Media Mining Digest 299 – Aug 4, 2017: Affordable Care Act Legislation, Al Franken, Alan Alda, American Revolution, Bail Business Failure, Baking Powder Wars, Black Colleges, Blasphemy in Pakistan, Blind Visual Interpreter Story, Bowel Cancer Study and Trump Global Gag, British Army Muslims, Cable Business, Campaign 68, Cancer Immunotherapy, Charlatans, Chef Samin Nosrat, Child Raising, Childhood Poverty in America, Coal History, Co-authoring a Book, College Dropouts, College for Low Income Students, Compulsions, Conservatism, Cyber Attack on British National Health Service, Cyber City, Cyber Weapons, Deflation Impact, Dementia Prevention and Care, Detroit Rejuvenation, Disabled Child Care, Dragon Lady and Watergate, Farming in Canada, Fertility Industry, For Profit Schools, Foreclosure City, Foreign Policy, Gang Members, Garth Brooks, Gender Issues, Glia Cells in Brain, GMOs and Glyphosate, Gonorrhea Vaccine, Good Muslim-Bad Muslim, Graphology, Gulf War Illness, Harvard Calculators, Health Bill Failure, Health Care Insurance, High Altitude Sickness, High Poverty Schools, Hillary Clinton Commencement Speech, Historically Black, Hypothermia, Immigrants in College, Inner Ear Functions, Iraqi Civilian Deaths, ISIS Opposition Overview, Job Decline in U.S., Kitchen Sinks, Lady Bootleggers, Learning Better, Lecture Ineffectiveness, Liberal Arts Majors, Life Expectancy Rise Stops, Living on Nothing, Low Income College Students, Mass Transit Segregation, Medicaid Cuts, Migration Issues, Mississippi Desegregation, Mitch McConnell, Molecular Biology Beginnings, Mongolia Pollution, Naval Operations, Neoniconoid Insecticides, Net Neutrality Issues, Neurological Physical Therapy, New Deal Legacy, Nuclear Blackmarket Business, Nuclear Bombs for Peace, Online College Classes, Parents Wanted, Preschool History, Privacy and Surveillance, Quantum Bits, Ransomeware Protection, Recidivism, Remedial Education Trap, Research Waste, Robot Personalities, Rolling Stone Founder, Rooftop Farming, Roosevelts on Radio, Russia-Cyber Solution, Russian Adoptions, Russia Interference in U.S., Sad Songs, Sarah Vaughn, School Discipline, Sex Robots, Sexual Harassment by Venture Capitalists, Single Parent Home Disadvantage, Solar Power Trends, Statin Controversy, Student Veterans, Summer College Melt Fix, Summer Jobs Decline, Syrian Cookbook, Teaching Character in School, Teen Sex Traffic, Teen Suicides, Teenage HIV, Text Book War, Trump, Voter Data Request Response in NH, Voter Fraud Commission, War Brutality, War on Poverty Water Problems, Well Sibling Syndrome, Whiteness in America, Women Computers, WW II Deception

Exercise your ears: the 142 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 491 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of over 16,000 similar podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Affordable Care Act Legislation 18 mins – “Jamelle Bouie talks to Patrick Caldwell, a health care reporter at Mother Jones, about the latest iteration of the Senate health bill and the politics surrounding it.” At the link find the title, “Questioning the Trump-Russia Conspiracy, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6658602983.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Al Franken 69 mins – “How did an award-winning comedian defy the odds and get elected to public office? Hear more about Senator Al Franken’s journey as he shares behind-the-scenes moments of his foray into politics and working in Washington, D.C. Senator Franken has represented the state of Minnesota since 2009. He serves on several committees, including the Judiciary; Energy and Natural Resources; Indian Affairs; and Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. Before entering the political scene, Senator Franken was a popular “Saturday Night Live” writer and featured player, comedian, and radio talk show host.” At the link find the title, “Senator Al Franken: Giant of the Senate, Jul, 2017,” right-click “ Media files cc_20170706_Al_Franken_Podcast.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alan Alda 39 mins – “Today’s guest is actor, writer, director, and science-curious artist Alan Alda. Jason says: “I grew up watching him in reruns of MASH, where his character Hawkeye Pierce was so specific and relatable that he feels in my memory like a not-too-distant relative. And in Horace and Pete, Louis CK’s 2016 brilliant web-tv dramedy, Alan underwent a miraculous metamorphosis into a bitter, racist barman who is also a fully-fleshed human being. But wait – there’s more! For decades, Alan has been helping to heal the ancient rift between highly technical science and ordinary curiosity. Alan’s new book If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face? Shares what he (and science) have learned about how we can communicate better. It’s no exaggeration to say that this is a matter of life or death.” Inspired by a passage in Alan’s book, Jason puts away his interview notes. What follows is a funny, honest, connected conversation unlike anything else in the show’s two-year history.” At the link find the title, “106. Alan Alda (Actor) – The Spirit of the Staircase,” right-click “Media files PP5550286131.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

American Revolution 52 mins – “On the 4th of July, we’re broadcasting our conversation with writer Nathaniel Philbrick about George Washington and Benedict Arnold. Arnold has long been regarded as the archetypal American traitor. But before he betrayed his country, he was actually one of Washington’s favorite and most trusted generals. In his book, Philbrick examines the complicated relationship between the two men. Ultimately, he says, it’s about their different reactions to a dysfunctional Congress that was driven by self-righteous opportunism. Nathaniel Philbrick is the author numerous books, including In the Heart of the SeaWhy Read Moby Dick? and Mayflower. His new book is called Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American“ At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bail Business Failure 19 mins – “Bail is broken. In New Jersey, defense attorneys, prosecutors, and judges banded together to try a dramatic solution: Blow it up.” At the link find the title “#783: New Jersey Bails Out,” right-click “Media files 20170712_pmoney_pmpod783.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baking Powder Wars 56 mins – “First patented in 1856, baking powder sparked a classic American struggle for business supremacy. For nearly a century, brands battled to win loyal consumers for the new leavening miracle, transforming American commerce and advertising even as they touched off a chemical revolution in the world’s kitchens. Linda Civitello chronicles the titanic struggle that reshaped America’s diet and rewrote its recipes.” At the link right-click the cloud with down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Colleges 54 mins – “Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities.” At the link find the title, “The Living Legacy: Black Colleges in the 21st Century, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files livinglegacy_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blasphemy in Pakistan 27 mins – “What drives a mob to climb several flights of stairs, break down a dormitory door and kill the young man inside? Secunder Kermani pieces together the last hours of Mashal Khan, the undergraduate beaten to death by vigilantes in April, 2017. It happened in the small city of Mardan, set on a fertile plain below mountains that form part of the border with Afghanistan. Until recently, this part of Pakistan was officially known as a “frontier”. Here, as in the rest of this huge Muslim country, blasphemy is a crime. And if the police won’t enforce the law, there’s a code. “If you have to kill someone as a punishment, do it in such a way that all connections to his brain are disconnected and there is no pain,” one local politician explained. “Just bury him afterwards.” Mashal Khan was not so lucky. His slow, painful death and subsequent mutilation was captured on mobile phones. The shocking footage spread quickly and reignited the controversy over Pakistan’s strict blasphemy laws. There have been rallies in support of the victim’s family. His grave is blanketed in tinsel and flowers from sympathisers. But there’ve been rallies for the alleged killers as well. The BBC’s Secunder Kermani is based in Pakistan and has gone to meet the families and friends on both sides of this story and asks, Who was Mashal Khan? And why did he die?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Visual Interpreter Story 7 mins – “Michael Hingson talks about his employment journey and how everything he has done in his past has led him to Aira. And that is what Michael brings to his new Strategic Sales position at Aira. He is not new to Aira as he has been involved for over 2 and a half years and understands completely how Aira brings instant access to information. Michael is well known for his Best Selling book titled, Thunder Dog. Telling the story about his experience surrounding the escape from Tower 1 during the September 11th terrorist attacks….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bowel Cancer Study and Trump Global Gag 27 mins – Could Donald Trump’s plan to ban US funding for global organisations that offer abortion advice stop women from accessing contraception? President of Women Deliver, Katja Iversen, talks to Claudia about the likely consequences of the ban, often known as the ‘Global Gag Rule’. She says this controversial policy will actually increase numbers of abortions and maternal deaths, and impact other services like immunisations offered at integrated clinics. Research in the gastronomic capital of France hopes to reveal how the foods we eat influence our risk of getting cancer. Scientists at a biobank in Lyon are analysing blood samples from more than half a million people to see if certain foods increase the risk of bowel cancer. Thousands of compounds produced by different foods have been identified – to see if they can be linked to cancers. The role of microbes living in the gut will also be examined. E-books score better than paper books in helping to improve language development in very young children according to a new American study. Reading on a tablet computer with a parent increased levels of interaction with very young children – but educational psychologist Gabrielle Strouse says toddlers still love the tactile nature of paper books.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

