Media Mining Digest 307 – Sept 29, 2017: 3D Printer Cost, 9-11 Story, Afghanistan Politics, AI and Creativity, Anonymous versus Isis, Arab Stories, Autism vs Vaccines, Battery Powered Britain, Brain Implants, Cancer Research, Chicken Industry, C-ion Cell Batteries, Climate Disinformation, Coal Hogs, Complex Global Law, Computer Security, Convicted Innocents, CT and MRI, Detroit Revitalization, Diagnosis Uncertainty, Dog Rescues, Drone Flying Careers, Ecuadorian Oil Problem, Election Security, Emotional Cognition, Equifax Fiasco, Evangelican Movement, Exercise and Learning, Food Crop Quality, Freedom of Religion, Georgetown University Slaves, Gerrymandering, Gut Research, Hate Speech, Hydrogel Retinas, Hygiene Hypothesis, Impact Investing, Investing Philosophy, Justice in U.S., Katy Tur Correspondent, Larry King Interview, Latin American Trends, Lexicographers, Liberal Democracy, Life Extension Factors, Nation of Islam, Netflix Gigs, North Korea History, NSA Security Counsel, Pink Slime Lawsuit, Prisons and Trump, Privacy Data, Read Between the Trump Lines, Renewable Energy in Texas, Robot Ethics, Robot Safecracker, Supernatural Beliefs, Syrian Refugee Story, Trump and the Press, Trump Controversies, Trump Special Investigation, Truth and Accuracy, Undocumented Students, Volt Solar Energy, Water Usage, Weed Control, Wildfire Future, Womens’ Prison, Zika Update

Exercise your ears: the 158 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 611 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 17,430 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 86GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 400 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printer Cost 16 mins – “Today, we’re going to talk cheap 3D printers. We were really impressed to find and to learn that there are some really cheap 3D printers out there. If that’s your biggest limiting factor is cost. They’re kits though, we have to be really careful that most of the ones with the cheap prices and the one we’re particularly talking about, the Lewihe. It stands for length, width, height, the first two letters of each. It’s not bad looking for what is a $75 printer. It’s a kit printer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

3D Printer Necessity 19 mins – “In today’s episode, Tom and Tracy Hazzard talk about the opportunity cost of 3D printing. They go through their own genesis story with 3D printing and how they saw that not buying a 3D printer would cost them a great opportunity. They also go into how 3D printing changes your production process, your design process and it’s helping you with your business that not doing it really is a missed opportunity. Tom and Tracy also discuss how a leap of faith is needed but you have to think about the opportunities that you would be missing if you don’t start now.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

9-11 Story 19 mins – “Jim Giaccone: Memories, Monsters, Mountaintops – A man conquers a nightmare in memory of his brother.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Afghanistan Politics 30 mins – “Episode 26: Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad on the War in Afghanistan President Trump recently announced his plans for the War in Afghanistan, including the deployment of additional US troops to the country. This week we look at the political geography and the recent history of Afghanistan with Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (2003-2005) and Iraq (2005-2007). He also served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (2007-2009). Ambassador Khalilzad discussed the roots and resilience of the Taliban, Afghanistan’s drug trade, and the importance of re-building Afghan state institutions in order to secure long-term peace in the region.” At the link find the title, “Episode 26: Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad on the War in Afghanistan,” right-click “Media files SBKHA0901.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI and Creativity 39 mins – “As humans, we have some unique abilities. We are self-aware, we exhibit critical thinking and we have the ability to be creative and innovate. Will that always be the case? Some think that artificial intelligence (AI) will someday take over creativity and innovation.” At the link find the title “Will Artificial Intelligence Take Over Creativity and Innovation? S13 Ep25, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files Will_Artificial Intelligence Take Over Creativity and Innovation_S13_Ep25.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Identification 68 mins – “This week, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan wrestle with a long-running tension in our country’s history: what it means to assimilate and “become American.” We’ll explore the 19th-century notions of who could become an American and the ways they were expected to change. Plus, we’ll discuss how much room there was for a hyphenated American identity in the past and if there is room today.” At the link find the title, “The Melting Pot: Americans & Assimilation, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files BKS8300246576.mp3 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anonymous versus ISIS 29 mins – “Following the terrorist attacks in Paris, French officials used metadata from a phone they found in a trashcan to gather information that made it possible to raid ISIS safe houses within a week. During these raids they were able to kill the suspected mastermind behind the operation, who was believed to be planning more attacks. Using a combination of cyber forensics and traditional police work, the French identified and successfully raided the purported hideout of the suspected ringleader. Considering our advanced technology, many are left questioning how this happened in the first place? And looking forward, can governments really prevent future acts of terrorism by building backdoors into encryption? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the digital forensics of the Paris attacks and the aftermath, including a surfacing argument about cryptic communication, the response from French, British, and American governments, and how Anonymous, the hacker group, has gotten involved. …Stay until the end of the podcast to hear about Anonymous’s war on ISIS and the hypocritical nature of ISIS’s use of social media.” At the link find the title, “Paris Attacks: The Digital Investigation, ISIS, and The Response, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files paris-attacks-digital-isis-response.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arab Stories 50 mins – “On the next Snap…”High Crimes and Misdemeanors. When your back is against the wall and you’re all out of options, you don’t want to break the law…but it wants to break you. Featuring the story of an imprisoned Iranian fiancee and a personal story from the Daily Show’s Hasan Minhaj.” At the link click the circle with three dots and right-click “Download this audio” to get the podcast.

Asthma Commission 19 mins – “Discussion with two authors of a new Lancet Commission about the need for a new approach to prevent, manage, and cure asthma.” At the link find the title, “Asthma Commission: The Lancet: September 11, 2017,” right-click “Media files 11sept_asthmacommission.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism vs Vaccines P1 45 mins – “Autism, seizures, and overloaded immune systems. Could these really be side effects of vaccines? This week, we dive into the science to find out how safe vaccines really are. We also talk to public health researchers Prof. Dan Salmon and Prof. Amy Kalkbrenner and neurologist Prof. Ingrid Scheffer.” At the link find the title, “Are They Safe? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT6426722197.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism vs Vaccines P2 36 mins – “Last week we explored the science behind vaccine safety. This week we try to understand where these fears came from, and why they persist. We speak to three historians: Prof. Nadja Durbach, Prof. Elena Conis, and Prof. Robert Johnston. And a concerned mom named Noelle.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Anti-Vaxxers,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT1489776495.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baby Creation 52 mins – “It’s a timeless question, asked by every kid that’s ever lived: where do babies come from? It turns out even the great scientific minds of the Enlightenment didn’t really have an answer. While navigators and cartographers seemed to have mastered the heavens and the Earth, other scientists were conducting bizarre experiments to put their finger on how exactly humans create life. Science writer Edward Dolnick joins us to tell the story of 250 years of searching and the meandering ways of scientific discovery. Edward Dolnick is the former chief science writer for The Boston Globe and the author of a number of books, including The Forger’s Spell and The Clockwork Universe. His new book is called The Seeds of Life: From Aristotle to da Vinci, from Shark’s Teeth to Frog’s Pants, the Long and Strange Quest to Discover Where Babies Come From.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Battery Powered Britain 30 mins – “New developments in battery technology are changing the way we power Britain. More efficient, higher capacity batteries expand the range of electric vehicles and allow solar and wind power plants to provide smooth, 24 hour electricity. Tom Heap is in Cornwall where power companies and local innovators are developing a new battery-powered economic model that could be rolled out to the rest of the UK. From mining the lithium that makes the batteries to holiday parks producing clean power for the grid Cornwall is leading the way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bayes Theorem 90 mins – “We don’t treat all of our beliefs equally. For some, we see them as either true or false, correct or incorrect. For others, we see them as probabilities, chances, odds. In one world, certainty, in the other, uncertainty. In this episode you will learn from two experts in reasoning how to apply a rule from the 1700s that makes it possible to see all of your beliefs as being in “grayscale,” as neither black nor white, neither 0 nor 100 percent, but always somewhere in between, as a shade of gray reflecting your confidence in just how wrong you might be…given the evidence at hand.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 073-Bayes_Theorem.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bill Nye Interview 55 mins – At the link find “273. Bill Nye the Science Guy, author of Everything All at Once, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files geeksguide273final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biotech Conflicts 69 mins – “Any podcast’s 100th episode is reason to celebrate.  In Talking Biotech’s 100th episode Chris Barbey interviews its originator, Dr. Kevin Folta, Professor and Chairman of the Horticultural Sciences Department at the University of Florida.  They discuss the current research efforts in Folta’s lab along with his science communication efforts and how activists have reshaped his career– simply because he spoke about science. Also, his new roles in science communication.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

BlocPower Project 30 mins – “Compared with new buildings, older buildings tend to eat up a lot more energy and produce and trap a lot more pollution. Whether it’s an old church, a broken-down community center, an under-funded school building, or public housing, too often these older buildings don’t get retrofitted due to fiscal constraints. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Donnel Baird, the founder and CEO of BlocPower, a startup that uses technology to retrofit buildings in financially underserved communities. Not only does this work result in long-term energy savings and more humane conditions, BlocPower offers these benefits at a much lower cost than was previously available. Baird explains BlocPower’s business model, tells us what inspired him to start the company, and talks about the challenges that the current political environment brings.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Books–Podcasts–Science 58 mins – “Episode 35 of Books and Ideas is an interview with best-selling author Scott Sigler. Scott is known for his unique blend of horror and hard science fiction. In this interview Dr. Ginger Campbell talks to him about his career with a focus on the challenges of trying to incorporate accurate science into fiction. They also talk about his most recent hard cover book “The Rookie” and how it is encouraging young adults to become readers.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar to download the audio file.

