Media Mining Digest 259 – Oct 28, 2016: Alzheimers Caregiver, Alzheimers Genetics, Arabs in Politics, Armenian Unrest, Big Listen – African American, Biocontrol, Breast Cancer, Broadband in Chattanooga, Broadband in North Carolina, Car Free in Los Angeles, Carbon Dioxide Levels, Catastrophism, CFCs and HFCs, Child Care and Education, Chocolate Benefits, Climate Deals History, Conspiracies and Paranoia, Denial of Service Attacks, Detroit Repair, Disabled in Canada, Distracted Minds, Economic Trends, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Extraterrestrial Communications, Eyesight Loss, Farm Labor, Forensic Science, Gabapentin, Gender Bias, Gender Police and Race Relations, Green City Rebuild, Gun Violence, Gunshot Deaths Book, Healthcare Fraud, Hidden Brain, Highway of Tears, Horses in Military, Hostage Ransoms, House Squatters, Housing Bubble in Canada, Human Rights Activist, Innovation Guidance, Internships, Jihadist Viewpoint, Kidnapping and Ransom Business, Maintenance Value, Mars, McMansion Rant, Medical Students Discussion, Medical Tattoos, Memory Illusions, MERS, Middle East Wars, Moose Hazards, Mosul Battle, Necrobiome, Ocean Microbiology, Online Activism Failure, Oysters Discussion, Parenting, Plant Chemical Uses, Pornography, Premature Baby Issues, Premed Concerns, Residential Politics, Refugees in Germany, Russia Inside, Self-Checkout Equipment, Self-gentrification, Ships-Marines-Baseball, Slum Health, Speechless Series, Squatters in Homes, Subarus and Lesbians, Syrian Activists in Canada, Syrian Disabled Refugee, Time Travel, Truman and MacArthur, United States and Russia, Universal Basic Income, Venezuela Implosion, Venomous, Violence Intervention, Wedding Traditions, Wikileaks and Politics

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 88 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 254 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 11,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 10,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 340 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Alzheimers Caregiver 43 mins – “When asked about what it was like to live with Alzheimer’s disease, Donald Burke said, “like standing on melting ice.” Today, a husband and wife dig into the metaphor to find meaning. [first 10 mins] Also today: how is it that humans can send rovers to Mars and 3D print organs, yet still not control rats?  For thousands of years, humans have been losing the battle against the vermin that destroy crops, spread disease, and proliferate on an almost unimaginable scale. We’re learning about a tech-startup run by a biologist Buddhist who may stumbled into a cruelty-free solution  – rodent birth control.” At the link right-click the play button beside :listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers Genetics 21 mins – “Randall Bateman and Nick Fox discuss what they’ve learned from their papers on Alzheimer’s disease.” At the link find the title, “‘Autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer’s disease: The Lancet Neurology: 21 October 2016,” right-click “Media files laneur_161021.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arabs in Politics 34 mins – “Did you know that in many states, Arab numbers are equal to or greater than Jewish numbers — but for a variety of reasons, Arabs have never defeated a candidate with their clout. Why? In this episode, Arab American Institute president, Dr. James Zogby explains. He gets real about what it takes to achieve power in this country and he would know … For decades, he’s been working tirelessly in Washington to influence power in a pretty hostile climate. Don’t miss it!” At the link click “Listen,” right-click “Download stream” from the pop-up menu.

Armenian Unrest 24 mins – “A group of war veterans who stormed a police station in Armenia call themselves the Daredevils of Sassoun, inspired by an 8th century poem, but are they heroes or terrorists?” At the link find the title, “Armenia’s Daredevils, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04cjgtd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Big Listen-African Americans 50 mins – “The host of The Show About Science gives Lauren some hot tips on interviewing, and we talk to the producer of Historically Black about the stories of everyday objects in African-American families.” At the link find the title, “Episode 1: Santa Is A Big, Big Fan, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161006_specials_biglisten.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biocontrol 58 mins – “When a Harvard professor accidentally let Gypsy Moths loose in the 1860s, he didn’t realize he was releasing a scourge that would plague New England forests for more than a century. Nothing could stop the moths except a controversial method of wildlife management called biocontrol. It’s the scientific version of “fighting fire with fire”: eradicate an invasive species by introducing another invasive species. Since then, there have been lots of biocontrol success stories, but also a few disastrous failures. In this episode, we ask whether biocontrol is the best–maybe the only way–to combat invasives, or if it’s just an example of scientific hubris.” At the link find the title,”Episode 15: Never Bring a Sledgehammer to a Scalpel Fight, right-click “Media files 4898285-episode-15-never-bring-a-sledgehammer-to-a-scalpel-fight.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biocontrol 56 mins – “ We kick off the second season of NHPR’s newest show, Outside/In, with a discussion of  biological control: using non-native species to combat destructive invasive pests and plants that are decimating a local species.  It’s the focus of the Outside/In episode titled “Never Bring a Sledgehammer to a Scalpel Fight.”  This approach to managing invasive species, used by scientists for over a century, has had some spectacular failures, but there have been many success stories as well.  We’ll look at the history of the approach, the arguments for and against, and examine the philosophical implications.  Is biological control messing with Mother Nature or our only hope against invasive species changing the landscape?” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Breast Cancer 4 mins – “Breast Cancer Education, Oct 20, 2016 – Audio interview by GAO staff with Marcia Crosse, Director, Health Care” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Chattanooga 25 mins – “Chattanooga, Tennessee, has a lightning-fast, publicly run broadband network that has attracted a lot of tech talent to the city. But as the city builds an economy around technology, one thing is becoming apparent: There’s a gaping divide between those who are tech-savvy and those who aren’t. In some neighborhoods, as few as 1 in 5 households have an internet connection. Can Chattanooga bridge its digital divide?