Jones-Brown.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Heather Mac Donald, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.445446.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Population Growth  40 mins – “Roger Martin, Chair of Population Matters, delivers a lecture for the Institute for our Institute for Sustainable Energy & the Environment considering population growth and the environment.” At the link find the title, “It’s no use reducing your footprint if you keep increasing the number of feet, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 273805685-uniofbath-its-no-use-reducing-your-footprint-if-you-keep-increasing-the-number-of-feet.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price Fixing  58 mins – “There are all sorts of situations in which we suspect the fix is in, but we almost never find out for certain. On today’s show, for once, we find out. The whole program is devoted to one story, in which we go inside the back rooms of one multinational corporation and hear the intricate workings—recorded on tape—of how they put the fix in.” At the link find the title, “#168: The Fix Is In,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychosis  54 mins – “What’s it like to go mad and be crazy, living at wit’s end? First comes diagnosis, followed by treatment. Then there’s stigma and stereotyping. Marilyn Powell talks to those dealing with mental illness with their own truth to tell.” At the link find the title, “Wit’s End, Part 1, Jun, 2016, right-click “Media files ideas_20160620_74679.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Panel  67 mins – “Libby Schaaf, Mayor of Oakland James Bell, Civil Rights Leader; Executive Director, W. Hayward Burns Institute for Juvenile Justice, Fairness and Equality Manuel Pastor, Demographer and Professor of Sociology, American Studies and Ethnicity, The University of Southern California Joshua Johnson, Creator/Host, Rockit Fuel Radio Podcast; Lecturer, U.C. Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism—Moderator This program is part of our special series focused on people, place and power in the Bay Area, sponsored by the San Francisco Foundation. The Bay Area is at a crossroads. We live in one of the most industrious, exciting places anywhere. We know that our vitality, ingenuity and broad array of cultural identities make the region special. Yet we also know that we have significant challenges. People are worried about jobs, housing, transportation, and about making sure that everybody has the chance to participate, prosper and reach their full potential, regardless of their race or the neighborhood in which they live. Is it possible to provide true opportunity for all residents of our region, or is the notion of Bay Area exceptionalism just a myth?” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy  29 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, host Alex Wise chats with Daniel Kirk-Davidoff, a climate scientist at the University of Maryland and at MDA Information Systems. First, Kirk-Davidoff tells us about how the science of predicting changes in climate and weather influences how utility companies and futures markets behave. Then, we hear about the challenges the developing world faces to keep carbon emissions low even as populations expand. Last, he talks about how different the electric grid of tomorrow may look in a few decades.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Scoble  83 mins – “Leo Laporte talks with Robert Scoble, a heavy virtual reality and mixed reality enthusiast. He is also an entrepreneur in residence at uploadvr.comAt the link click “Download options,”right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School of life  42 mins – “We are bring back one of our all time most downloaded guests this week, Roman Krznaric. In this episode we discuss Roman’s most recent book, How Should We Live?: Great Ideas from the Past for Everyday Life. There are many ways to try to improve our lives—we can turn to the wisdom of philosophers, the teachings of spiritual guides, or the latest experiments of psychologists. But we rarely look to history for inspiration—and when we do, it can be surprisingly powerful. In this episode, the cultural historian Roman Krznaric explores twelve universal topics—including love, family, and empathy; work, time, and money—by illuminating the past and revealing the wisdom we have been missing. Roman is a cultural thinker, writer, and founding faculty member of The School of Life in London. He has taught sociology and politics at Cambridge University and City University, London, and advises organizations including Oxfam and the United Nations on using empathy and conversation to create social change. He has been named by The Observer as one of Britain’s leading lifestyle philosophers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shark Conservation  47 mins – “Marine ecologist Dr. Neil Hammerschlag has looked inside the mouth of a wild tiger shark and lived to tell the tale. He says that sharks pose only a small risk to people: “Humans are not on the shark’s menu.” Also, opera percussionist Patti Niemi talks about her journey from Juilliard to the orchestra pit, and her struggles with anxiety and OCD.” At the link find the title, “July 14, 2016,”Swimming With Sharks & What ‘Jaws’ Got Wrong,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Debt Crisis  53 mins – “Just about everyone involved in the student loan industry these days – banks, private investors and even the federal government – makes money off the borrowers. On this episode of Reveal, we explore how this happened and who’s profiting from student debt.” At the link find the title, “Who’s getting rich off your student debt? Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files Whos-getting-rich-off-your-student-debt_podcast.mp3and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Loan Dissection  34 mins – “Our Spotlight on Magazine series continues with a recent story by [Boston Globe] Magazine Staff Writer Neil Swidey about the amount of student loan debt tripling to $1.23 trillion.” At the link find the title, “Washington Journal: Spotlight on Student Debt, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.444257.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Lone Crisis  49 mins – “Forty-two million Americans owe $1.3 trillion in student debt. We’ll look at who made money on all that debt.” At the link find the title, “Why Student Loan Debt Exploded, Jul, 2016 ,” right-click “Media files npr_486053959.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees  174 mins – “On Tuesday, June 14, the Foreign Policy Program at Brookings and its Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World hosted a panel discussion on “The Politics of Rescue,” which explored the current conflicts in the Middle East, the resulting refugee crisis, the international community’s response, and the political, social, and economic hurdles to addressing this global crisis. The discussion also explored how these issues are being addressed by the United States and how they are playing into the 2016 presidential election. Panelists included Senator John McCain (R-Arizona), David Miliband, CEO of the International Rescue Committee, and Leon Wieseltier, the Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy at The Brookings Institution. Washington Post columnist David Ignatius moderated the discussion. This panel discussion was part of the larger conference, “Refuge and Responsibility: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in 2016.” The objective of the conference is to generate meaningful discussion and mobilize real steps among international government and non-government actors to respond to the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis. The conflict in Syria and the flight of millions of traumatized Syrian citizens have placed enormous stress on Syria’s neighbors, Europe, and more broadly on the international refugee and humanitarian systems. An effective response must recognize the distinct circumstances facing the international community and Europe’s cities specifically, which are at the frontline of the crisis, absorbing massive numbers of refugees. The Refuge and Responsibility conference will focus on the political, economic, social, and cultural implications as countries grapple with this crisis. Conference participants, which include Syria refugees now residing in the United states, will seek to generate new ideas and mobilize effective international action.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Test Pilot  125 mins – “This is the first of several episodes from my trip to Airbus Toulouse: we cover flight testing of the A350. We have two guests. First, we speak with Peter Chandler, a test pilot at Airbus, about envelope expansion, the relationship between simulation and the real airplane, and test flying in general. Our second guest is Pascal Verneau, a test flight engineer. We discuss his role in flight testing, as well as some special equipment installed in (some of) the testing aircraft.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File Directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Textbook Publishing  17 mins – “…Over his career advising clients in a wide variety of publishing and entertainment transactions and disputes, Steve Gillen has explored the dark corners of contractual law and sheds light on what he found there in a new publication from the Textbook & Academic Authors Association, “Guide to Textbook Publishing Contracts.” …“But it may not be about money for a lot of textbook authors. Some of them – they’re at universities where publishing a textbook, particularly a market-leading textbook, would be considered in advancement and promotion and tenure considerations,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “If that’s the case, if this is a publication that they need for promotion or for tenure, then the focus ought to be not so much money, perhaps, but making sure that the book actually sees the light of day. So your attention is going to be focused on things like the manuscript acceptability clause and making sure that you maintain as much control over the content and the message that the book ends up delivering as is possible…. The Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) provides professional development resources, events, and networking opportunities for textbook authors and authors of scholarly journal articles and books. TAA is the only national, nonprofit membership association dedicated solely to assisting textbook and academic authors. Steve Gillen is a long-time member of the TAA Council.