Media Mining Digest 268 – Dec 30, 2016: Addiction Experts on Opioid Crisis, Addiction Medicine, Advertising History, Aging Cognition, Airline Travel, Aleppo, Andrew Weil MD, Asbestos Ban in Canada, Asian Americans, Astronomical Women, Bad Kids at Black Rock High, Beer Brewing, Biohacking, Blind People Jobs, Bollywood Book, Borneo Deforestation, Brain Cooling, Broadband in Boseman, California Climate One, California Water Plan, CIA and Elections, Cyber Attacks on Democracy, Cyberattacks, Desktop Fabrication, Disruptive Thinking, Dog Domestication, Ebola Review, Election Disruption in US, Election Hacks by Russia, Electoral College Dispute, Electronics Engineers Discussion, Encryption, Fake News, Fake Zombie Bands, Feds versus Locals, Female Negotiators, Genocide Survivors, Guatemala Social Media Use, Hidden Figures, Holiday Cards History, Icy Walkways, Indian Cash Chaos, Infrastructure Projects, Intellectuals and Race, Intelligence and Propaganda, Judaism in America, Katrina Disaster Response, Kid Logic, Korean Sea Women, Language Evolution, Linux Support, Malaysian Protests, Med Students Life, Medicine Defined, Micro Greens, Moral Decisions, Native Americans, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Opiate Epidemic, Pain Control Pills, Parasitism Case, Physics Tools, Political Activism, Political Unions, Prison Violence in Canada, Refugees in New Hampshire, Reindeer Racing, Religious Trends, Research Pitfalls, Robot Dangers, Roy Cohn Lawyer, Russian Nuclear Testing, Sanctuary Cities, Science of Motivation, Science Outreach to Kids, Seed Banks, Spices in US, Syrian Refugee Children, Syrian Refugees in Canada, Thomas Sowell on Economics, Tillerson as Secretary of State, Toy Inventors, Transgender Story, Trump Election Analysis, US Foreign Policy, Verizon, War Aftermaths, Warfare, Waste to Water, Wealth Poverty Politics, Wood Woodpecker, Word Use and Trends

Earobics – aerobics for the brain: the 104 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 308 for the week for your ears while your hands and eyes are busy. Double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source, although it’s easier to get all the files in zip format here for the next four months.  A collection of over 12,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically, can be downloaded piecemeal or in groups here.  You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download, so at least twelve group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 45GB and may take awhile. The first entry of this collection is a text file listing all the titles for quicker reference.  An alphabetized collection of all 12,000 abstracts is available at this link and it’s updated quarterly.  Even more diversity is possible using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of 350 sources, so even the discarded podcasts can be found and downloaded. Exercise your ears and let everything else relax.

Addiction Experts on Opioid Crisis 23 mins – “B.C’s epidemic of opioid overdoses is in need of a solution. But how to tackle a seemingly intractable problem is complicated. The Current looks at a proposal to end the prohibition of heroin to the call for more government money to treat addiction.” At the link find the title,Dec 20: Addiction experts discuss solutions to opioid overdose crisis, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161220_50978.mp3”and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addiction Medicine 49 mins – “Psychiatrist Anna Lembke says the medical establishment and drugmakers began telling doctors in the 1980s that opioids were effective treatment for long-term chronic pain. “That was patently false,” she says. Her book is ‘Drug Dealer, MD.’ Critic Ken Tucker shares his top 10 favorite albums of 2016.” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, Inside The Prescription Drug Epidemic,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advertising History 60 mins – “Tim Wu is the Author of The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Brains. Tim and Leo talk about the history of mass media advertising, from its beginnings in the 1830s with newspaper broadsheets to its current state on the internet. Tim argues that what you pay attention to defines your life, and you should think hard about how you want to spend your precious attention.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Cognition 56 mins – “There are many normal physiological changes that come with aging. Dr. Anne Fabiny helps distinguish those from the pathological changes of disease or illness. Then, Craig Wingate of the Alzheimer’s Association, provides clues to differentiate typical aging with Alzhemier’s. When we can make that distinction we can focus on being resilient, sustaining a sense of purpose and vitality, even while coping with stressful experiences. Recorded on 11/01/2016. (#31555)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Aging Prognosis 86 mins – “Dr. Alex Smith is a clinician-researcher at the University of California San Francisco who is at the forefront of efforts to integrate geriatrics and palliative care. Recorded on 11/08/2016. (#31556)” Reference is made to ePrognosis site and process. At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Airline Travel 47 – “A heads-up for all travelers. In-flight phone use is back on the table, and a new bare-bones economy class is moving in. We catch up with air travel.” At the link find the title, “Are You On Board With Cellphones On Airplanes? Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505579657.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Evacuation 19 mins – “It was supposed to be over with a ceasefire and withdrawal. But over the last 24 hours, there have been claims of executions by government troops and stories of bombardment. The Current speaks with those still inside — trapped.” At the link find the title, “Dec 14: ‘They are dying in the streets’: Aleppo ceasefire fails, civilians trapped,” right-click “Download Dec 14: ‘They are dying in the streets’: Aleppo ceasefire fails, civilians trapped” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Aleppo Power Dynamics 19 mins – “Eastern Aleppo’s fall signals changed power dynamics in and around Syria with potentially world-changing geopolitical implications. The Current looks at the new dynamic between Russian and U.S. influence. “ At the link find the title, “Dec 15: How will Aleppo’s fall factor into Assad’s end game?” right-click “Download Dec 15: How will Aleppo’s fall factor into Assad’s end game?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andrew Weil, MD 59 mins– “Dr. Andrew Weil, the country’s leading expert in integrative medicine, believes that good health begins in the kitchen. It’s hardly revolutionary to propose that diet matters when it comes to our health, but so many people feel that eating delicious, healthy home-cooked meals isn’t possible for them. They don’t have time, they say, or they can’t afford good food. Dr. Weil shows us that tasty, healthful food can be prepared quickly and easily, and it isn’t especially pricey. His new cookbook, Fast Food Good Food tells us all how we can enjoy good food fast….” At the link right-click “Download the mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asbestos Ban in Canada 22 mins – “Today the federal government announces a comprehensive ban on asbestos which may come as a surprise to people who think asbestos is already banned in Canada. The CBC’s Julie Ireton explains the long road ahead for getting rid of asbestos.” At the link find the title, “Dec 15: Thought asbestos was fully banned in Canada? Not until 2018,” right-click “Download Dec 15: Thought asbestos was fully banned in Canada? Not until 2018” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Americans 28 mins – “California newspapers once wrote that Chinese immigrants had “most of the vices and few of the virtues of the African”. Until 1940, Asian Americans earned less than whites…and less than black Americans too. All that changed just a few generations. Today, how Asian Americans became a “model minority.” Then, from unidentified noises to a story of heartbreaking loss, we scour the audio landscape for sound we can’t help but share. Morning Edition host Rick Ganley joins us for the latest installment of Overheard.