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 23 mins – “In June, North Carolina released a report pronouncing that 93 percent of the state has access to broadband speeds. At the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, our Research Associate H.R. Trostle, who has been examining reporting data in North Carolina for the past year, came to some very different conclusions. In episode 224, she and Christopher talk about the report they co-authored, which gives a different perspective on the connectivity situation in the Tar Heel State.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file….”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Car Free in Los Angeles 12 mins – “The Ride’s Sue Carpenter continues her adventures with carlessness” At the link find the title, “‘The Ride: Tesla goes self driving and continuing the adventures of decarification, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files Audio_4_01-e3cc10b7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Dioxide Levels 60 mins – “For some reason, perhaps deep in our past, humans easily fixate on catastrophe, whether real or imaginary. Does the nation, the economy, or even civilization need to collapse in order to start anew? Who benefits if we think like that….” At the link find the title, “Can We Count on Catastrophe? Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files ES_161019_LoFi.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catastrophism 60 mins – “…The producers of the long-running radio program “Against the Grain” teamed up with others, to write an influential if controversial book about all that. It was published in 2012 with the title “Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Politics of Collapse and Rebirth.” Why bring that back now? Three reasons: some listeners suggest I’m too fixated on collapse, at the expense of solutions. Meanwhile, in America Donald Trump, and others in Europe, feed on creating public fear. And finally, there are signs more people are afraid something awful is about to happen, or already happening behind the scenes. Not to mention the science of the rapidly developing climate catastrophe, which is all too real. I’ve reached out to one of the authors, Eddie Yuen. Eddie teaches in the Urban Studies Department at the San Francisco Art Institute. He is the co-editor, of the book “Confronting Capitalism: Dispatches from a Global Movement.” He’s written about popular movements, the politics of Right and Left, and the role of apocalypse in environmentalism. Along with Sasha Lilley, another author in the book, Eddie has been a radio producer for “Against the Grain” on KPFA, the Pacifica flagship station in Berkeley and the Bay area.” At the link right-click “Lo-Fi” near “Download…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CFCs and HFCs 30 mins– “The Montreal Protocol that was signed in 1987 is widely regarded as one of the most important pieces of international cooperation on environmental issues. It created a phased ban on chlorofluorocarbons, or CFCs, the principal culprit of the so-called hole in the ozone layer, now greatly diminished, due in large part to this agreement. Just this past weekend, nearly 30 years later, representatives from 140 nations gathered in Kigali, Rwanda to amend the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. This time, the aim was to phase out the use of hydrofluorocarbons or HFCs, which don’t affect the ozone layer, but are among the most potent greenhouse gasses that humans produce. This week on Sea Change Radio, we talk with one of the key figures behind the Montreal Protocol and Kigali Amendment, international environmental lawyer and founder of the Institute for Governance and Sustainable Development, Durwood Zaelke.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Care and Education 58 mins – “Opposition spokeswoman for early childhood education and development and TAFE and vocational education.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Kate Ellis, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files NPCc_KateEllis_1910_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chocolate Benefits 36 mins – “In episode 327, Mike and James do a delicious podcast around the evidence for chocolate. We look at the cohorts and the RCTs that have looked at the effect of this heavenly food on outcomes like mortality, cardiovascular disease, blood pressure, depression and acne. The results make us happy and smile.” At the link find the title “Episode 327: Chocolate – evidently very beneficial, or is it?” right-click “Media files Episode 327 Chocolate evidently very beneficial or is it.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Deals History 80 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture, University of Bath honorary graduate and Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University Scott Barrett discusses his work on international agreements. Known for his cross-cutting research, which combines economics and game theory with international politics, Professor Barrett here examines the relative success of climate deals over the last 25 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conspiracies and Paranoia 32 mins – “Jesse Walker is the author of The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory, a book that explores the history of American conspiracy theories going all the way back to the first colonies. Walker argues that conspiratorial thinking is not a feature of the fringe, but a fundamental way of looking at the world that is very much mainstream. Listen as Walker explains why we love conspiracy theories, how they flourish, how they harm, and what they say about a culture.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 087-Paranoia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Denial of Service Attacks 44 mins – “A group calling itself New World Hacking took down the websites for BBC Global in January, 2016 through denial of service – or DDOS attacks. Other hacks have hit the Trump campaign and MasterCard. The hackers say it’s just the beginning. That could affect all of us, thanks to our increasingly connected lifestyles. Our tech dude explains the internet of broken things.