British Army Muslims 27 mins – “When Lance Corporal Jabron Hashmi became the first, and now only, British Muslim soldier to be killed in Afghanistan in 2006, there was an outpouring of sympathy from his local community, but there was criticism from some quarters too. His death highlighted the role of Britain’s Muslim soldiers and soon afterwards a plot to kidnap and behead a Muslim soldier was discovered in Birmingham. Zubeida Malik meets Muslim soldiers who speak for the first time about what it is like to serve as a Muslim in the British army.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cable Business 30 mins – “Matt Polka, president and CEO of the American Cable Association, and ACA board member Tom Larsen discuss issues facing small cable companies and their potential for expansion.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Matt Polka and Tom Larsen. Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.475859.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Campaign 68 54 mins – “The 1968 presidential election was a watershed in American politics. After dominating the political landscape for more than a generation, the Democratic Party crumbled. Richard M. Nixon was elected president and a new era of Republican conservatism was born.” At the link find the title, “Campaign ’68, Oct, 2008,” right-click “Media files campaign68_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Immunotherapy 4 mins – “Stand Up To Cancer (SU2C) has partnered with the Lustgarten Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer Research to sponsor a translational research team focused on applying chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy to fighting pancreatic cancer. The Stand Up To Cancer–Lustgarten Foundation Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (CAR-T) Translational Research Team will seek to apply to a solid tumor cancer the CAR-T approach that has seen success in blood cancers such as leukemia. The team has been awarded $2 million. Half will come from SU2C, a 501(c)(3) funder of cancer research established in 2008 by film and media leaders. The other half will come from the Lustgarten Foundation, which has directed $132 million to research since its inception and is the largest private foundation dedicated solely to funding pancreatic cancer research. Leading the team are three pioneers in CAR-T therapy development based at the University of Pennsylvania’s …” At the link find the title, “July 18, 2017 Looking at the CAR-T Landscape As First Approval Nears ”. Click that link to listen online, but downloads are not available; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Charlatans 52 mins – “The next documentary in our Through the Lens series is a true story of desperation, scams, and goat testicles. Director Penny Lane joins us to talk about John Romulus Brinkley, a man who claimed to have a cure for impotence and many other ailments in 1920s Kansas. He took to newfangled radio to tout his unorthodox treatments, but soon found his nemesis in one Morris Fishbein, editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Lane’s film is called NUTS! At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chef Samin Nosrat 58 mins – “Samin Nosrat is a writer, teacher, and chef. Called a “go-to resource for matching the correct techniques with the best ingredients” by the New York Times and “the next Julia Child” by NPR’s All Things Considered, she’s been cooking professionally since 2000, when she first stumbled into the kitchen at Chez Panisse restaurant. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Bon Appetit, and the San Francisco Chronicle, among other places. She lives, cooks, and gardens in Berkeley, California. Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat is her first book.” At the link right-click the cloud with down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Raising 60 mins – “Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) looks at how to engage adolescents and young adults to become independent, active, and engaged citizens. He is interviewed by Steven Olikara, founder and president of the Millennial Action Project.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Senator Ben Sasse, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.478012.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Poverty in America 56 mins – “One in five American children is growing up poor. Critics of welfare and other social programs say government spending hasn’t solved poverty. But neither has economic growth.” At the link find the title, “The Forgotten 14 Million, May, 1999,” right-click “Media files forgotten14million_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Co-authoring a Book 37 mins – “Today, for the first time, we welcome TWO guests to Think Again – writers Neal Stephenson & Nicole Galland – and talk to them from New York to a Los Angeles hotel room over a horrible wi-fi connection. And it all works out beautifully. Nicole’s typically a writer of historical fiction including The Fool’s Tale and Iago, and Neil’s known for complex, speculative science fiction including Seveneaves, Snow Crash, and many other novels. Together, they’ve written a new novel: The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O. – a massive and massively entertaining epic involving magic, time travel, quantum physics, secret government organizations, and an ancient banking family called the Fuggers — with all of the jokes that implies. In this episode, we delve into Schroedinger’s Cat, why humans make such terrible decisions, and how linear a story has to be to be a story at all. Surprise conversation starter interview clips in this episode: Salman Rushdie on video games and the future of storytelling, Robert Sapolsky on brain regions and impulse control” At the link find the title, “107. Neal Stephenson & Nicole Galland (Authors) – The Garden of Forking Paths,” right-click “Media files PP9113345420.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal History 54 mins – “The production of electricity in America pumps out more greenhouse gases than all of our cars, trucks, planes, and ships combined, and half of our electricity comes from burning coal.” At the link find the title, “Power and Smoke: A Nation Built on Coal, Fe” right-click “Media files powerandsmoke_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Dropouts 54 mins – “In an economy that increasingly demands workers with knowledge and skills, many college dropouts are being left behind.” At the linkf idn the title, “Some College, No Degree: Getting Adults Back to School, Aug, 2011,” right-click “Media files somecollegenodegree_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College for Low Income Students 54 mins – “Just 20 percent of college-goers fit the stereotype of being young, single, full-time students who finish a degree in four years. College students today are more likely to be older, part-time, working, and low-income than they were three decades ago.” At the link link find the title, “The New Face of College, Sept, 2014,” right-click “Media files newfaceofcollege_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Compulsions 52 mins – “You may have said this before … a lot of us do … “I’m completely OCD.” Though doubling back to make sure you locked the doors and turned off the coffee maker or constantly reaching for your phone to check for text and other alerts may not be signs of clinical Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, science writer Sharon Begley says that compulsion is a way of coping with our daily anxieties. Begley joins Doug to talk about the neuroscience of compulsion, and why we “Can’t Just Stop.” Sharon Begley is a senior writer at STAT. the life sciences publication of The Boston Globe. She’s the author of four books. This latest is called Can’t Just Stop: An Investigation of Compulsions At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conservatism 45 mins – “…Sir Roger Scruton, a formally trained political philosopher, talks about his life and the events he’s witnessed that led him to conservatism. …Sir Roger examines a brief history of conservatism in the twentieth century of England in regard to Margaret Thatcher and Winston Churchill. Although he appreciates what Margaret Thatcher stood for, he argues that she had many conservative ideals but never used the conservative framework to organize her overall political strategy. Instead she organized around market economics, which was not always effective in the social, cultural, and legal areas. Peter Robinson argues that Winston Churchill did a much better job of organizing around conservative ideals but eventually lost an election because he didn’t have the vocabulary or the focus on free markets. They discuss the tenuous relationship between free markets and conservative ideals that have not mixed well together in British politics. Robinson and Sir Roger discuss the 2016 political upset of Brexit in the United Kingdom and how the political analysts failed to predict the vote outcome, much like what happened in November 2016 in the United States. They deliberate how the issues around immigration from Eastern Europe to the United Kingdom contributed to Brexit, in addition to general dissatisfaction with the European Union. Thus, in the cases of both the United Kingdom and the United States, the media and intellectuals ignored the will of the “indigenous working classes” who made their voices known through their votes….” At the link find the title “How to Be a Conservative, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170720-Scruton.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Attack on British National Health Service 37 mins – “Earlier this year, the WannaCry ransomeware attack took control of computers in 40 NHS trusts, blocking access to the data held on them. This wasn’t the first time that NHS computers had been infected by malware, but it brought the danger of cyber attack into the consciousness of doctors and patients. In this podcast we hear from two people who have been thinking hard about cyber security in the NHS – James Kinross, a surgeon and lecturer at Imperial College London, and Chris Hankin, director of Imperial’s Institute for Security Science and Technology.” At the link find the title, “James Kinross and Chris Hankin WannCry about NHS IT, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 333190344-bmjgroup-james-kinross-and-chris-hankin-wanncry-about-nhs-it.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber City 54 mins – “The nation’s foreign-born population will soon surpass the 14.7 percent share reached in 1910, when the Statue of Liberty beckoned to Europe’s “huddled masses yearning to breathe free.” Most of the new immigrants are from Latin America.” At the link find the title, “Pueblo, USA, Sept, 2008,” right-click “Media files pueblousa_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Weapons 46 mins – “The latest global cyberattack—using NSA cyber-weapons—has raised the stakes. We’ll look at real vulnerability and defense.” At the link find the title, “The Global Cyberattack Challenge, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_535397667.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deflation Impact 54 mins – “An extraordinary moment: America in a rare period of price stability.” At the link find the title, “The World Turned Upside Down, Mar, 1998,” right-click “Media files worldturnedupsidedown_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Prevention and Care 18 mins – “Lead author Gill Livingston discusses the new Lancet Commission on dementia prevention, intervention, and care.” At the link find the title, “Dementia Commission: The Lancet: July 20, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20july_dementia.