Bored and Brilliant 29 mins – “When was the last time you found yourself truly bored? Have you forfeit those nooks and crannies in the day when you used to let your mind wander aimlessly in a daydream? On today’s episode of Team Human, Douglas is joined by Manoush Zomorodi, host of the popular WNYC Studios podcast, Note to Self. On Note to Self, Manoush initiated a series of listener experiments aimed at breaking the influence of our digital devices and networks on our lives. Those social experiments led her to uncover the creative power of boredom, detailed in her brand new book Bored and Brilliant: How Spacing Out Can Unlock Your Most Productive and Creative Self.” At the link find the title, “Ep. 54 Manoush Zomorodi “Blissfully Bored,” right-click “Media files 59b8c64eed01d6b16d563ffa.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Implants 46 mins – “It’s not quite as crazy as it sounds.” That’s how Brett Wingeier describes his work as the Principal Biomedical Engineer with NeuroPace, the company where he spent over a decade designing and ultimately winning FDA approval for an implantable medical device that sits inside the skull of epilepsy patients, patiently waiting for the warning signs of an “electrical storm in the brain” — the neurological underpinnings of an epileptic seizure — and the countering the signal. Dr. Wingeier describes his invention as “like a defibrillator for the brain,” with the significant difference that his is a small wafer of platinum resting on the inside of a living human skull.  Technically, it’s not on the inside of the skull itself, but an artificial trapdoor cut into the skull by surgeons specifically to gain entry for the NeuroPace device.  When all goes as planned, the NeuroPace defuses seizures without the patient even knowing anything has happened. Wingeier talks about his work with realism of someone who knows he’ll have to back up claims with working prototypes, but also the enthusiasm of a sci-fi fanboy who truly sees ‘human potential as unlimited.’” At the link find the title, “#194: Brain Implants – Medical and Beyond with Dr. Brett Wingeier, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SDS194.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

C-ion Cell Batteries 6 mins – “Many appliances used around homes and gardens run off rechargeable batteries. Typically, these cordless drills, hedge cutters, vacuum cleaners and sanders take up to 4 hours to charge then deliver their charge in 20 minutes. A new battery technology would see an end to this. The battery uses carbon nano materials and graphene, with energy stored within an electrolyte. The cells are known a C-ion cells. As well as domestic appliances, the technology has application for stabilizing electricity grids which may be fed by intermittent sources such as wind.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Calendar History 20 mins – “A month is hardly a unit of measurement. It can start on any day of the week and last anywhere from 28 to 31 days. Sometimes a month is four weeks long, sometimes five, sometimes six. You have to buy a new calendar with new dates every single year. It’s a strange design. Avery Trufelman explores the weirdness and alternate designs for the calendar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Research 30 mins – “This week we discuss precision medicine and genetic testing with Dr. Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer at Color Genomics, which provides genetic testing for hereditary cancer and high cholesterol risks as well as preventative health services, including genetic counseling. We spoke to her about recent breakthroughs in cancer research and precision medicine, the benefits of testing for cancer-causing gene mutations, and what it means for patients, families, and medical providers.” At the link find the title, “Episode 27: Dr. Jill Hagenkord on Precision Medicine and Genetic Testing, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SBHAG0915.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cavitation Science 60 mins – – “This week, we’re discussing an effect called cavitation: low pressure causes bubbles of vapour to form in a liquid, which can cause a lot of damage when those bubbles collapse. First up is Paul Brandner, Associate Professor and Research Leader of the Cavitation Research Laboratory at the Australian Maritime College, to discuss how these bubbles form and why they can be so destructive. And we talk with Suzanne Cox, artist, scientist, and engineer, to discuss her work with crustaceans who have evolved ways of controlling the effect when they strike snail shells.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chicken Industry 48 mins – “Chicken is such a mainstay of the contemporary American dinner table that it seems hard to imagine that, just a century ago, it was rare and expensive. But over the course of the 20th century, both chickens and the chicken industry exploded in size. Much of that growth can be attributed to the miraculous properties of antibiotics, which were developed to fight human diseases but quickly began to be fed to farm animals in vast quantities. Journalist and author Maryn McKenna weaves these two intertwined tales together in her new book, Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats. In this episode of Gastropod, she describes the consequences of decades spent feeding chicken antibiotics, in terms of chicken flavor, poultry well-being, and, most significantly, human health.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Climate Analysis 26 mins – “Dr. Armin Shwartzman, an associate professor at University of California San Diego, received a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University and since then has used statistics for image analysis. On this week’s science studio, we begin a new season with Dr. Shwartzman as he shares with us his expertise in statistics and how he has advanced his studies.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Disinformation 30 mins – “Disinformation. It sometimes manifests in theatrical shows of ignorance, like Senior Republican Senator James Inhoffe bringing a snowball to the Senate floor as “evidence” that global warming is a hoax, or the persistent denial coming out of the ill-informed head of the current president that Harvey and Irma are unrelated to climate change. But where does the disinformation start? Sometimes the seeds of willfully inaccurate right-wing talking points are planted by more mainstream conservative thinkers like George Will, Rich Lowry, Peggy Noonan, or the latest star of the right wing elite, NY Times opinion columnist, Bret Stephens. Under cloak of sophisticated language, these opinion columnists bury grains in the fertile right-wing psyche that grow into dangerously thorny vines of falsehood. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with DC-based science communicator, Aaron Huertas, to discuss what disinformation Bret Stephens has sown lately regarding the climate. We talk about Stephens’s disregard for solutions that could fight climate change, examine the weaknesses in his research, and ponder what motivates him to reach his simplistic and misleading conclusions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Hogs 23 mins – “…As a new miner in a dangerous industry, Ronnie had to go through an intensive orientation process before this first trip underground. He sat through 40 hours of training and safety classes before going down into the mines. He was also issued a yellow hardhat that identified him as a rookie, and given his first reflective coal mining stickers. He put one on his new hardhat and saved one in a box, later putting it into an album.Today, after 34 years as a miner in Alabama, Ronnie has filled several photo albums with thousands of stickers. Some are inside jokes. Others commemorate big events or accomplishments at work. Some come from unions or manufacturers connected to the industry….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the title and right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Commercial Law 20 mins – “The federal government can’t pass any law it wants to. It’s limited by Article 1 Section 8 of the Constitution, but the executive branch can choose how to enforce those laws. Under Trump, there are indications that drug laws, which are based on the Commerce Clause, are about to be enforced very differently.” At the link find the title, “9- Commerce Clause,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_9_Commerce_part 1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Common Carriage Law 30 mins – “The modern fight over network neutrality isn’t a few years old. It is well over 1,000 years old across a variety of infrastructures and is totally wrapped up in a legal concept known as common carriage that has governed many kinds of “carriers” over the years. Few, if any, are as conversant in this subject as Barbara Cherry – a lawyer and PH.D in communications. She has worked in industry for 15 years, at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for five years, and is currently a professor in the Media School at Indiana University. One of the key points of our conversation is regarding the problems with media shortening the Network Neutrality policy fights as turning the Internet into a “public utility.”  Barbara helps us to understand how common carriage is distinct from public utility regulation and why common carriage regulation is necessary even in markets that may have adequate competition and choices.” At the link right-click “…download this mp3 file directly from here.” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Complex Global Law 67 mins – “Law professor Gillian Hadfield of the University of Southern California and author of Rules for a Flat World talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book for regulating the digital future. Hadfield suggests the competitive provision of regulation with government oversight as a way to improve the flexibility and effectiveness of regulation in the dynamic digital world we are living in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Security 27 mins – “With the coming of the World Wide Web in the 1990s internet access opened up to everybody, it was no longer the preserve of academics and computer hobbyists. Already prior to the Web, the burgeoning internet user groups and chat rooms had tested what was acceptable behaviour online, but access was still limited. Aleks Krotoski asks whether the Web through enabling much wider use of the internet is the villain of the piece in facilitating not just entertainment and commerce, but all aspects of the darker side, from malicious computer hacking attacks, worms and viruses, to new channels for criminality, online extortion and identity theft.” At the link find the title, “Dark Side of the World Wide Web,” right-click “Media files p05fh819.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 56 mins – “In the second year of what’s becoming a tradition here on Think Again, this is a mixtape of some of Jason’s favorite moments from the past year’s shows. Things that stuck with him because they were funny, or especially wise, or because of something extraordinary about the conversation that he can’t quite put his finger on. This episode — 2017 Mixtape #1 — features philosopher of mind Daniel Dennett, architecture critic Sarah Goldhagen, novelist Ian McEwan, child psychologist Alison Gopnik, neuroscientist Erik Kandel, and actor Alan Alda. Among the many ideas that come up: minds, buildings, Hamlet, A.I., the nature of evil, communication.” At the link find the title, “113. 2017 Mixtape #1 – Mind, Body, Authenticity, Artifice,” right-click “Media files PP5241072106.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness 60 mins – “In his latest book Consciousness and the Social Brain  Princeton neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a unique and compelling theory of consciousness. He proposes that the same circuits that the human brain uses to attribute awareness to others are used to model self-awareness. He emphasizes that his attention schema theory is only tentative, but it is testable and it does fit our current knowledge of brain function. In a recent interview for the Brain Science Podcast (BSP 108), Graziano used the following clinical example to clarify his approach. A colleague had a patient who was convinced that he had a squirrel in his head. When confronted with the illogic of his claim the patient replied “Not everything can be explained by science.” In this example it is clear that the squirrel doesn’t really exist, so the question to be answered is HOW did his brain reach the conclusion that it does. While imagining one has a squirrel in one’s head is thankfully rare, we also know that our subjective experiences of the world are not necessarily accurate. Our perception of the world is shaped by how our brain processes the sensory inputs it receives. For example, we perceive white light as an absence of color even though in reality it consists of all wavelengths.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Convicted Innocents 12 mins – “Harvard Law professor Ronald Sullivan fights to free wrongfully convicted people from jail — in fact, he has freed some 6,000 innocent people over the course of his career. He shares heartbreaking stories of how (and why) people end up being put in jail for something they didn’t do, and the consequences in their lives and the lives of others. Watch this essential talk about the duty we all have to make the world a bit more fair every day, however we can.” At the link find the title, “How I help free innocent people from prison | Ronald Sullivan, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files RonaldSullivan_2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cosmic Questions 53 mins – “Who better to answer fan-submitted questions about science fiction on TV and in the movies than Bill Nye? Bill and Chuck Nice flip channels between “Star Trek,” “Star Wars,” “Lost in Space,” “Gilligan’s Island,” “Back to the Future,” and more. (Adult Language.)” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Cosmic Questions 55 mins – “Black holes, neutron stars, the multiverse, and much more. Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Leighann Lord delve into the dark mysteries of the universe – now extended with a cosmic conversation between Neil and Matt O’Dowd, host of PBS Space Time.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

