Media Mining Digest 318 – Dec 15, 2017: African Small Business, AR and VR Training, Balkan Instability, Behavioral Economics, Bosnia War Crime, Brain Implants, Carbon Neutral London, Cellulosic Biofuels, Central Park Five Case, Childhood PTSD, Civilization Key Traits, Climate Warming Impact, Cruise Line Impact, Democracy in Trouble, DNA Testing, Econtalk Founder, Educational Technology, Expertise in Medicine, Fake News, Farming Seven Successful Traits, Female Employment Trends, Feminism, Fetal Brain Activity, First Amendment, Freakonomics Thinking, Genetic Research, Government Surveillance, Homelessness, Human Beliefs, Inner City Schools, Internet Censorship, ISIS Child Theft, Mass Shooter Illness, Meditation Teacher, Mycology Breakthroughs, Net Neutrality, Network Power, North Korea Cyberwarfare, Option B, Political Homelessness, Poverty and Health, Presidential Removal, Privacy vs Data Collection, Ransomeware, Saudia Arabia and Educational Endowment, Sex Worker Interview, Smart Phone Searches, Taxation Power, Terrorism Discussion, Tesla Batteries, Thinking Tools, Tim O’Reilly Interview, Troll Farm, Vietnam Heroin Use, Wisdom of Elders

Exercise your ears: the 111 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 646 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 18,700 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, which total over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Small Business 7 mins – “Niti Bhan studies business strategy for Africa’s informal markets: the small shops and stands, skilled craftspeople and laborers who are the invisible engine that keeps the continent’s economy running. It’s tempting to think of these workers as tax-dodgers, even criminals — but Bhan makes the case that this booming segment of the economy is legitimate and worthy of investment. “These are the fertile seeds of businesses and enterprises,” Bhan says. “Can we start by recognizing these skills and occupations?” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AR and VR Training 38 mins – “…I’m talking with Taylor Freeman of Upload.io. They are a company that are in San Francisco and Marina del Rey that has these amazing classes that are teaching virtual reality, augmented reality, mixed reality, X reality. It’s just an amazing company that is building the University of the Future. They have the coolest space. I’ve got a little sneak preview from Taylor. I am now going to take Tom and we’re going to go up there in the next months because it is just such a cool space to look at but such cool tools to play with. I just really thought that you would find this really interesting and really start talking about how the skills that you might be building over in 3D design really translate themselves into becoming virtual reality designers, augmented reality designers, really build this future of this idea of marketing all the way through to product, through 3D printed on-demand end results. I love that idea. I really thought you should hear this. Let’s go to my interview with Taylor Freeman.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arctic Energy Supply 60 mins – “This week we’re looking at how alternative energy works in the arctic. We speak to Louie Azzolini and Linda Todd from the Arctic Energy Alliance, a non-profit helping communities reduce their energy usage and transition to more affordable and sustainable forms of energy. And the lessons they’re learning along the way can help those of us further south.” At the link click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save” and “OK” to get the file.

Astrophysics Questions 56 mins – “Delve into this mashup of Cosmic Queries as Neil deGrasse Tyson and an ensemble of comic co-hosts explore the vast wonder of the cosmos including double star systems, black holes, dark matter and antimatter, the Hubble constant, tidal friction, ET, and much more.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Balkan Instability 29 mins – “Preventing the Unraveling of the Balkans Peace Agreements, Nov, 2017.” At the link find the title with the same words, right-click “Media files T001_20171106_ed.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Behavioral Economics 63 mins – “Michael Lewis is one of the most successful non-fiction authors alive. He has been acclaimed as a genius by Malcolm Gladwell and as the best current writer in America by Tom Wolfe. In a series of titles that have sold 9 million copies worldwide, he has lifted the lid on the biggest stories of our times, enthralling readers with his knack for humanising complex subjects and giving them the page-turning urgency of the best thrillers. Liar’s Poker is the cult classic that defined Wall Street during the 1980s; Moneyball was made into a film with Brad Pitt; Boomerang was a breakneck tour of Europe’s post-crunch economy; and The Big Short was made into a major Oscar-winning film starring Christian Bale, Ryan Gosling and Steve Carell. In November 2017 Lewis came to the Intelligence Squared stage, where he was joined by Stephanie Flanders, former economics editor at the BBC. Discussing the themes of his latest book, The Undoing Project: A Friendship that Changed the World, they explored the extraordinary story of the relationship between Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky – a collaboration which created the field of behavioural economics. This is the theory which shows that human beings are not the rational creatures we imagined ourselves to be, and has revolutionised everything from big data to medicine, from how we are governed to how we spend, from high finance to football. It won Kahneman the Nobel Prize in economics in 2002 – the first time the award had gone to a psychologist.” At the link find the title, “Michael Lewis On How Behavioural Economics Changed The World, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Man in Berlin 28 mins – “Peter White explores Berlin through the sounds of a city that is finding new and imaginative ways to mark its troubled past and plan for its fast expanding future. He is struck by how much it is still haunted by the past. He idles on street corners to absorb the voices around him and he is struck by a familiar lament: people worrying about how much longer they will be able to afford to live in a city with fast rising property prices prompted in part by an influx of foreign investors. His guide is a fellow blind-man, entrepreneur Erich Thurner, who shares the concerns as he contemplates his own future in Berlin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blind Tech Show 60 mins – “That Blind Tech Show Rolls Again. Bryan brings Allison and Jeff back to the sho to talk about some of the latest Tech news, gidgets and gadgets and the latest from Sonos. We are proud to announce that Twitterrific for the Mac is Back, Downcast just got an update and AOL Messenger is no longer. Jeff gives us an update on the fire that hit Enchanted Hills Camp above Napa, CA and how we can all contribute and support #RebuildEHC.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bosnia War Criminal 28 mins – “Mark Urban returns to Bosnia to examine the impact Serb General Ratko Mladic had on the lives of thousands of people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Implants 28 mins – “This week we hear stories on what to do with experimental brain implants after a study is over, how gene therapy gave a second skin to a boy with a rare epidermal disease, and how bone markings thought to be evidence for early hominid tool use may have been crocodile bites instead, with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. [and] Sarah Crespi interviews Gary King about his new experiment to bring fresh data to the age-old question of how the news media influences the public. Are journalists setting the agenda or following the crowd? How can you know if a news story makes a ripple in a sea of online information? In a powerful study, King’s group was able to publish randomized stories on 48 small and medium sized news sites in the United States and then track the results.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Carbon Neutral London 51 mins – “Could London be the first carbon neutral city? Listen to this exciting debate hosted by Intelligence Squared. Gadget guru Jason Bradbury is the chair, plus guests including award winning actor and broadcaster Richard Ayoade.” At the link find the title, “Can innovation transform London into a carbon neutral city? Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cellulosic Biofuels P1 29 mins – “This episode begins a three-part series on cellulosic ethanol and other cellulosic biofuels. What if we could take one of the most prolific, abundant, renewable, and sustainable items on the plant – Cellulose – and make fuel from it?  Well, we can! Sounds fantastic, but there are, of course, challenges. It’s expensive, the conversions aren’t as great as we’d like them to be, there is a lot of work that needs to be done to improve the processes in order to make cellulosic biofuels a widespread reality.  This is the first part of the three-part series where we explore these opportunities and challenges with cellulosic biofuels. Dr. Brown describes a future where farmers can produce biomass that is specifically bred to be processed into fuels that can go directly into an engine. This would, of course, take collaboration between seed companies, farmers, ethanol plants, and fuel manufacturers and retailers.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Central Park Five Case 26 mins – “Presidents don’t usually weigh in on criminal cases. In fact, it’s critical to the integrity of the criminal justice system that the executive not try to influence the outcome of cases. But Trump can’t help himself. President Trump has called the US criminal justice system “a joke.” At the link find the title, “13- Criminal Justice and the POTUS, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_13_Criminal Justice and the POTUS_part_01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood PTSD 27 mins – “Why do asylum-seeking children in Sweden withdraw from the world & how can they recover?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civilization Key Traits 60 mins – “Niall Ferguson is the most brilliant British historian of his generation. In this talk from February 2011, based on his book ‘Civilisation: The West and the Rest’, he asks how Western civilization came to dominate the rest of the world. His answer is that the West developed six “killer applications” that the Rest lacked: competition, science, democracy, medicine, consumerism and the Protestant work ethic. The key question today is whether or not the West has lost its monopoly on these six things. If it has and the Rest of the world can successfully download these apps, we may be living through the end of Western ascendancy.” is the preeminent historian of the ideas that define our time. He has challenged how we think about money, power, civilisation and empires. Now he wants to reimagine history itself. On October 4th, Ferguson came to the Intelligence Squared stage to unveil his new book, ‘The Square and The Tower’. Historians have always focused on hierarchies, he argued – on the elites that wield power. Economists have concentrated on the marketplace – on the economic forces that shape change. These twin structures are symbolised for Ferguson by Siena’s market square, and its civic tower looming above. But beneath both square and tower runs something more deeply significant: the hidden networks of relationships, ideas and influence. Networks are the key to history. The greatest innovators have been ‘superhubs’ of connections. The most powerful states, empires and companies have been those with the most densely networked structures. And the most transformative ideas – from the printing presses that launched the Reformation to the Freemasonry that inspired the American Revolution – have gone viral precisely because of the networks within which they spread. ‘When we understand these core insights of network science,’ says Ferguson, ‘the entire history of mankind looks quite different.’” At the link find the title, “Niall Ferguson on History’s Hidden Networks, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Skeptic 46 mins – “In a joint production with Stevie Lepp and the Reckonings podcast we hear from Jerry Taylor, a former professional climate change skeptic who switched sides entirely.” At the link right-click “Media files 964c4ba3-3154-42c5-b364-234a7bbbef04.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Activism 15 mins – “The biggest obstacle to dealing with climate disruptions lies between your ears, says psychologist and economist Per Espen Stokes. He’s spent years studying the defenses we use to avoid thinking about the demise of our planet — and figuring out a new way of talking about global warming that keeps us from shutting down. Step away from the doomsday narratives and learn how to make caring for the earth feel personable, do-able and empowering with this fun, informative talk.