[first 10 mins] Also, novelist Willa Cather wrote of pioneers on the plains from a farm in Peterborough. More than 65 years after her death, a series of local events and newly published letters reveal the hidden side of a fiercely guarded writer.” At the link right-click the play button beside :listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Repair 21 mins – “Over the last 40-plus years, Detroit has seen its economy falter and its population dwindle, leaving thousands of homes empty and starting a downward spiral of neighborhood decay. In this episode, join host Brian Babylon as he digs into how Loveland Technologies has used city support and funding from JPMorgan Chase to build an innovative crowdsourcing platform to help heal Detroit’s neighborhoods.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Disabled in Canada 21 mins – “The next generation of disability activists aren’t waiting for society to ‘help them’, they’re calling for a revolution. Meet young Canadians living with both visible, and invisible disabilities, fighting against gaps in funding, services, and attitudes.” At the link find the title, “Meet the next generation of disability activists ‘calling for a revolution’ Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_74314.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Distracted Minds 52 mins – “We all do it. Walking down the street–a quick check of the phone to see who emailed. Watching television–why not send out a tweet, too. Sitting at dinner with family–it will take only a second to read that text. Even when we know we should resist the temptation, it’s so hard to ignore technology. We pay for it in half-completed tasks, near accidents, and disjointed conversations. Why is this? It turns out our brains are not very good at driving away distraction, and technology has only aggravated it. Guest host Derek McGinty talks to neuroscientist Dr. Adam Gazzaley and psychologist Dr. Larry Rosen about our ancient brains in a high-tech world.” (2 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Economic Trends 69 mins – “Chris Arnade, former Wall Street trader turned photographer and social chronicler, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what he learned from the front lines of the financial industry in the 1990s and 2000s when everything slowly and then very quickly began to fall apart. He also discusses his transition into observer and photographer of drug addicts, the poor, and the forgotten parts of America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanor Holmes Norton 35 mins – “Washington may be the political center of the free world, but its 670,000 residents don’t have a say in the national legislature. What they do have is a nonvoting delegate in the House of Representatives. Eleanor Holmes Norton can introduce legislation and vote in committee, but she can’t vote on the House floor. Over the course of 13 terms, the “Warrior on the Hill” been fighting to change that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Extraterrestrial Communication 50 mins – “Astrobiologist David Grinspoon and his guest, Hugo Award-winning sci-fi author and scientist David Brin weigh the pros and cons of attempting to contact extraterrestrials. Plus, Chuck Nice asks the pair Cosmic Queries about what we’ll do if aliens find us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyesight Loss 55 mins – “Singer and broadcaster Mônica Vasconcelos is slowly losing her sight. Originally from Brazil, she now lives in London, a busy city she finds harder and harder to negotiate safely. As her vision gradually fades, she goes in search of people who may show her new possibilities – new ways of being. They are, among others; her brother, who lives with the same eye condition, and who expertly masters the use of a white cane to navigate the city; her godson, Tiago, who takes her hand in the warm waves on the beaches of Brazil, and – in one of the last interviews he gave before his death – the writer and thinker Dr Oliver Sacks. Oliver Sacks was a neurologist who changed the way many people think about so called ‘disabilities’, and who Monica met in his New York flat. To her surprise, they found themselves discussing ways of approaching the onset of blindness not only with insight, but also with humour – especially at one magical moment when Sacks shared his own collection of canes with her. The canes, he explained, were acquired to help him get around the city, as his own sight fades. Swimming, he tells Monica, is the one place he feels free and in his own skin – try and find your own version of swimming he advises her.” At the link find the title,”Losing My Sight and Learning to Swim, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04c1682.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eyesight Loss 21 mins – “Peter White is joined by Brazilian singer and journalist Monica Vasconcelos, who is the subject of a World Service documentary, in which she talks of her sight loss. Tom Walker meets Tony North who has been using a new reading device called OrCam. The user wears it like a pair of spectacles and points to text or information for the device to read out. Assistive technology consultant Graham Page talks about other platforms which are available to help blind and partially-sighted people access the written or printed word.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Labor 98 mins – The slowdown in migration from Mexico since the 2008-09 recession has had a little-noted effect on farm labor in the United States: Increased use of the H-2A guestworker program. The H-2A program, long criticized by employers for cumbersome regulations, has doubled in size since 2007 and now provides workers to fill more than 150,000 farm jobs. Since agriculture relies on newcomers from abroad to replace farm workers who exit for nonfarm jobs, farm labor markets are ideal for observing employer adjustments to the reduction in the arrival of immigrant labor. Often identified as the source for unauthorized migration from Mexico because of the Bracero program, agriculture may also provide the template for future immigration reforms that involve legalizing currently unauthorized workers and making it easier to hire guestworkers in the future. This discussion features data that could help inform future reform debates. It also focuses on some of the adjustments that farm employers are making, including increased mechanization, improved wages and benefits, and the increased use of the H-2A program.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Science 55 mins – “In these cases, emerging DNA evidence and the smell of death (yes, really) pushed the boundaries of what was technologically possible. But how reliable are they? To find out, we go to a body farm and talk to Assoc. Prof. Joan Bytheway, Asst. Prof. Sheree Hughes-Stamm, Matt Young, Dr. Arpad Vass, and Asst. Prof. Donovan Haines.” At the link find the title, “DNA and the Smell of Death, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT2954924539.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pp-up menu.