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Rejuvenation 51 mins – “On this season of Working, we left the East Coast behind and flew to Detroit. We’re speaking with eight people who are drawing on the city’s complex history as they work to create its future. For this episode, we spoke with Alexis Wiley, Mayor Mike Duggan’s Chief of Staff. Wiley showed us around her office, told us about how she transitioned into the world of politics from a role as a local tv reporter, and explained what goes into the mayoral team’s response to a crisis. Then in a Slate Plus extra, Wiley talks about introducing and advocating for Detroit’s Project Green Light, an effort to install police video cameras at gas stations.” At the link find the title, “In Detroit: How Does the Mayor’s Chief of Staff Work? Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM1983568354.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Rejuvenation 58 mins – “For this episode, we spoke with Diana Nucera, director of the Detroit Community Technology Project. Diana Nucera runs an organization that promotes digital literacy and internet access in Detroit. Diana tells us about how she works to fill in technological gaps in Detroit—a city where nearly 40% of households still don’t have internet access. She talks us through her organization’s digital literacy programs and describes their efforts to build networks to build networks. Nucera also tells us a bit about her organization’s DIY roots, and how they fit into the city’s evolving political infrastructure. In a Slate Plus Extra, Nucera describes how net neutrality might change and how that might affect DCTP’s work.” At the link find the title, “In Detroit: How Does a Community Internet Organizer Work? Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM2761259729.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Child Care 22 mins – “Two moms have forced Canada to re-examine the definition of family and who can be parents. Natasha and Lynda are platonic friends, neighbours and legal parents to the same little boy. This is the story of Elaan and his two “mommas.” At the link find the title,”July 7: ENCORE | How two friends fought to be legal ‘co-mommas’ to a 7-year-old boy — and won, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170707_97474.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dragon Lady and Watergate 39 mins – “Foreign Collusion and the Dragon Lady Whistlestop is Slate’s podcast about presidential history. Hosted by John Dickerson, each installment revisits a memorable (or even a forgotten) moment from America’s past….In this bite-sized podcast for fans of presidential campaign history, John Dickerson of Slate’s Political Gabfest revisits a moment from the American quadrennial carnival. Hear about the grand speeches, emergency strategies, baby kissing, and backstabbing that make each presidential election cycle so fascinating. Part of the Panoply Network. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Canada 88 mins – “Brendan Grant raises six acres of vegetables plus laying hens, Highland cattle, and a hundred acres of hay with his wife, Marcelle Paulin, at Sleepy G Farm, just east of Thunder Bay, Ontario, on the north shore of Lake Superior. The only certified organic farm for 500 miles around in Canada, Sleepy G’s produce is marketed through a 150-member CSA, grocery stores, a farmers market, and a small on-farm store. Brendan shares his techniques for bringing new land into production, and delves into the ins and outs of tillage and mechanical weed control on raised beds. We also dig into marketing in Thunder Bay, an isolated city eight hours from other metropolitan areas with no history of market farming, as well as the impact of their isolation and extreme climate on production and input choices. We also discuss how the farm survived a serious accident two years ago, the impact that accident had on the farm and on Brendan, and how they managed their way through the crisis. We also discuss the pieces that Brendan and Marcelle had in place that helped the farm survive.: At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertility Industry 56 mins – “A series about the social implications of infertility and the advanced reproductive techniques designed to correct the condition.” At the link find the title, “The Fertility Race, Sept, 1999,” right-click “Media files fertilityrace_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

For Profit Colleges 55 mins – “For-profit colleges have deep roots in American history, but until recently they were a tiny part of the higher education landscape. Now they are big players.” At the link find the title,”The Rise of Phoenix: For-Profit Universities Shake Up the Academy, Sept, 2012,” right-click “Media files risephoenix_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreclosure City 53 mins – “Until recently, Las Vegas was one of the few places where the American Dream still seemed widely possible. Each month, thousands of people flocked there, lured by the promise of good jobs and a chance to own a home. It was the fastest growing city in the country. But now, Las Vegas has a new distinction: the nation’s highest foreclosure rate.” At the link find the title, “Foreclosure City, Apr, 2009,” right-click “Media files foreclosurecity_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foreign Policy 71 mins – “For 70 years, the Truman Doctrine has guided U.S. foreign policy, tying the United States to support for democracy, open societies, and market economies across the globe. Rallying a war-weary nation, President Harry Truman laid the foundation for a system of alliances in Europe and Asia, international institutions for economic cooperation, and the spread of human rights that underlay U.S. Cold War strategy. Seven decades later, what relevant lessons of the Truman Doctrine remain? On July 19, Foreign Policy at Brookings hosted U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-Va) for a discussion of these themes from his new article for Foreign Affairs, “A new Truman Doctrine: Grand strategy in a hyperconnected world.” While much has changed since the early Cold War, the senator’s call for a revitalized, 21st century Truman Doctrine recognizes that essential questions of Harry Truman’s time ring true today.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gang Members 55 mins – “Rene Enriquez was a leader in one of America’s most violent gangs, the Mexican Mafia. He’s serving 20 years to life in California for murders he committed for the gang.” At the link find the title, “Gangster Confidential, “ right-click “Media files gangsterconfidential_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Garth Brooks 48 mins – “Country music legend Garth Brooks joins us. Don’t miss it.” At the link find the title, “Garth Brooks On ‘Gunslinger’ Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_535516247.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Issues 57 mins – “Temple University professor Heath Davis examines gender identity. He is interviewed by Sarah Ellis.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Heath Davis, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.479871.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glia Cells in the Brain 10 mins – “…. It started when I was a post-doc. I was interested in the role of glia in brain development and wiring. At the time, Ben Barres was looking at the role of glia in this context. Centrally, through an unbiased screen, we unexpectedly identified a role for these immune molecules (called complement) in the pruning (or elimination) of synapses, which is a normal developmental process. It’s very important for brain wiring. Back then, in 2005, this was surprising, because we didn’t typically think about immune molecules being in the brain. We thought about immune molecules when someone had an infection or if there was a breach of the blood-brain barrier. We discovered that a number of these molecules that were traditionally associated with the complement system were actually being expressed in neurons and in healthy glial cells in the normal brain. We then discovered that they played a role in this pruning process. This was a perfect way to launch a lab because nothing was known mechanistically. Over the first 5 years, we tried to dig into that using mouse models, and we started thinking about how this might work. That led to our discovery that another type of immune cell, called “microglia,” were at play here. As a glial biologist, I completely ignored microglia because they are immune cells and they weren’t really born in the brain. Neurobiologists didn’t think about them in the context of the healthy brain. We put these two ideas together and realized that the microglia are actually part of the pruning process. Much of the work that we have been doing over the past 8 years has just been digging in and trying to understand how this immune pathway is involved in something as important as pruning….” At the link find the title, “’Sparks Fly’ and ‘Momentous Discovery’ in Brain Diseases Follows, Jul 2017, “ right-click “Media files 882177.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMOs and Glyphosate 52 mins – “Are genetically modified food advocates the new “flat-earthers”? Are their opponents the new climate deniers? As with many issues these days, the two sides are working from different sets of facts. Monsanto, the agrochemical company, and other supporters of foods that include genetically modified organisms (GMOs) say using GMOs can promote more nutritious crops, improve farmer livelihood, foster drought tolerance and flood resilience, reduce chemical pesticide use, and end hunger. Food advocates say those claims are false. They note that GMO foods promote industrial monoculture, concentrate corporate power in a few hands and drive the use of glyphosate, which has been labeled a carcinogen by the World Health Organization’s cancer agency and is now the subject of a class action lawsuit in California. Both critics and supporters were displeased by a law passed last year requiring the future labeling of GMO foods.” At the link find the title, “Rounding up the Facts on”right-click “Media files cc_20170709_cl1_Rounding_Up_Facts_PODCAST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gonorrhea Vaccine 9 mins – “Helen Petousis-Harris discusses a proof of principle study which suggests that a type of meningococcal B vaccine could protect against gonorrhoea.” At the link find the title, “Putting a dent in gonorrhoea?: The Lancet: July 10, 2017,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Good Muslim-Bad Muslim 33 mins – “Back in May [2015], Zahra and Taz had an awesome time getting interviewed by John Fugelsang and Frank Conniff for the SirusXM show Tell Me Everything. We weren’t able to share the link – so instead, we’re going to share the audio directly! Listen to the audio from the show right here – and thanks to the Tell Me Everything team for inviting us on!” At thelink you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.  