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Impact 8 mins – “Military leaders have known for millennia that the time to prepare for a challenge is before it hits you, says scientist and retired US Navy officer David Titley. He takes us from the humanitarian catastrophe in Syria to the icy shores of Svalbard to show how the military approaches the threat of climate change, in a refreshingly practical, nonpartisan take on climate preparedness. “The ice doesn’t care who’s in the White House. It doesn’t care which party controls your congress. It doesn’t care which party controls your parliament,” Titley says. “It just melts.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterculture 65 mins – “Is there a New Counterculture movement?  If so, what is it?  Can we define it, or at least describe it?  Might you be a part of it, even if in a small way, even if you don’t realize it? Join Prof CJ as he discusses: Why cultural, artistic, and/or intellectual movements are often hard to identify without hindsight (either after they’ve fizzled out entirely, or at least jumped the shark); What the Old Counterculture was, and its problems; Defining what the New Counterculture is (as CJ sees it) by describing a nonexistent, archetypal New Counterculturalist individual in terms of his or her age, religiosity, career, political views, lifestyle, etc.; CJ’s take on the degree to which he himself (at least somewhat) fits the mold; Reasons why the New Counterculture has more potential to achieve lasting, positive change” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cruise Line Impact 51 mins – “What is the fastest growing sector in tourism? It is cruise ship holidays, increasing exponentially and globally. Twenty-five million cruise vacations were taken this year and that will double very soon. International cruise lines want remote, pristine and idyllic places to satisfy the appetite of passengers to be somewhere beautiful, especially in the Pacific. In a remote, tiny community in the southern tip of Vanuatu in the South-West Pacific, a village is earning more than ever through hosting gleaming white giant cruise ships that regularly appear over the horizon. Most months more than 25,000 visitors step ashore. The attraction is Inyeug, marketed to tourists as Mystery Island – a tiny offshore reef-ringed island, fringed by a beautiful beach and surrounded by sparkling clear turquoise shallow water. Susie Emmett listens to villagers as they prepare souvenirs and village tours. She asks the captain of a cruise ship about the effects of the ships on the environment. And she joins tourists as they explore and meets the teams dealing with the debris after their departure.” At the link right-Click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy in Trouble 60 mins – “In September 2014, Professor Francis Fukuyama came to the Intelligence Squared stage to square up with one of Britain’s most brilliant political thinkers, David Runciman, to assess how democracy is faring in 2014. We certainly haven’t attained the rosy future that some thought Fukuyama was predicting in his book ‘The End of History and The Last Man’ in 1992: authoritarianism is entrenched in Russia and China, in the last decade the developed democracies have experienced severe financial crises and rising inequality, and Islamic State militants are wreaking havoc in Iraq and Syria. Is religion becoming the new politics? How will the technological revolution continue to impact our politics? And in the West are we in danger of becoming complacent about the challenges to democracy that we face?” At the link find the title, “Francis Fukuyama with David Runciman – Democracy: Even the Best Ideas Can Fail, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Testing 10 mins – “262 – How Well Do Ancestry DNA Tests Actually Work?” At the link find the title with the same words, right-click “Media files ede_262-as3.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Use Excess 58 mins – “Consumer Reports recently had a cover story on “Too Many Meds? America’s Love Affair with Prescription Medication.” It turns out that half of American adults take at least one prescription drug. Actually, the average number of prescriptions is four. That’s a lot more pills than people in other countries, and it is more than we Americans used to take. Are we taking too many prescriptions? How Can You Tell If You Are Taking Too Many Prescriptions? Very often, prescriptions start to pile up almost before you notice it. If your sleeping medicine gives you heartburn, you may end up with a prescription to treat that symptom. Sometimes the second medication will then cause symptoms for which the doctor prescribes a different drug. This is one way people end up taking three, four or five different pills. The problem is that using too many prescriptions increases your risk of side effects. And taking all those different pills means that they may interact with one another. There were more than 1 million emergency department visits due to adverse drug effects in 2014. More than 100,000 people died from those reactions. And, of course, paying for all those pills is also hard on the budget. That is why Consumer Reports declared October 21st National Check Your Meds Day. They recommend a “brown bag” review of everything you are taking. That means you ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on whether you are taking anything you might not need. Be sure to ask exactly how to discontinue it, if that is the advice. Some drugs should not be stopped abruptly.” At the link left-click the “Download MP3,” select “Choose MP3,” add it to the cart and download it (for free).

Earth Poles and Spin 27 mins – “No one knows why the Earth’s magnetic North and South poles swap. But polar reversals have happened hundreds of times over the history of the Earth. John Turk emailed curiouscases@bbc.co.uk to ask, “when is the next pole swap due and what will happen to us?”
Featuring Prof Lucie Green from Mullard Space Science Laboratory and Dr Phil Livermore from the University of Leeds. Plus, astronaut Terry Virts, author of The View from Above, describes his experiences of a strange magnetic glitch in the earth’s magnetic field, known as The Bermuda Triangle of Space. The World That Turns – “Why does the Earth spin?” asks Joe Wills from Accra in Ghana. Hannah quizzes cosmologist Andrew Pontzen about the birth of the Solar System. BBC weatherman John Hammond describes the curious things that would happen if the Earth spun the opposite way.”
At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Offsets 69 mins – “Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econtalk Founder 55 mins – “The host of Econtalk provides his take on our ep. 174 on The Wealth of Nations, and explores with us the idea of emergent economic order. As preparation, we all listened to a June 2017 episode of Econtalk that featured Russ, Mike Munger, and Don Boudreaux, so you should too! For a graphic introduction to this idea, see wonderfulloaf.org. Is the economy profitably thought of as a machine? Like the behavior of a natural system like a liquid or gas whose behavior can be described using simple laws and perhaps manipulated? As a garden? A rainforest? Are the unplanned results of mass economic activity always good? Russ leans libertarian but has a nuanced view honed through over 600 episodes of Econtalk, where he’s talked to economists of all stripes. Like Smith, Russ recognizes that wealth is not the only good, that the economy is not going to serve all human needs, and that government regulations and infrastructure can be helpful and even necessary. We talk through what “invisible hand” really means, tariffs and trade policy for less-developed countries, dehumanizing labor, self-interest, how Adam Smith’s picture in The Wealth of Nations relates to his account of moral judgments in The Theory of Moral Sentiments (discussed on PEL and at great length on Econtalk), how to induce changes in popular mores, and whether Smith’s moral concepts can handle the progressive character of morality (e.g., how people figured out over time that slavery was bad).” At the link find the title,”Episode 177: Guest Russ Roberts on Adam Smith and Libertarian Economics (Part One),” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Technology 64 mins – “Welcome to episode 74 of the EdTech Situation Room from November 24, 2017, where technology news meets educational analysis. This week Jason Neiffer (@techsavvyteach) and Wes Fryer (@wfryer) discussed recent news articles addressing Apple’s MacBook in our post-PC computing environment, net neutrality and the FCC’s upcoming plan to roll it back, as well as various security news reports from the past two weeks. These included WikiLeaks release of CIA cyber weapon source code, the reported impersonation of Kaspersky by CIA hackers, Uber’s $100,000 cover-up of a large cyber breach, and the dangers posed by a WiFi Pineapple. The 10th birthday of the Amazon Kindle was also discussed, including its history of iterative design and function improvements. Geeks of the week included What’s App (from Wes) and fakespot.com (from Jason), a helpful website to identify fake product reviews on Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor and the Apple App Store. Refer to our podcast shownotes for all referenced news articles and links. Please follow us on Twitter @edtechSR to stay updated, and join us LIVE for a future show at 9 pm Central / 8 pm Mountain most weeks on Wednesday night. Check all our shownotes on http://edtechSR.com/linksAt the link right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Europe On Edge 61 mins – “What’s happening to Europe? The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 was seen as a triumph for liberal democracy. True, the ‘end of history’ narrative didn’t play out across the world as many predicted. But in Europe political liberalism seemed unshakable, supported as it was by international business and transnational organisations such as the EU and NATO. But now Europe stands at a precarious moment. Anti-establishment and anti-EU political parties are on the rise. Brexit and the presidency of Donald Trump add to the uncertainty. Europe seems to face a near near-constant threat of terrorist attacks. And while Marine Le Pen didn’t sweep to victory in the recent French presidential election, the new president Emmanuel Macron faces an uphill battle to fix the French economy and reform the EU’s institutions. If he fails, Le Pen could be well set to win the presidency in 2022. How can we account for this surge of support for far-right and populist parties in Europe? Conventional wisdom has it that it is only in times of economic hardship and high unemployment that these groups begin to gain ground. That may be true of France, which took a serious knocking in the 2008 crash and has a high rate of joblessness. But the Dutch sit comfortably high in all the OECD rankings for income levels, employment and life satisfaction. And look at Poland, a country initially seen by the west as a post-communist success story. Although it has been largely unaffected by the Eurozone crisis and has no immigration as such, a xenophobic, authoritarian government is now in charge. In this major Intelligence Squared event, we brought together a star panel to explore the reasons behind the rise of populism in Europe and to discuss where the continent is heading next. Are terrorist attacks the new normal in Europe? How will the continent deal with the effects of continuing large-scale immigration and its entrenched economic woes?” At the link find the title, “Europe on the Edge, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Expertise in Medicine 22 mins – “After Podcast 211 with Anders Ericsson, I promised my thoughts on deliberate practice and expertise…” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News 61 mins – “There are lies, damn lies, and then there’s fake news. Manipulating the facts for political gain is as old as politics itself, but due to the rise of social media and search engine algorithms false stories can now spread like wildfire. In the run-up to the US presidential election, more people on Facebook engaged with fake news than they did with fact-checked media outlets. And according to a study by Stanford University, fabricated news items favouring Donald Trump were shared 30 million times during the campaign. In the recent French elections, a quarter of the political stories shared on Twitter were based on deliberate misinformation. Fake news was even broadcast