CT and MRI 58 mins – “We talk with Dr. Scott Klioze, a board certified radiologist from Saint Augustine, Florida who is using social media and YouTube to inform the public about the theory and practical applications of MRI and CT scanning, about his views on 3D in Medicine and the role radiology has played in bringing 3D visualization and fabrication to forefront of the media’s attention on the 3D. Dr. Klioze’s YouTube videos can be found on his channel “Doctor Klioze” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SUHgtREWQc&list=UUp0iQ6CVp6qPcJetHP5-nEA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djAxjtN_7VE&index=7&list=UUp0iQ6CVp6qPcJetHP5-nEA This episode was recorded on the 2nd of September, 2014. And if you want to see some of the cool 3D animations that Dr. Klioze is talking about, head out to our YouTube channel ‘All Things 3D’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Revitalization 87 mins – “On May 17, the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings held an event that aimed to unpack the updated findings from the Detroit Reinvestment Index, a comprehensive report created and issued by The Kresge Foundation that measures Detroit’s comeback from its history-making bankruptcy in 2014.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.

Diagnosis Uncertainty 22 mins – “This week we’re at the Preventing Overdiagnosis conference in Quebec Canada, The conference is a forum to discuss the harms associated with using uncertain methods to look for disease in apparently healthy people – and is part of the BMJ’s too much medicine campaign. The literature on overdiagnosis has mostly been published since 2013 – partly…” At the link find the title, “Preventing Overdiagnosis 2017 – Rita Redberg, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 338474985-bmjgroup-preventing-overdiagnosis-2017-rita-redberg.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dilbert Creator 44 mins – “Recorded on July 12, 2017 The Dilbert comic strip artist and political philosopher Scott Adams sits down with Peter Robinson to discuss his book How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big. He discusses with Peter his theory of “talent stacking,” the idea that rather than being an expert in one particular skill (i.e., Tiger Woods and golf), one can become successful by stacking a variety of complementary nonexpert skills. …Adams argues that President Trump is one of the best branders, influencers, and persuaders he has ever seen, in that the president uses persuasive techniques in debates and on social media as a way to get people to do what he wants. Adams contends that President Trump’s persuasive techniques will help solve the problem of North Korea because he has already set up China to get involved by intimating that it tried and failed. …They also briefly discuss his new book, Win Bigly, about the persuasive strategies of Donald Trump. Scott Adams is releasing his new book, Win Bigly, in October 2017.” At the link find the title, “How to Fail at Almost Everything with Scott Adams, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170914-adams.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Domestication 58 mins – “According to Dr. Clive Wynne, most of the differences we see in dogs versus their wolfish cousins derive from the fact that dogs — in Peter Pan fashion — maintain the features and mentality of juvenile wolves all through their lives. A dog is wolf whose genes refuse to let it grow up. Dr. Monique Udell, an Animal Behaviorist at Oregon State University, studies the differences (and the similarities) between dogs and wolves, including the approaches that each take to problem solving, social learning, and submission to human authority.  She paints a picture of dogs as a pretty laid-back species, un-self-consciously waiting on humans to solve their problems for them.  Kind of like a canine Marie Antoinette. In Episode #195, both Wynne and Udell combine to provide a tag-team interview on almost everything you might have wondered about your dog’s innermost mind.  (The kind of questions you just can’t ask your dog without getting a cock-headed stare and a confused bark in reply.)” At the link find the title, “195: Dognition,”right-click “Media files SDS195.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Rescues 57 mins – “Episode 33 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Kyla Duffy from Happy Tails Books. Duffy publishes inspiring stories about how adopting rescued dogs enriches peoples lives. Proceeds go to various rescue organizations.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drone Flying Careers 37 mins – “Is a career flying, fixing, or supporting drones in your career future? Today I am joined by Ryan Wallace from Polk State College to discuss the career opportunities in the world of Commercial Drones. Ryan is a professor of Aeronautical Science and is actively involved in the local Unmanned Aircraft System Community.” At the link right-click “Downloads” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eclipse Experience 53 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson, Chuck Nice, and broadcast meteorologist Joe Rao are here with everything you need to know about the August 21st total solar eclipse, called “the Great American Eclipse.” Keep looking up – but only with eclipse-safe glasses!” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Eclipse History 27 mins – “Eclipses have inspired dread and awe since antiquity. The earliest Chinese mythology saw solar eclipses as dragons eating the sun. We speak to native American astronomer Nancy Maryboy who tells us about the Navajo and Cherokee beliefs, many of which are still held today. We visit Stonehenge to examine theories that the ancient Aubrey holes, burial pits on the outer edge of the monument, were used to predict eclipses. And, psychologist Dr Kate Russo looks at her own and others obsession with eclipses to examine the reactions so many people report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eclipse Research 27 mins – “Eclipses have inspired dread and awe since antiquity. The earliest Chinese mythology saw solar eclipses as dragons eating the sun. We speak to native American astronomer Nancy Maryboy who tells us about the Navajo and Cherokee beliefs, many of which are still held today. We visit Stonehenge to examine theories that the ancient Aubrey holes, burial pits on the outer edge of the monument, were used to predict eclipses. And, psychologist Dr Kate Russo looks at her own and others obsession with eclipses to examine the reactions so many people report.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ecuadorian Oil Problem 30 mins – “Yasuni National Park in Ecuador is widely recognised as the most biodiverse place on earth. Around 10% of all known life forms can be found within a few hundred acres of this part of the Amazon rainforest. Yet the forest sits on top of thousands of barrels of crude oil and the Ecuadorian government has now given the go-ahead for drilling. Tom Heap finds out what is at stake and asks why the Ecuadorian government which has one of the greenest constitutions in the world has decided to exploit the reserves.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Election Security 59 mins – “On September 8, the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and the Governance Studiesprogram at Brookings hosted an event focused on the national security concerns surrounding election security in the United States.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow to get the audio file.