Graphology 27 mins – “Maria Konnikova returns to look at a tool prosecutors have used for decades: handwriting analysis, or graphology. Older versions of the practice have used handwriting to predict everything from a person’s mental state to their capacity for murder. “People have been convicted based on it,” says Konnikova. “We’re not talking about phrenology. Graphology is still something that exists in the United States. There are societies of graphologists.” Konnikova is the author of The Confidence Game and host of the Panoply podcast The Grift. For the Spiel, Trump’s voting commission may be hobbled, but it can still do some real harm.” At the link find the title, “The Garbage Art of Handwriting Analysis, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM3052640002.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gulf War Illness 6 mins – “VA estimates that 44 percent of veterans who served in the Persian Gulf War in 1990-91 have medical issues commonly referred to as Gulf War Illness and that those who have been deployed to Southwest Asia since then may suffer from similar medical issues. These medical issues may entitle a veteran to VA benefits. Recently, questions have been raised about whether VA is processing GWI claims correctly. GAO was asked to review VA’s handling of these claims. This report examines (1) recent trends in GWI disability claims, (2) challenges associated with accurately processing and clearly communicating decisions on GWI claims, and (3) how VA uses GWI research to inform the disability compensation program. GAO reviewed relevant federal laws, regulations, and guidance; analyzed VA data on GWI-related claim decisions from fiscal years 2010–2015 (the most recent data available); visited 4 of 58 regional offices, choosing those with high GWI caseloads; and interviewed headquarters and regional VA staff and key stakeholders. GAO also reviewed a non-generalizable sample of 44 claim files to provide illustrative examples of how VA evaluated and communicated decisions on GWI claims.” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harvard Calculators 100 mins [2 parts] – “In the first part of a multi episode series, we look at the lives of two very different women.  Williamina Fleming and Antonia Maury both made significant contributions to the field of stellar spectroscopy by developing classification systems to better understand the light from stars but their different backgrounds and training meant that they understood the role of being a calculator very differently.” [Then in Part 2] Annie Jump Cannon and Henrietta Swan Leavitt would form the core of the calculation staff at the Harvard College Observatory for nearly two decades.  They oversaw the transition of the Observatory from the directorship of Edward Charles Pickering to Harlow Shapley and established the dominant classification systems and physical laws for stellar spectra and variable stars in the early 20th century that would lead to foundational discoveries in the fields of astronomy and astrophysics.” At the link right-click “Direct Download Link” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. Do the same for Part 2 with this link.

Health Bill Failure 18 mins – “Jim Newell and Jordan Weissmann recall the sudden collapse of the Republican health care bill on Monday night and wonder if master tactician Mitch McConnell can still bring it back from the dead. Could President Donald Trump change senators’ minds, and is there any hope for a bipartisan compromise?” At the link find the title, “Is It Really Dead? Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY1648522422.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Health Care Insurance Impact 13 mins – “After the Republican Party’s seven-year attempt to dismantle the Affordable Care Act kicked the bucket this week, Donald Trump declared that he would “let Obamacare fail.” He has plenty of options for moving that failure along and his actions inevitably would hit poor people the hardest, a fact that does not surprise Jack Frech who spent 30 years serving the poor in Appalachian Ohio. Frech was saddened but not surprised by the proposals put forward by house and Senate Republicans. He says such ideas are both perennial and bipartisan. For example the Clinton administration bundled what was once federal welfare assistance into block grants to states where the money often is misdirected or hoarded by the states, even as its shriveled by inflation. For context in the ensuing healthcare battles we are replaying a conversation Brooke had with Jack just after the house bill was passed.” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Legislation 16 mins – “Jim Newell and Jordan Weissmann try to work out if Mitch McConnell actually cares about health policy and why moderate Republicans would vote for such a harsh bill. Then they get into the complicated question of the many ways the Senate legislation threatens to mess with Medicaid.” At the link find the title, “Why Would Moderate Republicans Vote for Such a Harsh Bill? Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY5399083692.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Altitude Sickness 28 mins – “If you are hiking, skiing, climbing or just visiting at altitude higher than 8,000 feet you may experience altitude sickness. Emergency Medicine specialist Dr. Chris Colwell covers the symptoms and what you should do if you show any of the signs. Recorded on 04/26/2017. (#32415)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

High Poverty Schools 54 mins – “The nation’s high school graduation rate is at an all-time high, but high-poverty schools face a stubborn challenge. Schools in Miami and Pasadena are trying to do things differently.” At the link find the title, “What It Takes: Chasing Graduation at High-Poverty High Schools, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files whatittakes_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Hillary Clinton Commencement Speech 33 mins – “Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers the commencement address at her alma mater of Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She urges students to fight for the truth, which she says is under assault, and she condemns the president’s budget.” At the link find the title “Hillary Clinton Urges Wellesley Students to Fight for Truth, Attacks President’s Budget, May, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.478642.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historically Black P1 54 mins – “NASA’s Human Computers, Harlem Through James Van Der Zee’s Lens, The Spirit of the Million Man March” At the link find the title,”Historically Black, Part 1, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files hbradio1_128.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historically Black P2 54 mins – “Tracking Down a Slave’s Bill of Sale, The Path to Founding an HBCU, The Fiddler who Charmed Missouri” At the link find the title, “Historically Black, Part 2, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files hbradio2_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hypothermia 60 mins – “Hypothermia is a potentially dangerous drop in body temperature. If the temperature drops too low it is a medical emergency. Emergency medicine specialist Dr. Chris Colwell explains the risk factors and the signs and symptoms of hypothermia so that it can be managed as soon as possible. Recorded on 04/26/2017. (#32414)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrants in College 54 mins – “The United States is facing a dramatic demographic challenge: Young Latinos are the fastest-growing segment of the population, and they are the least likely to graduate from college.” At the link find the title,”Rising By Degrees, Nov, 2009,” right-click “Media files risingbydegrees_128.mp3” and selec t “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inner Ear Functions 76 mins – “UCSF Physical Therapists explore the how the inner ear works with the brain in an effort to help patients with perception, balance and movement. Recorded on 05/02/2017. (#32388)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Civilian Deaths 21 mins – “Re-capturing one of Iraq’s main cities has come at an enormous cost, especially at the expense of civilians.” At the link find the title, “July 3: After ISIS is pushed out, what’s the future of Mosul? 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170703_46050.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Opposition Overview 13 mins – “As the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria emerged, it seized territory in Iraq and Syria, and established branches and launched terror attacks in a number of countries. The U.S. government, working with international partners, undertakes a range of efforts to counter the group. We identified 9 key issues related to U.S. counter-ISIS efforts. Among the issues: Assisting and equipping Iraqi and Syrian opposition forces combatting ISIS; Providing humanitarian and governance assistance to Iraqis and Syrians; Disrupting ISIS’s branches and networks in various countries, including its financing and propaganda; Mitigating threats to homeland security” At the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Decline in .U.S. 49 mins – “Author Rick Wartzman says that jobs offering security, decent wages and good benefits are becoming harder to find, in part because of automation, globalization, and the weakening of unions. His book is ‘The End of Loyalty.’ Also, Sharon Horgan, co-creator and co-star of the Amazon comedy series ‘Catastrophe’ talks with ‘Fresh Air’ producer Ann Marie Baldonado about finding her comedy partner Rob Delaney on Twitter, her confessional approach to writing, and working with the late Carrie Fisher.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kitchen Sinks 20 mins – “The kitchen sink is one the hardest working fixtures in the entire house.  So, we need to choose the best sink for our kitchen routine and our kitchen design. Some sink materials are tougher than others.  Taking the time to become familiar with different sink features and materials will help you find a sink that will make your kitchen look great and function well. This week we’ll go over the pros and cons of the most common kitchen sink materials, then I’ll give you a few tips for choosing the best sink size and style for your home and habits.  Plus we’ll go over our Pro Term: Farmhouse sink.