live on television during the second-round debate, when Marine Le Pen alluded to a false online story that her rival Emmanuel Macron had an offshore bank account in the Bahamas. Welcome to the world of ‘alternative facts’, where conspiracy theories, false claims and dodgy statistics proliferate. This phenomenon doesn’t just undermine the work of the mainstream media: it may have devastating consequences for democracy itself. Our system depends on citizens making electoral decisions based on facts. What happens when people don’t know what to believe? Fake news – often linked to Russian interests – has become an increasingly effective instrument of propaganda to create chaos and weaken the public’s trust in democratic institutions. Can anything be done to combat the new post-truth politics? Tech giants such as Google, Facebook and Twitter are hosting, propagating and monetising ‘clickbait’ stories. Will they eventually come to acknowledge that they are no longer neutral platforms directing traffic to news sites and admit that they are media organisations with all the responsibilities that implies?” At the link find the title, “Fake News: The Facts, May, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Pasture Management 98 mins – “Todays show will take another look at the topic of farmsteading, when I talk to farmers and authors of the book The Independent Farmstead Shawn and Beth Dougherty. Their journey into farmsteading started out romantic and then got real. In their words… “When we bought the Sow’s Ear in 1996 and began the process of turning it into a family smallholding we followed the usual path of the neophyte homesteaders: we put in a garden, bought chickens, and acquired goats. We picked up how to books on animal husbandry and organic vegetable growing. We ate a lot of tomatoes, collected a lot of eggs from our flock and drank goats milk. It was fun, and our diets underwent a significant improvement, but we began to be conscious of a vague unease. Was what we were doing really farming? Something told us, as we lugged sack after sack of laying mash and sweet feed from the station wagon to the barn, that this importation of concentrated nutrients, was not farming, not as we remember our grandparents doing it.” Fast forward ahead and they found the answer, and it was grass. “The puzzle was coming together, grass, the solar collector, ruminants, the convertors, joined by chickens and pigs as batteries, self-reproducing storage units of surplus solar energy. Here at last was the secret of Grandfather’s farm.” Their story has evolved over the 20 years on the farmstead as their focus has shifted more and more towards rotational grazing… As they say: “Our goal is to rejuvenate a parcel of land while we produce food for our home and our farm, so the level of exactitude necessary is much lower than for operations whose success is measure by monetary profit. We are trying to manage our animals for the conversion of sunlight into forage, forage into milk, meat, and manure to build a homestead where energy cascades from organism to organism with a net gain for the ecosystem as a whole – and we want the system to feed us while we do it.” In this episode we touch on a variety of topics from have a homestead milking cow, to rotational grazing and establishing a pasture, to what to look for when purchasing land.” At the link find the title, “ GFL 79,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming in Kansas 38 mins – “How does a 30,000 acre farm operate with just 9 employees? Lon Frahm shares with Tim how he has grown his row crop operation to over 30,000 acres, and how he uses economies of scale such as self-insuring and storing his own grain, to develop advantages over other farmers. Lon has a very impressive story. He took over his family’s farm upon his father’s death when he was just 28 years old. He has lead the operation to tremendous growth over the past 30 years and has experiences very little employee turnover. Lon knows the value in keeping good people on the team, learning quicker than your competition, and networking with peers in the industry. Whether you are a farmer, in agribusiness, or not in any related field, there are still some business gems in this episode.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Farming in Ohio 83 mins – “Corinna and Kurt Bench raise a little under ten acres of certified organic vegetables at Shared Legacy Farms in Elmore, Ohio. With 400 CSA shares and a 78% retention rate, Corrina and Kurt have created a values-based business on family land that is supporting them in their tenth year of business. We take a deep dive into how Corinna and Kurt create a connection with and market to their CSA members – a system that has resulted in them being 94% sold out seven months before their CSA program starts. We get some great insights into their focus on just five delivery sites, the customer research they’ve done to identify the mindset and practices of their long-term CSA membership, and how they’ve used that information to create a marketing system that attracts dedicated and highly qualified prospects to their CSA program. Then, we learn how they’ve created a system to provide new and renewing members with a roadmap to CSA success.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Microgreens 72 mins – “Chris Thoreau has grow microgreens for over 10 years, but he recently reached the point where he Chris realized it was time to do something else and move on. Find out what changed and why Chris is changing with it.” At the linkf ind the title, “The 10 Year Evolution of a Microgreen Farmer – Life and Business, Business and Life (FSFS121), Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files FSFS_121_2017_ChrisT.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Post Harvest Processing 54 mins – “Michael Kilpatrick joins me to talk about some of the issues that he sees on farms that struggle with post harvest processing and how most farms can improve that part of the process.  He will also touch on the role that new food safety regulations will play on vegetable farms and how famers can start preparing for that.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Seven Success Traits 68 mins – “Over the past few years I have interviewed over one hundred different farmers.  During the course of our conversations I have noticed quite a few trends – some which lead to struggling farms and some which lead to successful farms.  Today I am going to share 7 of the traits that I have noticed that successful farms and farmers exhibit.  Regardless of whether you are a vegetable farmer or a livestock farmer, I think these traits are universal and apply across the board. 1. Efficiency and equipment is everything; 2. Money controls the pace; 3. Ideology will be sacrificed; 4. You’ll do a lot you don’t want to do, and put in long hours doing it; 5. You’ll wear multiple hats; 6. No matter how much you learn, you need to go do it; 7. You’ll need intense grit” At the link find the title, “GFL 81,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female CEO’s 46 mins – “Is it a myth that women can have it all, all of the time? Or do the rising numbers of female executives in Hong Kong and around the world suggest otherwise? Does the glass ceiling exist as a barrier to the boardroom, or is the only limitation to a woman’s professional success her personal ambition? To celebrate International Women’s Day this year, Intelligence Squared Asia brought together four experts to ask whether a good mother has time to be a good CEO. In this debate, which took place in Hong Kong on 3 March 2014, award-winning journalist and author Allison Pearson and author of “Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection” Debora Spar proposed the motion. CEO of Newton Investment Helena Morrissey and CEO of SOHO Property Zhang Xin opposed the motion.” At the link find the title, “The Hand that Rocks the Cradle Cannot Rock the Boardroom, Apr, 2014,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Employment Trends 69 mins – “Leading international institutions and private sector corporations have concluded that women’s economic participation is critical to global growth and prosperity. However, today nearly 90 percent of nations still have laws on the books that impede women’s work, thereby undermining economic development. Diana Farrell and Jody Heymann discuss the legal barriers that women face, with particular focus on workplace discrimination. Heymann presents findings from a new global study of 193 countries showing that more than 81 million working women do not have legal protections against gender-based employment discrimination. This meeting is part of a high-level series, in collaboration with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to explore the economic effects of inequality under the law” At the link find the title, “How Workplace Discrimination Impedes Economic Growth, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 20171026_Workplace_Discrimination.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism 59 mins – “A year ago, you could have been forgiven for thinking that gender equality was on an unstoppable trajectory. America stood poised to elect its first female president. On this side of the Atlantic, members of the political and cultural establishment proudly sported ‘This Is What a Feminist Looks Like’ T-shirts. Had you told a Hillary Clinton supporter or one of those T-shirt campaigners that a year later the US president would be Donald Trump, a man with an abysmal record of sexually harassing women, and that women over the world would be defending their basic rights, including access to abortion, they would have barely believed it. How did we end up here? Has feminism become trapped, as some claim, in its own elitist ‘lean-in’ bubble? The recent Women’s Marches may have seen millions take to the streets in a tide of popular outrage. But some feminist commentators argue that the marches only demonstrated just how much middle-class liberal aspirations have become over-represented in the gender equality movement. Feminism, for these critics, has failed ‘ordinary’ women by focusing almost exclusively on the advancement of women at the top. According to a new report, while female CEOs’ salaries are rising, the gender pay gap across the globe is actually wider today than it was in 2008. If the gender equality project is to move beyond the needs and concerns of the so-called ‘elite’, what are the blindspots it needs to address? What can feminism do to expand the conversation beyond the ‘politically correct’ classes? How can we bring men into the conversation, and involve them in a project that stands to benefit everyone? To explore how gender equality can be made more accessible, Intelligence Squared is bringing together a brilliant panel to put forward their practical solutions. Speakers will include Jess Phillips, the outspoken MP described as ‘Labour’s future red queen’, and Catherine Mayer, bestselling author and co-founder of the Women’s Equality Party. They will be joined by writer and TV star David Baddiel, and teenage activist and journalist June Eric-Udorie, named one of the BBC’s 100 Women of 2016. Join us on March 8th, International Women’s Day, hear the arguments, and put your questions to our speakers.” At the link find the title, “Feminism Is For Everyone” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Brain Activity 35 mins – “We talk to pediatric neuroscientist Moriah Thomason about her research into what we can learn by imaging the brains of fetuses before they’re born.” At the link find the title, “What’s Going on in the Brain of a Fetus? Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 1329d54e-617c-4c23-81ed-26991eb912b5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment 26 mins – “From “taking a knee” to refusing to salute the flag, the US has a rich history of public dissent, a right guaranteed by the Constitution. But you’d be surprised to learn that the Supreme Court has taken drastically different stands on this right, and now that Trump has tweeted his opposition to certain public displays of dissent, it’s a good time to explore the history of this principle of the First Amendment.” At the link find the title, “12- Right to Dissent, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files TCL_ep_12_Take a Knee_part 01.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment Cake Case 38 mins– “As the high court continues through its unprecedented session, Dahlia speaks with Adam Liptak who covers the Supreme Court for the New York Times and knows the ins and outs of the Masterpiece Cakeshop case. And he gives his insight on what a jaw-dropping brief from the Solicitor General’s office means for relations between the Court and the Trump administration. Plus, a look into how the Supreme Court Justices seem to be the last grown-ups left in Washington.” At the link find the title, “Why the Cakeshop Case is So Delicious, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY6309201689.