Gabapentin 6 mins – “Gabapentin has been described as a ‘wonder drug’ for its ability to treat neuropathic pain, restless leg syndrome, migraine, bipolar disorder, drug and alcohol dependence, attention deficit disorder, premenstrual syndrome, and much more. It is a pharmacologically active amino acid, created as a potential epilepsy drug in 1974 by the pharmaceutical company Parke-Davis, now owned by Warner-Lambert, a division of Pfizer. Although it was first approved as a treatment for partial seizures in 1993, Pfizer pleaded guilty to illegally marketing gabapentin for unapproved uses in 2004 and was heavily fined by the US Department of Justice for defrauding public health care programs….” At the link find the title, “Gabapentin: Chemistry in its element, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files CiiE_Gabapentin.mp3” nd select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Bias 21 mins – “A century after women won the vote in the US, we still see very few of them in leadership roles. Researchers say women are trapped in a catch-22 known as “the double bind.” Note: an early version of this episode incorrectly stated that Carol Moseley Braun was the first African-American U.S. Senator. She was in fact the first female African-American Senator.” At the link find the title, “Episode 48: Men: 44, Women: 0,” right-click “Media files 20161018 hiddenbrain hbepi48.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender, Police and Race Relations 92 mins – “A formal apology from the leader of the national police chiefs association, how fathers talk with their sons about respecting women, the little-known history of LA’s Wrigley Field.” At the link find the title, “A police chief’s apology, how fathers speak to their sons, the lost history of LA’s Wrigley field, Oct, 2016,” right-click “A police chief’s apology, how fathers speak to their sons, the lost history of LA’s Wrigley field, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files SHOW101816-744bff72.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Green City Rebuild 28 mins – ”A decade ago, a tornado wiped out the small town of Greensburg, Kansas. But the town decided to rebuild—as a totally green community. Ten years out, has the green rebuilding program been successful, and is this a model that might be used by other towns? Or is going green harder than it seems?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 27 mins – “The doctors in the U.S. who treat the epidemic of gun violence… and the researcher who is trying to prevent it.” At the link find the title, “The MD Who Spent A Million Dollars Researching Gun Violence,” right-click “Download The MD Who Spent A Million Dollars Researching Gun Violenceand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gunshot Deaths Book 52 mins – “On November 23, 2013, nearly a dozen children and teens were shot and killed in the United States. This did not happen in a mass shooting, but in cities, suburbs and towns across the country – like San Jose, California, where best friends played with a gun they thought was unloaded; Charlotte, North Carolina, where a disagreement escalated to gunfire; Dallas, Texas, where a case of mistaken identity left a 16-year-old dead on the street. These stories do not make this day remarkable. In fact, they make it a pretty average day in America. A new book tells the stories of these young people, and explores what their lives – and deaths – reveal about our country’s relationship with guns.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Healthcare Fraud 32 mins – “This week, we’re revisiting California’s workers’ compensation program that covers 15 million workers across the state. Reporter Christina Jewett discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They showed that in the past decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers’ comp medical system out of $1 billion. Find out what’s happened since we first aired that episode. And at the end of this week’s episode, we tell you about a big development in a different story – one that we’re actively reporting on.” At the link find the title, “[Update] Billion-dollar scam, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files Update-Billion-dollar-scam_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hidden Brain 52 mins – “NPR’s Shankar Vedantam says that in some ways, human behavior is the ultimate frontier of science. After all, there’s a lot we don’t know about why behave the way we do. But if we can get a glimpse at the unconscious patterns that influence us, Vedantam argues we have the potential to make big changes in our lives and our world. Shankar Vedantam is host of the popular podcast Hidden Brain, and Tuesday, he joins us to explain how science and storytelling can improve the human experience. Shankar Vedantam is NPR’s social science correspondent and host of the Hidden Brain podcast. He’s also the author of The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P2 24 minsThe Current devotes the program to a public forum on the issues surrounding missing, murdered Indigenous women along the Highway of Tears. With the launch of a public inquiry, families, community leaders and residents of Prince George search for justice.” At the link find the title, ““MMIW public forum: ‘We’d like to see something happen soon’ Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_14307.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P3 23 mins – “Community leaders involved in the issue of murdered and missing Indigenous women hope the national inquiry will have an impact prompting the changes desperately needed to move forward. Many question if the necessary action will really happen.” At the link find the title, “MMIW: Trust a barrier with Indigenous girls and RCMP, says advocate, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_35563.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Highway of Tears P4 21 mins – “Ramona Wilson was 16 years old when she disappeared in 1994. Her murder remains unsolved. As a public inquiry looks into murdered, missing Indigenous women, families continue to search for answers about MMIW on the Highway of Tears and hope for justice.” At the link find the title, “’Not just a statistic, they are people’: Families of MMIW search for justice. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161017_84524.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horses in Military 52 mins – “…the story of a daring rescue of horses caught up in the Third Reich’s vision for genetic supremacy. Horses still played a role in the military, and Hitler aimed to use stolen purebreds to create the ideal war horse. But with the stud farm under imminent threat from the starving Russian army, the Nazi officer in charge asked General Patton himself for help. Author Elizabeth Letts joins us to explain why soldiers set aside alliances and risked their lives to save The Perfect Horse. Elizabeth Letts is a former competitive equestrian rider. Her books include the New York Times best seller The Eighty-Dollar Champion and her new book The Perfect Horse: The Daring U.S. Mission to Rescue the Priceless Stallions Kidnapped by the Nazis.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hostage Ransoms 61 mins – “A journalist named Meron Estefanos gets a disturbing tip. She’s given a phone number that supposedly belongs to a group of refugees being held hostage in the Sinai desert. She dials the number, and soon dozens of strangers are begging her to rescue them. How can she ignore them?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

House Squatters 30 mins – “Steven DeCaprio is known as one of the most knowledgeable squatters in the United States. For this old punk rocker, it’s not just a free home: It’s political. He believes it’s criminal that people are homeless while abandoned homes sit vacant. Could squatting help stem gentrification in Oakland, California? It might depend on who’s squatting—and who lives next door.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link Ass” from the pop-up menu.