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tin Ears  55 mins – “Many of us love to sing, but we’re not all good at it. Some of us can’t even carry a tune and are told not to sing. Tim Falconer dives into neuroscience, psychology — and music itself — to find out why he’s a bad singer.” At the link find the title, “The Ballad of Tin Ears, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20160712_11940.mp3 The Ballad of Tin Ears” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income  49 mins – “The idea of a universal basic income has been around for centuries. Thomas Paine, one of this country’s founding fathers, was an early proponent. Later, it was taken up by progressives like Martin Luther King Jr., but conservatives and libertarians have been interested in the idea, too. Today, a leading voice in support of the concept is Andy Stern, who spent 14 years as president of the Service Employees International Union, a tenure that led some to call him the country’s most influential labor leader at the time. Diane talks with Andy Stern about technology, the future of work and why he is making a case for a universal basic income.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Veterans Affairs Modernization  60 mins – “With the demand for its services constantly evolving, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) faces complex challenges in providing accessible care to America’s veterans. Amidst a history of long patient wait times, cost overruns, and management concerns, the VA recently conducted a sweeping internal review of its operations.  The result was the new MyVA program. How will MyVA improve the VA’s care of veterans? What will it do restore public confidence in its efforts? What changes is the VA undergoing to address both internal concerns and modern challenges in veteran care?On June 20, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted VA Secretary Robert McDonald. Secretary McDonald described the VA’s transformation strategy and explained how the reforms within MyVA will impact veterans, taxpayers and other stakeholders. He addressed lessons learned not just for the VA but for all government agencies that strive to achieve transformation and improve service delivery.” At the link, under the audio tab, right-click “Download (Help),” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vulcanology  60 mins – “UK Geo-hazards expert Dr. Bill McGuire (“Waking the Giants”) on recent quakes & links to climate change. Oregon Professor Robert Yeats new book “Earthquake Time Bombs” – most cities at risk from quakes or mega-tsunamis. About 12,000 years ago there was a period of “volcanic storms”, so many erupted. The Earth was unstable, rocking and rolling with Earthquakes. Geologists know climate change destabilized the Earth’s crust. Bill McGuire wrote an influential article in the Guardian newspaper about this in 2012. Does that sound too fantastic? The weight of ice miles thick poured into the sea as that latest ice age ended. Released from that weight, land rose. Long-standing pressure points reacted, and the world shook. As the article in Live Science says: “McGuire conducted a study that was published in the journal Nature in 1997 that looked at the connection between the change in the rate of sea level rise and volcanic activity in the Mediterranean for the past 80,000 years and found that when sea level rose quickly, more volcanic eruptions occurred, increasing by a whopping 300 percent.“ …Even if that time of extra volcanoes and quakes is farther into our future, the threat of everyday earthquakes and tsunamis is larger now. That is because so much of the doubled and tripled human population lives near the sea. We’ve built our mega-cities – and nuclear power plants – within tsunami range. Eight thousand years ago, an earthquake caused an undersea land-slide off Norway. The tsunami raced around the whole North Atlantic, reaching up to 30 meters high – that’s well over 90 feet. …We’ll talk about what happened the last time Tokyo was nearly levelled, and the next time, which Japanese scientists say is over 90% likely within the next couple of decades. The aftershocks would be in the world’s shaky financial system. Would a big quake in Los Angeles, Vancouver, or Tokyo be the trigger for a massive collapse in the global economy? That’s why our second guest, Dr. Robert Yeats from Oregon wrote his book “Earthquake Time Bombs”. We’ll go into that risk in depth.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Welfare Programs  53 mins – “Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton vowed to end welfare as we know it. And he did. Today, only a quarter of welfare dollars actually goes toward basic assistance – housing, transportation or essential household items. On this hour of Reveal, we take a road trip with Marketplace’s new podcast “The Uncertain Hour” and find out the surprising ways different states use this money, for things such as relationship counseling and college tuition for well-off kids.” At the link find the title, “A welfare check, Jul, 2016,”right-click “Media files A-welfare-check.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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