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomical Women 62 mins – “Dava Sobel argues that in the 19th century, it was women and not male astronomers who actually made some of the great discoveries of the universe. …At the outset, this group included the wives, sisters and daughters of the resident astronomers, but by the 1880s the female corps included graduates of the new women’s colleges—Vassar, Wellesley and Smith. …Anna Draper, whose late husband pioneered the technique of stellar photography—enabled the women to make extraordinary discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim. Hear this captivating, little-known true story of a group of women whose remarkable contributions to the burgeoning field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of the stars and our place in the universe. Sobel is a noted author, and in addition to her work for The New York Times she has been a longtime science contributor to Harvard Magazine, Audubon, Discover, Life, Omni, and The New Yorker.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bad Kids at Black Rock High 12 mins – “Many of the kids at Black Rock High School have been labeled “bad kids.” Their principal and teachers are determined to help them succeed.” At the link find the title, “’The Bad Kids’ offers lessons in empathy and second chances, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files BadKidsDoc BROOD PODCAST-2cfedf87.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beer Brewing 16 mins – “What gives beer its taste? Why do some ales taste of berries, bananas or chocolate? A big part of the answer is the type of yeast used to ferment it. There are hundreds of different strains that brewers can use to make beer, and many of them can be found at the National Collection of Yeast Cultures in Norwich. We went for a pint with scientists from the NCYC to find out how different yeasts affect the taste of ales, and learn about their research to find strains that can produce new and better beers.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking 55 mins – “How fake news spreads. Making ears from apples. Texting with household cleaners. The impact of tech on families. Transgender on Tinder.” At the link find the title, “339: Fake news, synthetic ears and more, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files spark_20161218_30659.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Blind People Jobs 20 mins – “US report on employment for visually impaired people, Charles Bonnet in pictures”At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bollywood Book 53 mins – “Author, Columnist Gautam Chintamani talks all things Bollywood in this awesome interview. We talk about his interest in movies, the documentaries made by him, his book on Bollywood Star Rajesh Khanna. We also talk about his most recent book titled Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak, which is based on the film by the same title.” At the link find the title, “Biography of Bollywood Film Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak: Author Gautam Chintamani ep81,” right-click “Media files 5423070-biography-of-bollywood-film-qayamat-se-qayamat-tak-author-gautam-chintamani-ep81.mp3” right-click “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation 8 mins – “…Over the past 10 years, roughly half of the deforestation on Borneo, an island Indonesia shares with Malaysia and Brunei, has been done to clear the way for industrial plantations. Most of that deforested land, an area just slightly smaller than Taiwan, has been converted into oil palm plantations in the Indonesian portion of Borneo. The vegetable oil those palms produce is used in a huge variety of products sold in the US, from ice cream to lipstick…. “Communities that live near forests depend on these forests for a number of natural resources that they use every day,” Chatellier says. When conservation groups move in to claim a piece of land to preserve it, “that can create conflict,” Chatellier says. As billions of dollars are poised to flow from developed to developing countries to protect their forests, countries like Indonesia are scrambling to figure out how to resolve that kind of conflict: how to balance the lives and livelihoods of local people with the need to protect the global climate and fragile species, like Borneo’s endangered orangutans. Note: This is the first story in a series on PRI.org and The World examining social entrepreneurs using innovative methods to protect Indonesian forests.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation Control 6 mins – “The sun is just starting to dip toward the horizon in Indonesian Borneo, and Dharsono Hartono is standing on a fire tower, looking out over a peat forest falling into shadow. …“Unlike the typical mineral soil,” Hartono says, “peat soil is actually dead wood, leaves and logs that become part of the soil.” The layers of wood and decomposing leaves create a forest floor so thick it bounces when Hartono steps on it. All those decomposing plants contain lots of carbon, which means peat forests store more greenhouse gases than a regular tropical rainforest. If the forest in front of Hartono were converted to plantations like much of Borneo already has been, tons of carbon would be freed from the soil and released into the atmosphere, where it would contribute to global warming. “It would emit about 6 million tons of carbon dioxide-equivalent,” Hartono says. “Which is in this case close to about 5 million cars a year.” Hartono’s job is to prevent that from happening. And to make sure his company turns a profit along the way. …Getting the right government permits has been a bureaucratic nightmare. Then there’s the science: Measuring the carbon stored in the company’s 600 square miles of peat forest took two years, and then the methodology had to be verified by an independent carbon credit certification body called the VCS. … I’m still very optimistic that we will make it.” Hartono hopes to finally start selling carbon credits next year….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Borneo Deforestation Medicine 3 mins – “ In a village on the western edge of Borneo, there’s a small hospital where people come from miles around to get treatment for everything from a broken arm to a heart attack. Good health care in a remote town like Sukadana, in the Indonesian province of West Kalimantan, is hard to come by. But there’s another thing that sets this one-story, metal-roofed clinic apart: how patients pay for their health care. “You can pay with non-cash means,” says Dr. Kinari Webb, founder of the ASRI clinic, known by the acronym for its Indonesian name, Alam Sehat Lestari. “So that people don’t have to log in order to pay for health care.” Patients can pay with manure, seedlings, handicrafts including hand-woven baskets, or their labor. In ASRI’s courtyard, seedlings that patients have used to pay for healthcare are a sign of what’s different about this clinic. And no matter the currency they use, patients get a 70 percent discount if they live in an area where illegal logging activity has stopped. …According to ASRI data, when the clinic opened, there were an estimated 1,350 logging households around the national park. That dropped to 450 after the clinic had been in operation for five years, and today, Webb says fewer than 200 people (that’s individuals, not households) in villages bordering the national park are loggers. ” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Cooling 27 mins – “Victims of traumatic brain injuries – caused by car accidents or falls – have a better chance of survival if their body temperature is deliberately cooled for a few days. But the technique does not help children with similar injuries – according to the British researchers behind the largest ever review of “brain cooling” studies. Pankaj Sharma, Professor of Neurology at Royal Holloway, University of London led the research and says the body should be cooled quickly to get the best results. Is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder actually a problem of excessive mind-wandering? Children who find it hard to sit still and concentrate may be diagnosed with ADHD. Health Check hears from two teenage girls with ADHD, talking about how difficult they find it to concentrate at school. Philip Asherson is Professor of Clinical and Molecular Psychiatry at Kings College London – and he says the idea that mind-wandering might play a big part in ADHD is now being taken seriously….