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lady Bootleggers 33 mins – “Despite its uber-masculine connotation, it’s women who are behind the renaissance of this delightful drink, and women who were instrumental to its American origin story.” At the link find the title, “The Magnificent History of Women & Whiskey, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 2017-07-05-smnty-women-whiskey-final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Learning Better 54 mins – “Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Smart, Aug, 2014,” right-click “Media files scienceofsmart_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lecture Ineffectiveness 54 mins – “College students spend a lot of time listening to lectures. But research shows there are better ways to learn. And experts say students need to learn better because the 21st century economy demands more well-educated workers.” At the link find the title, “Don’t Lecture Me: Rethinking the Way College Students Learn, Sept, 2011,” right-click “Media files dontlectureme_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Arts Majors 54 mins – “The most popular college major in America these days is business. Some students think it doesn’t pay to study philosophy or history. But advocates of liberal arts programs say their graduates are still among the most likely to become leaders, and that a healthy democracy depends on citizens with a broad and deep education.” At the link find the title, “Who Needs an English Major? 2011,” right-click “Media files englishmajor_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Expectancy Rise Stops 27 mins – “The rise in life expectancy in the UK has stalled for the first time in a hundred years – despite improvements in other parts of the world. The increase was around one year every three and a half years for men, and a year for every five years for women. Sir Michael Marmot who’s the Director of the Institute of Health Equity at University College London was surprised to find that this rate of change has halved since 2010. He believes that as well as dementia, socio-economic inequalities are to blame. For life expectancy to rise, good health in childhood is crucial. In Ghana the government is tackling childhood malnutrition by giving pupils free meals at school – with the help of some new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Living on Nothing 62 mins – “Financial expert Rachel Schneider and economics professor Jonathan Morduch report on how low to moderate income families manage their finances. They are interviewed by Professor Kathryn Edin, author of [$2.00 a Day].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Jonathan Morduch and Rachel Schneider, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.475635.MP3-STD.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Low Income College Students 54 mins – “More people are going to college than ever before, but a lot of them aren’t finishing. Low-income students, in particular, struggle to get to graduation.” At the link find the title, “Grit, Luck and Money: Preparing Kids for College and Getting Them Through, Aug, 2012,” right-click “Media files gritluckmoney_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mass Transit Segregation 53 mins – “Equal access to transportation was once a central issue of the Civil Rights Movement. But today, disparities still persist.” At the link find the title, “Back of the Bus: Mass Transit, Race and Inequality, Jan, 2011,” right-click “Media files backofthebus_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicaid Cuts 28 mins – “Senate Republicans unveiled a health care plan that includes deep cuts in Medicaid. We explain what those changes are and how they will be felt by many of the 70 million Americans who rely on Medicaid for their healthcare.” At the link find the title, “202: How the GOP wants to change Medicaid” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Issues 92 mins – “An estimated 244 million people—or about 3.2 percent of the world’s population—were international migrants in 2015. Migration will only grow both in size and complexity, partly in response to the inexorable aging and persistent low fertility of a growing number of wealthy and middle-income countries. It has become increasingly unclear, however, whether the migration system can be managed well enough so that all actors—immigrants, members of the communities they leave and in which they settle, and sending and receiving societies—can fully draw its many benefits. As Migration Policy Institute co-founder, President (2002-2014), and since then, Distinguished Senior Fellow and President Emeritus Demetrios G. Papademetriou steps down from his day-to-day work at the Institute, he provides a far-ranging presentation of what migration’s challenges and opportunities are likely to look like in the next couple of decades. His presentation is followed by a conversation with Andrew Selee, MPI’s incoming President. Drawing from his decades of experience as a thought leader on migration policy around the globe, Papademetriou sets forth his views on the immediate and long-term challenges governments face as they grapple with the economic, social, and political impacts of aging populations and low fertility—and the proper role for migration as one of the responses to it. He offers suggestions on how governments on both sides of the Atlantic and beyond might better manage migration and thus capitalize on the opportunities it presents while reducing its negative effects on those who lose from the process.” At th elink right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mississippi Desegregation 54 mins – “Mississippi led the South in an extraordinary battle to maintain racial segregation. Whites set up powerful citizens groups and state agencies to fight the civil rights movement. Their tactics were fierce and, for a time, very effective.” At the link find the title, “State of Siege: Mississippi Whites and the Civil Rights Movement, Jan, 2011,” right-click “Media files stateofsiege_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mitch McConnell 24 mins – “Jamelle Bouie talks to ProPublica’s Alec MacGillis, author of The Cynic: The Political Education of Mitch McConnell, about how the majority leader is failing to deliver for the Republicans.” At the link find the title, “The Many Missteps of Mitch McConnell, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM5263864552.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Molecular Biology Beginnings 39 mins – “Today’s genomics explosion has foundations in seminal discoveries in molecular biology almost 50 years ago.  Today’s guest, Sir Richard Roberts, was a pivotal figure in a number of these areas. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1993 as a co-discoverer of the intron, a part of many eukaryotic genes that contains no protein-coding function, yet can have important roles in a gene’s structure as well as mRNA stability and processing.  He shares his memories of the methods that led to the discovery of introns and restriction enzymes. In the second part of the podcast he discusses the important role of the Nobel Laureates as agents of social change.  As decorated experts, the Laureates have provided leadership in a number of social issues, including pressing for application of biotechnology application. Hosted by Chris Barbey, Graduate Student in the Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology Program at the University of Florida.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mongolia Pollution 5 mins – “A baby cries for attention while his mother makes tea and tends a stove inside her family’s ger, or yurt. The air inside the heavy canvas walls is thick with the smells of smoke and cheese curd. Two older boys are playing outside. It’s a scene that could be from any time in Mongolia going back hundreds of years, and just about anywhere in the country’s vast open plains, where families of nomadic herders have followed their livestock for countless generations. But things are changing fast in Mongolia. And recently this nomadic family set down its portable home in a place they never expected to end up — a sprawling patchwork of dirt roads, makeshift fences and hundreds of yurts in the country’s crowded capital city of Ulaanbaatar. A few years ago the family gave up on herding and moved to the city after losing most of its livestock in a harsh winter, known here as a “dzud.” And they weren’t alone. “So many nomadic families lost their herds” during that time, says Jargalsaikhan Erdene-Bayar, the father of the family. “So they started moving here. And it’s still happening.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Naval Operations 26 mins – “Retired Admiral James Stavridis wants to remind us: Despite headlines about the rise of ISIS, there are bigger existential threats to America. “Terrorism is not apocalyptic, it’s a tool,” says Stavridis. He warns that conflicts with Russia and China are much more worrisome and likely to include a maritime component. “Again and again when there’s a crisis, the first question from the president is, where are the [aircraft] carriers? They are flexible and they can strike.” His new book is Sea Power.” At the link find the title, “At Sea With James Stavridis, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM1834836017.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Neonicotinoid Insecticides 44 mins – “Neonicotinoids (neonics) are a class of insecticides based on natural plant compounds that disrupt the insect nervous system. They are used because they have relatively low toxicity on non-insects.  They are applied as seed coatings, so when a seed germinates the water-soluble insecticides are taken up and mobilized throughout the plant, providing protection against insects that feed on it.  The strategy decreases the need for aerial spraying of broad-spectrum insecticides. Because of these attributes, neonic use has increased significantly. As usual, when a single strategy is employed there can be collateral effects. Dr. John Tooker from Penn State University describes his work on today’s podcast.  Dr. Tooker examines a situation where the reliance on neonics has led to problems with other pests. This reminds us that integrated pest management is important, that there are no one-size-fits-all solutions, and that we have to exercise care in monitoring unanticipated effects of insecticide use.