Emotional Cognition 69 mins– “In The Cognitive-Emotional Brain: From Interactions to Integration neuroscientist Luiz Pessoa argues that emotion and cognition are deeply intertwined throughout many levels of the brain. In a recent interview (BSP 106) Pessoa and I focused on recent discoveries about the amygdala and Thalamus that challenge traditional assumptions about what these structures do. The amygdala processes more than fear (and other negative stimuli) and the Thalamus is more than  a mere relay station. This a fairly technical discussion but Pessoa did a good job of making the material accessible to all listeners. The reason I think these concepts matter is that not only do they challenge overly simplistic notions of how the brain works, but they also challenge our tendency to see emotion and cognition as separate and often opposing processes.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Fiasco 119 mins – “[Starts at 80 min mark.] This week we discuss last Friday’s passing of our dear friend and colleague Jerry Pournelle, when AI is turned to evil purpose, whether and when Google’s Chrome browser will warn of man in the middle attacks, why Google is apparently attempting to patent pieces of a compression technology they did not invent, another horrifying router vulnerability disclosure — including ten 0-day vulnerabilities, an update on the sunsetting of Symantec’s CA business unit, another worrying failure at Comodo, a few quick bits, an update on my one commercial product SpinRite, answering a closing the loop question from a listener, and a look at the Equifax fiasco.” At the link right-click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Mess 96 mins – “[Intro covers Equifax.] Leo Laporte and Jason Howell take an in-depth look at the new Essential Phone PH-1. It finally arrived and Jason has spent a lot of time with it the last few days and will have a review. Also, Kelsea Weber from iFixit.com (a sponsor of TWiT) joins us to talk about what’s inside the Essential Phone. They had a hard time getting inside and had to freeze it! (plus they broke two screens!) Leo has the new Mavic Pro drone from DJI. We’ll take it for a spin and see if it’s worth the high price tag. Megan Morrone has a full review of the Tovala smart oven. Father Robert Ballecer, SJ has some ideas to bring new life to your old remote controls. In Call For Help, we’ll talk about whether or not you should install Oreo on your Android phone. Equifax gets hacked and leaked personal info of 143 million consumers.” At the link click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evangelical Movement 29 mins – “Between impending nuclear annihilation and the President of the United States seeming to endorse white supremacists, you may have missed the dismantling of the Environmental Protection Agency. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with Brendan O’Connor, a reporter for Gizmodo Media who has recently written an extensive piece chronicling the evangelical community and the elements behind the movement’s embrace of climate change denialism – and the politicians, oil companies and think tanks connected to it all. We look at the history of the movement, its leaders and discuss the unlikely alliance between the evangelical right and Donald Trump.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise and Learning 44 mins – “…One of the world’s foremost researchers on the subject of exercise and the brain is Dr. John Ratey, who is a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He’s also my guest on the show today. In this episode, Dr. Ratey goes into detail about how exercise makes your brain stronger and more capable. My hope is that, after listening to this episode, you’ll be equipped with a more technical understanding of exercise’s pivotal role in brain health – which, in turn, should give you more ammunition for fighting your brain’s lazy excuses and getting your daily exercise in”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Falklands 27 mins – “Britain and Argentina’s competing claims over a small group of islands in the South Atlantic go back almost 250 years. In English they’re known as the Falkland Islands, after the 17th-century British lord Falkland. Matthew Teller explores the enduring connections of history, culture and identity that link the Falkland islands and the continent of South America.” At the link click “Download,” then right-click “Lower quality” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Food Addiction 27 mins – “Is being addicted to food the same as being addicted to crack?” At the link find the title, “Can you be addicted to food?, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files whitecoat_20170909_77999.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Crop Quality 68 mins – “Author and farmer Ben Hartman talks about his farm and his book, The Lean Farm. View the show notes for this episode and all previous Farm Small, Farm Smart episodes.Keep learning with these two great audiobooks: The Market Gardener by JM Fortier and The Urban Farmer by Curtis Stone – Increase farm efficiency with the Paperpot Transplanter.” At the link find the title, “FSFS112: The Lean Farm with Ben Hartman, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files FSFS_112_2017 BenHartman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foundations and Philanthropy 64 mins – “Is private charity always a good thing? Do large foundations have too much power? Political Scientist Rob Reich of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the power and effectiveness of foundations–large collections of wealth typically created and funded by a wealthy donor. Is such a plutocratic institution consistent with democracy? Reich discusses the history of foundations in the United States and the costs and benefits of foundation expenditures in the present.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freedom of Religion 93 mins – “On September 13, 2017, Brookings hosted a discussion with the American Charter Project on the vital role that religious pluralism and freedom of religion and conscience play in fostering civility and unity in our democratic republic.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Georgetown University Slaves 50 mins – “By the time the Jesuit priests of Maryland founded Georgetown College in 1789, they were among the biggest slave owners in the colony. With several tobacco plantations scattered across Maryland, the Catholic order owned at least 200 slaves. It used the income from their labor to create Georgetown, part of an educational mission to spread and maintain Catholicism in the U.S. “The idea was that the Jesuit plantations manned by enslaved people would essentially subsidize the Jesuit educational mission,” says Adam Rothman, a historian at Georgetown University, explaining the purpose and economics of free tuition. Georgetown also directly employed slave labor, says Rothman, citing the school’s early ledgers showing rented or hired enslaved people. By the 1810s, the Jesuits’ tobacco plantations failed, and Georgetown was in debt. For some 20 years, the priests debated whether to free their slaves, keep them as part of their religious stewardship or sell them. The Maryland Jesuits decided to sell 272 men, women and children — virtually their entire slave community — to two planters in Louisiana. They were paid $115,000, roughly $3 million in current dollars. The money helped pay off Georgetown’s debts. In 1838, the enslaved people were divided and sent by ship to Louisiana. Nearly two centuries later, Georgetown President Jack DeGioia formed the Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation to investigate that history and recommend ways to atone.” At the link find the title, “Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America, Sept 2017,” right-click “Media files shadowclassed_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gerrymandering 39 mins – “When the Supreme Court term opens next month, perhaps no issue will be more urgent – and more complicated – than voting rights. One of the first cases the justices will hear is Gill v. Whitford, a challenge to the 2011 redrawing of district lines in Wisconsin. While the Court has struck down racially-motivated gerrymanders in the past, no election map has ever been rejected as a purely partisan gerrymander. And recent developments have some court watchers concerned that Justice Anthony Kennedy may still not be ready to do that. Our guest this episode is Richard Hasen, Chancellor’s Professor of Law and Political Science at the University of California, Irvine, and curator of the must-read Election Law Blog.” At the link find the title, “Gerrymandering Goes Back to Court, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY9994512039.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guts Research 60 mins – “This hour, we dive into the messy mystery in the middle of us. What’s going on down there? And what can the rumblings deep in our bellies tell us about ourselves? We stick our hand in a cow stomach, get a window into our core (thanks to a hunter who became a walking science experiment in the 1800s), and listen in on the surprising back-and-forth between our gut and our brain. And we talk to a man who kind of went out of his mind when a medical procedure left him (for a little while) gutless. Correction: An earlier version of this piece implied that subjects in the human probiotics study were given a larger dose of probiotics than they actually were. We also compared the results of the study to the effect of giving people anti-anxiety medication. The subjects did experience a significant positive mood change, but the researchers did not compare that result to the effect of anti-anxiety medication. The audio has been adjusted to reflect these facts.At the link right-click “Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Expert 30 mins – “On The Gist, Gretchen Rubin explains why her system of sorting people into four personality types (Rebel, Obliger, Questioner, and Upholder) will make your life easier. Rubin is the author of The Four Tendencies and host of the podcast Happier. In the Spiel, what happens when politics seeps into sports.” At the link find the title, “Which Type Are You? Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7778843674.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Happiness Expert 36 mins – “This episode we have Gretchen Rubin back on the podcast. Gretchen is the author of several books, including the blockbuster New York Times bestsellers, Better Than Before, The Happiness Project and Happier at Home. In Better Than Before: Mastering the Habits of Our Everyday Lives, she provides surprising insights and practical advice drawn from cutting-edge research, ancient wisdom, and her own observations, about how we can make our lives better than before. Listen in as we talk about her new book The Four Tendencies, what it means to be an Upholder, a Questioner, an Obliger, or a Rebel, and how to use that to better your own life and motivation.” At the link right-click “Download episode hereMP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hashtag Octothorpe 16 mins – “If you want to follow conversation threads relating to this show on social media—whether Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram, Tumblr—you know to look for the hashtag: #99pi. In our current digital age, the hashtag identifies movements, events, happenings, brands—topics of all kinds. The “#” didn’t always have this meaning, though. It’s had a few different lives and a few different names.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 48 mins – “In the wake of the white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville, Virginia, we dig into the nuances of how businesses handle the First Amendment and their own ethics policies. Plus, a discussion of the case for diversity in business, the question of whether you can bring your kids into the office and the ongoing debate over the North American Free Trade Agreement.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Hate Speech 57 mins – “After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, people in this region are looking more closely at local racist and anti-Semitic groups: their statements, their plans, and what may happen next.  We’ll talk about those issues and gauge the overall New Hampshire reaction to what happened this weekend.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Hip Hop Geeks 54 mins – “Drop That Track! Neil deGrasse Tyson discusses the fusion of hip-hop and science, the legacy of violence in hip-hop, the culture of music, and much more with rapper Logic, co-host Chuck Nice, and rapper/educator/DJ Steve Tyson, a.k.a The Intellect.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Homeless Drunk 7 mins – “Earlier this year, Keith Howard stepped down as executive director of Liberty House, a transitional living facility for formerly homeless veterans.  And he started something new. Howard now lives at a converted hunting camp in northern New Hampshire, on the grounds of Warriors at 45 North, where he’s going to run writing retreats for veterans.  Howard himself lives in what he calls the Tiny White Box. I went to visit him there….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospital Discharge Concerns 44 mins – “In this presentation, Dr. Mitchell discusses discharge-related risks, appropriateness for discharge, and elements of the discharge process.  Dr. Mitchell emphasizes that dangerous events happen commonly, involving medications, test results, and poor communication and/or follow-ups. However, with a clear understanding for the process, these are mostly preventable.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hurricane Forecasting 28 mins – “In the last few weeks, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have been breaking records as they caused devastating damage in the Atlantic. Is there a link between global warming and these mega hurricanes? Looking at data collected over the last decade, the number of hurricanes each season may not change, but it is possible that strong storms will get even stronger.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hydrogel Retinas 4 mins – “Until now, replacement retinas have consisted of hard materials, which can lead to inflammation or scarring. A PhD candidate at Oxford University, Vanessa Restrepo-Schild has led a team producing a new synthetic, double-layered retina which closely mimics the natural human retinal process. The replica retina consists of soft hydrogels and biological cell membrane proteins.  The cells act as pixels, detecting and reacting to light to create a grey scale image.  Currently Vanessa is trying to incorporate the photoreactive cells with cultured cells, which might be able to stimulate the neurons at the back of the eye as does a working retina.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hygiene Hypothesis 30 mins – “Do germaphobic parents doom their kids to a lifetime of allergies and irritable bowels? This sounds like a question for our favorite game, “Is That Bullshit?” Returning champion Maria Konnikova helps us sort good bacteria from bad. Konnikova writes for the New Yorker and is the author of The Confidence Game.” At the link find the title, “The Hygiene Hypothesis, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9560599236.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 62 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, senior strategy officer at a political risk startup Anna Szymanski, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and VP and Managing Director of Impact Investing at Enterprise Community Partners Julia Shin discuss: The disbanding of Trump’s CEO council; Companies’ responsibilities to their shareholders; Impact investing” At the link find the title, “The Only Way Is Ethics Edition, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM5858333871.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Partition P1 26 mins – “On its 70th anniversary, Kavita Puri hears the untold stories of those who witnessed India’s partition in 1947. The years leading up to partition was a time in which many Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus recalled living together harmoniously. We hear about the calls for independence; the rising clamour for an independent Pakistan; the dread as communal rioting gripped ever more of the sub-continent; how the movement of people began prior to independence; and how independence day was marked on both sides of the border.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Partition P2 25 mins – “On the 70th anniversary of the partition of India, Kavita Puri hears remarkable testimonies from people who witnessed the drama first hand – and even took part in it. They speak with remarkable clarity about the tumultuous events, whose legacy endures to this day. Witnesses describe the immediate aftermath of partition itself. As the former British territories were divided into two new dominions of India and Pakistan, millions on both sides of the new border found themselves in the wrong place – and fled. Intercommunal violence spread rapidly among Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs, and news of the atrocities sparked revenge attacks. Yet even as this brutality shocked the world, some of those who bore witness to it recall many individual acts of courage and humanity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing Philosophy 42 mins – “Paul addresses the 4 most common questions he receives from readers and listeners: Will indexing work as well in the future as in the past? Will small cap and value asset classes produce higher than S&P 500 returns in the future? How often should I rebalance? How do I best put my money into the market at these historically high prices? He also discusses an important lesson learned from a meeting with Dr. Hendrick Bessembinder.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iran Elections 83 mins – “On May 16, the Brookings Center for Middle East Policy and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace co-hosted a discussion on the election’s candidates, its stakes, and its potential impact on the policies of the Trump administration and CongressAt the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow to get the audio file.    

Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium 48 mins – “What if the way our infrastructure is designed could keep us safe from earthquakes, accidents and from terrorism? Lizzie O’Leary looks at the design of U.S. cities with counterterrorism expert Brian Michael Jenkins. Also, ex-Fed economist Bill Nelson talks about the people who are thinking of our financial well-being: the monetary policy leaders meeting at the Jackson Hole Economic Policy Symposium. Plus, a visit to places that inspire us — public libraries! — and how they’re changing to meet the needs of the millennial generation that visits them the most. Marketplace Weekend also gets a sneak peak at Marketplace’s Trade Off series on globalization with reporter Scott Tong.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jazz Artists 52 mins – “Neil deGrasse Tyson gets his improv on with legendary jazz musicians Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock. Featuring Chuck Nice, Sean Ono Lennon, Stephen Tyson, Mona Chalabi, Charles Limb, and the Columbia University Jazz House.” At the link click the square with three dots and double-click “Download” to get the audio file.

Justice in U.S. 52 mins – “The United States has the world’s largest prison population. In 2012, there were 2.3 million people in American prisons or jails – and even more under some kind of “correctional supervision.” In fact, if you added up all the people in America in prison, on probation, or on parole, it’d total about 6 million – just a little smaller than the population of New York City. The system is vast, but how well is it working? In this episode, we explore how a few communities across the country have responded creatively to problems with police, courts, and prisons.” At the link find the link, “American Justice, Oct, 2014,” right-click “Media files Justice_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Karachi Pakistan 30 mins – “Razia wants to win Pakistan’s first Olympic gold medal for women’s boxing; student teacher Iqra is a guide on Karachi’s first tourist bus tour; top boy scout Rizwaan started Pakistan’s Youth Parliament and young lawyer Faiza has created Asia’s first female troupe of improvisational comedians. They are just some of the young people determined to put their home city on the map for good reasons rather than bad. In 2013 Karachi was described as the most dangerous mega-city in the world where political gang warfare, terrorist bomb blasts, targeted killings, kidnapping and extortion were everyday occurrences. But in the past two years the security situation has been brought under control and citizen-led activities to reclaim Karachi’s public spaces are blossoming again, particularly by young people under 30 who make up two thirds of Pakistan’s population. Walls that were once covered with political slogans and hate speech are now painted over with murals celebrating the city’s history and diversity. Nightlife is once again booming with arts and culture back on the stage. This spring’s annual all-night Aalmi Mushaira, held in the Karachi Expo Centre, attracted thousands of Urdu poetry lovers of all ages and backgrounds. And the comedy scene is thriving, drawing new audiences and challenging stereotypes with internationally successful acts such as Saad Haroon. Join Karachi radio journalist Noreen Shams Khan to discover a Pakistan that you do not usually hear about.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Katy Tur Correspondent 46 mins – “Katy Tur, NBC News Correspondent and author of a new book about “Unbelievable,” joins Chuck on stage at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan to talk Donald Trump and the 2016 election. This podcast was part of the 92Y Talks program and has been edited for pacing.” At the link double-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar to get the podcast.

Larry King Interview 96 mins – “Larry King (@kingsthings) has been dubbed “The most remarkable talk show host on TV, ever” by TV Guide and “Master of the mic” by Time Magazine. Larry’s been described as the Muhammad Ali of the broadcast interview, and he’s been inducted into five of the nation’s leading broadcasting halls of fame. He’s the recipient of the Allen H. Neuharth Award for Excellence in Journalism, an Emmy, the George Foster Peabody Award for Excellence in Broadcasting, ten CableACE awards — the list goes on.” At the link find the title, “#259: Lessons from 50,000 Interviews: Larry King and Cal Fussman,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Larry King and Cal Fussman.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latin American Trends 105 mins – “On May 16, the Brookings Global-CERES Economic and Social Policy in Latin America Initiative hosted a panel discussion on the implications of new global and regional trends for the political and macroeconomic outlook in Latin America, including whether these new trends could reverse the institutional, economic, and social progress of the last 20 years.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.

Lexicographers 56 mins – “Kory Stamper is a lexicographer at Merriam-Webster, often seen on their “Ask the Editor” video series. Her funny and fascinating book Word By Word: The Secret Life of Dictionaries is about the how the sausage of dictionaries is made, and about the slipperiness of words themselves. This is not a “prescriptivist” manifesto, fussily criticizing people’s misuse of apostrophes or words like “irregardless.” On the contrary, like any lexicographer worth her salt (and salt, as Kory will tell you, was once so valuable it was used as money, which is where we get the word “salary” from…) Kory’s a professional “descriptivist”, painstakingly trying to pin down how words are actually used even as they try to wriggle away from her.” At the link find the title, “95. Kory Stamper (Lexicographer) – Lair of the Level 10 Word Mage, Apr, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP8415028636.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liberal Democracy 86 mins – “On September 13, as governments gather in Washington for the 9th ministerial conference of the Community of Democracies, Foreign Policy at Brookings hosted Secretary Albright and Prime Minister Jomaa to launch the Democracy and Security Dialogue’s final report.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Life Extension Factors 16 mins – “The Italian island of Sardinia has more than six times as many centenarians as the mainland and ten times as many as North America. Why? According to psychologist Susan Pinker, it’s not a sunny disposition or a low-fat, gluten-free diet that keeps the islanders healthy — it’s their emphasis on close personal relationships and face-to-face interactions. Learn more about super longevity as Pinker explains what it takes to live to 100 and beyond.” At the link find the title, “The secret to living longer may be your social life | Susan Pinker, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SusanPinker_2017.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Intro 19 mins – “There are literally hundreds of versions of Linux to choose from. Each has its own look and feel. Each is designed with a specific purpose in mind. Each comes pre-packaged with a selection of software applications, and each is the same Linux at the core. Having said that, if you ask 10 people which version of Linux is best, you will get at least 12 different answers. 🙂 The recommendations we give in this episode are based on our experience and knowledge. (Larry has been using Linux as his exclusive personal computer operating system for about 10 years.)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Literacy Lawsuit 51 mins – “The show this week is education themed, and we’re looking at stories from all over the country. We consider a landmark case weighing the right to literacy and its value, tax breaks for school supplies, the cost of college and the best gifts to give a new freshman. Parents, students and teachers all share their views in this episode about the value of education in the U.S.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Madisonian Law 66 mins -”In commemoration of Constitution Day 2017, we will explore what James Madison would think of today’s presidency, Congress, courts, and media and how we can resurrect Madisonian values today.” At the link find the title, “What would Madison think today?, Sept, 2017,” right click “Media files PP6836023159.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marine Venoms 46 mins – “Coral, sea urchins, venomous fish, and stingrays can all inject venom into their targets causing pain and wounds that must be treated. Dr. Dan Repplinger explains how to recognize and treat these injuries. Recorded on 05/10/2017. (#32457)” At the link right-click “audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther Anniversary 50 mins – “Chris Bowlby visits Wittenberg, where Martin Luther started it all in 1517. He discovers how the Reformation transformed life in many different ways, and helped make Germany a nation of singers and book-lovers. But amidst all the culture and kitsch Germany’s also grappling with a darker legacy – Luther’s anti-Semitism and exploitation by dictators and populists.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Million Dollar Question 28 mins – What is the best way to spend $100 million to fix one huge problem in the world today? That is the challenge laid down by the MacArthur Foundation in Chicago, distributors of the “genius grant”. They created the 100&Change competition to inspire solutions for some of the looming disasters facing people, places or the planet. The prize is one colossal grant of $100 million for the project which can make the most lasting difference to people’s lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Model Helicopters 87 mins – “This week we talk with Robert Rodriquez, the founder of the Society of Aerial Cinematography (AKA SOAC), for a discussion about the use of Multirotors and helicopters in the motion picture industry. Also discussed in this show are some cool new multirotor products and upcoming flying events.On this show Raja joins us to answer your questions about helicopters. Why are there different swashplate geometries? How do mechanical mixing and CCPM compare? And everyone’s favorite, flybar or flybarless?” At the link find the title, “ATTF #253 – Helicopter Tech Questions,” right-click “Media files ATTF_253-Helicopter Tech Questions.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music Snippets Creator 21 mins – “Behind almost all popular music, there is this hidden economy of music producers buying and selling sonic snippets, texting each other half-finished beats, and angling for back-end royalties.” At the link find the title, “#794: How To Make It In The Music Business,” right-click “Media files 20170915_pmoney_pmpod794.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nation of Islam 30 mins – “Abdurrahim Rashada has seen a lot in his life. He served in the Navy during World War II. He survived and escaped the Jim Crow South. He worked in the GM factories of Michigan and saw their rise and fall. And then, he joined the Nation of Islam, attracted by their message of freedom, justice, and equality for black folks. And later, when the community moved towards Sunnism, he learned to adapt to a broader community of immigrant Muslims. In 1988, he met Ahmed when he had his first aqiqah (first haircut) at the mosque in Saginaw. In this episode, Ahmed takes a step back and Khalila Rashada interviews her grandfather in the Saginaw house she grew up in.” At the link find the title, “Episode 33: A 91-Year-Old Imam Still Finds Joy In The Podcast Studio, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY8830390577.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Netflix Gigs 21 mins – “Patty McCord helped create a workplace at Netflix that runs more like a professional sports team than a family. If you’re not up to scratch, you’re off the team. Is this the future of work?” At the link find the title, “#647: Hard Work Is Irrelevant, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20170913_pmoney_pmpod647rerun.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neural Discovery 29 mins – “Our guest this week is Greg Gage. Greg is the co-founder and CEO of Backyard Brains, a company started with Tim Marzullo as neuroscience graduate students at the University of Michigan. Greg is a published neuroscientist and engineer, and has helped develop tools, curriculum and experiments that allowed the general public to participate in neural discovery. Greg is a senior fellow at TED and the recipient of the White House Champion of Change from Barack Obama award for his commitment to citizen science.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-clcik “Download” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Niger High Birth Rate 27 mins – “Women in Niger have more children, on average, than anywhere else in the world. The government of Niger can’t support such a fast growing population and wants traditions to change” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigerian Author 27 mins – “The author of Stay With Me, Ayobami Adebayo, sits down with Isaac Chotiner to discuss what she learned from Margaret Atwood, the pain of writing about Nigeria’s turbulent recent past, and using fiction to challenge the idea that women must have children.” At the link find the title, “Ayobami Adebayo, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY2169299463.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea History 31 mins – “Episode 25: Jean H. Lee on the Rise and Rule of North Korea’s Kim Dynasty As tensions with North Korea rise, this week we examine the history of that country’s ruling Kim family. We spoke to Jean H Lee, author of “Kings of Communism: Inside Kim Jong Un’s Bloody Scramble to Kill of His Family” in the September edition of Esquire Magazine. She also led the Associated Press’s coverage of the Korean Peninsula as bureau chief from 2008 to 2013 and opened the AP’s Pyongyang bureau in January 2012. We spoke with Ms. Lee about the Kim family’s rise to power, the idea of North Korea as an absolute monarchy, and the message Kim Jong Un sent with the assassination of his brother in February.