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flood Plain Maps 30 mins – “The Federal Emergency Management Agency maps flood plains across the country. The maps are intended to show which areas are likely to flood so that local governments can better plan for disasters. They also determine who must buy flood insurance, and at what rates. But there are problems: Many of them are outdated and don’t take into account the anticipated effects of climate change. And if you have enough money and enough political power, you can get your condo or your city moved off the map, even if you are in the eye of a storm. Host Jimmy Williams talks to two experts on why these maps don’t tell the true story of where floods are happening now and in the future.” At the link find the title,”211: The problem with FEMA’s flood maps,” right-click “Media files c982a5d1-dd70-49f8-9283-d34183dd5476.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freakonomics Thinking 60 mins – “The books ‘Freakonomics’ and ‘SuperFreakonomics’ have been worldwide sensations, selling tens of millions of copies. They have come to stand for challenging conventional wisdom using data rather than emotion. Questions they examine are typically: Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? How much do parents really matter? Why is chemotherapy prescribed so often if it’s so ineffective? Now the books’ two authors, Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, have turned what they’ve learned into a readable and practical toolkit for thinking smarter, harder, and different – thinking, that is, like a Freak. On 28th May they came to Intelligence Squared to discuss their new Frequel, ‘Think Like a Freak’. By analysing the plans we form and the morals we choose, they showed how their insights can be applied to help us make smarter decisions in our daily lives.” At the link find the title, “How to Think Like a Freak: Learn How to Make Smarter Decisions with the authors of “Freakonomics” May, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Manipulation 60 mins – “Genetics has revolutionised not just how we think of biology but how we think of ourselves. We are, in the words of one geneticist, the first organism that has ‘learned to read its own instructions’. Now, with the breakthrough of gene-editing technology — whose precision allows us to alter a single letter of DNA — we can now not only decipher but rewrite our genetic code. We may soon be able to treat diseases such as cancer not simply with drugs, but with genetic manipulation. Yet behind this medical revolution lies the prospect of something altogether more worrying. Already, we possess the technology to add to our genetic code at will, and thus create the world’s first generation of ‘transgenic’ humans. As we intervene genetically on ourselves with ever more accuracy, do we risk changing what it means to be human? In a potential quest for the genetically ‘normal’, will we risk annihilating the very diversity and mutations on which evolution depends? These are some of the questions that the Pulitzer…” At the link find the title, “The Gene: Unlocking the Human Code, with Siddhartha Mukherjee, Oct, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 27 mins – “We react against the idea of surveillance, but it turns out that we’ve invited it into our homes through devices like digital assistants, connected toys, and baby monitors. Are you comfortable with the idea that someone might be watching you or listening to you right now? IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Struck by the idea that toys made for kids may have prying eyes (and ears)? For more on connected devices and surveillance, head over to our blog. And, check out the Surveillance Self-Defense Kit mentioned in this episode, developed by the Electronic Frontier Foundation.” At the link find the title, “IRL5 – “I Spy With My Digital Eye, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6547098/62690553.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control and Refugees 69 mins – “In the wake of another American mass shooting, Dahlia speaks with Adam Skaggs, Chief counsel at the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence about the Second Amendment. And as this week marks the one year anniversary of Donald Trump’s election to office, Becca Heller, co-founder of the International Refugee Assistance Project, joins to talk about how her job changed after the election.” At the link find the title, “Guns in America and the Travel Ban that Went Unnoticed, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY8298476342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homelessness 14 mins – “What do you think would happen if you invited an individual with mental health issues who had been homeless for many years to move directly from the street into housing? Loyd Pendleton shares how he went from skeptic to believer in the Housing First approach to homelessness — providing the displaced with short-term assistance to find permanent housing quickly and without conditions — and how it led to a 91 percent reduction in chronic homelessness over a ten-year period in Utah.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Beliefs 53 mins – “Jason Gots: As far back as we’re able to peer into human history, way past the written or pictoral record, into the gravesites of our most ancient ancestors, there’s evidence of what you might call spiritual or religious belief. From the idea of a separate soul to animal spirits, to the anthropomorphization of trees and natural elements, pantheons of superhuman gods, and ultimately the inscrutable, sometimes indivisible gods of Monotheism, we’re Homo Credulous…creatures hardwired to believe in a reality that transcends the evidence of our senses. In his new book God, a Human History, my guest Reza Aslan looks at this history of belief, asking not so much why but how we’ve made and remade God in our own image since our very beginnings.” At the link find the title, “125. Reza Aslan (author) – Deus Ex Hominem, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP4446010570.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hungarian Democracy 28 mins – “Hungary is becoming an “illiberal democracy”, in the words of its Prime Minister Viktor Orban. The government has changed the constitution, electoral law, and refused to take its EU-allocated quota of refugees, while warning of a “Muslim invasion”. The European parliament is so concerned about the perceived breaches of EU values that it has launched a procedure that could culminate in Hungary’s EU voting rights being withdrawn. Yet Hungary feels it is on the right path, a path that others should follow.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 42 mins – “…When we put our money in a bank (or a mutual fund, pension plan, endowment, etc.) it doesn’t just sit there, it is put to use. It is invested in the economy, and it has power. But have you ever stopped to wonder what your money is being invested in? Is it supporting the causes and communities you care about? Or is it being used to further the cause of individuals, organizations, or governments that you disagree with. It is time to recognize that we are all investors, and that it is up to us to make sure we are adding more value than we extract and that the risk and returns are balanced between our investments and the communities. This is the basis for impact investing. Impact investing is the support of social and environmental projects with a financial return, and it has become a hot topic in the world’s philanthropy and development circles. In the next decade, it is poised to eclipse traditional aid by ten times. Yet for all the excitement, there is work to do to ensure it actually realizes it’s potential. This week on the show we are interviewing an expert in this field, Morgan Simon. Morgan is the author of the brand new book, Real Impact: The New Economics of Social Change….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Influenza Research 49 mins – “Stacey Schultz-Cherry explains the selection process to choose the influenza virus strains to include in the annual influenza vaccine. Schultz-Cherry also discusses her research on the influence of obesity on the course of disease and vaccine efficacy.” At the link find the title, “070: Influenza vaccine and susceptibility with Stacey Schultz-Cherry,” right-click “Media files MTM070.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the p op-up emnu.

Inner City Schools 78 mins – “In this DHP episode, CJ talks to Mike K., a DHP listener and former teacher with extensive knowledge of inner-city education based on both research and firsthand, real-world experience. Join CJ & Mike as they discuss many topics related to education, including: Mike’s background, including his studies in education (through the Ph. D. level) and 10 years of experience teaching in an inner-city school; The particular challenges of teaching in these sorts of schools, and how they compare to more ‘typical’ American public schools; A bird’s eye perspective of the evolution of schooling in America since the Antebellum period; De jure desegregation, followed by de facto resegregation; Comparing poor urban schools to poor rural schools, which face some of the same challenges, but also some different ones; The problems of over-diagnosing and over-prescribing psychiatric medication for children; The degree to which building real relationships with students based on mutual respect is a key to effective teaching; How real, effective teaching often requires a teacher to routinely flout rules in the current American education system, which is a dehumanizing system to both teachers & students; Teaching as a craft; The importance of teaching genuine critical thinking; Possible ways to cope with the current system, whether one is fully outside of it or not; The problems of NCLB & standardized testing, and the degree to which education is a racket; Possible things individuals can do with their own children or in their local community to try to improve things in some way” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Access 27 mins – “What is life like without fast Internet, and how does life change once a person has it? Should Internet access be a right, rather than a luxury? Veronica Belmont explores these questions as she talks to people about joining the digital economy. Inspiring stories of access are surfaced by members of a small Minnesota community and by a Syrian refugee who found hope in Amsterdam. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org The more voices, perspectives, languages, and people contributing to the Web, the richer the experience for everyone. But the Internet is not yet accessible to all. Find out how you can make a difference. And, find out how libraries, in particular, are evolving to meet digital demand and address patrons’ connectivity issues.” At the link find the title, “All Access Pass, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6676819/037277dd.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Censorship 38 mins – “In our final episode of season 1, we break from our usual format to host a big conversation. Recent events like the Charlottesville, VA rally have revealed the Internet’s role in helping spread IRL threats and violence. Leaders in the tech world have represented varying positions on both protecting free speech and also reducing hate speech online. Should tech companies regulate who says what on the Internet? Brandi Collins of Color of Change, Anil Dash of Fog Creek Software and Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation address this question and more with Veronica Belmont. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Freedom of speech is important, online and off. And, it’s also important that free speech not infringe on the freedom of others. Tell us: what can regular internet citizens do to address this issue? How can we all accelerate the pace of change for a more free, civil and healthy Internet? Leave a rating or review in Apple Podcasts so we know what you think.” At the link find the title, “Free Speech, Limited?, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6823925/a3d1c6fb.