Media Mining Digest 331 – Mar 16, 2018: Addict Employees, Air Pollution Fixes, Alt Right, Apache Wars, Assassinated Russian Diplomat, Autism Talents, Backfire Effect, Bed Bugs, Black Mothers, Blockchain in Agriculture, College Cost, Corruption in Egypt, Cryo Electron Microscopy, DACA Battle, Depressed Friends, Digital Migration in China, Disinformation Discussion, Emotional Courage, Exercise the Brain, Fear Confrontation, Ferguson Background, Gang Death Reconciliation, Genetic Medicine, Get Rich Slowly, Gun Violence Students, Health Care Finances, HIV Evolution, Human Emotions, Humanity Future, Human-Robot Interactions, Linux for Protection, Memory Research, Mesh Wi Fi, Mind Wandering, Mosquito Researcher, Mutual Responsibility, Never Again, Nunes Memo Controversy, Ocean Plastic Pollution, Personal Space, Plant Breeder Pioneer, Populism, Protest Clothing, Race and Identity, Racism in America, Senior Helpline, Sex Harassment in Medicine, Sex Science, Solar Energy Off Grid, South African President, Space Technology on Earth, Sustainable Seafood, Threat Protection Online, Traumatic Brain Injuries, Tribal Formation, Twitter Cofounder, Virtual Reality, War Letters, Washington’s Cook

Exercise your ears: the 107 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 555 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 19,914 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Entrepreneurs 24 mins – “Wanting to be an entrepreneur and actually becoming a successful one has a fine line that aspiring 3D print entrepreneurs can cross easily by seeking mentorship. Mentors can further your goal. Advice from experts can help with the mismatch between the product and the market and get your ideas to distribution channels. Learn the steps of moving from aspiration to success. Never feel ashamed of looking for people who can help you to get to your goals.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Addict Employees 58 mins – “In the midst of a drug crisis, New Hampshire is also dealing with a severe labor shortage.  So now, some employers and the state hope to creatively address where the two overlap, promoting so-called “recovery friendly workplaces”.  We look at the practical, legal, and financial aspects of this.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Air Pollution Fixes 9 mins – “Driving in Johannesburg one day, Tapiwa Chiwewe noticed an enormous cloud of air pollution hanging over the city. He was curious and concerned but not an environmental expert — so he did some research and discovered that nearly 14 percent of all deaths worldwide in 2012 were caused by household and ambient air pollution. With this knowledge and an urge to do something about it, Chiwewe and his colleagues developed a platform that uncovers trends in pollution and helps city planners make better decisions. “Sometimes just one fresh perspective, one new skill set, can make the conditions right for something remarkable to happen,” Chiwewe says. “But you need to be bold enough to try.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alt Right 65 mins – “For the past year, Lois Beckett [@loisbeckett], senior reporter at The Guardian US, has been showing up at white nationalist rallies, taking their pictures, writing down what they say. And she finds herself thinking: How did we get here? How did her beat as a political reporter come to include interviewing Nazis? And what are the consequences of giving these groups this much coverage? In this week’s program — the culmination of a months-long collaboration between On the Media and The Guardian US — we take a deep dive into what the news media often get wrong about white supremacists, and what those errors expose about the broader challenge of confronting racism in America.” At the link find the title, “Face the Racist Nation, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files otm030218_cms837963_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Husbandry 56 mins – “Other areas swimming in myth and misinformation involve our pets.  Domesticated animals are part of our lives, and therefore are frequent subjects of marketing shams and dangerous trends.  An animal anti-vaccination movement is alive and well, and a pet food industry is as steeped in half truths, marketing and emotional appeals attempts to skew consumer purchasing trends.  This week’s podcast interviews two experts in the area of pet food and vaccination.  Dr. Debbie Cottrell a veterinarian and the owner of West End Animal Hospital in Newberry, Florida.  She prides herself on an evidence-based practice, and is especially critical of claims that attempt to misinform her clients. Dr. Amy Stone is a small animal veterinarian from the University of Florida with an extensive background in immunology.  We had a wonderful conversation about recent trends, hot topics, and the manipulation of pet owners by unscrupulous marketers and ideologs, that sometimes can have negative outcomes for animals and owners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Antarctic Research 11 mins – “Antarctica is a vast and dynamic place, but radar technologies — from World War II-era film to state-of-the-art miniaturized sensors — are enabling scientists to observe and understand changes beneath the continent’s ice in unprecedented detail. Join radio glaciologist Dustin Schroeder on a flight high above Antarctica and see how ice-penetrating radar is helping us learn about future sea level rise — and what the melting ice will mean for us all.