NSA Security Counsel 57 mins – “We have a special treat in this off-cycle episode!  NSA GC Glenn Gerstell is in Austin to speak to our students here at UT, and (no doubt against his better judgment) he agreed to sit for an interview with Professors Chesney and Vladeck.  The conversation focuses in particular on the nature, operation, and criticisms of Section 702 collection authority.  As you probably know, Section 702 is scheduled to expire at the end of December, and there is certain to be a fascinating, high-stakes Congressional fight over its renewal in the months ahead.   Tune in for our discussion of targeting, minimization, “backdoor” searches, database queries, masking, unmasking, and many other key elements in the debate!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

One-legged Wrestler 33 mins – “On the next Snap Judgment,”On The Mat.” Amazing people wrestling with tough opponents and big decisions. Featuring Anthony Robles, the grappler that could take you down with one leg, and the Von Erich wrestling family whose glitz and fame was riddled with pain and sacrifice.” At the link click the circle with three dots and right-click “Download this audio” to get the podcast.

Orphan Prevention 13 mins – “Could it be wrong to help children in need by starting an orphanage? In this eye-opening talk about the bad consequences of good intentions, Tara Winkler speaks out against the spread of orphanages in developing countries, caused in part by foreign donors, and details the harm done to children when they are separated from their families and left to grow up in institutions.” At the link find the title, “Why we need to end the era of orphanages | Tara Winkler, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files TaraWinkler_2016X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panhandling Solution 12 mins – “When Richard J. Berry, the mayor of Albuquerque, saw a man on a street corner holding a cardboard sign that read “Want a job,” he decided to take him (and others in his situation) up on it. He and his staff started a citywide initiative to help the homeless by giving them day jobs and a place to sleep — and the results were incredible. Find out how your city can replicate Albuquerque’s model with this frank and optimistic talk.” At the link find the title, “A practical way to help the homeless find work and safety | Richard J. Berry, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files RichardJBerry_2017X.mp4” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pink Slime Lawsuit 55 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, senior strategy officer at a political risk startup Anna Szymanski, and Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann discuss: Pink slime and food libel; Disney and Netflix; Office open seating plans” At the link find the title, “The Disney World Edition, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7938092209.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poker Pro Interview 69 mins – “Phil Hellmuth (@phil_hellmuth) is an American professional poker player who has won a record fourteen World Series of Poker bracelets. He is the winner of the Main Event of the 1989 World Series of Poker (WSOP) and the Main Event of the 2012 World Series of Poker Europe (WSOPE), and he is a 2007 inductee of the WSOP’s Poker Hall of Fame. Hellmuth is also known for his temperamental “poker brat” personality — reflected in his new book, Poker Brat: Phil Hellmuth’s Autobiography. We recorded three hours of material and only one hour was used for the TV show. This podcast episode is almost entirely new content that didn’t appear on TV. In this conversation, we examine Phil’s morning routine, the importance of goals and blessings, how he became the youngest person to win the World Series of Poker, his prep for high-stakes games, what it takes to compete at the highest level, and much, much more.” At the link find the title, “#260: Setting Goals, Making Money, and Overcoming Tough Times — Phil Hellmuth,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Phil Hellmuth.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prisons and Trump 44 mins – “How we got from the events in Ferguson to the election of you-know-who: Chris Hayes talks about race, incarceration, and politics in his new book  A Colony in a Nation—Salon called it “a dark book for a dark time.” Start Making Sense is hosted by Jon Wiener and co-produced by the Los Angeles Review of Books. Plus: Although Trump was the least Christian of all the Republican candidates, white evangelicals voted for him overwhelmingly, despite the work of some prominent evangelical leaders.  Sarah Posner of the Nation Institute analyzes the political deal that evangelicals made—she wrote about the issue last month for The New Republic. And Gary Younge explains what it’s been like talking about kids killed by guns—on call-in shows on talk radio.  His book Another Day in the Death of America: A Chronicle of Ten Short Lives recently won the Anthony J. Lukas Prize.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Privacy Data 55 mins – “More and more our lives are online. Wherever we go, whatever we do, we leave a digital trail. Cameras follow us as we walk through the city. Financial transactions are recorded be it banking or buying groceries, buying anything. And some people choose to document their lives on social media. Our data is valuable.  Profiles are assembled. What about privacy? Does it exist anymore? A human right or an outdated custom?  When political messages are unregulated and targeted, is democracy under threat? This discussion was held as part of Brisbane’s World Science Festival 2017.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race-Class-Culture 108 mins – “On September 5, the Brookings Institution hosted a conversation with William Julius Wilson, America’s leading voice on the sociology of race and poverty and author of “The Truly Disadvantaged,” and J.D. Vance, the author of the acclaimed “Hillbilly Elegy,” a personal and moving account of white underclass struggle in Appalachia.At the link double click the down-pointing arrow and to get the audio file.  