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality Issues 4 mins – “Thousands of companies, including tech giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon, staged a Day of Action Wednesday to protest plans by the Federal Communications Commission to roll back rules that they say would affect net neutrality. “The notion and the principle behind net neutrality is that there should be no ability for any company or entity to be able to throttle [or] block access; not allow certain content; require pay prioritization for content to anywhere on the web,” said Denelle Dixon, chief legal and business officer at Mozilla, which is among more than 80,000 websites, organizations and individuals taking part in the protest. Under rules enacted in 2015, internet service providers are forbidden from favoring or discriminating against particular online content, apps or services, Mashable reports. But that will no longer be the case if ISPs succeed in reversing a 2015 “Title II” classification that has them regulated like traditional telephone service providers. “Internet service providers like Comcast, Verizon and AT&T want to be able to create their own rules and regulations around how they provide content to their end-user … and want more flexible rules,” Dixon said….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurological Physical Therapy 85 mins – “UCSF Physical Therapists Catherine Printz and Monika Patel explore neurological physical therapy. Recorded on 04/25/2017. (#32387)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Deal Legacy 54 mins – “President Barack Obama wants to create jobs by building infrastructure. So did another president. Franklin Delano Roosevelt tried to put people to work by building roads, bridges, dams, sewers, schools, hospitals and even ski jumps. The structures that New Deal agencies built transformed America.” At the link find the title, “Bridge to Somewhere, May, 2009,” right-click “Media files bridgetosomewhere_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Blackmarket Business 54 mins – “In January 2000, a German engineer living in South Africa met with a friend and business partner to hatch a deal. Gerald Wisser, a 61-year-old broker, visited his friend’s pipe factory outside Johannesburg to see if his friend wanted to make a bid on a manufacturing project.” At the link find the title, “Business of the Bomb, Apr, 2008,” right-click “Media files businessofthebomb_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Bombs for Peace 4 mins – “Fifty-five years ago this month, Milo Nordyke was staring out at the Nevada desert, waiting for a huge explosion to blow a hole in the surface of the earth. The blast was known as Sedan, and it was one of two dozen nuclear explosions that American scientists set off for non-military purposes. It was 1962, a year when most people feared the destructive power of nuclear bombs. But Nordyke and his colleagues believed that bombs had the power not only to destroy, but also to create. Let’s say you wanted to build a harbor or pit mine. One nuclear bomb could do the work of hundreds of bulldozers — or millions of sticks of dynamite….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online College Classes 54 mins – “Digital technologies and the Internet are changing how many Americans go to college. From online learning to simulation programs to smart-machine mentors, the 21st-century student will be taught in fundamentally new ways.” At the link find the title,”Keyboard College: How Technology is Revolutionizing Higher Education, Sept, 2012,” right-click “Media files keyboardcollege_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parents Wanted 54 mins – “Advocates for kids are trying to persuade more families to adopt teenagers. If teenagers in foster care don’t find permanent families, they face a grim future. They “age out” of foster care, usually when they turn 18 years old, and many wind up on the streets. Every year, more than 24,000 American young people age out of foster care.” At the link find the title, “Wanted: Parents Nov, 2007,” right-click “Media files wantedparents_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Preschool History 54 mins – “The Perry Preschool Project is one of the most famous education experiments of the last 50 years. The study asked a question: Can preschool boost the IQ scores of poor African-American children and prevent them from failing in school?” At the link find the title, “Early Lessons, Oct, 2009,” right-click “Media files earlylessons_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy and Surveillance 67 mins – “The U.S.-EU Privacy Shield framework, the agreement between the U.S. government and the European Commission that enables continued flows of commercial data from Europe to the United States, is undergoing its first annual review by the Commission and other European institutions. In the U.S., the Trump administration has affirmed support for the framework and its essential pillars, while simultaneously pursuing foreign policies and privacy policies that cause alarm to some Europeans. What will be the outcome of the EU Commission’s review, scheduled to be completed by September, and how will the actions of the Trump administration affect the future of data transfers? On July 19, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted a leading member of the European Parliament on privacy and data protections issues, Jan Philipp Albrecht, to discuss views of the Privacy Shield and consumer data privacy more broadly. How well has the Privacy Shield functioned since it was adopted in July 2016? How might other geopolitical events impact the future of trans-Atlantic data transfers? And what emerging threats pose the greatest risk to data protection in the EU and U.S.?” At the link right click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Bits 28 mins – “This week, a new kind of quantum bit, the single-cell revolution, and exploring Antarctica’s past to understand sea level rise.” At the link find the title, ”Nature Podcast: 6 July 2017,” right-click “ media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomware Protection 36 mins – “This week, Ben discusses recent events in cybersecurity with Matt Tait. Matt shared his views on WannaCry, NotPetya, and what companies and governments can do to protect against such attacks in the future.” At the link find the title “8 Jul, 2017, Matt Tait on Recent Events in Cybersecurity,” right-click “Direct download: Matt_Tait_Ransomware.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recidivism 54 mins – “After an abrupt reversal 20 years ago, some prisons and colleges try to maintain college education for prisoners.” At the link find the title, “Rewriting the Sentence: College Behind Bars, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files rewritingthesentence_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Remedial Education Trap 54 mins – “A system meant to give college-bound students a better shot at succeeding is actually getting in the way of many, costing them time and money and taking a particular toll on students of color.” At the link find the title, “Stuck at Square One: The Remedial Education Trap, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files squareone_128.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Research Waste 28 mins – “Twenty years ago the statistician Doug Altman railed against, “The Scandal of Poor Medical Research,” in an editorial in The BMJ. 10 years later, Iain Chalmers and Paul Glaziou calculated that costs $170 billion annually in wasted research grants. In this podcast, recorded at Evidence Live, we spoke to Altman and Chalmers about their campaigns to improve the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials, and why that level of waste still occurs.” At the link find the title, “”For the public good, not for careers” – Iain Chalmers and Doug Altman on research waste Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 332106211-bmjgroup-for the public good not for careers ian-chalmers-and-doug-altman on research waste.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Personalities 35 mins – “Will we one day create machines that are essentially just like us? People have been wrestling with that question since the advent of robotics. But maybe we’re missing another, even more intriguing question: what can robots teach us about ourselves? We ponder that question with Kate Darling of the MIT Media Lab in a special taping at the Aspen Ideas Festival.” At the link find the title,”Could You Kill A Robot? Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170710 hiddenbrain_ep77.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Rolling Stone Founder 50 mins– “After being involved in Berkeley’s Free Speech Movement, Jann Wenner wanted to start a publication to capture the exploding counterculture scene of the 1960s. The result was Rolling Stone, a gritty music magazine that – for 50 years — has left an indelible mark on rock music and journalism. PLUS in our postscript “How You Built That,” how Cleveland resident Joel Crites created the app Micro Fantasy, a game where fans can make mini-predictions about what will happen next during a baseball game.” At the link find the title, “Rolling Stone: Jann Wenner, Jul, 2017,” right-click “20170707_hibt rolling.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Rooftop Farming 80 mins – “John Stoddard and Lindsay Allen work together at Higher Ground Farm, a rooftop farming operation with two locations in Boston. John is the founder of the business and operator of the site at the Boston Design Center, and Lindsay runs the new site at the Boston Medical Center. Higher Ground sells to restaurants and direct to consumers, and provides produce the Boston Medical Center cafeteria, patient food service, and a preventative food pantry. We dig into the fundamentals of rooftop farming, including options for different production systems and why Higher Ground has opted for their system. John and Lindsay provide insights into the surprising of ecology of rooftop farming – including weeds and seagulls! – and discuss soil fertility management and irrigation systems. John and Lindsay also ruminate on how to find a roof to farm on, what it takes for an urban farm to survive, and how they’ve leveraged the rooftops to create relationships with customers and clients. And we examine the two different business models that Higher Ground uses to make their operation work – growing food for sale, as well as operating a rooftop farm for a management fee.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Roosevelts on Radio 54 mins – “When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before.” At the link find the title, “The First Family of Radio: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt’s Historic Broadcasts,Nov, 2014, “ right-click “Media files roosevelts_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russia – Cyber Solutions – “At this point, it’s widely accepted that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election; the question now is what the United States should do about it. At Third Way, Mieke Eoyang, Evelyn Farkas, Ben Freeman, and Gary Ashcroft have a new paper on the subject, titled “The Last Straw: Responding to Russia’s Anti-Western Aggression.” Mieke and Evelyn came to the studio to talk with Benjamin Wittes about their proposals, which range from sanctions to FARA reforms.