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Sve Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Bozeman 29 mins – “This week, we return to Bozeman’s unique model in Montana to get an update now that the network is up and running. President of Bozeman Fiber Anthony Cochenour and city of Bozeman Economic Development Director Brit Fontenot join us again to discuss their unique approach. We last spoke with them on episode 142. We discuss how they are doing two months after launching the network. With five ISPs already using it to deliver services a several more in the process of signing up, they are on target for where they hoped to be….” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Climate One 59 mins – “Cassandra Sweet, Energy Reporter, The Wall Street Journal Katie Fehrenbacher, Former Senior Writer, Fortune David Baker, Energy Reporter, San Francisco Chronicle Top energy stories this year range from speedy ratification of the Paris climate deal to the large number of reservations for Tesla’s mid-priced sedan. Recent headlines also include PG&E’s surprise announcement that it will close the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant and the surprise bankruptcy of SunEdison, once a darling of the solar industry. We’ll take stock of a year in which oil prices stayed low, autonomous cars sped ahead, and the first offshore wind farm in the United States was poised to come online. On the policy front, California extended its main climate law with the passage of SB 32, but clean energy is playing defense in many states around the country. Would you fly in a battery-powered helicopter or a solar-powered plane? Brave souls did just that this year. Join us for a look back at an active year in technology, innovation, policy and the battle over how to power our future.” At the link right-click “Play Now” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Water Plan 58 mins – “California’s primary clean water supply, upon which 25 million people depend, is out of date, unreliable and inefficient. California’s largest supply of clean water is dependent on 50-year-old levees. Earthquakes, floods and rising sea levels could cause these levees to fail, putting the fresh water supply at risk from saltwater contamination. The current system is inefficient and cannot adequately capture and store water when it is available. The state is losing fresh water that could be used by farms, businesses and communities. Without an update to the water infrastructure, the environment and the state’s economy are at risk. Tune in today as we talk with Jeffrey Kightlinger, the General Manager of Metropolitan Water District, and Erin Mellon, Communications and Outreach Advisor at the California Natural Resources Agency.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA and Elections 14 mins – “As the CIA cries foul over Russian election interference, more than a few observers find it a little bit rich given the CIA’s past meddling in elections abroad. The Current speaks to a history professor who says, “History is replete with ironies.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Whatever Russia did, CIA has its own history of meddling in elections,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Whatever Russia did, CIA has its own history of meddling in elections” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Attacks on Democracy 5 mins – “Germany finds itself in the center of the cyberstorm – … “What we’re seeing now is only the beginning,” Klingbeil says. In addition to the hacking, “there’s the problem of fake news, fake quotes and even fake videos floating around, and people believe this stuff, because they’re losing faith in traditional institutions.” Klingbeil says Germany needs new regulations for social media companies like Facebook and Twitter. He supports new legislation that would impose hefty fines on social media sites if they fail to remove fake news posts quickly… Klingbeil says, “We are irritated about Russia influencing the US election campaign. … But it’s also true that the Americans are engaging in cyber-espionage.” “They were listening to our chancellor’s mobile phone. And it’s not just Russia and America,” Klingbeil adds. Klingbeil says other national governments are capable of carrying out large-scale cyberattacks….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberattacks 136 mins – “This week, Leo and Steve discuss Russia’s hacking involvement in the US Election; that, incredibly, it gets even worse for Yahoo!, misguided anti-porn legislation in South Carolina, troubling legislation from Australia, legal confusion from the Florida appellate court, some good news from the U.S. Supreme Court, Linux security stumbling, why Mac OS X got an important fix last week, the Steganography malvertising attack that targets home routers, news of a forthcoming inter-vehicle communications mandate, professional cameras being called upon to provide built-in encryption, LetsEncrypt gets a worrisome extension, additional news, errata, miscellany… and how exactly DOES that “I really really promise I’m not a robot (really!)” non-CAPTCHA checkbox CAPTCHA work?” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Desktop Fabrication 8 mins – “In this installment of On the Lookout, we explore another device in the world of desktop fabrication.  Recently, we were able to test out Carvey – a tabletop 3D carving machine from Inventables. Right out of the box, we discovered Carvey to be a remarkably easy to use tool appropriate for younger learners. Solidly built, Carvey’s small footprint can easily sit on a tabletop, and features an enclosed frame that keeps the workspace relatively clean and safe. Of course, Carvey’s reach extends well beyond the science classroom, and will function as a savvy tool that any STEAM program or Makerspace could rely upon for hands-on student learning. Listen to (and watch our unbox video) to see how this new digital manufacturing tool can allow students to transform their digital creations into physical, everyday objects.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disruptive Thinking 92 mins – “A.J. Jacobs (@ajjacobs) is a kindred guinea pig of self-experimentation who chronicles his shenanigans in books that seem to keep winding up as New York Times best sellers. The Know-It-All was about his quest to learn everything in the world. In The Year of Living Biblically, he tried to follow all the rules of the Bible as literally as possible. Drop Dead Healthy followed his well- (and ill-) advised experiments to become the healthiest person alive. My Life as an Experiment is about exactly what it sounds like, and It’s All Relative — which will be out in 2017 — will aim to connect all of humanity in one family tree. A.J. is also the host of the new podcast Twice Removed, which takes a celebrity guest and introduces them to a surprise cousin they didn’t know they had. It could be one of their heroes, an old friend, a teacher, etc.” At the link find the title, “#211: A.J. Jacobs: Self-Experimenter Extraordinaire,” right-click “Media files The_Tim_Ferriss_Show-AJ_Jacobs.