Housing bubble in Canada 16 mins – “In a world of haves and have-mores, those without a home can be found in wealthy Western cities and in the rapidly urbanized spaces of developing countries. The UN’s special rapporteur on housing argues housing is not a commodity, it’s a human right.” At the link find the title, “Housing a human right not a commodity, says UN rapporteur, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161019_54365.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Rights Activist 26 mins – “Zafra Lerman is a Distinguished Professor of Science and Public Policy Emerita at Columbia College in Chicago.  Lerman is a scientist and a humanitarian, and she was recently recognized for her work with the 2016 Andrei Sakharov Award for human rights from the American Physical Society.  She joins us to tell us why she got involved in humanitarian issues…how she managed to sneak out at nighttime to meet with dissidents while visiting the USSR…and how an idea to bring Middle Eastern scientists together grew into the Malta Conferences, which aims to promote peace by bringing together scientists who might otherwise be stifled by their respective governments to build collaborations and partnerships.” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Innovation Guidance 37 mins – “What is the number one cause for failure in early-stage startups? Team issues! In this episode of Stanford Innovation Lab, Tina Seelig interviews executive coach Michael Terrell. Michael is the founder and managing partner of Terrell Leadership Group, and co-author of The Inside Out Effect, which focuses on effective leadership. In this conversation, Michael shares his insights on effective team dynamics, his process for diagnosing team issues, and examples of how he works through team challenges.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Internships 66 mins – “Author Tam Pham talks about what it takes to get the internship you’ve always wanted.” At the link find the title,”How to Land Your Dream Internship (Ep. 129),” right-click “Media files 49966.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jihadist Viewpoint 17 mins – “”For a long time, I lived for death,” says Manwar Ali, a former radical jihadist who participated in violent, armed campaigns in the Middle East and Asia in the 1980s. In this moving talk, he reflects on his experience with radicalization and makes a powerful, direct appeal to anyone drawn to Islamist groups that claim violence and brutality are noble and virtuous: let go of anger and hatred, he says, and instead cultivate your heart to see goodness, beauty and truth in others.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kidnapping and Ransom Business 24 mins – “Journalist Loretta Napoleoni’s new book Merchants of Men is about human trafficking, kidnapping, and selling women for sex. For Jihadi groups including ISIS and al-Qaeda, those sources of human misery are sources of tremendous revenues.” At the link find the title, “How ISIS has turned refugee trafficking into multi-billion dollar business, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161019_13598.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maintenance Value 41 mins- “Has our culture’s obsession with innovation led us to neglect the fact that things also need to be taken care of?” At the link click the circle with thtree dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

McMansion Rant 16 mins – “Few forms of contemporary architecture draw as much criticism as the McMansion, a particular type of oversized house that people love to hate. McMansions usually feature 3,000 or more square feet of space and fail to embody a cohesive style or interact with their environment. Kate Wagner, architecture critic and creator of McMansion Hell, is on a mission to illustrate just why these buildings seem so terrible.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Student Discussion 62 mins – “WHO researchers in Uganda are keen to teach schoolchildren there how to spot dubious health claims. This leads Dave to ask Levi Endelman, John Pienta, and newcomers Alice Ye and Adam Erwood whether their generation was taught the principles of logic and scientific thought in a way more effective than his own generation was taught. On a related note, listener Jake writes in to remind John that even we on The Short Coat Podcast, careful as we are to disclaim any logic whatsoever, should be wary of “shallow/uncontrolled” arguments. We discuss emerging ideas on treating ICU patients in ways that minimize ICU delirium and PTSD, a problem once known as ICU psychosis, including changing the ways patients are sedated, their environments, the emphasis on convenience for healthcare personnel, and other factors that may be making patients crazy. Perhaps one day, ICU patients might receive some benefit from Kratom, which the DEA has now removed from the Schedule 1 drugs list after public outcry. And doctors are still better than online “symptom checkers” at diagnosing both common and uncommon illnesses. Take that, Doctor Google.” At the link find the title, “Against Logic there is No Armor like Ignorance. Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 149-No-Armor-like-Ignorance.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Tattoos 10 mins – “What if doctors could monitor patients at home with the same degree of accuracy they’d get during a stay at the hospital? Bioelectronics innovator Todd Coleman shares his quest to develop wearable, flexible electronic health monitoring patches that promise to revolutionize healthcare and make medicine less invasive.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Illusions 39 mins – “For decades now, we’ve known that our memories are not as infallible as we like to think. And with research now showing that researchers are able to plant entirely novel memories that never actually happened – the need for psychological research in the courtroom has never been more pressing. But as we find out, the world of false memory is a murky and uncertain one. Helping Ian Sample clear the way this week is London South Bank University Criminologist and Expert Witness Dr Julia Shaw, and – one of the field’s most prominent pioneers – Professor Elizabeth Loftus, who bravely used much of her expertise during the “Satanic Panic” of the 1980s.