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_238.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Adoptions 20 mins – “That meeting between Donald Trump Jr. and a Russian lawyer was two decades in the making. It began in 1996, when an adventurous American went to Russia, trying to make a buck.” At the link find the title, “#784: Meeting The Russians, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170714_pmoney_pmpod784.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Interference in U.S. 27 mins – “Former FBI Special Agent Clint Watts joins Chuck to walk through the timeline of events around June 2016, beginning with Donald Trump, Jr. meeting with a Russian lawyer and ending with then-candidate Donald Trump asking for Russia to release Hillary Clinton’s emails.” At the link find right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sad Songs 45 mins – “Why country music makes you cry, and rock and roll doesn’t: A musical interpretation of divided America.” At the link find the title, “The King of Tears, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY2187906186.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sarah Vaughan 48 mins – “Race, jazz and the incredible voice of Sarah Vaughan, Queen of Bebop.” At the link find the title, “The Vast Voice Of Sarah Vaughan, J” right-click “Media files npr_535651147.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Discipline 54 mins – “A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don’t make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.” At the link find the title, “ReSpare the Rod: Reforming School Discipline, Aug, 2016,” right-click “Media files sparetherod_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Robots 23 mins – “Robot experts say it’s time to deal with the ethics of sexual robotics since the advanced technology has implications for human intimacy and our evolving relationship with robots.” At the link find the title, “July 7: Designing robots for sex a ‘dehumanizing practice’: robot ethicist, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170707_35279.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment by Venture Capitalists 39 mins – “It started with a handful of women who called out Binary Capital co-founder Justin Caldbeck for what they call inappropriate behavior, making unwarranted advances towards women who approached him for funding. He and his business partners at Binary Capital have offered to resign. Then 500 Startups co-founder Dave McClure was called out for alleged inappropriate behavior. And in a public apology, said he is a self-proclaimed “creep’. This has caused a long overdue stir in Silicon Valley. But this shake-up is far from over. I’m just waiting for the next shoe to drop as female entrepreneurs, who’ve long joked about going in for a check and out with an unwanted date, get up the courage to come forward. And taking it to the next level, other women may come forward shedding light on investors who simply wouldn’t invest in women because they were in ‘child bearing years’. Beyond that, even men may start coming forward and express an abuse of power by the venture capital community as well, showing that the bad behavior in the rich and powerful investing market actually doesn’t doesn’t discriminate. It may be worse for women, but the abuse of power also transcends across the board. It’s not to say that all VC’s are acting in inappropriate ways. They’re not. And I would hate for the venture capitalists and angel investors I work with, who are amazing, respectful, have diverse portfolios, and are incredibly supportive off all people no matter, race, gender, or sexuality, to get looped into the group of bad seeds. They should be celebrated. And in this show we have a great group of powerful women who are choosing to focus on those men AND women in Silicon Valley that support great innovation by ALL. They have great solutions to eliminate the “Creeps” in Silicon Valley and to create a more comfortable, safe, and equal working environment. If you have other suggestions, please share with any one of us personally, join us on Twitter using #GirlsInTech or #StandTogether, or in the comment section as well. Let’s keep this conversation going.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Single Parent Home Disadvantage 43 mins – “Over 40 percent of U.S. births are to unmarried mothers, and the numbers are especially high among the less-educated. Why? One argument is that the decline in good manufacturing jobs led to a decline in “marriageable” men. Surely the fracking boom reversed that trend, right?” At the link click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power Trends 26 mins – “To combat global warming, the world needs to change where it gets its energy from. Three energy experts discuss the challenges of transitioning to low carbon energy, and what advances are needed to make the journey possible. This is the final episode in the Grand Challenges podcast series.” At the link find the title, “Grand Challenges: Energy, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statin Controversy 52 mins – “Cardiologists agree that we should all be getting regular exercise and eating a healthful diet with lots of vegetables and fruits. But they don’t agree on which of us should be taking statins to protect our hearts. Just how much do these cholesterol-lowering drugs actually reduce the risk of a heart attack? The answer to the statin standoff is surprisingly controversial….” You can listen at the link, but have to buy the download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Student Veterans 54 mins – “The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives.” At the link find the title, “From Boots to Books: Student Veterans and the New GI Bill Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files bootstobooks_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Summer College Melt Fix 25 mins – “According to research from Harvard, as many as 40% of kids who intend to go to college at the time of high school graduation don’t actually show up in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon “summer melt,” and it has long been a puzzling problem. These kids have taken the SATs, written college essays, applied to and been accepted by a school of their choice. Often they’ve even applied for and received financial aid. Why would they not show up at college? This week on Hidden Brain, we look more closely at the problem — and talk about ways that some universities are trying to fix it.” At the link find the title, “Summer Melt, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170717 hiddenbrain, ep 78 summer melt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Summer Jobs Decline 46 mins – “That rite of passage: the teen summer job is disappearing. We’ll ask why and probe the costs beyond the missing paycheck.” At the link find the title, “Vanishing Summer Jobs For Teens, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files npr_535399027.mp3” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Cookbook 51 mins – “Scents and Flavors is a 13th century Syrian cookbook which historian and Arabic scholar Charles Perry has edited and translated.  Unlike many early recipe manuals this book gives us a glimpse of the social history of the medieval period in Syria. Charles talks about an inventive cuisine that elevates simple ingredients by combining various aromas of herbs, spaces, fruits and flower essences.  He shares stories and descriptions of ingredients and recipes for food and drink as well as the fragrances that garnish the meals and perfume the diners.” At the link right-click the cloud with down-pointing arrow on the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teaching Character in School 54 mins – “This documentary explores the “Expeditionary Learning” approach, traces the history of ideas that led to its inception, and investigates what American schools could learn from its success.” At the link find the title, “Beyond the Blackboard: Building Character in Public Schools, Sept, 2015,” right-click “Media files beyondtheblackboard_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Sex Traffic 54 mins – “Advocates for kids are pushing for a new approach to combating underage prostitution: treating young people caught up in sex trafficking as victims, not delinquents.” At the link find the title, “Bought and Sold: The New Fight Against Teen Sex Trafficking, “ right-click “Media files boughtandsold_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teen Suicides 60 mins – “Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among teens in the U.S. In this program, Elliot Kallen, who founded A Brighter Day in honor of his late son, Jake, will discuss the organization’s efforts in fighting depression and teen suicide; Dr. Patrick O’Reilly, a clinical psychologist specializing in anxiety disorders, and Dr. Rona Hu, the medical director of the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital, will join him. A Brighter Day reaches out to teens suffering from depression and other related issues while allowing them to maintain the dignity. The charity connects teens to the resources they need, showcasing local bands in a way that helps teens learn about depression and its risk factors.” At the link find the title, “A Brighter Day, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files cc_20170630_A_Brighter_Day_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teenage HIV 21 mins – “Teens with HIV face the challenge of preparing for an adulthood they may never reach.” At the link find the title, ‘The Positive Life, Jan, 1999,” right-click “Media files positivelife_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Text Book War 54 mins – “What should children learn in school? It’s a question that’s stirred debate for decades, and in 1974 it led to violent protests in West Virginia. Schools were hit by dynamite, buses were riddled with bullets, and coal mines were shut down. The fight was over a new set of textbooks.” At the link find the title, “The Great Textbook War, Jun, 2010,” right-click “Media files greattextbookwar_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Explained 53 mins – “Earlier this week