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Dog Domestication 37 mins – Experts agree that dogs have evolved from the gray wolf, but after that there are many questions and debates about how and why they became our prized companions.  Prof. Greger Larson applies the lessons of evolution, archaeology and genomics to describe the canine lineage and describe this progression.  There are many inferences and surprises along the way, and DNA from dog fossils is shedding light on this interesting question. Follow Prof. Larson at @Greger_Larson or www.palaeobarn.com  Also, Chelsea Boonstra and The Boonstra Report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Review 20 mins – “Marie-Paule Kieny outlines encouraging final results of the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine trial from Guinea.” At the link find the title, “Ebola vaccine: The Lancet: Dec 22, 2016,” right-click “Media files 22dec-ebola.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Disruption in US 47 mins – “Russia and the American vote. Aleppo horror. Exxon Mobil chief to State. The Fed hikes rates. Our weekly news round table goes behind the headlines.” At the link find the title, “Week In The News: Russia Hack, Aleppo Burning, Exxon Mobil And Trump Appointees, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505876656.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Hacks by Russia 48 mins – “Late last week, a CIA report suggested Russia intervened in U.S. elections to boost Donald Trump’s chances of winning. On Tuesday, a New York Times investigation supported that conclusion – and revealed new evidence that Russian hackers also targeted nearly a dozen congressional races. The investigation details a series of missed signals, slow responses and a mis-estimation of Russia’s ability to influence U.S. politics—by political leaders, the FBI and The White House. It also traces two decades worth of Russia’s attempts to tamper with America’s most sensitive computer networks. Diane and a panel discuss new details about Russia’s role in the 2016 race and its efforts to destabilize democracies around the world.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Electoral College Dispute 47 mins – “Calls grow to abolish the Electoral College and for electors to vote their conscience. We’ll take on the Electoral College question.” At the link find the title, “As Vote Looms, Controversy Over The Electoral College, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505732717.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronics Engineers Discussion 66 mins – “Jeff Keyzer returns for a special Christmas episode! We talk about travel, prototyping, Bell Labs, high volume manufacturing, radio astronomy and much more!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Encryption 30 mins – “How encryption hides all around us, how it was used in 18th century Paris to separate merchants from their money and the difference between your brain and your fingertip. Listen, decode, and decide: Can encryption save us?” At the link find the title,”S02-6: Encryption, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files codebreaker 20161221_e6_671_20161114_128.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. “Why women doctors might be better for your health, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161223_58213.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 47 mins – “Buzzfeed News’ media editor, Craig Silverman, dissects how false stories during the presidential campaign were spread on Facebook and monetized by Google Ad Sense. Also, critic at-large John Powers shares six things he loved this year that he didn’t get around to reviewing.” At the link find the title, “Dec, 2016, How Fake News Spreads & Why People Believe It,”click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake Zombie Bands 20 mins – “When “Time of the Season” became a hit song in 1969, the Zombies had already disbanded. Yet for some reason, there was a band touring around America calling itself the Zombies. Listen as Daniel Ralston, author of the article “The True Story Of The Fake Zombies,” talks about unearthing this forgotten piece of music history.” At the link find the title, “16: The Fake Zombie Invasion, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 585614ac88d80d2d4a1f77a8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feds versus Locals 92 mins – “The latest on former Sheriff Lee Baca’s mistrial, an up close look at the fears facing LGBT youth during the holidays, a shift in attitudes towards holiday classics.” At the link find the title, “Former Sheriff Baca’s mistrial, LGBT youth in crisis, a shift in pop culture, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SHOW_122316-b800a92b.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P1 74 mins – “In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P2 62 mins – “In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Negotiators P3 72 mins – “State fragility poses a significant threat to international security, contributing to conflict onset and relapse, the global refugee crisis, the expansion of extremist groups, and public health emergencies like the Ebola epidemic. In fragile states, women are often marginalized, despite their potential contributions to the security and prosperity of their societies. The speakers on this panel will review lessons from conflict situations and provide recommendations to the next U.S. administration on addressing state fragility by promoting women’s participation in conflict prevention and peacebuilding” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genocide Survivors 26 mins – “After Rwanda, Bosnia, WWII — the world has vowed never to let such atrocities happen again. Yet, the killing in Syria continues. Two survivors of Srebrenica, and Rwanda, share their perspectives on the failure to respond, once more.” At the link right-click “Dec 22: ‘United Nations didn’t do anything’: Genocide survivors relate to Aleppo, 2016,” right-click “Media files current_20161222_86307.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemala Social Media Impact 39 mins – “Everybody has that one Facebook friend who just won’t stop posting their political opinions. This week, we talk to one of those Facebook friends, someone whose opinions got her into an enormous mess.” At the link find the title, “#47 Quit Already (REBROADCAST) Dec 2016,” right-click “Media files GLT6508571625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hidden Figures 12 mins – “The movie “Hidden Figures” comes to theaters this month. The film looks at the lives of a group of African American women who worked for NASA as “human computers” – the brains behind the calculations necessary for human space flight. In this Short Take, Brian talked to Margot Lee Shetterly (the author of the book the movie is based on) about the work the women did on projects Mercury and Apollo and the impact they had on the 20th century.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the en of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holiday Cards History 47 mins – “ Holiday cards were the first social media. We’ll look at the rich history and hot trends for sharing “Seasons Greetings.” At the link find the title, “From Snail Mail To Social Media: The History Of Holiday Cards, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505429006.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Icy Walkways 20 mins – “It’s that time of year again when sidewalks get treacherous and thousands of Canadians end up in the ER after a spill. From better boots, to deluxe heated sidewalks, The Current looks at ways to cut down on the ice-induced injuries.