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MERS 19 mins – “Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory tract infection caused by the novel betacoronavirus. Cases have been limited to the Arabian Peninsula and its surrounding countries, and to travellers from the Middle East or their contacts. The clinical spectrum of infection varies from no symptoms or mild respiratory symptoms to severe, rapidly progressive pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, septic shock, or multiorgan failure resulting in death. In this podcast Sarah Shalhoub, infectious diseases consultant at King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital, in Saudi Arabia joins us to discuss the history of the disease, clinical presentation, and what can be done to support those infected.” At the link find the title, “Middle East respiratory syndrome, Oct 2016,” right-click “Media files 289325473-bmjgroup-middle-east-respiratory-syndrome.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middle East Wars 53 mins – “In a speech two years ago at West Point, President Barack Obama laid out what has come to be known as the “Obama Doctrine” for fighting terrorism: aiding other countries militarily without leading the fight. This week, in what many say is the ultimate test of that strategy, U.S. special operations forces began assisting Iraqi troops in their battle to retake the city of Mosul from Islamic State militants. In Afghanistan, Libya and Somalia, American troops are also aiding government forces, conducting airstrikes and other operations against Islamist insurgents. Guest host Derek McGinty and guests discuss where and how U.S. troops are being deployed in the fight against terrorism around the globe.” (3 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Moose Hazards 22 mins – “Fall is a busy time for Kristine Rines’s department, the moose are in rut (mating) and hunting season is open. She works for NH Fish and Game as the state’s first ever Moose Biologist. She received the distinguished “Moose Biologist of the Year” from her peers at the North American Moose Conference in 2006. Rines has announced her plans to retire after three decades on the job and sat down with Something Wild to reflect on her time studying the state’s moose….Ticks are a well reported problem for moose in the northern parts of the state, but as Rines points out brainworm is a problem in the south. “Both parasites are brought by white-tailed deer,” brainworms have no observable effect on deer, but are lethal to moose. Shorter winters are good for deer, so our deer populations are increasing, and so too is the occurrence of brainworm….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosul Battle 19 mins – “Considered the jewel in the crown of ISIS, the retaking of Mosul holds strategic significance as the campaign to liberate Iraq’s second-largest city is underway. But author Fawaz Gerges warns it’s likely ISIS will lash out after the epic battle.” At the link find the title,”Defeat of Mosul won’t be the end of ISIS, says author, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161018_81506.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Necrobiome 69 mins – “Decomposition is one of the most important functions that microbes perform in our environment.  As microbial ecologists, Dr. DeBruyn and her lab seek to understand how microbial communities work to recycle inputs in terrestrial environments.   Understanding decomposition and biodegradation is key to developing better solutions for waste disposal, environmental bioremediation, and predicting ecosystem response to perturbations.” At the linkr ight-click “Download the audio only…” under the video file and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Microbiology 68 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloElio SchaechterMichael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson – From the TWiM team, highlights of the Recent Advances in Microbial Control meeting in San Diego, and expansion of a gut pathogen by virulence factors that stimulate aerobic respiration.” At the link right click “download TWiM#137and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Activism Failure 16 mins – “Today, a single email can launch a worldwide movement. But as sociologist Zeynep Tufekci suggests, even though online activism is easy to grow, it often doesn’t last. Why? She compares modern movements — Gezi, Ukraine, Hong Kong — to the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and uncovers a surprising benefit of organizing protest movements the way it happened before Twitter.” At the link click “Download,: right-click Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oysters Discussion 44 mins – “We’re living in a golden age for oysters. Just two decades ago, an ostreophile would have thought him or herself lucky to choose among a handful of options; today, in the U.S. alone, hundreds of varieties with exotic names like Moon Shoal, Hama Hama, and Kusshi tempt oyster lovers. What creates all those different flavors and textures—and what’s the story behind today’s oyster revolution?” AT the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Parenting 52 mins – “The psychologist Alison Gopnik is worried about modern day parenting, including her own. It’s too much like being a carpenter, she says, where you shape chosen materials into a final, preconceived product. Kids don’t work like that. In a new book, Gopnik suggests parents think less like carpenters and more like gardeners: creating safe, nurturing spaces in which children can flourish. Gopnik joins us Wednesday to discuss how we can raise better kids by changing our approach to parenting. Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and an affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. She writes the Mind and Matter column for the Wall Street Journal. Her new book is called The Gardener and the Carpenter: What the New Science of Child Development Tells Us About the Relationship Between Parents and Children” At the link right-click the play button beside ‘Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Chemical Uses 41 mins – “You probably ate something toxic today.  But don’t panic!  It was actually good for you. Turns out, many plants produce chemicals that are poisonous in large amounts, but have health benefits in small doses. Dr. Mark Mattson, Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging, is back on the podcast to talk to us about plant toxins — how our bodies protect us against those toxins and actually benefit from them. Phytochemicals are chemicals naturally produced in plants.  Many of them function to protect plants from being eaten, especially before the seeds are fully formed and ready to be dispersed. That’s why unripe fruit is so bitter.  