we recorded a special episode of the Intelligence Squared podcast at the Acast studio in east London. We were joined by author and activist Naomi Klein and BBC economics editor Kamal Ahmed as they discussed Klein’s bestselling new book ‘No Is Not Enough’. In this wide-ranging discussion, Klein sets out her view of Trump as the ultimate megabrand. To her, Trump’s presidency is not an aberration – it’s the culmination of recent political trends and amounts to nothing less than a giant corporate takeover of America. Will Trump-style politics become the new normal, or – however unstable the world feels right now – can progressives unite to to defeat what Klein calls the new politics of shock and fear?” At the link find the title, “Naomi Klein on Donald Trump and the new shock politics, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Resistance 37 mins – “After tackling the social impact of branding and corporate dominance in No Logo, then the use of crises to further political agendas in The Shock Doctrine, and the problem of political apathy in the face of climate change in This Changes Everything, activist and author Naomi Klein is back with a book that unites all her previous targets: No Is Not Enough. Written in just months after Donald Trump’s election, No Is Not Enough is a powerful call to arms in the Trump era. Klein warns readers to be aware of the shock tactics employed by the Trump administration, in which crises are exploited in order to impose a sinister political agenda on a distracted public.” At the linkr ight-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Trump-Russia Story 21 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Masha Gessen about why she thinks the latest developments in the Donald Trump Jr. story aren’t as revelatory as people are making it out to be.” At the link find the title, “Questioning the Trump-Russia Conspiracy, Jul, 2017,” right-click “media files SM1527667716.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Voter Data Request Response in NH 57 mins – “The President’s Election Integrity Commission’s request for state voter checklist information set off lots of concerns about voter privacy. Some states, including Maine, have refused to cooperate.  Others, like New Hampshire, have said they’ll comply, but only with information that’s already publicly available.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Voter Fraud Commission 31 mins – “President Trump believes he would have won the popular vote — if it weren’t for the 3 million people that voted illegally. Even though there’s no evidence to support his claim, he put together a commission to look into the issue, and their first meeting is today. They’ve already been pretty active, asking for voter data from all 50 states. But what exactly is going on with this commission, and what can we expect?” At the link find the title, “203: What you should know about Trump’s voter fraud commission, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files 7bd89778-fd80-4fbd-9d9f-c581e5ef5d23.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Brutality 54 mins – “Sergeant Adam Gray made it home from Iraq only to die in his barracks. Investigating his death, American RadioWorks pieces together a story of soldiers suffering psychological scars – because they abused Iraqi prisoners.” At the link find the title, “What Killed Sergeant Gray, Oct, 2008,” right-click “Media files whatkilledsgtgray_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War on Poverty 54 mins – “When Lyndon B. Johnson became president after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, he put the power of his presidency behind a remarkable series of reform initiatives. The legislation was geared toward boosting economic opportunity, a theme captured by his administration’s catchphrase, the Great Society.” At the link find the title, “War on Poverty, Jun, 2010,” right-click “Media files waronpoverty_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Problems 54 mins – “Scientists say most people on Earth will first experience climate change in terms of water — either too much or too little.” At the link find the title, “Thirsty Planet, “ right-click “Media files thirstyplanet_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Well Sibling Sydrome 12 mins – “The effects of mental illness are well documented. But until recently, there has been little said about the siblings of the mentally ill. Now researchers are starting to look at the “well-sibling” syndrome.” At the link find the title, “A Burden to Be Well, May, 2007,” right-click “Media files burdentobewell_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America 54 mins – “This week, BackStory looks at whiteness in America by broadcasting segments from podcasts we admire. These stories — from the podcasts Scene on Radio and What’s Ray Saying along with a segment from BackStory’s archives — explore what it means to be white in America, and how the concept of whiteness has fundamentally shaped our country.” [The 13-part (7 hr) Scene on Radio, are included here while nine of eleven episodes of What’s Ray Say are found in past episodes of this blog.] At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P1 17 mins – “Events of the past few years have turned a challenging spotlight on White people, and Whiteness, in the United States. An introduction to our series exploring what it means to be White. By John Biewen, with special guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P10 38 mins – “The story of Bhagat Singh Thind, and also of Takao Ozawa – Asian immigrants who, in the 1920s, sought to convince the U.S. Supreme Court that they were white in order to gain American citizenship. Thind’s “bargain with white supremacy,” and the deeply revealing results.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P11 46 mins – “For hundreds of years, the white-dominated American culture has raised the specter of the dangerous, violent black man. Host John Biewen tells the story of a confrontation with an African American teenager. Then he and recurring guest Chenjerai Kumanyika discuss that longstanding image – and its neglected flipside: white-on-black violence.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P12 40 mins – “For years, Myra Greene had explored blackness through her photography, often in self-portraits. She wondered, what would it mean to take pictures of whiteness? For her friends, what was it like to be photographed because you’re white? With another conversation between host John Biewen and series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P2 29 mins – “For much of human history, people viewed themselves as members of tribes or nations but had no notion of “race.” Today, science deems race biologically meaningless. Who invented race as we know it, and why? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P3 34 mins – “Chattel slavery in the United States, with its distinctive – and strikingly cruel – laws and structures, took shape over many decades in colonial America. The innovations that built American slavery are inseparable from the construction of Whiteness as we know it today. By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P4 37 mins – “All men are created equal.” Those words, from the Declaration of Independence, are central to the story that Americans tell about ourselves and our history. But what did those words mean to the man who actually wrote them? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika. ” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P5 63 mins – “Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen heard next to nothing about the town’s most important historical event. In 1862, Mankato was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history – the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors – following one of the major wars between Plains Indians and settlers. In this documentary, originally produced for This American Life, John goes back to Minnesota to explore what happened, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it afterwards.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P6 40 mins – “When it comes to America’s racial sins, past and present, a lot of us see people in one region of the country as guiltier than the rest. Host John Biewen spoke with some white Southern friends about that tendency. Part Six of our ongoing series, Seeing White. With recurring guest, Chenjerai Kumanyika.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P7 14 mins – “How attached are you to the idea of being white?” Chenjerai Kumanyika puts that question to host John Biewen, as they revisit an unfinished conversation from a previous episode. Part 7 of our series, Seeing White.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P8 29 mins – “Scientists weren’t the first to divide humanity along racial – and racist – lines. But for hundreds of years, racial scientists claimed to provide proof for those racist hierarchies – and some still do.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whiteness in America P9 29 mins – “In 1919, a white mob forced the entire black population of Corbin, Kentucky, to leave, at gunpoint. It was one of many racial expulsions in the United States. What happened, and how such racial cleansings became ‘America’s family secret.’At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Computers 26 mins – “A group of African-American women, whose job at NASA was to do the math, pushed for civil rights and made a lasting mark on the U.S. space program.” At the link find the title, “july 4: ENCORE | Meet the black women who broke ground in NASA space race, 2017,” right-click “Media files current_20170704_23389.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

WW II Deception 4 mins – “It’s 3:00am on D-Day. As the Allied forces set sail for Normandy, the Germans receive an urgent message from one of their agents in England. It reveals that troops are shipping out to cross the Channel. This information is critical; it means the Germans can deploy their reserve divisions and destroy the Allied troops as they come ashore. The message exposes the biggest secret of the war – and this is all a part of the Allies‘ plan. You see, that German agent was a double-agent -one of the most successful in history. He was part of Operation Fortitude, the campaign of deception that was crucial to the success of D-Day. And yet his country wasn’t even in the war: he was a Catalan from Barcelona, named Juan Pujol García.” At the link right-click “Click here for audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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