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Think big treads on winter boots can stop you from slipping on ice? Nope,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Think big treads on winter boots can stop you from slipping on ice? Nope” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Cash Chaos 24 mins – “The Indian government’s move was designed to help combat the underground economy. But whether it was a bad idea or just bad execution, the country’s been sent into a state of cash chaos.” At the link find the title, “Dec 16: Cash crunch grips India one month after move to demonetization,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Cash crunch grips India one month after move to demonetization” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Projects 15 mins – “Forecasts of the costs and benefits of infrastructure projects are important for making informed investment decisions. However, there have been many instances of major cost overruns and unexpected low utilization of new facilities. To explore the nature and pattern of such prediction errors and what we can do to make more accurate predictions, we talk with, Dr. Martin Wachs, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Urban Planning at UCLA, formerly with the RAND Corporation and before that professor at UC Berkeley.” At the link right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intellectuals and Race 38 mins – “Thomas Sowell discusses is newest book, Intellectuals and Race, which argues that the impact of intellectuals’ ideas and crusades on the larger society, both past and present, is the ultimate concern.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell, May, 2013,” right-click “Media files 20130516.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intellectuals and Society 53 mins – “On the occasion of the publication of a new edition of his book Intellectuals and Society, Thomas Sowell returns to Uncommon Knowledge for a wide-ranging interview.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell, May, 2012,” right-click “Media files 20120507.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence and Propaganda Operations 47 mins – “The saga over Russian interference in the election has been marked by secrecy, rumor, and contradictory evidence. We try to bring some clarity to a cloudy narrative. Also, the CIA says Russian hackers deliberately helped Donald Trump win the election but the FBI wasn’t initially convinced. We consider the long and tumultuous rivalry between the two agencies, and how spies and G-men have been depicted in popular culture. Plus, how the US propaganda agency “Voice of America” might function under President Trump.” At the link find the title, “Spy vs. Spy, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files otm121616pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Judaism in America 59 mins – “On Dec. 24th, Jewish communities across the country begin celebrating Hanukkah. The annual holiday celebrates the victory of the Jews over the Greeks, and marks the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem in the 2nd century BC. Roughly 2% of the U.S. population is Jewish, but the influence of American Jews far outweighs their relatively small numbers. In this episode of BackStory, the Guys (along with guest host Joanne Freeman of Yale University) explore the history of Judaism in America.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Katrina Disaster Response 35 mins – “On this episode of the Disaster Podcast, we have a special guest on the show to talk about managing triage in disaster situations. Hosts Jamie Davis, the Podmedic and Sam Bradley are joined by Dr. Jullette Saussy. Dr. Saussy was the medical director for New Orleans Fire and EMS Department during the Hurricane Katrina response and aftermath. She was an EMT and paramedic before she went on to become an ER doctor in New Orleans. She talks about the importance of building relationships with the people connected with your mutual aid partners at the state and federal level ahead of the day of the disaster.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kid Logic 58 mins – “Stories of kids using perfectly logical arguments, and arriving at perfectly wrong conclusions. An updated version of an episode from 2001, with one story swapped.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean Sea Women 54 mins – “South Korea’s “sea women” have been harvesting commercial treasures from the ocean floor since the 4th century. With only a few tools and fishing baskets slung over their shoulders, these sunburnt and wrinkled grandmothers can dive up to 20 metres on a single breath. Their dives mix dexterity, desire and death. Vancouver writer and broadcaster Gloria Chang returns to the country of her birth for an intimate portrayal of these cultural icons and to unravel a matriarchal mystery: Why do only women take to the waters? ” At the link find the title, “The Sea Women (Encore Oct 18, 2007),” Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161214_90639.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Evolution 52 mins – “If you’re worried that the word “literally” now means “figuratively,” or if you fret that acronyms are replacing actual words, today’s show will do one of two things: make you pull out your hair, or it’ll change your mind. The linguist John McWhorter says that changes to the English language are nothing new. Language, he says, isn’t some static thing that just is, “it’s actually something always becoming.” McWhorter will join us to discuss how languages evolve and why we should embrace the changes.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Support 26 mins – “You can get help for your Linux computer in many ways. In this episode we provide some details about each kind of support. Many of the answers to your questions are available on your distribution’s website. Often, the fastest and easiest way to get answers to your questions about how to use Linux and its applications is to ask in the distribution’s community forum.” AT the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysian Protests 27 mins – “Street artist Reza captured public dissatisfaction when he caricatured the PM as a clown” At the link find the title, “Punk Art and Protest in Malaysia, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04m5c2t.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Med Students Life 51 mins – “Dave and the crew–Mark Moubarek, Levi Endelman, Julie Gudenkauf, and Erin Pazaski–look back on things they experienced as the semester draws to a close.  As first years, Levi and Erin share their thoughts on entering medical school.  Mark is getting ready for his clerkships to begin.  And Julie has finished up her primary-care clerkships and is moving into exploring some of the more specialized areas of medicine.  We also discuss the not surprising fact that baby-boomers are more into cannabis than their children and grandchildren are.  A scientist has decided that he can find people who are overly susceptible to the placebo effect and screen them out so drug companies can save millions on clinical trials and drugs can get to patients faster.  Meanwhile, some other podcasters who couldn’t join us this week send in their Short Thoughts on American consumerism, a woman that was truly a pioneer in medicine, and cats.” At the link find right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicine Defined 17 mins – “Science is a learning process that involves experimentation, failure and revision — and the science of medicine is no exception. Cancer researcher Kevin B. Jones faces the deep unknowns about surgery and medical care with a simple answer: honesty. In a thoughtful talk about the nature of knowledge, Jones shows how science is at its best when scientists humbly admit what they do not yet understand.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Micro Greens 3 mins – “Red cabbage microgreens: A potent bad cholesterol fighter.” At the link find the title, “Episode 723 – December 21, 2016,” right-click “Media files ScienceElements_Dec21_2016.