Read Between the Trump Lines 26 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Lawfare’s Benjamin Wittes about who’s saying what in the Trump-Russia investigation and why it’s important to know the difference.” At the link find the title, “How to Read L’Affaire Russe, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY7229385510.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy in Texas 27 mins – “Why has a heavily Republican city in Texas, chock full of climate change sceptics, become the first city in the South to be powered entirely by renewable energy? And why, just a few miles away, has a small town consisting of a lone truck stop and a deserted dirt road they call Main Street, become the richest area in the entire United States? As Donald Trump pulls the US out of the Paris Climate Accords, and talks up the use of fossil fuels, we explore the unexpected reality of the energy industry in the ‘oil state’.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Ethics 28 mins – “Alan Winfield is the only Professor of Robot Ethics in the world. He is a voice of reason amid the growing sense of unease at the pace of progress in the field of artificial intelligence. He believes that robots aren’t going to take over the world – at least not any time soon. But that doesn’t mean we should be complacent. Alan Winfield talks to Jim al-Khalili about how, at a young age, he delighted in taking things apart. After his degree in microelectronics and a PhD in digital communication at Hull University, he set up a software company in the mid-80s, which he ran for the best part of a decade before returning to academia. In 1993, he co-founded the Bristol Robotics Laboratory at the University of the West of England, by far the largest centre of robotics in the UK. Today, he is a leading authority, not only on robot ethics, but on the idea of swarm robotics and biologically-inspired robotics. Alan explains to Jim that what drives many of his enquiries is the deeply profound question: how can ‘stuff’ become intelligent.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Safecracker 82 mins – “Leo Laporte and Iain Thomson talk with Nathan Seidle, the founder of SparkFun Electronics about the safe-cracking robot he created and how it works[20 min mark]. It was one of the most popular exhibits at DEF CON. Is your digital life a mess? Megan Morrone is here to help as she kicks off our #DigitalCleanse series. Today, learn how to tame your notifications. Is there a good ‘trust no one’ cloud storage solution? Why is Verizon so late on Android updates? Find out in our ‘Calls for Help.’ Then, Jason Howell loves great audio and has a review of IK Multimedia’s small iLoud Micro Monitor speakers.” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Romanian Internet Porn 29 mins – “Inside Romania’s live, web-camming world – the engine of the online sex industry… Assignment explores the fastest growing sector of so-called, ‘adult’ entertainment.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Roundabouts 7 mins – “…Rotaries were introduced in the U.S. in the early 20th century — but there was no real design criteria. They have pretty high entry speeds, over 30 miles an hour, and they don’t process traffic very well. Another name for those? Traffic circles. But take that traffic circle, shrink it down, and add a few rules, maybe an extra lane, and you’ve got something special: the roundabout. Traffic circle being converted to a roundabout in Kingston, NY. The roundabout is the smaller circle in the middle. Oldenburg says you actually have less traffic in a roundabout than in a traffic circle, and that a lot of the roundabout construction in New Hampshire is actually a retrofitting of existing traffic circles. The engineers see a better flow of traffic and think, success! But the people driving through these things often have a different opinion….”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Salman Rushdie 58 mins – “Since 2008, Big Think has been sharing big ideas from creative and curious minds. Since 2015, the Think Again podcast has been taking us out of our comfort zone, surprising our guests and Jason Gots, your host, with unexpected conversation starters from Big Think’s interview archives. Today’s guest is Salman Rushdie. He’s the author of twelve previous novels and four books of nonfiction, including Joseph Anton, Midnight’s Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the Best of the Booker), Shame, The Satanic Verses, and Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights which we discussed two years ago on this show.  He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University. His kaleidoscopic, funny, philosophical new novel The Golden House has been called a “return to realism” but maybe only because the present-day American realities it draws upon and reimagines are so indistinguishable from fantasy. In this episode, the first one with a repeat guest since the show was launched (Henry Rollins was one taping split into two episodes) Rushdie and Jason discuss New York City, the surrealism of everyday life, comic books, and much, much, more.” At the link find the title, “115. Salman Rushdie (writer) – A Permeable Frontier, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP1671544126.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Lunches 54 mins – “Across the United States, school lunch is being transformed, as counties and cities partner with local farms to access fresh vegetables, as well as hire chefs to introduce tastier and more adventurous meals. This is a much-needed correction after decades of processed meals that contained little in the way of nutrition and flavor. But how did we get to trays of spongy pizza and freezer-burned tater tots in the first place? While it seems as if such culinary delights were always part of a child’s day, the school lunch is barely a century old—and there are plenty of countries in the world, like Canada and Norway, where school lunch doesn’t even exist. This episode, we dive into the history of how we got to today’s school lunch situation, as well as what it tells us about our economic and gender priorities. Listen in now for all that, plus the science on whether school lunch even matters.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sharps’ War 52 mins – “In January 1939, Unitarian minister Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha received a call: would they travel to Europe to help Jewish dissidents and refugees under threat of Nazi persecution? While few Americans were paying attention to Hitler’s growing power, the Sharps agreed to the dangerous mission. A new PBS film explores their incredible work, and Wednesday, filmmaker Artemis Joukowsky joins us to talk about how the Sharp’s actions saved hundreds and altered the course of their own lives.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Sixties Big Switch 53 mins – “Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University Department of Classical Studies, and is titled “Personal Agency and the Big Switch 1962-64: Thucydides, Bob Dylan and Stanley Kubrick.”  Our speaker is Professor Thomas Palaima from the University of Texas at Austin.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep and Memory 71 mins – “In The Secret World of Sleep: The Surprising Science of the Mind at Rest Dr. Penelope A. Lewis provides a highly readable account of the fascinating world of sleep research. Fascinating research is being carried out with animals as varied as fruit flies and rats, as well as with humans. I was surprised to learn that most people actually find it fairly easy to fall asleep in an fMRI scanner. I have just posted an interview with Dr. Lewis (BSP 107) that includes a discussion of the role of sleep in memory as well as interesting findings about how synapses in the brain actually change during sleep. We still don’t know exactly what sleep (and dreaming) are essential, but research in this field is growing. Dr. Lewis is excited about emerging research that suggests improving slow wave sleep may significantly improve learning and memory.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sleep Deprivation 33 mins – “If you could compare the person you were before you became sleep deprived to the person after, you’d find you’ve definitely become…lesser than. When it comes to sleep deprivation, you can’t trust yourself to know just how much it is affecting you. You feel fine, maybe a bit drowsy, but your body is stressed in ways that diminish your health and slow your mind. In this episode, we sit down with two researchers whose latest work suggests sleep deprivation also affects how you see other people. In tests of implicit bias, negative associations with certain religious and cultural categories emerged after people started falling behind on rest.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 110-Sleep_and_Bias.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Walk Stories 20 mins – “200 miles above Earth’s surface, astronaut Dave Wolf — rocketing through the blackness of Earth’s shadow at 5 miles a second — floated out of the Mir Space Station on his very first spacewalk. In this short, he describes the extremes of light and dark in space, relives a heart-pounding close call, and shares one of the most tranquil moments of his life. When we were putting together our live show In the Dark, Jad and Robert called up Dave Wolf to ask him if he had any stories about darkness. And boy, did he. Dave told us two stories that  became the finale of our show….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Special Forces Wound Care 19 mins – “This Clinical Practice Guideline was written by a fellow 18D with input from around the surgical community.  It reconciles the differences between wound care done in a role 2 or 3 facility, such as serial debridements, with what is taught in the 18D Special Forces Medical Sergeant Course with regards to delayed primary closure.  One way is not “right” while the other wrong, it has more to do with the amount of time and resources available to the medic or other provider.  The remainder of the blog post and podcast is meant to be a refresher for those who have already been taught these procedures.  It is also meant to be informational for those medical directors who may not be exactly certain of what has been taught as far as wound care and surgery. If you haven’t been trained to do these procedures before going ahead with them, it is very likely that you may do more harm to the patient than good.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Wound_Care.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Startup Mentor 33 mins – “Jasen Yang gave up the security of a high-paying Wall Street job to launch his company, Polly Portfolio. It’s been three years since then, and Jasen still isn’t taking a salary. It’s put a lot of strain on his family, and made it difficult for Jasen and his wife, Lynn, to make important decisions about their future. So we brought in executive coach Jerry Colonna, who helped Jasen find the unlikely source of his anxiety.” At the link find the title, “Sell the Apartment, Keep the Startup (Season 6, Episode 3), Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT8589225555.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Sterile Earth 27 mins – “This month’s episode is about what it would take to sterilize the Earth, and why you might want to figure that out in the first place. First we talk to the authors of a paper that tries to figure out this exact question. David Sloan and Rafael Alves Batista are the authors of a paper called “The Resilience of Life to Astrophysical Events” (along with Avi Loeb). No, they’re not evil scientists, just interested in what it might take to find life on other planets. They explain their calculations, and how we mostly don’t have anything to worry about. Plus, cool facts about tardigrades! Then we talk to science-fiction author N.K. Jemisin who is the author of The Broken Earth trilogy. Which is very good! She explains her thinking behind the books, why the Earth is out to get her characters, and how humans banding together to survive is more interesting to her than the lone ranger making it on his own.” At the link find the title, “After Life, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide History 52 mins – “Questions surrounding suicide have been with us for at least as long as we’ve had written record, and the answers are as varied as the times and places where they were discussed. Tuesday, Doug’s guest is the philosophy scholar Margaret Battin. She’s spent her career collecting the works of religious and secular thinkers regarding suicide. It has been considered noble, immoral, heroic and cowardly, and we’ll talk about what all of those views teach us about end-of-life issues today. Margaret Battin is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and an Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Utah. Her books include Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die and The Ethics of Suicide: Historical Sources ”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Supernatural Beliefs 34 mins – “Episode 34 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Bruce Hood, author of “SuperSense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable.” Dr. Hood is a developmental psychologist with a long-standing interest in why people believe weird things. In “Supersense” he argues that innate cognitive structures (how we think without being taught) give people a natural tendency toward belief in the supernatural. Our intuitive sense of how the world works is often at odds with the findings of modern science. In this interview we discuss the evidence for these conclusions and their implications. Please go to http://booksandideas.com for show notes and episode transcripts.” At the link double click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Syrian Refugee Story 28 mins – “In the summer of 2015 tens of thousands of Syrians left their war torn homeland and put their lives in the hands of the smugglers who would help them navigate the hazardous route to Europe. Among the new arrivals were Mohammed Dallal, a man in his late 40s and his 16-year-old daughter Noor. Amy Zayed and Laura Graen have accompanied Mohamed and Noor for nearly two years through the emotional and bureaucratic vagaries of the refugee life. In this programme, we hear whether the family is, at last, together again.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tennis Pro Interview 133 mins – “Maria Sharapova (@MariaSharapova) is one of the best tennis players in the world. She is the winner of five Grand Slam titles (two at the French Open and one each at the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and US Open) and an Olympic silver medalist. Forbes named Maria the highest-paid female athlete of all-time in 2005 — a title she’s held for 12 years. Off the court, she’s an ambassador for many of the world’s top luxury brands and a number of Fortune 500 companies including Porsche, Nike, Evian, and Head. In 2007, she became a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and has made significant contributions to Chernobyl-related projects. Her first book, Unstoppable: My Life So Far, comes out this year. In this conversation, we went deep into tactics of training, mental performance, mental toughness, and much more. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did!” At the link find the title, “#261: Mental Performance, Work-Life Balance, and the Rise to the Top – Maria Sharapova,” right-click “Media files The Tim Ferriss Show-Maria Sharapova.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanksgiving Day 50 mins– “If a Pilgrim were to attend a contemporary Thanksgiving celebration, he or she would probably be stunned by our “traditional” foods. In this episode of BackStory, The Guys discuss Puritan foods with historian James McWilliams, and religion scholar Anne Blue Wills reveals the surprising, 19th century origins of our national holiday. We’ll also hear from legendary NFL quarterback Roger Staubach about what it was like to spend every turkey day on the football field.” At the link find the title, “American As Pumpkin Pie: A History Of Thanksgiving, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files BKS6372346025.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and the Press 31 mins – “Josh King talks to Chief Media Writer at the Poynter Institute for Media Studies, Jim Warren, about the competition between the Washington Post and The New York Times. Plus, how are those two organizations handling the attacks coming from Donald Trump and his administration and what might the future hold for both papers?” At the link find the title, “The Last Newspaper War (Pt. 1), Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8799356700.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Controversies 26 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Matt Miller, formerly of the DoJ and currently an MSNBC Justice and Security Analyst, about the latest surrounding the Trump-Russia investigations.” At the link find the title, “If You’re Concerned and You Know It, Just Impeach, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM9038421348.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Trump Russia Affair 26 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Andrew Rice, a contributing editor at New York Magazine, about Felix Sater, Trump’s original Russia connection, and why his name may come up more and more as Mueller’s investigation unravels. Read Andrew’s story The Original Russia Connection over at New York Magazine.” At the link find the title, “The Key to a Thousand Doors, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM7212731565.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Special Investigation 45 mins – “In the past 24 hours, the Financial Times reported that Russian lobbyist Rinat Akhmetshin testified before Robert Mueller’s grand jury; Politico carried that the Mueller team is cooperating with the New York Attorney General to investigate Paul Manafort; and the Wall Street Journal broke that the President’s lawyers have provided memos to the Special Counsel arguing that the president cannot commit obstruction of justice and questioning Jim Comey’s credibility. Shane Harris and Paul Rosenzweig joined Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes to discuss the recent developments.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Shane and Paul on WSJ1.mp3” and select “Save LinkAs” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Standards 45 mins – “Josh King talks to Philippe Reines, longtime spokesman and adviser to Hillary Clinton, about playing Donald Trump in debate prep and his former boss’ book What Happened.” At the link find the title, “Becoming the Opposition, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6495119894.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth and Accuracy 54 mins – “Yascha Mounk and Matthew d’Ancona discuss why lies have taken over our politics; what kinds of policies might be able to move us past the post-truth age; and how Democrats can win in 2020.” At the link find the title, “Matthew d’Ancona,” click the three dots near the title, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undocumented Students 51 mins – “President Trump is ending DACA, which allowed some 800,000 undocumented young people to stay and work in the United States. For some, that may mean the end of a dream of going to college. This program profiles DACA students and their opponents and examines a key court case and political forces that led to this moment.” At the link find the title, “Shadow Class: College Dreamers in Trump’s America” right-click “Media files shadowclassed_128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Utopias 52 mins – “In his recent book “Utopia for Realists,” Rutger Bregman advocates a 15-hour workweek, universal basic income, and open borders. Sounds like paradise to us! From the Oneida Community’s dream of open, or “complex marriage” to the rise and spectacular fall of Pullman’s model company town, the Guys look at why the idea of “utopianism” has such strong appeal to Americans.” At the link find the title, “A Whole New World: A History of Utopias, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files BKS2337485428.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Overview 27 mins – “Episode 24: Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela Earlier this month, President Trump addressed the deepening political and economic crises in Venezuela stating that the U.S. may consider “military options” if the situation gets worse. This week we spoke to Francisco Toro, a Venezuelan journalist and the Executive Editor of English-language blog Caracas Chronicles, about the current state of affairs in Venezuela and the rapidly deteriorating quality of life for those who remain in the country.” At the link find the title, “Episode 24: Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela,” right-click “Media files SBTOR0818.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Status 27 mins – “Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world but incredibly, around four in five Venezuelans live in poverty. The BBC’s South America correspondent, Katy Watson, went to cover the unfolding political and economic crisis in Venezuela and found a country divided.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuela Violence 27 mins – “Venezuela has some of the largest oil reserves in the world but incredibly, around four in five Venezuelans live in poverty. The BBC’s South America correspondent, Katy Watson, went to cover the unfolding political and economic crisis in Venezuela and found a country divided.” At the link right-click “Download: and select Save Link As” from the up-up menu.