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apache Wars 49 mins – “Whenever we start seeing people as other, we just get lost. There were so many decent cowboys trying to do the right thing. And so many decent First Nation people trying to do the right thing. And there were so many liars, and cheaters, and people trying to get ahead. So many people with short term goals screwing everything up.” After his breakout roles in Dead Poets Society and Reality Bites, actor, director, and author Ethan Hawke has followed his own path as an artist, starting a theater company, writing two novels, acting in decade-spanning film productions directed by Richard Linklater including, most recently the amazing Boyhood. He’s just published his first graphic novel, which he wrote with artist Greg Ruth. It’s called INDEH: A Story of the Apache Wars, and its tells a complex and very human story of relations between the Apaches and the white Americans who ultimately took over their lands. On this week’s episode of Think Again – a Big Think Podcast, Ethan Hawke and host Jason Gots discuss fatherhood, perpetual warfare, and the daily struggle between light and dark within every person. It’s a raw, intense, sometimes laugh-out-loud conversation that spans continents and decades in under an hour.” At the link find the title, “50. Ethan Hawke (Actor, Author) – The High, Hard Road/Ghosts of the Apache Wars, Jun, 2016,” right-click “Media files PP1250101271.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Assassinated Russian Diplomat 43 mins – “Alina Polyakova speaks to Zhanna Nemtsova about the life and political legacy of her father, Boris Nemtsov. Learn more about Nemtsova’s work at nemtsovfund.org.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Zhanna Nemtsova mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Talents 27 mins – “Not every podcast episode will make you look at the world differently. This one might. Why? Because in this show you’ll learn about a concept that’s changing the way people view the autism spectrum. The idea is called “neurodiversity.” While neurodiversity may sound complex, the idea behind it is as simple as it is true: people are wired differently. People on the spectrum are neurodiverse, while those who are not on the spectrum are known as neurotypical. In this episode, you’ll learn more about how it works, and meet a company that’s using the idea to create jobs.” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the file.

Backfire Effect 75 mins – “Last year on this show, we did three episodes about the backfire effect, and by far, those episodes were the most popular we’ve ever done. …The popularity of the backfire effect extends into academia. The original paper has been cited hundreds of times, and there have been more than 300 articles written about it since it first came out. The backfire effect has his special allure to it, because, on the surface, it seems to explain something we’ve all experienced — when we argue with people who believe differently than us, who see the world through a different ideological lens — they often resist our views, refuse to accept our way of seeing things, and it often seems like we do more harm than good, because they walk away seemingly more entrenched in their beliefs than before the argument began. But…since those shows last year, researchers have produced a series new studies into the backfire effect that complicate things. Yes, we are observing something here, and yes we are calling it the backfire effect, but everything is not exactly as it seems, and so I thought we should invite these new researchers on the show and add a fourth episode to the backfire effect series based on what they’ve found. And this is that episode.” At the link find the title, “120 – The Backfire Effect – Part Four, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 120-The Backfire Effect-Part Four_v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bed Bugs 32 mins – “On this week’s Podcast Bryan and Scott talk about Bed Bugs and discuss Vendetta Nitro and More” At the link find the title, “Bed Bug, Vendetta Nitro, and More,” right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bird Songs 56 mins – “It’s contentious. Is there more to birdsong than staking out territory and attracting a mate? Are there messages about food and danger? And is there more? Birdsong is certainly functional, but is it only functional? Musician Hollis Taylor has been recording and studying Australian birdsong since 2002. She has documented their calls and songs, and even observed young birds being trained to sing by their parents. Hollis Taylor speaks to a range of scientists as she considers whether birds appreciate their calls as much as we do. One biologist argues that as birds learn from and mimic each other, this passing of learning from one generation to the other fits the definition of culture. And being culture makes it music. See what you think!” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Mothers 8 mins – “’It is the artist’s job to unearth stories that people try to bury with shovels of complacency and time,’ says poet and freedom fighter Mwende “FreeQuency” Katwiwa. Performing her poem “The Joys of Motherhood,” Katwiwa explores the experience of Black mothers in America and discusses the impact of the Movement for Black Lives — because, she says, it’s impossible to separate the two.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Impact 22 mins – “Keep your crypto safe with a hardware wallet Ledger for Hardware Wallets to provide maximum security for your Cryptocurrency Or get a Trezor Or get a Or Keepkey A pleasant salutation and thoughtful analogy from Sarah starts off the show. We follow with a good ol’ school chat almost two years after The Blockchain Show’s inception, where Steve and Ethan reflect and exchange ideas on the current state of affairs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain in Agriculture 38 mins – “James Song is the CEO and Founder of ExsulCoin, a startup based on blockchain technology that focuses on helping solve the world’s refugee crisis. A large part of this project is an app he developed called Exsul. Exsul delivers free basic education and is currently undergoing tests at a refugee camp in Bangladesh. Alex Danco is an Associate at Social Capital, a group consisting of technologists, capitalists, and philanthropists who find and fund startups that can help change the world for the better. Alex is what you call a futurist, a person who always looks at things in a very, very long-term perspective. In this episode, James discusses what ExsulCoin is all about and why they decided to focus on the growing refugee problem. He shares ExsulCoin’s mission, projects, and why they preferred to establish a strong foothold in Myanmar. Alex shares his thoughts on the future of cryptocurrencies. He shares his opinions on the ICO trend and why most of them are no different from Ponzi schemes. He explains why offering a big ICO can make users lose interest in a company’s projects and provides his tips to those who want to get involved in blockchain with agriculture applications in mind.