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Moral Decisions 54 mins – “We all have a moral code — a clear sense of what is right and what is wrong. But the reasons why we make certain decisions can quickly get fuzzy. Producer John Chipman explores why some people stick to their moral codes more stringently than others, and delves into the latest neuroimaging research to find out what it can tell us about what guides our moral decisions.” At the link find the title, “Cracking the Moral Code,” right-click “Download Cracking the Moral Code” and select “Media files ideas 20161212_62698.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Native Americans 67 mins – “What do you imagine when you think about a Native American reservation? Do you see sweeping vistas of the desert or plains? Glittering casinos? Or substandard housing, stray dogs, and young men milling about? In this week’s episode, host Russ Roberts welcomes back Terry Anderson of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC), who describes most reservations today as “islands of poverty in a sea of wealth.” The conversation covers what life was like for Native Americans pre-Europeans through today, raising lots of interesting questions about the changing nature of Indian institutions and the effects of current policy on reservation life today. What did you learn from this week’s episode, and what questions linger in your mind? Let us know, or have a crack at one of those posed below. As always, we love to hear from you.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil de Grasse Tyson 28 mins – “The US science superstar, Neil de Grasse Tyson grew up in the Bronx, and studied astrophysics at Harvard, Columbia and Princeton Universities before becoming director of the Hayden Planetarium in New York City. But he’s best known for his TV and movie appearances, his books, podcasts and his tweets or ‘scientific droppings’ as he likes to call them. He has over 6 million followers on Twitter and is often credited with turning millennials around the world on to science. Neil tells Jim al-Khalili why he’s so committed to making science feel exciting, why we are all stardust and why Pluto isn’t a planet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Epidemic Control 11 mins – “On August 24, 2016, I mailed a letter and pocket card …to 2.3 million doctors, nurses, dentists, and other clinicians asking them to help address America’s escalating opioid epidemic. It was the first time in the 145-year history of the Office of the Surgeon General that such a letter was issued specifically to medical professionals calling them to action….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Epidemic 36 mins – “Since 2011, authorities have attempted to curb the growing opioid epidemic by monitoring prescribers, limiting doses, and cracking down on so-called pill mills. The goal is to limit access to addicts. But what do those restrictions mean for the estimated 25 million Americans who suffer from chronic pain? Plus, The Seventh Fire – a documentary follows two men through the cycle of poverty, addiction, and crime on a northern Minnesota Indian reservation.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Pain Control Pills 48 mins – “By some estimates, medical error is the third-leading cause of death in the U.S. How can that be? And what’s to be done? Our third and final episode in this series offers some encouraging answers.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parasitism Case 122 mins – “Hosts: Vincent RacanielloDickson Despommier, and Daniel Griffin The TWiPanorama solve the case of the Dutch Woman with Wormy Objects in Her Stool, dissect a study on cytoadhesion of malaria infected red blood cells, and introduce Parasitology Superheroes.” At the link right-click “Download TWIP #123” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physics Tools 36 mins – “We talk to physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski about her new book Storm in a Teacup: The Physics of Everyday Life.” At the link find the title, “160 Helen Czerski – The Little Bits of Physics in Everyday Life,” right-click “Media files 1e413130-0ea9-4355-a7d8-0a44fbe0aa8c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Activism P1 30 mins – All over the world people who care about the environment are watching the US President-Elect sketch out a blueprint for disaster. To head the EPA he has tapped a man who demonstrates open disdain for the very agency he would be running, and for Department of Energy Chief his choice is a guy who announced …” At the link find the title, “How We Fight Back: Part I, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-12-13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Activism P2 30 mins – “This week on Sea Change Radio, in the second half of our discussion with former senior advisers to the Bernie Sanders campaign, Becky Bond and Zack Exley, host Alex Wise struggles with the harsh reality of an incoming President completely unqualified and unprepared to lead the planet’s only superpower. We recap the 2016 presidential election …” At the link find the title, “How We Fight Back: Part II, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files SC-2016-12-20.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Unions 18 mins – “Today on the show, two unions separated by 200 years, an ocean and an exit clause. The United States has no exit clause. It led to civil war. Europe, on the other hand, has Article 50.” At the link find the title, “#743: 50 Ways to Leave Your Union,” right-click “Media files 20161221 pmoney podcast122116.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison Violence in Canada 12 mins – “Prison violence is on the rise across Canada. And a recent prison riot in Saskatchewan that left one man dead is proof of that. The Current speaks to a former inmate for insights on how to fix a broken system.” At the link find the title “Dec 16: Prison violence won’t stop until overcrowding addressed, says former inmate,” right-click “Download Dec 16: Prison violence won’t stop until overcrowding addressed, says former inmate” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 27 mins – “The San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety Training program uses blunt talk to confront racial bias in Canadian health care, with the goal of making healthcare safer and more accessible for Indigenous patients.” At the link find the title, “I’m a white settler: Why that matters in healthcare,” right-click “Download I’m a white settler: Why that matters in healthcare” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 24 mins – “Syrian refugees were welcomed by the government and Canadians but adjusting to life here, reconciling with what they’ve left behind has its challenges. One year on, The Current brings you the stories of families who now call Canada home.” At the link find the title, “Dec 14: ‘It’s a girl!’: Snapshots of Syrian refugees in Canada one year later,” right-click “Download Dec 14: ‘It’s a girl!’: Snapshots of Syrian refugees in Canada one year later” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in New Hampshire 56 mins – “About a dozen Syrians were resettled in New Hampshire last year, and more than 7000 refugees from many countries have come here since the 1980s. We look at the resettlement process, the challenges both newcomers and their host communities face, and what changes might be in store under a Trump administration.” At the linkr ight-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reindeer Racing 27 mins – “Competitive reindeer-racing is a popular sport across the Arctic Circle. In Finland, the season runs from November to April and good jockeys are local celebrities. They need strong biceps and serious guts: strapped onto cross-country skis they’re hauled behind reindeer at up to 60km/hour….” At the link find the title, “Burn Slush! The Reindeer Grand Prix, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lxn22.