Volt Solar Energy 29 mins – “Our guest this week on Sea Change Radio, Gilbert Campbell III, the Co-Founder of Volt Energy, is here to remind us that sustainable energy is good, not only for the earth, but also for business. Campbell’s company, based in Washington, D.C., builds and operates solar projects, electric-vehicle charging stations, and offers energy storage solutions. We discuss how Volt Energy’s business model works, why there are not nearly enough minority-owned businesses in the renewable energy space, and the challenges of interacting with a new Administration that is openly hostile to science and minorities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Walt Mossberg Columnist 75 mins – “Walt Mossberg has been reporting on tech since 1991. He talks to Leo Laporte about his recent retirement, how he got his start, and his history as a ‘tech kingmaker.’” At the link click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Useage 29 mins – “Brad Udall has an extensive background in water and climate policy issues, including as Director of the Western Water Assessment (University of Colorado), as the first Director of the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources, Energy and the Environment (University of Colorado), and currently as the first senior water and climate research scientist/scholar at the Colorado Water Institute (Colorado State University). This week, he joins us in the studio for an enlightening conversation on water.” At the link right the title, “SCIENCE STUDIO: Brad Udall, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files sci_stud-082717-_orig._052216_0.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weed Control 88 mins – “Sam Hitchcock Tilton studies weed control at Michigan State University, where he went to study after two years of pushing a wheel through clay soil on his own farm, and more years of working for other farmers. His graduate-student work on in-row weed control in vegetable crops has led him to explore the various elements that go into setting up for weed control success. Sam draws on his experience on farms, a visit to Europe to learn about and evaluate precision weed-control tools, and his work in his experimental plots to provide insight into more than just the cool tools that make weed control work. We look at the foundations of mechanical weed control, starting with soil preparation and seeding the crop through blind cultivation, flame weeding, tool carriers, and selecting the right tools for between-row and in-row weed control.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wildfire Future 51 mins – “Nature writer Gary Ferguson says we are facing a “perfect storm” when it comes to wildfires. Climate change has led to less snow, longer droughts, and more wind and there’s a lot of fuel on the forest floors. The result is ten more weeks of fire season than we saw in the early ’70s, and those fires are hotter and often beyond control. Ferguson joins us to talk about the role fire should play in a healthy ecosystem and the new reality of wildfire in the West. Gary Ferguson has written many books on nature and science, including Hawks Restand The Carry Home. His new book is called Land on Fire: The New Reality of Wildfire in the West.”  At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Womens Prison 53 mins – “A lot of people wouldn’t guess that the first women’s prison in the nation was built in Indiana in 1873. Though it has moved locations and changed names, it is still open and imprisoning women. Its current name is the Indiana Women’s Prison. We talked to two researchers who uncovered stories about the early history of this prison, stories that call the official textbook account into question. But this isn’t just the story of the first women’s prison in the nation, it’s also the tale of the journey of the two researchers who exposed the prison’s dark beginnings.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link as” from the pop-up menu.

Wordstar Impact 26 mins – “The unlikely rise of Lee O’Denat, the founder of Worldstar Hip Hop. Also, we reopen a cold case. Further Listening -Q’s interview on Shots Fired – [WorldStarHipHop.com gets around 4-6 million hits a day. Q is the man behind this juggernaut of a website and joins MC Nocando & Jeff Weiss to talk about his early beginnings selling mixtapes online with DJ Whoo Kid, where he got his inspiration to make WorldStar a central hub for entertainment, when WorldStar started getting huge, which is the highest trafficked video, how rappers can get on WorldStar, criticisms the site has received from the fight videos, and the future ventures of WorldStarHipHop. Be sure to get a copy of Jeff’s new book “2pac vs. Biggie: An Illustrated History of Rap’s Greatest Battle,” check out Nocando’s mixtape “Tits ‘N Explosions” at http://hellfyreclub.bandcamp.com/, and fire shots of your own by calling us at (424) 216-6230! Also, come to a live taping of Shots Fired, next Thursday, May 30 at Lot 1 in Echo Park. 8 p.m. 1533 W. Sunset Blvd. Featuring guests Evan McGarvey, co-author of 2Pac Vs. Biggie: Rap’s Greatest Battle, and 2Pac’s mentor and first manager, Leila Steinberg.]…” At the link find the title, “#89 Worldstar, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT9889756837.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Global Financing 13 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. A new series, authored by Devi Sridhar, and her team from the University of Edinburgh, and published on bmj.com, looks at where the World Bank has come. In this fourth interview, Genevie Fernandes a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh discusses a new model of combing grants and loans in the Global Financing Facility. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3395” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – the Global Financing Facility, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430843-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-the-global-financing-facility.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Global Health 22 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this first interview, Devi Sridhar, professor of global health at the University of Edinburgh explains why the bank matters for global health. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3339” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – why it matters for global health, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430541-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-why-it-matters-for-global-health.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Pandemic Risk 22 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this final interview, Felix Stein a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Edinburgh describes the bank’s move to create a market for pandemic insurance. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3394” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – creating a market in pandemic risk, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430948-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-creating-a-market-in-pandemic-risk.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Trust Funds 19 mins – The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this third interview, Janelle Winters a PhD student at the University of Edinburgh explains what the bank’s trust funds are, and why it can be hard to tell what they’re funding. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3394” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – trust funds, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430773-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-trust-funds.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank – Universal Health Care 17 mins – “The world bank was set up in 1944. In the aftermath of the second world war, the institution was there to give loans to countries rebuilding after the conflict. Their first loan went to France – but with stipulations about repayment that set a tone for future funds. In this second interview, Marlee Tichenor, postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Edinburgh explains why the bank has embraced universal healthcare. Read the full analysis: http://www.bmj.com/content/358/bmj.j3347” At the link find the title, “The World Bank – Universal Healthcare, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files 340430656-bmjgroup-the-world-bank-universal-healthcare.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WW II Shanghai Battle P1 26 mins – “Chiang Kai-Shek decides that the time has come to openly fight back against Japan. His chosen site is the port city of Shanghai. Both sides build up their forces there, but the Chinese Nationalists will attempt to deliver a surprise attack. As the war enlarges, Stalin decides to assist the Chinese. Tokyo will widen the battle of Shanghai, as their first attempt is blunted.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 201-9917_4.15_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai Battle P2 33 mins – “The Japanese bring reinforcements to Shanghai as their marines are bogged down by Chiang Kai-Shek’s best troops. Meanwhile, retired US Army Air Force Captain Claire Lee Chennault, finds the Chinese pilots woefully inadequate in deflecting the building assault. The Japanese invaders come ashore and now the fate of Shanghai is in the balance, as British and American civilians flee the International Settlement.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 202- 91517_11.10_PM.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Update 108 mins – “Sharon and Scott return to TWiV for a Zika virus update, including their work on viral evolution and spread, and whether pre-existing immunity to dengue virus enhances pathogenesis. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson DespommierAlan Dove, and Kathy Spindler Guests: Sharon Isern and Scott MichaelAt the link right-click “Download TWIV 454” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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