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blue School 14 mins – “In 1988, Matt Goldman co-founded Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create “aha moments” — moments of surprise, learning and exuberance — frequent and intentional rather than random and occasional. Now Goldman is working to apply the lessons learned from Blue Man Group to education, creating Blue School, a school that balances academic mastery, creative thinking and self and social intelligence. “We need to cultivate safe and conducive conditions for new and innovative ideas to evolve and thrive,” Goldman says.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Changeist Founder 33 mins – “Our guest this week is Scott Smith. Scott is a critical futurist and founder of Changeist, where he leads strategy and research. His work taps over 20 years’ experience tracking social, tech and economic trends. He works with brands and organizations to find new futures. He’s also a writer and frequent speaker, and on Twitter @changeist.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Chinese Generation Gap 51 mins – “Chinese reporter Haining Liu was born into the ‘one-child generation’ in the early 1980s. She explores how these political, social and economic changes have affected the relationship between old and young in China. Haining looks at family life, marriage, divorce, dating, opportunities for women, and how being from the one-child generation has affected her and her peers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Generation Gap 52 mins – “Chinese reporter Haining Liu travels to Beijing and finds out what it was like for people who grew up during the Cultural Revolution and how those who lived under strict communism relate to their children who have had much more material, individualistic lives. And she hears about new attitudes to work and education as more people choose to study and work and outside the state system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

City and Town Conditions 57 mins – “In advance of Governor Sununu’s State of the State address, we check in with four mayors on how their communities are faring: on education, the local economy, and the addiction crisis. And we ask what they’d like to hear from the Governor.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

City Planning Architects 24 mins – “In 1933, a group of architects boarded a ship and set sail from Marseille, France to Athens, Greece. On board were several of the world’s most famous modernist architects and artists, including Erno Goldfinger, Le Corbusier, Alvar Alto, and dozens of others. There was a silent film made of the voyage that shows the architects on the deck in short-sleeved white shirts and sunglasses. The cruise was the setting for the International Congress of Modern Architecture, commonly known by its French acronym, CIAM.Ville Radieuse plan by Le Corbusier The subject of this particular congress was city-planning. The members of CIAM thought that cities were too congested, noisy, polluted and chaotic. And they believed some of these problems could be solved by separating out the functions of a city into distinct zones for housing, working, recreation, and traffic. Zoning wasn’t a new idea, but the architects from CIAM wanted to take it farther. The living spaces would be in high-rise apartments so that the ground-level was open for recreation and collective spaces— live in the sky, play on the ground. Cars would even drive on elevated roads so that pedestrians could have the space below all to themselves. There would also be separate districts for industry and shopping. Where old European cities were winding, cluttered and polluted, this new one would be linear, open, and clean, with everything in its proper place.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Cost 57 mins – “It’s the time of year when students and their families navigate financial decisions, and the loans, grants, and bills associated. We ask how the rising cost of higher education and increased focus on student loan debt is changing the conversation, and we’ll get an update on federal policy.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cool Tools Software 39 mins – “Our guest this week is Dean Putney. Dean is the founding software engineer at laser cutter startup Glowforge in Seattle. Previously he wrote software for organizations like Reddit, IDEO, Boing Boing and Cool Tools.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the soundbar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Fish Ecosystems 5 mins – “Mike Gil spies on fish: using novel multi-camera systems and computer vision technology, the TED Fellow and his colleagues explore how coral reef fish behave, socialize and affect their ecosystems. Learn more about how fish of different species communicate via social networks — and what disrupting these networks might mean to the delicate ecology of reefs, which help feed millions of us and support the global economy.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Egypt 28 mins – “A well-known blogger and activist jailed for a peaceful protest, a young man imprisoned and tortured for wearing the wrong T- shirt, a young woman abducted by masked police, and now among more than a thousand people who have been forcibly disappeared – these are just some of the alarming stories from the new Egypt. Orla Guerin has spent the last four years reporting from Cairo where she has witnessed a systematic assault on freedoms and human rights. The country’s ruler, former army chief, President Abdel Fatah al Sisi is standing for re-election (next month) in a climate of fear and intimidation. Seven years after the euphoria in Tahrir Square, Orla asks what happened to the hope born during the revolution, and reports on the abuses which campaigners say are at the heart of the Sisi regime.