The plant doesn’t want anyone eating the fruit until the seed(s) inside are mature.  Of course, once it is mature, all that sugar in the ripe fruit is there to entice passing animals to take a bite and help scatter the seeds. But even though green fruit is bitter to eat, small amounts are really good for you.  One example:  a chemical in green tomatoes is neuroprotective and has been found to increase the lifespan of worms.  But it disappears once the tomato ripens to red.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pornography 61 mins – “Hooray for porn! What would we be without it? Bored, repressed, frustrated. Porn allows the timid to indulge fantasies they’d never live out in real life and the adventurous to experiment with new forms of pleasure. Now that it has stepped down from the top shelf and waltzed across the internet we can all enjoy it. All we need to do is stop pretending it’s something dirty and come straight out and salute it. Or maybe not. Porn after all is selling a lie: that women are always eager to engage in extreme practices, that bodies are always tanned and buffed, orgasms explosive. Isn’t this a recipe for frustration and disappointment? And to attract the restless voyeur, porn is always having to up the ante – cyber-sex is getting ever more degrading and extreme. Men are finding it harder to be satisfied with their real world partners, women are feeling inadequate and pressured to live up to the cyber-competition – this is the reality of pornland. So which is it – the great liberator of the libido or a blight on human intimacy? Listen to pornographic film maker Anna Arrowsmith and erotica expert Dr Clarissa Smith, square up to renowned feminist Germaine Greer and addiction specialist Dr Robert Lefever.” At the link find the title, “Pornography is Good For Us: Without it We Would Be a Far More Repressed Society, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premature Baby Issues 26 mins – “Born in the grey zone. Micro-preemies are babies born so premature, they’re on the edge of viability. Modern medicine means these babies can increasingly be saved. But with the advances, come thorny new questions about where life truly begins.” At the link find the title, “Born in the grey zone: Journalist parents explore medical frontier of micro-preemies, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161018_76460.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Premed Concerns  32 mins – “In this episode, Ryan talks about some of the most common things that he sees premed students struggle with, the students that he works with for application prep or those doing personal statement editing and mock interview prep. These are some common trends and themes that Ryan has seen as well as questions directly emailed to him and questions over at the OldPreMeds.org forum.” At the link find session 204, right-click “Media files PMY204.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Politics 60 mins – “[New York Times] columnist Maureen Dowd discusses her book, [The Year of Voting Dangerously: The Derangement of American Politics].” At the link find the title,”Q&A with Maureen Dowd, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457203.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Germany 54 mins – “It is now a year since the German Chancellor Angela Merkel threw Germany’s borders open to thousands of stranded Syrian refugees. We follow five of them and for most it has been a year of uncertainty, a year of unending bureaucratic hurdles, and a year of struggle with German grammar.” At the link find the title,”Die Klassen: Waiting and Hoping, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04c13df.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia Inside 56 mins – “We sit down with Corey Flintoff, longtime NPR Russia Correspondent. Flintoff has returned to the U.S., with tales of his many years reporting overseas. We talk with him about some of the big stories he covered, including Russian aggression in Ukraine, and allegations of Russian meddling in America’s presidential election….” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Checkout Equipment 21 mins – “A doctor treating psychiatric patients in an emergency room created the first self-checkout machine in his spare time. Now he can’t stand self checkout. So we take him shopping.” At the link find the title, “#730: Self Checkout,” right-click “Media files 20161019 pmoney podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Gentrification in Bronx 28 mins – “Majora Carter embraces the idea of “self-gentrification” in her native South Bronx. She founded a park in a spot slated to become a waste-transfer facility. She’s hired local gamers to test software and provide customer service for major tech outfits. And now she’s opened the first boutique coffee shop in Hunts Point, a marginalized neighborhood that, once upon a time, she swore she would leave forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Ships Marines and Baseball 52 mins – “Let Moss Hills take you on sea cruise …To learn more about the sinking of the Oceanos, be sure to check out: http://www.oceanossinking.com/ And you like that, you definitely won’t want to miss the video of the ship’s final moments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nfIZ6rcySuY [then] When Bill Babbitt realizes that his brother Manny has committed a crime, he must figure out what to do. Will he call the police, or get him a bus ticket out of town? Bill Babbitt finds himself responsible for his brother after he returns from the Vietnam War. Check out the documentary Last Day of Freedom. The film was directed by Nomi Talisman and Dee Hibbert-Jones http://www.lastdayoffreedom.net/ [and finally] Tara’s softball team was not afraid to shed a little blood in the ultimate game of boys v.s. girls. This story was recorded live at Sideshow Goshkosideshowgoshko.blogspot.com, a New York Times “Critic Pick” storytelling series that takes place the 4th Thursday of every month at the KGB Bar in Manhattan. Big news, Tara Clancy has a brand new memoir out!  It’s called “The Clancy’s of Queens.”  Get it here:  www.TaraClancy.comAt the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slum Health 11 mins -”Oyinlola Oyebode discusses the health problems of people living in slums, possible interventions, and the value in additional research needed for this neglected field.” At the link find the title,”The health of people living in slums: The Lancet: Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files 16october-slumhealth.