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intuition Pumps 62 mins – “Daniel Dennett is one of the world’s most original and provocative thinkers. A philosopher and cognitive scientist, he is known as one of the ‘Four Horseman of New Atheism’ along with Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and the late Christopher Hitchens. In 2013 he came to Intelligence Squared to share the insights he has acquired over his 40-year career into the nature of how we think, decide and act. Dennett revealed his favourite thinking tools, or ‘intuition pumps’, that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions. As well as taking a fresh look at familiar moves – Occam’s Razor, reductio ad absurdum – he discussed new cognitive solutions designed for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, consciousness and free will.” At the link find the title, “Daniel Dennett on Tools To Transform Our Thinking, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Child Theft 27 mins – “In Iraq, thousands of children held captive by so-called Islamic State are now being reunited with their families– but many are still missing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jefferson vs Adams 43 mins – “The relationship between Thomas Jefferson and John Adams largely shaped the course of the newly-formed United States of America. Historian Gordon Wood examined this relationship and its effect on America’s future in his new book “Friends Divided: John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.” Last week, Benjamin Wittes interviewed Wood on his book to discuss the friendship and disagreements between Jefferson and Adams, America’s perilous position in the 1790s, and the ways in which the Founding Fathers forged the country’s national security policy.” At the link right click “Direct download: Gordon Wood final mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jellyfish 49 mins – “Jason Gots: What happens in your brain when I say the word “Jellyfish”? If you’re not a marine biologist, and if going to the beach almost anywhere in the world is a part of your life, the word probably makes you wince. Maybe you remember getting stung. Maybe you remember someone putting meat tenderizer on it (is it good for anything else?) But as my guest today, Juli Berwald, knows, Jellyfish are neither a fish, nor the cartoon villains we make them out to be. They’re a fascinating, complex, diverse lifeform whose tentacles are tangled up in all of our lives in ways we’re only dimly aware of. Juli Berwald is a science writer with a PHD in Ocean Science. Her new book is Spineless: The Science of Jellyfish and the Art of Growing a Backbone.” At the link find the title, “124. Juli Berwald (writer) – Our Jellyfish Overlords,” right-click “Media files PP8282984320.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Karl Marx 60 mins – “We can’t say Karl Marx didn’t warn us: capitalism contains the seeds of its own destruction. In their chase for ever higher profits, the capitalists shed workers for machines. The higher return on capital means that the share of profits rises and the share of wages falls, and soon the mass of the population isn’t earning enough to buy the goods capitalism produces. And that’s exactly what’s been happening over the past four years of the Great Recession: ever increasing income inequality, leading to ever weaker aggregate demand – temporarily disguised by an unsustainable credit binge – leading to collapse. You don’t have to be a communist to see that this is so. We should all be Marxists now. Or should we? Every time capitalism hits an inevitable bad patch, Marx’s name is invoked with wearisome regularity. But no serious economist or political thinker – with the possible exception of Gordon Brown – has ever suggested capitalism can break free of booms and busts. Once bust, as we’ve seen time and again, the…” At the link find the title, “Karl Marx Was Right, Sept, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyndon Johnson Tapes 32 mins – “This week: The LBJ tapes- President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the audio recordings made during his presidency. We spoke with presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss. He’s the author of two books examining the recordings, “Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes, 1963-1964” and “Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson’s Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965.” At the link find the title, “Episode 37: Michael Beschloss on the LBJ Tapes,” right-click “ Media files SBBES1121.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magna Carta 60 mins – “June 2015 will see the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, the ‘Great Charter’ which was signed at Runnymede by King John to resolve a political crisis he faced with his barons. Buried within its 69 clauses is one of immeasurable importance. This is the idea that no one should be deprived of their freedom without just cause, and that people are entitled to fair trial by their peers according to the law of the land. At the time Magna Carta did nothing to improve the lot of the vast majority of English people, and all but three of its provisions have been repealed. Yet Magna Carta has come to be seen as the cornerstone of English liberty and an international rallying cry against the arbitrary use of power. But Where does Magna Carta stand today? In a time of secret courts in Britain and the Guantanamo gulag, the threat to rights from terror laws and state surveillance of our online activities, do we need to reaffirm its basic principles? Should we take things even further, as Tim Berners-Lee has suggested…” At the link find the title, “Magna Carta: Myth and Meaning, Feb, 2015,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Margarine History 21 mins – “It’s one of the most bizarre episodes in American food history: when butter and margarine were at war. What you choose to spread on your toast might seem like a boring subject, but it turns out to be fascinating and sometimes hilarious. Margarine’s history began with French emperor Napoleon III, a French chemist, and some sheep’s stomachs and went on to include heated courtroom debates, our first federal laws regulating food, and outlaws smuggling faux butter across state lines. The spreads have competed for more than a hundred years, and public preferences shift each time our understanding of health science changes. In this episode of Distillations we learn about the history of butter and margarine and explore the distinctly American debates they inspired involving food, health, science, and regulation.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow, click “Save File” and “OK” to save the file.

Mass Shooter Illness 24 mins – “Last Sunday, a gunman walked into a church in Sutherland Springs, Texas and opened fire on the congregation — killing more than two dozen people. The next day, President Donald Trump told reporters the mass shooting wasn’t a “guns situation,” and instead blamed it on “mental health.” Politicians have linked mental illness and mass shootings after virtually every mass shooting. In this week’s episode, Jimmy talks to The Atlantic’s Olga Khazan, who looked into that link… and found that it doesn’t exist.” At the link find the title, “219: Fact checking the link between mental illness and mass shootings,” right-click “Media files 5a4fde09-0b0c-41d5-8015-726501bdd869.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meditation Teacher 76 mins – “Sharon Salzberg (@SharonSalzberg) is a central figure in the field of meditation, a world-renowned teacher, and New York Times bestselling author of Real Happiness: The Power of Meditation: A 28-Day Program. Sharon has played a crucial role in bringing meditation and mindfulness practices to the West and into mainstream culture since 1974, when she first began teaching. She is the co-founder of the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, MA, and she has written ten books — from her seminal Lovingkindness: The Revolutionary Art of Happiness to her latest, Real Love: The Art of Mindful Connection. Sharon offers a secular and modern approach to Buddhist teachings, making them more accessible. She is a regular columnist for On Being, a contributor to Huffington Post, and the host of her own podcast: The Metta Hour.” At the link find the title, “Sharon Salzberg, World-Renowned Meditation Teacher, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 505397f9-8b1b-4747-b509-06cb97ab28f5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microsoft CEO 60 mins – “Satya Nadella is one of the world’s most inspirational business leaders, as much a humanist as a technologist and executive. On September 28th, he comes to the Intelligence Squared stage to discuss his personal journey from a childhood in India to becoming CEO of Microsoft, the culture change that he has driven inside his legendary technology company, and the transformation that is coming to all our lives as we face the most disruptive wave of technology humankind has experienced: artificial intelligence, mixed reality, and quantum computing. While many people worry about the negative impact of exponential digital growth – from automation taking over our jobs to the increasing power that algorithms are having over our lives – Nadella will proffer his optimistic vision of the future, which he sets out in his forthcoming book Hit Refresh. He will argue that, as technology upends the status quo, the very human quality of empathy will become increasingly valuable. And he will explain how people, organisations and societies must transform in their quest for new energy, new ideas, relevance and renewal.” At the link find the title, “Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella on hitting refresh and seizing the opportunity of the digital revolution, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mycology Breakthroughs 116 mins – ““Radical Mycology is a movement and social philosophy based on accessibly teaching the importance of mushrooms and other fungi for personal, societal, and ecological health. Radical Mycology differs from classical mycology in that classical mycology generally focuses on taxonomy, identification, mycophagy (eating mushrooms), and the more personal benefits of working with fungi while Radical Mycology is about using fungi for the benefit of larger communities and the world. As a concept, Radical Mycology is based on the belief that the lifecycles of fungi and their interactions in nature serve as powerful learning tools for how humans can best relate to each other and steward the world they live in.” Mushroom Cultivation for Remediation – This introductory text guides you through the core skills and concepts needed to begin cultivating large quantities of mycelium for the purposes of fungal remediation (aka mycoremediation) work. This text covers some of the simplest, cheapest, and quickest ways to grow vigorous mycelium with a minimum of sanitary precautions. The techniques covered are also explored and elaborated upon in a 3-part video entitled Mushroom Cultivation for Remediation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Napoleon 60 mins – “How should we remember Napoleon, the man of obscure Corsican birth who rose to become emperor of the French and briefly master of Europe? In 2014, as the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo approached, Intelligence Squared brought together two of Britain’s finest historians to debate how we should assess Napoleon’s life and legacy. Was he a military genius and father of the French state, or a blundering nonentity who created his own enduring myth? Was his goal of uniting the European continent under a common political system the forerunner of the modern ‘European dream’? Or was he an incompetent despot, a warning from history of the dangers of overarching grand plans? Championing Napoleon was historian Andrew Roberts, author of, among other books, ‘Napoleon the Great’, ‘Napoleon and Wellington’, and ‘Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Gamble’. Opposing him was fellow historian Adam Zamoyski, author of, among other books, ‘1812. Napoleon’s Fatal March on Moscow’ and ‘Rites of Peace. The Fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna’.” At the link find the title, “Napoleon the Great? A debate with Andrew Roberts, Adam Zamoyski and Jeremy Paxman, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Net Neutrality 25 mins – “The Internet (at least in the US) is at a crossroads as the FCC is considering rolling back the net neutrality regulations it adopted in 2015. If net neutrality is abolished, the Internet could shift from an essential service that all consumers can access to a product that can be packaged and sold to the highest bidders. Get to know the potential winners and losers on both sides of the issue. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.orgAt the link find the title, “IRL 6 – The Neutral Zone: The Future of Net Neutrality, Jul, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384460/0cb629a8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromt eh pop-up menu.