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Religious Trends 16 mins – “At a moment when the world seems to be spinning out of control, religion might feel irrelevant — or like part of the problem. But Rabbi Sharon Brous believes we can reinvent religion to meet the needs of modern life. In this impassioned talk, Brous shares four principles of a revitalized religious practice and offers faith of all kinds as a hopeful counter-narrative to the numbing realities of violence, extremism and pessimism.” At the link click “Download,” right-click “Download audio” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Pitfalls 28 mins – “There is a replication “crisis” in psychology: many findings simply do not replicate. Some critics take this as an indictment of the entire field — perhaps the best journals are only interested in publishing the “sexiest” findings, or universities are pressuring their faculty to publish more. But this week on Hidden Brain, we take a closer look at the so-called crisis. While there certainly have been cases of bad science, and even fraudulent data, there are also lots of other reasons why perfectly good studies might not replicate. We’ll look at a seminal study about stereotypes, Asian women, and math tests.” At the link find the link, “Encore of Episode 32: The Scientific Process,” right-click “Media files 20161216_hiddenbrain_hb32.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Dangers 19 mins – “Gordon Briggs, a postdoc at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, talks about the article he and Matthias Scheutz, director of the Human Robot Interaction Laboratory at Tufts University, wrote in the January issue of Scientific American titled the Case for Robot Disobedience.” At the link find the title, “Getting Robots To Say No, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roy Cohn Lawyer 26 mins – “If president-elect Donald Trump learned anything from his mentor Roy Cohn, it was this: punch first and never apologize. Cohn was notorious for going on the attack—as counsel for Senator Joseph McCarthy during the communist witch-hunts of the fifties, and later as a pugnacious attorney for whom the only bad publicity was no publicity. With hooded eyes and a scar running along his nose, Cohn relished playing the intimidating outlaw in a black hat. He was fearless and bullying yet always considered himself as a victim. Despite this loathsome reputation, Cohn was resolutely loyal and counted among his friends Democrats and Republicans alike. More than partisanship, what mattered most to Cohn was power, as we learn in Ken Auletta’s searing 1978 profile, “Don’t Mess with Roy Cohn.” Auletta joins host David Brancaccio on the Esquire Podcast this week to discuss Cohn’s unrelenting cruelty and drive, and how it helped shape the man who will now lead the country.” At the link find the title,“Don’t Mess With Roy Cohn, by Ken Auletta, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files Dont-Mess-With-Roy-Cohn-by-Ken-Auletta.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Nuclear Testing 48 mins – “Between 1949 and 1989 the Soviet Union tested 456 nuclear bombs in Semipalatinsk in Kazakhstan. The area the size of Belgium became known as the Polygon and when Kazakhstan became independent – 25 years ago this week – it inherited the world’s fourth biggest nuclear arsenal. The BBC’s Rustam Qobil visits the Polygon to piece together its remarkable story.” At the link find the title, “The Polygon People, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files p04lpdhn.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sanctuary Cities 26 mins – “U.S. president-elect Donald Trump has set up a showdown with the dozens of American cities actively sheltering undocumented immigrants. But a lot of those cities have vowed not to back down.” At the link find the title, “Dec 22: Santa Fe mayor defies Trump’s crackdown on immigrant ‘sanctuary cities’, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161222_78184.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Science of Motivation 60 mins – “It happens to all of us every day. You get rejected. Your customer doesn’t buy. Your boss doesn’t agree. Your crush doesn’t say yes. In this provocative and entertaining talk, exclusive to Intelligence Squared, American author Daniel H. Pink harvested a rich trove of social science to explain the theory and practice of bouncing back. He showed why questioning your abilities is often more effective than affirming them; why being positive (but not too positive) can improve your performance; and how to explain failure in ways that prepare you for your next encounter… Pink lectures on economic transformation and the new workplace at corporations, associations and universities around the world. His latest book is To Sell is Human: The Surprising Truth About Persuading, Convincing and Influencing Others.” At the link find the title, “Dan Pink on the Science of Buoyancy, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up men.

Science Outreach to Kids 26 mins – “So many of our misconceptions about science come from where we first encountered them—the classroom. How can we do a better job of teaching science, both so we make sure we have a new generation of STEM professionals, but also a STEM-literate public? The second of the three-part series.” At the link find the title, “The Face of Science: Teaching Teachers, y, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files 161004_faceofscience_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Banks 54 mins – “In the face of climate change and declining biodiversity, one of humanity’s oldest cultural practices – seed saving – has a new urgency. Maria Zytaruk explores how preserving seeds reflects the deepest of human fears and hopes, whether it’s done in a high-tech seed bank in Britain, or a simple storage closet lined with jars at a convent in Kingston. ” At the link find the title, “Seed Banks: Re-sowing paradise, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files ideas_20161216_50145.mp3” ad select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serengeti Rules 60 mins – “This week we’re exploring how life is regulated at very small scales — down to the molecular level — and how those rules and regulations also seem to apply when we zoom back out to look at environments and ecosystems across the planet. We spend the hour with author and Professor of Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Wisconsin Sean Carroll talking about his new book “The Serengeti Rules: The Quest to Discover How Life Works and Why It Matters”.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spices in US 46 mins – “Vanilla, chili, garlic, soy. We’ll taste the “Eight Flavors” that writer Sarah Lohman says now define American cuisine and culture.” At the link find the title, “Uncovering The ‘Eight Flavors’ Of Modern American Culture, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files npr_505734977.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Children 24 mins – “More than 20,000 Syrian refugees who have come to Canada over the last year are under the age of 18. In schools across the country, teachers share challenges and triumphs with their students. But how do you teach a kid to be a kid again?” At the link find the title, “Dec 21: Syrian refugee children learn to be kids again, one year in Canada, 2016” right-click “Media files and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugees in Canada 20 mins – “This is the story of a new life, in a new country with a successful new business. It starts in the kitchen where three Syrian refugees created a catering company to bring the taste of home to Canada.” At the link find the title, “Dec 22: New life, new business: Syrian refugees bring taste of home to Canada, 2016,” right-click “Media files current 20161222_89510.