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Speechless Series 10 mins – “Josh Blue is a stand-up comedian who has been promoting Speechless, a TV comedy he says paints a realistic view of life with disability. He joins The Current to talk about finding humour in living with cerebral palsy.” At the link find the link, “Comedian Josh Blue says new show Speechless isn’t ‘delicate’ about disability, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_34384.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Squatters in Homes 28 mins – “Steven DeCaprio is known as one of the most knowledgeable squatters in the United States. For this old punk rocker, it’s not just a free home: It’s political. He believes it’s criminal that people are homeless while abandoned homes sit vacant. Could squatting help stem gentrification in Oakland, California? It might depend on who’s squatting—and who lives next door.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Subarus and Lesbians 19 mins – “Subaru’s sales had been slumping for years. So the car company took a big risk and targeted a group of consumers that just about everyone else was ignoring.” At the link find the title, “#729: When Subaru Came Out,” right-click “Media files 20161014 pmoney podcast101416.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Activists in Canada 24 mins – “In a way, she’s just a face in the crowd — one of millions of Syrian refugees who have fled their home in search of a better life. But young Nujeen Mustafa made her escape in a wheelchair and says next she’d like to head to the moon.” At the link find the title, “Teen Syrian refugee recounts journey to Germany in wheelchair, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_26501.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Disabled Refugee 24 mins – “In a way, she’s just a face in the crowd — one of millions of Syrian refugees who have fled their home in search of a better life. But young Nujeen Mustafa made her escape in a wheelchair and says next she’d like to head to the moon.” At the link find the title, “Teen Syrian refugee recounts journey to Germany in wheelchair, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161021_26501.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Time Travel 52 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson unravels time travel with the help of theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, “Back to the Future’s” Doc Brown, aka Christopher Lloyd, “Doctor Who’s” Missy, aka Michelle Gomez, and co-host Chuck Nice. Plus, Bill Nye takes a ride in the DeLorean.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truman and MacArthur 53 mins – “In the years following World War II, Americans enjoyed a brief respite from global conflict. But in December of 1950, China entered the war against the U.S. and its allies in Korea. President Harry Truman assures the American people he will defend South Korea but also wants to avoid escalation into a third world war. His commander of forces in the Pacific is Douglas MacArthur, beloved hero of World War II. MacArthur wants to fight the Chinese and North Korean forces all the way out of Korea. The two leaders soon clash over strategy and President Truman ultimately fires MacArthur. Diane talks with historian H.W. Brands about the struggle for power between an untested president and a powerful general, and how it changed the course of history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

United States and Russia 63 mins – “Experts discuss the current state of relations between the United States and Russia, including cooperation on strategic initiatives in Syria, tensions surrounding the ongoing conflict in Ukraine and the post–Cold War expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and recent allegations of Russian-sponsored cyberattacks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 105 mins – “In this IPR Research Seminar, Dr Malcolm Torry – Director of the Citizen’s Income Trust – gives an introduction to the concept of universal basic income, and discusses its feasibility with reference to trials around the world. This IPR Research Seminar took place on 11 October 2016.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Implosion 19 mins – “Venezuela has just about every economic advantage a country could ask for: fertile land, good climate, educated population, and oil, lots and lots of oil. So how did it go so wrong?” At the link find the title, “#731: How Venezuela Imploded,” right-click “Media files 20161021 pmoney podcast102116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venomous 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at some of the animals, insects, and creatures we fear the most and the venom that makes them so powerful. Biologist and science blogger Christie Wilcox returns to talk about her first book “Venomous: How Earth’s Deadliest Creatures Mastered Biochemistry”. And Jim Olson, a physician scientist and Director of Project Violet, tells us about “Tumor Paint”, a fluorescent molecule that binds to solid tumors to help guide surgeons during surgeries, which was partially derived from the venom of the deathstalker scorpion.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Violence Intervention 27 mins – “A groundbreaking program at a Winnipeg ER helps youth escape the cycle of violence on that city’s streets.” At the link find the title, “When Heather Met Ricky,” right-click “Download When Heather Met Ricky” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wedding Traditions 39 mins – “Something borrowed, something blue, something that explains why weddings look the way they do.” At the link find the title, “#23 The Wedding,” right-click “Media files GLT8129824178.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wikileaks and Politics 53 mins – “WikiLeaks has published thousands of Clinton campaign emails over the past week obtained by hackers. The content of the emails has led to embarrassing headlines about the Clinton Foundation, internal campaign disputes and talks with Goldman Sachs. The Clinton campaign is neither confirming nor denying the authenticity of the emails. John Podesta, Clinton’s campaign chairman, alleges the Russian government is behind the hacks. U.S. intelligence agencies are investigating. WikiLeaks, Russia and the 2016 presidential race.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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