Network Power 62 mins – “Have historians misunderstood everything? Have they missed the single greatest idea that best explains the past? Niall Ferguson is the preeminent historian of the ideas that define our time. He has challenged how we think about money, power, civilisation and empires. Now he wants to reimagine history itself. On October 4th, Ferguson came to the Intelligence Squared stage to unveil his new book, ‘The Square and The Tower’. Historians have always focused on hierarchies, he argued – on the elites that wield power. Economists have concentrated on the marketplace – on the economic forces that shape change. These twin structures are symbolised for Ferguson by Siena’s market square, and its civic tower looming above. But beneath both square and tower runs something more deeply significant: the hidden networks of relationships, ideas and influence. Networks are the key to history. The greatest innovators have been ‘superhubs’ of connections. The most powerful states, empires and companies have been those with the most densely networked structures. And the most transformative ideas – from the printing presses that launched the Reformation to the Freemasonry that inspired the American Revolution – have gone viral precisely because of the networks within which they spread. ‘When we understand these core insights of network science,’ says Ferguson, ‘the entire history of mankind looks quite different.’” At the link find the title, “Niall Ferguson on History’s Hidden Networks, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nigeria Movie Industry 29 mins – “Award-winning screen director Tope Oshin celebrates a new generation of Nigerian women film-makers who are currently reinventing Nollywood, the largest and most prolific film industry in Africa. She explores their distinctive approach to telling screen stories that better represent women’s lives and aspirations in Nigeria today.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Cyberwarfare 33 mins – “In this episode of Malicious Life, we take a look at one of the oldest forms of criminal activity on the web- the spam empires of the 90’s and 2000’s. Find out how these multi-million dollar industries operated, how they served as a half step towards the organized online crime groups of the modern age, and what price was paid by those who tried to stop them. With special guest- Stephen Cobb.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Option B 60 mins – “I learned about the depths of sadness and the brutality of loss. But I also learned that when life sucks you under, you can kick against the bottom, break the surface and breathe again.’ – Sheryl Sandberg Sheryl Sandberg is the COO at Facebook and international bestselling author of ‘Lean In’. In 2015 disaster struck when her husband, Dave Goldberg, died suddenly at the age of 47. Sheryl and her two young children were devastated, and she was certain that their lives would never have real joy or meaning again. Just weeks later, Sandberg was talking with a friend about the first father-child activity without a father. They came up with a plan for someone to fill in. ‘But I want Dave,’ she cried. Her friend put his arm around her and said, ‘Option A is not available. So let’s just kick the shit out of Option B.’ Everyone experiences some form of Option B. We all deal with loss: jobs lost, loves lost, lives lost. The question is not whether these things will happen but how we face them when they do. Sandberg’s new book, ‘Option B’, weaves her experiences of coping with adversity with new findings from her co-author, the award-winning psychologist Adam Grant, and other social scientists. The book features stories of people who recovered from personal and professional hardship, including illness, injury, divorce, job loss, sexual assault and imprisonment. These people did more than recover – many of them became stronger. In this special Intelligence Squared event on June 24th, Sandberg was joined by Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl who was shot by the Taliban for speaking up for women’s education. She refused to be silenced, and her recovery, bravery and stoicism have made her an international role model. In 2014 she became the youngest ever winner of the Nobel Peace Prize. Sandberg and Yousafzai, in conversation with Grant, will explore how even after the most devastating events, we can learn to find deeper meaning and appreciation in our lives and rediscover joy. They will discuss how we can help others in crisis, raise strong children, and create resilient families, communities, and workplaces. Many of these lessons can be applied to our everyday struggles, allowing us to brave whatever lies ahead.” At the link find the title, “Option B,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Physical Activity 27 mins – “Millions of people wear electronic step-counting bracelets or use apps on their phones – aiming for ten thousand steps a day. Claudia Hammond asks whether this routine motivates her – or if it’s actually setting her up for failure. Some experts applaud the bar charts and graphs which track progress as proof of healthy activity. But can the constant checking take away the pleasure of exercise? American scientists found that after the novelty wore off people did less because the competitive nature of step counting undermined their intrinsic motivation. Claudia looks for evidence behind the daily target of 10,000 steps. It dates back to the 1964 Tokyo Olympics when a Japanese company produced the “manpo-kei” pedometer (literally “ten thousand steps meter”) to boost activity – though the evidence to support the 10k target appears weak. Measuring activity has now moved into the workplace. One Dutch company gave free Fitbits to workers to track their steps, calories burned and sleep. Although drop-out rates were high, stress levels did fall. Some insurance companies now offer discounts for the most active – but steps counters ignore factors like age, stride length and speed. And who’s to say you haven’t given the step counter to your dog, running around the park?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Polish Democracy 28 mins – “Is Poland sliding towards autocracy, or just on a different democratic path? The government has been accused of a “systemic threat to the rule of law” and of undermining other democratic values which it signed up to when it joined the European Union in 2004. Earlier this year thousands took to the streets to protest over government plans to reform the judiciary. Critics say the independence of the courts is under threat but the governing Law and Justice Party argues it is simply clearing out the old order, left over from Communist times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Homelessness 62 mins – “Is Britain facing an identity crisis? The traditional dividing lines of left and right seem to be dissolving into new political tribes – metropolitan liberals versus the culturally rooted working classes, graduates versus the uneducated, the young versus the old. In June’s general election, traditional Labour heartlands like Mansfield went Conservative, while wealthy areas such as Kensington swung to Corbyn. Britain seems utterly confused about its politics. As the far left and Eurosceptic right have gained strength, much of the country has been left feeling politically homeless. So what’s going on? How will these new alignments play out as the country faces the historic challenge of leaving the EU and forging a new relationship with the rest of the world? Are the Conservatives really up to the job, as they bicker over what kind of Brexit they want and jostle over who should succeed Theresa May? Is it now unthinkable that Jeremy Corbyn could be the next prime minister? Looming over the current turmoil is the biggest question of all: What kind of Britain do we want to live in? What are the values that should hold our society together? We were joined by Ken Clarke, the most senior Conservative voice in Parliament; Hilary Benn, Labour MP and Chair of the Brexit Select Committee; and Helen Lewis, deputy editor at the New Statesman and prominent voice on the left. Alongside them was David Goodhart, author of one of the most talked about analyses of post-Brexit Britain, and Anand Menon, a leading academic thinker on Britain’s fractious relations with the EU. The event was chaired by Stephen Sackur, one of the BBC’s most highly regarded journalistic heavyweights.” At the link find the title, “The Great Realignment: Britain’s Political Identity Crisis,, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Trends 60 mins– “What is going on in the Western democracies? From Britain’s vote for Brexit, to Donald Trump’s election victory in America and the growth of populist movements across Europe, voters are expressing their dissatisfaction with the status quo. Economic anxieties go some way to explain the phenomenon, but as with the Brexit decision, people are voting in ways that seem – at least to their critics – likely to harm their own material interests just to give the establishment a bloody nose. In this special Intelligence Squared event, renowned American social psychologist Jonathan Haidt and politician Nick Clegg will examine the complex web of social, moral and political concerns that are driving the unrest. How can we explain the new illiberalism that is growing on both left and right, as authoritarian trends spread across campuses throughout the Anglosphere (the no-platforming of speakers being a typical example)? How should we understand the new ‘culture war’ emerging in Britain, America and elsewhere between the ‘globalists’ and ‘nationalists’? As deputy prime minister during the Coalition government, Clegg witnessed the upheaval in British politics from the inside. Haidt, author of the acclaimed bestseller ‘The Righteous Mind’, has long been studying the moral and cultural drives that divide people into different political camps.” At the link find the title, “The Rise of Populism and the Backlash Against the Elites, with Jonathan Haidt and Nick Clegg, Nov, 2016,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty and Health 42 mins – “This week, Ian Sample and Nicola Davis explore the complex relationship between poverty, stress, and life expectancy” At the link find the title, “How does socioeconomic position affect our health? – Science Weekly podcast, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 01-46908-gnl.sci.171101.ms.markers_of_inequality.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Removal 8 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick speaks with Representative Jamie Raskin about the Republican remedy for Trump’s unfitness for office: The 25th Amendment. Plus, she speaks with ProPublica’s Ryan Gabrielson about his recent reporting which revealed that the high court tends to make staggering errors of fact in opinions.” At the link find the title, “The 25th Amendment, What’s That? Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY1358409664.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Privacy vs Data Collection 27 mins – “You’ve heard the expression, “When something is free, you’re the product.” And, while you may think it’s no big deal to give away your personal data in exchange for free online services, how can you know that what you get for what you give is a fair trade? Meet some of the people determined to shape the reality (or lack thereof) of privacy online.” At the link find the title, “IRL 1 – “All Your Data Are Belong To Us, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384461/52b4d81c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ransomeware 26 mins – “Have you been hacked, or been the victim of malware or ransomware? Humans make the internet vibrant, but we’re also the weakest link — we’re predictable and often easily fooled. This episode of IRL focuses on our internet insecurity. Meet the unsung heroes fighting to keep us safe. IRL is an original podcast from Mozilla. For more on the series go to irlpodcast.org. Stay safe online! Here’s more on how to not be a ransomware victim. And, if you’d like to learn a bit more about the PATCH Act mentioned in our episode, go here.” At the link find the title, “IRKL 3 – “Hack Jobs, Jul 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6384459/558fffa7.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Grassroots 21 mins – “Phyllis Henderson is a state representative in South Carolina, and she is worn out by the state of political discourse. We spoke with her right after the 2016 election, and she had some reservations. Now we check back in with her to see how she thinks the GOP is doing — and what she thinks about the tone of American politics.” At the link find the title, “220: A Republican has some advice for the GOP, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 73ecfdd7-8a4c-4a2a-8bda-d720884c1fec.