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Sowell on Economics 50 mins -”In this episode of Uncommon Knowledge, Peter Robinson interviews Hoover fellow and author Thomas Sowell, on his 5th edition of Basic Economics: A Common Sense Guide to the Economy. In this interview, Sowell brings the world into clearer focus through a basic understanding of the fundamental economic principles and how they explain our lives. Sowell draws on lively examples from around the world and from centuries of history.” At the link find the title, “Thomas Sowell Brings the World into Focus through an Economics Lens, Dec, 2014,” right-click “Media files 20141219.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thomas Sowell Reader 29 mins – “Thomas Sowell has studied and taught economics, intellectual history, and social policy at institutions that include Cornell, UCLA, and Amherst. Now a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, Sowell has published more than a dozen books. His most recent book is The Thomas Sowell Reader.” At the li” right-click “Media files 20111031.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tillerson as Secretary of State 47 mins – “Donald Trump’s transition team says the president elect is choosing ExxonMobil chief Rex Tillerson as his Secretary of State. Tillerson is a controversial pick. Like Trump he has no government experience and is likely to face many questions about his business ties with Russian leader Vladimir Putin. Meanwhile Donald Trump is holding another victory rally today, gatherings his supporters greet with great enthusiasm. But some of his sharpest critics are concerned that his political appeal and agenda bear some similarity to last century’s fascist leaders in Europe. Join us to talk about reactions to Rex Tillerson plus the history of Fascism and what resonance, if any, it has in U.S. politics today.” (4 guests) At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Toy Inventors 37 mins – “Melissa and Doug Bernstein’s first success was a wooden ‘fuzzy puzzle’ of farm animals. Today, Melissa & Doug makes over 2,000 kinds of toys and serves as an antidote to the rise of digital toys.” At the link find the title, “Melissa & Doug: Melissa And Doug Bernstein, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 20161216_hibt_melissadoug.mp3” and Select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Story 50 mins – “Nicole Maines was born an identical twin, but unlike her twin brother, never identified as male. She became prominent in the trans community after winning a discrimination lawsuit. Also, contributor Sarah Hepola talks about the stress of the holiday season when you don’t drink. And producer Sam Briger speaks to author Maria Semple about her comic novel ‘Today Will Be Different,’ about a stressed-out wife and mother who starts every day with a mantra.” At the link click find the title, “Dec 2016, Best Of: Transgender Activist Nicole Maines / Writer Maria Semple,” click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Election Analysis 39 mins – “After a surprising presidential election, Americans and foreign leaders have closely watched the executive transition for clues to American priorities and policy under the Trump administration. What does Donald J. Trump’s victory tell us about American politics – and how will our allies and adversaries respond?” At the link find the title, “A New President and the Middle East with Norman Ornstein and Dennis Ross, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files PolicyCast_13_Ornstein_Ross.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Foreign Policy 47 mins – “What role the U.S. should play in Syria has been one of the most vexing foreign policy challenges for the Obama administration. The enormity of the crisis is playing out right now in Aleppo as the Syrian government, backed by Russia and Iran, take back the city from rebel forces. It’s a problem President-elect Donald Trump now inherits, and it’s one of many complex foreign policy challenges he’ll face. High on the list is Russia, following reports that the country interfered in U.S. elections in support of Trump, as well as the future of the U.S.’s “One China” policy. Diane sits down with former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and former national security adviser Stephen Hadley to discuss U.S. foreign policy and risks for the new administration.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Verizon 30 mins – “Verizon General Counsel Craig Silliman discusses issues facing his company, including the so-called “internet of things,” Verizon’s purchase of AOL and proposed purchase of Yahoo, and its work on new phone technology, mobile services, and broadband.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Craig Silliman, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.462750.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Aftermaths 59 mins – “Entrepreneur and travel writer Brian Gruber discusses his book, [War: The Afterparty – A Global Walkabout Through a Half-Century of U.S. Military Interventions].” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Brian Gruber, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files program.457868.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Warfare 27 mins – “In this year’s Christmas BMJ 2016 podcasts, we’ve been discussing morality, compassion, truth. In this final one, it’s time for war. After the second world war, there was an attempt to bring a moral sense to conflict – and Julian Sheather, specialist adviser on ethics and human rights to the BMA, and author of the christmas editorial “medicine under fire” is worried about the retrenchment of those ideals.” At the link find the title, “Christmas 2016 – War, Dec, 2016,” right-click “Media files 299298723-bmjgroup-christmas-2016-war.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Waste to Water 6 mins – “On the outskirts of Windhoek, the capital of Namibia, there’s a huge, churning vat of nasty brown liquid. It’s so stinky that my guide, the man who runs Windhoek’s water department, tells me I might want to stay in the car. But this is what I came to see — raw sewage, on its way to being turned back into drinking water. The Goreangab waste treatment plant is where most of the wastewater from Windhoek’s 300,000 residents ends up. But it’s not your run-of-the-mill sewage plant. It’s the first stop in the city’s pioneering water recycling system. Cities around the world are wrestling with whether they should build facilities like this. But here, in the middle of a desert in a remote corner of southern Africa, they’ve been recycling wastewater for almost 50 years. It’s cutting-edge technology, but it’s based on the humblest of creatures — bacteria….”At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wealth, Poverty, Politics 44 mins – “Hoover Institution fellow Thomas Sowell discusses poverty around the world and in the United States. Poverty in America, he says, compared to the rest of the world, is not severe. Many poor people in poverty in the United States have one or two cars, central heating, and cell phones. The real problem for the poor is the destruction of the family, which Sowell argues dramatically increased once welfare policies were introduced in the 1960s.” At the link find the title, “Wealth, Poverty, and Politics, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files 20151208.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woody Woodpecker 10 mins – “Who knew cartoon characters could be so litigious?” At the linkr ight-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Word Use and Trends 36 mins – “It’s finally over, kids. This monstrosity of a year is coming to a close! And to celebrate, Amy + Rebecca sit down with Kory Stamper, lexicographer for Merriam-Webster, to discuss the dictionary’s 2016 Word Of The Year: Surreal. We also learn fabulous new swears, consider Beowulf, and say eff you to the academy.” At the link right-click “Download” below “Listen Now” and select and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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