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Church 50 mins – “The Russian Revolution of 1917 brought a radical political change. But at the same time, a lesser-known group of religious reformers were busy plotting a better future for Russia’s souls – and a new, more democratic, Orthodox Church, closer to the people. Caroline Wyatt explores whether they were simply being used by the Bolsheviks, or was there a chance that the Revolution’s answer to Martin Luther could prompt a real Russian Reformation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Far East 48 mins – “Putin’s government is often painted as an all powerful, centralized regime. But, in reality, it’s far from that: in Russia’s Far East, Moscow is either resented or disregarded by many, and the security services are the only agents fully loyal to Moscow. This week, special guest host Alina Polyakova interviewed Arkady Ostrovsky, the author of “The Invention of Russia: The Rise of Putin and the Age of Fake News” and the Russia and Eastern Europe editor at the Economist, on life Russia’s wild Far East, the tensions between the Kremlin and its far flung provinces, and what it all means for the limits of Putin’s power and his deepest fears. This is the second podcast in a new series with Alina Polyakova to shed light on Russian politics and society in an effort to understand the Kremlin’s intentions toward and engagement with the West.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Edited Final Alina Arkady mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Revolution P1 29 mins – “After the multinational force sailed away from Arkhangelsk, it was payback time for the Whites. Once the Red Army arrived in February of 1920, the mass executions of those who sided with the Allies began. Lucy Ash visits a 17th Century convent outside Arkhangelsk where thousands of so called counter revolutionaries were slaughtered during the Red Terror.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Revolution P2 29 mins – “Back in the Soviet era, boatloads of day-trippers went to the island of Mudyug in the White Sea, to visit a museum. It was based around the remains of a prison camp – and one that is very different from the decaying Gulag camps scattered across north Russia and Siberia. For one thing, it was set up as far back as 1918. Even more remarkably, many jailors were not Russian. They were foreign troops. Bizarrely one French officer at the camp later created the world’s most famous scent, Chanel No 5, inspired by his experiences in the Russian Arctic.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia 22 mins – “This week we take a look at the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with Bruce Riedel. He is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution. He’s also the author of “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and the United States Since FDR.” At the link find the title, “Episode 36: Bruce Riedel on Saudi Arabia,” right-click “Media files SBRIE1117.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudi Arabia and Educational Endowments 54 mins – “Felix Salmon of Fusion, Slate Moneybox columnist Jordan Weissmann, and political-risk consultant Anna Szymanski discuss: Corruption in Saudi Arabia” At the link find the title, “The Well-Endowed Edition, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files SM8128270392.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Worker Interview 146 mins – “Alice Little (@thealicelittle) is considered the #1 top-earning legal sex worker in the United States. She is a 4’8″ legal sex worker at Nevada’s world famous Moonlite Bunny Ranch. This episode is definitely not suitable for work (NSFW). In this wide-ranging episode, we cover a lot of ground, including: Technical sex tips; How Alice puts people at ease, including adult virgins; BDSM and power play; Threesome do’s and don’ts, plus the “Big KO” finishing move; Her music playlist for getting people into the erotic zone; Misconceptions about sex workers and the realities; Why “The Girlfriend Experience (GFE)” is her most popular offering; How she works with couples who want to explore new boundaries. Alice is also a vocal advocate for legal sex workers and the founder of the political movement “Hookers for Healthcare.” Featured on ABC’s Nightline, Alice is no stranger to the conversation of sex surrogacy and seeks to shift America’s perceptions of sex workers and sex work.” At the link right-click “Media files 94e42944-29a2-4028-9cdc-866fdb84cd12.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Phone Searches 69 mins – “Alex Abdo of the Knight First Amendment Institute and Orin Kerr of George Washington Law debate whether warrantless searches and seizures of cellphone records violate the Fourth Amendment in a special podcast hosted at the National Press Club. In late November, the Supreme Court will tackle a very modern question about the venerable Fourth Amendment: Does it allow police to see where you’ve been for the past four months by looking at your cellphone data without a warrant? In Carpenter v. United States, which will be argued on November 29, cell number data placed a robbery suspect, Timothy Ivory Carpenter, near the scenes of several crimes, and at about the same time as those crimes happened. The phone information was used as evidence leading to Carpenter’s conviction on robbery charges and he is serving a long prison sentence. The Carpenter case has spurred a flurry of activity among Fourth Amendment scholars. Carpenter’s lawyers believe modern cellphone records are fundamentally different than traditional phone records cited in a 1979 Supreme Court decision at permits such searches without warrants. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled against Carpenter and said the Fourth Amendment’s search warrant requirement only protects what was actually said in phone conversations. And it upheld a third-party doctrine that the phone records belong to the phone company, they aren’t private information. Note: Audio for this podcast was recorded at an October 26, 2017 live event at the National Press Club sponsored by the American Constitution Society and The Federalist Society and presented with the generous support of the Bernstein Family Foundation.” At the link find the title, “The future of digital privacy, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP6668366567.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smart Tech Trends 53 mins– “There was a lot of small news this week including updates to the Google Home/Assistant ecosystem that Kevin and I discuss on this week’s podcast. I share my feelings on the Google Mini and then we segue into a conversation about Google’s new AI framework for embedded devices that launched this week. We also discuss the push by smart home and lock companies to give delivery or service people access to your home. SmartThings gets local control for some devices this week. Kevin reviews the Wink Lookout security bundle and we take a listener question about what to look for in a smart home camera.Our guest this week is awesome. I speak with Michael Sherwood, Director of Technology and Innovation City of Las Vegas, about plans for a traffic light that detects pollution and can send cars along before it builds up, and what it really means to build a smart city. Sherwood shares a lot of good insights about the challenges of building a smart city that we don’t often see. It’s a good show.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Sugar Question 60 mins – “…How is it that some people can eat absolutely anything and stay slim, while others on a ‘healthy’ diet get fat? Why is it that Cubans are much healthier than Americans, despite eating on average twice the amount of sugar? …Sugar has recently replaced saturated fat as the nutritional enemy number one. The theory is that it messes with our metabolism and causes heart disease, obesity and diabetes. Arguing that sugar is the tobacco of the new millennium in our event was acclaimed science writer Gary Taubes, whose new book The Case Against Sugar has been making waves on both sides of the Atlantic. …A different explanation lies in a subject that has been getting a lot of attention recently – our gut microbiome. This is made up of the trillions of bacteria that inhabit our intestines and help digest our food and keep us healthy. …Research indicates that, rather than any single foodstuff being to blame for the rise of obesity and other modern diseases, the root of the problem lies in our depleted microbiomes. Setting out the new research on our gut bacteria and debunking many popular myths about diet was Tim Spector, an award-winning scientist who runs the British Gut project. What makes the subject even more fascinating is that we all have a very individual cocktail of bacteria in our gut, and research shows that the way we respond to food relates more to our own specific set of microbes than the calories in the food itself. Joining us was Eran Segal, one of world’s leading scientists in this field, who will explain how his lab can wire you up and predict precisely which carbohydrates you should and shouldn’t eat so as to prevent weight gain and be healthy. The results can be surprising. In 60% of cases, they show that you can enjoy sugary ice-cream but should avoid rice….” At the link find the title, “The Bittersweet Truth About What We Eat, Feb, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suggestibility 39 mins – “This episode we travel to a future where you can choose to turn off your ability to deceive yourself. Are you now a perfectly clear eyed genius? Or a perpetually depressed misanthrope? Maybe both? This episode was suggested by my mom. It begins with two tales of self deception, one from Jacquelyn Gill, an assistant professor of paleo-ecology at the University of Maine and the host of a podcast about climate change called Warm Regards, and the other from Beth Duckles, a writer, researcher, ethnographer and social scientist. Then we talk to Zoë Chance, an assistant professor of marketing at the Yale School of Management and an expert on self-deception. After that, we go to therapy, and Chamin Ajjan, a clinical psychotherapist and author of Seeking Soulmate: Ditch the Dating Game and Find Real Connection explains what she does when she sees a case of self-deception in her office. And finally, Erik Vance, science journalist and author of Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain’s Ability to Deceive, Transform, and Heal helps us understand what might really happen if we could truly turn off this ability to deceive ourselves.” At the link find the title, “Deceptible Me, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalism 19 mins – “The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening stats about their dominance and motivation — and what happens when a society prizes shareholder value over everything else. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson. (Note: This talk contains graphic language.)” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalism 19 mins – “The combined market capitalization of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google is now equivalent to the GDP of India. How did these four companies come to infiltrate our lives so completely? In a spectacular rant, Scott Galloway shares insights and eye-opening stats about their dominance and motivation — and what happens when a society prizes shareholder value over everything else. Followed by a Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson. (Note: This talk contains graphic language.)” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Reform 20 mins – “With Republicans pushing ahead on their plan to overhaul taxes for the first time in 30 years, we revisit an episode of DeocodeDC that explained how that reform 30 years ago actually came together. Jimmy speaks with two major players in that effort – Pam Olsen of Pricewaterhouse Coopers and former Congressman Bill Archer.” At the link find the title, “Revisiting how tax reform really works, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 6832f2ce-8d81-413c-bcb6-bed77b0e79c6.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taxation Power 52 mins – “Joseph Fiskin from the University of Texas at Austin Law School and Steven Willis from the University of Florida, Levin College of Law join National Constitution Center president and CEO Jeffrey Rosen to look at potential constitutional issues related to tax reform measures under debate at Congress.” At the link find the title, “Tax reform and the Constitution, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PP3181673095.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Discussion 62mins – “…Again and again, after every attack, our media react by giving the terrorists exactly what they want – maximum publicity. Of course, the public should be told that an atrocity has taken place. …In addition, the wall-to-wall news coverage creates a climate of fear and fuels the more authoritarian and xenophobic strands of our politics. …Over a thousand foreign fighters have recently returned from Syria to Europe, and are highly likely to pose a risk to our security. It’s vital that our media and authorities keep the public fully aware about the terrorist threat and encourage everyone to be vigilant. Honest reporting is absolutely crucial, especially when society itself is under attack. …Does publicising terrorism play into the hands of the perpetrators or does it help keep us on the alert against further attack?” At the link find the title, “Don’t give them what they want: Terrorists should be starved of the oxygen of publicity, Mar, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla Batteries 85 mins – “Elon Musk is considered by many to be a technological visionary. In this, the third in a series of shows about Elons projects, we look at Tesla, its history, its cars the practicalities of what Elon’s trying to achieve.” At the link right-click Download it” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thinking Tools 60 mins – “Daniel Dennett is one of the world’s most original and provocative thinkers. A philosopher and cognitive scientist, he is known as one of the ‘Four Horseman of New Atheism’ along with Richard Dawkins, Sam Harris and the late Christopher Hitchens. In 2013 he came to Intelligence Squared to share the insights he has acquired over his 40-year career into the nature of how we think, decide and act. Dennett revealed his favourite thinking tools, or ‘intuition pumps’, that he and others have developed for addressing life’s most fundamental questions. As well as taking a fresh look at familiar moves – Occam’s Razor, reductio ad absurdum – he discussed new cognitive solutions designed for the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, consciousness and free will.” At the linkk find the title, “Daniel Dennett on Tools To Transform Our Thinking, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim O’Reilly Interview 144 mins – “Tim O’Reilly (@timoreilly) is one of the most fascinating polymaths I’ve ever encountered. Wired has called him “the trend spotter” in the world of tech and macrotrends. Tim is the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, Inc. His original business plan was pretty simple: “interesting work for interesting people,” and that’s worked out pretty well. His company has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue doing everything from online learning, book publishing, running conferences, urging companies to create more value than they capture, and trying to change the world by spreading and amplifying the knowledge of innovators. …Tim has now turned his attention and is very focused on Artificial Intelligence (AI) and its implications, the on-demand economy, and other technologies that are transforming the nature of work and the future shape of the business world. His new book is WTF?: What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us. Enjoy!” At the link right-click “Media files 00ba562c-2ed1-4258-93c2-04d525c75349.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tipping Problem 66 mins – “Why does tipping persist? Despite the efforts of some restaurants to stop tipping, it remains a healthy institution and has recently spread to Uber. Political scientist Anthony Gill of the University of Washington talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about why tipping persists and what it achieves despite there being no formal way of enforcing this norm.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Control 27 mins – “Trolls. You’ll find them in every corner of the Internet. During this episode, explore the landscape of trolling online, its impact on individuals, and its impact on the Web. Some people are fighting back in new and tasty ways. Baked goods included.” At the link find the title, “IRL 4 – “The Care and Feeding of Your Troll, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Enclosure: https://tracking.feedpress.it/link/17512/6431718/f4d354b4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Troll Farm 42 mins – “In 1989, a message was found in a virus: “Eddie Lives…Somewhere in Time!”. ‘Eddie’ was a particularly nasty virus, and its discovery led a young Bulgarian security researcher down a rabbit hole, on a hunt for the prolific creator of the Eddie virus: The Dark Avenger. With special guests: Vesselin Bontchev, Graham Cluley.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam Heroin Use 60 mins – “CJ is joined in this episode by Professor Alfred McCoy, who holds a Ph. D. from Yale University in Southeast Asian history, and currently holds the Harrington Chair in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is the author of many books, including The Politics of Heroin, Policing America’s Empire, and A Question of Torture, among others. His most recent book is In the Shadows of the American Century: The Rise and Decline of US Global Power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wisdom of Elders 62 mins – “Independent, free now from the constraints of office, with a wealth of experience and the ability to open doors at the highest level, The Elders are helping tackle some of the world’s most intractable problems. Brought together by Nelson Mandela in 2007, The Elders use their collective experience and influence to promote peace, justice and human rights worldwide, using private advocacy and public diplomacy. They include the former holders of some of the world’s most important and demanding posts, as well as individuals with an extraordinary track record on peace-making, reconciliation and driving social change. To celebrate the group’s fifth anniversary, in July 2012 Intelligence Squared hosted three of the Elders on stage in London at the Barbican Centre. We were joined by Former President of the United States Jimmy Carter, the first female president of Ireland and former UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson, and Archbishop Emeritus of Cape Town, Nobel Peace Laureate, and Chair of The Elders Desmond Tutu. Chairman of Virgin Group Richard Branson and Singer and songwriter Peter Gabriel, whose original vision of The Elders was translated into reality by Nelson Mandela, made a special guest appearance at the beginning of this event. It was chaired by Channel 4 News presenter Jon Snow.” At the link find the title, “The Elders in conversation with Jon Snow (Pres. Jimmy Carter, Archbp. Desmond Tutu & Mary Robinson), Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women on the Move 23 mins – “Leah Chase’s New Orleans restaurant Dooky Chase changed the course of American history over gumbo and fried chicken. During the civil rights movement, it was a place where white and black people came together, where activists planned protests and where the police entered but did not disturb — and it continues to operate in the same spirit today. In conversation with TED Women Curator Pat Mitchell, the 94-year old Queen of Creole Cuisine (who still runs the Dooky Chase kitchen) shares her wisdom from a lifetime of activism, speaking up and cooking.” At the link left-clink “Share” on the video frame, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Farms 34 mins – “If there’s one thing Jagpaul Badhesha learned as a farmer, it’s that you don’t take money for granted. While Jag wouldn’t trade his family’s 1,000-acre operation – or the personal satisfaction of a hard day’s work – for the world, it comes with incredible amount of responsibility and massive financial pressure.” At the link find the title, “The Farmer’s Almanac: Jagpaul Badhesha, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files PPY5353090711.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Politics 62 mins – “‘America first!’ Donald Trump hammered out this message over and again in his inauguration speech a week ago today. He promised tariffs, a crackdown on immigration, and a restoration of American military might. He entered the White House as the least popular incoming president in 40 years. Not every liberal thinker, however, is in a state of despair. Jeffrey Sachs was recently ranked by The Economist as one of the world’s most influential political scientists. No Trump supporter himself, he came to the Intelligence Squared stage to explain why there may be silver linings to the Trump cloud, and to set out a new world order. Take trade. Trump has threatened to tear up Nafta and slam huge taxes on Mexican imports, and has already withdrawn the US from the Trans-Pacific Partnership to bring jobs back to the heartlands of America. While this strikes fear amongst free-trade supporters, there is a case to be made that globalisation has been moving faster than is politically sustainable, dividing rich from poor. Or take Trump’s proposal to invest $1 trillion in infrastructure. Sachs has described this promise to rebuild America’s decrepit inner cities, highways, schools and hospitals as ‘a valid, indeed uplifting perspective’, provided it is done in a smart and fair way. Trump’s programme could be viewed as a Keynesian fiscal policy to boost competitiveness and job creation. It may, Sachs believes, be Trump’s great legacy. And then there’s foreign policy. As Sachs pointed out, Trump has filled his administration not just with protectionists but also with business people like himself, who enjoy making a buck (in fact, billions of them) and who have profitably invested for years in Russia, China, and other emerging economies. So while the rhetoric may be all about American primacy and trade protection, we shouldn’t rule out some friendly deal-making with other countries. And while Trump’s future relations with Vladimir Putin remain obscure, would it necessarily be a dangerous move if he pursues a conciliatory line with Russia? From a Russian perspective, America’s meddling in Ukraine and its attempts to bring that country into NATO, which would take the US-led military alliance right up to Russia’s border, look like aggression in its own historical sphere of influence. Isn’t it time there were a better understanding between both countries? Sachs argued that we are entering not a new tripolar world, dominated by the US, China and Russia, but what he calls ‘the World Century’, in which the rapid spread of technology and the sovereignty of nation states mean that no single country or region will dominate the world. For Sachs, the great foreign policy challenge will be to manage cooperation among regions, and face up to our common environmental and health crises. The idea that one place or people should have primacy over any other should be as antiquated as slavery or empire, and guard us against the senseless descent into violence.” At the link find the title, “Jeffrey Sachs on America and a New World Order, Mand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World War One and Britain 60 mins – “The First World War is not called the Great War for nothing. It was the single most decisive event in modern history, as well as one of the bloodiest: by the time the war ended, some nine million soldiers had been killed. It was also a historical full stop, marking the definitive end of the Victorian era and the advent of a new age of uncertainty. By 1918, the old order had fallen: the Bolsheviks had seized power in Russia; the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman empires had been destroyed; and even the victorious Allied powers had suffered devastating losses. It was supposed to be the war to end all wars. And yet barely two decades later, the world was again plunged into conflict. Little wonder then that historians still cannot agree whether Britain’s engagement was worth it. For some, the war was a vitally important crusade against Prussian militarism. Had we stayed out, they argue, the result would have been an oppressive German-dominated Europe, leaving the British Empire isolated and doomed to decline. And by fighting to save Belgium, Britain stood up for principle: the right of a small nation to resist its overbearing neighbours. For others, the war was a catastrophic mistake, fought at a catastrophic human cost. It brought Communism to power in Russia, ripped up the map of Europe and left a festering sense of resentment that would fuel the rise of Nazism. We often forget that, even a few days before Britain entered the war, it seemed likely that we would stay out. H. H. Asquith’s decision to intervene changed the course of history. But was it the right one?…” At the link find the title, “Britain Should Not Have Fought in the First World War, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Written Language History 26 mins – “How has written language changed over time? Do the way we read and the way our eyes work influence how scripts look? This week we hear a story on changes in legibility in written texts with Online News Editor Catherine Matacic. [and] Sarah Crespi also interviews Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel on her story about detecting signs of psychosis in kids and teens, recruiting at-risk individuals for trials, and searching for anything that can stop the progression.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zimbabwe Coup 37 mins – “On Wednesday, Zimbabwe’s military placed President Robert Mugabe under house arrest and took over state institutions in what is largely considered a military coup. Naunihal Singh, author of “Seizing Power: The Strategic Logic of Military Coups” and professor at the Naval War College, joined Benjamin Wittes for a lively discussion on current events in Zimbabwe and the nature of coups in general. They discussed the defining elements of a military coup and its modern history, the politics surrounding Zimbabwe’s situation and much more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Zimbabwe Coup mixdown final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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