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corruption in Ukraine 27 mins – “The Parkovy Conference and Exhibition Centre, a huge modernist structure of concrete and glass, stands boldly on the banks of the Dnieper River in central Kiev, a helipad on the roof. It hosted the official after party for last year’s Eurovision Song Contest and was meant to be a symbol of Ukraine’s economic development. Instead, four years after President Yanukovych was overthrown by a people sick of corruption, it has become a focus of efforts to reclaim the billions of dollars said to have been stolen by the ex-president’s regime. In this edition of Assignment, Tim Whewell attempts to unpick the tangled global web of companies behind the building’s ownership. Who does the helipad actually belong to and what does it tell us about Ukraine’s attempts to bring its corrupt politicians to account?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryo Electron Microscopy 39 mins – “Richard grew up in a remote village in the Scottish borders exploring the countryside and reading the weekly bundles of comics sent by his great aunt, as part of a care package for his family. When he started work at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, a string of Nobel Prizes had been awarded for x-ray crystallography, a technique that had revealed the double helix structure of DNA, and the atomic structure of haemoglobin, vitamin B12 and insulin. But Richard decided to experiment with a radical new approach, using electrons not x-rays. After an early success in 1975, he spent the next 15 years trying to improve the resolution of electron crystallography and, in 1990, he managed to see in astonishing atomic detail how individual atoms were arranged within a particular biological molecule. Next, however, he decided that the future of microscopy lay in different direction and,despite the initial results being very blurry, he embraced a more direct approach to microscopy that involved flash freezing molecules to catch them, mid-movement, as they existed in nature. Undeterred by a steady stream of technical problems, Richard spent the next 17 years refining this new approach to microscopy convinced that it should outperform all the others and, in 2012, he was proved right. Cryo electron microscopy now enables us to see how the individual atoms are arranged within biological molecules that were previously opaque. We are seeing atomic structures that have never been seen before and, since these are the molecules that make life possible, knowing what they look like is worth millions to pharmaceutical companies trying to design drugs to activate or inhibit their action. Richard talks to Jim Al-Khalili about half a century of problem solving and the bold strategic decisions that led him to be awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize for Chemistry, together with Joaquim Frank and Jacques Dubochet.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

DACA Battle 49 mins – “Success on the screen means plenty of money to be made off the screen as well. But what happens when an important cultural moment is at risk of being turned into a commodity? That story, plus how business owners with DACA status face an uncertain future, the money behind an evangelical Christian network and why falling unemployment means employers are stepping up their game to recruit works. And a look at Betsy Devos’ holdings and where conflicts of interest do — and don’t — come into play.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Program Problems 28 mins – “…On this episode of “Can He Do That,” we ask the question: Can President Donald Trump force Congress to settle on a long-term bill for dreamers? And why has it been so hard for Congress to strike a deal on something that many Republicans and Democrats say they want? We talk to The Post’s immigration reporter Maria Sacchetti, who tells the story of the genesis of the Dream Act in the early 2000s. We hear from Jen Olson, who helped Sen. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) try to pass a bill to help dreamers in 2007. And Post congressional reporter Ed O’Keefe offers insight on why — despite the congressional gridlock — Trump may yet stand in a strong position to come up with long-term legislation that has eluded dreamers for nearly two decades. “Ultimately, I don’t think he wants to be the president held responsible for deporting hundreds of thousands if not millions of people who are clearly contributing to society,” O’Keefe said. “There’s an urgent political need for Republicans to address this.” At the link find the title, “Will Trump strike a deal on the Dream Act? Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5a875e00e4b0cadd3c51b98e_1351620000001-300040_t_1518820868587_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depressed Friends 13 mins – “Want to connect with a depressed friend but not sure how to relate to them? Comedian and storyteller Bill Bernat has a few suggestions. Learn some dos and don’ts for talking to people living with depression — and handle your next conversation with grace and maybe a bit of humor.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Migration in China 29 mins – “Goodpath was once an agricultural village but is now home to 61 massive factories and 40,000 migrant workers who came from rural China to better their lives. The migrants work very long hours in poor conditions and then spend the rest of their time in cramped rooms, often sharing living space and beds. However most have been able to buy smart phones from the local mobile phone shop and have set up social media accounts on platforms like QQ, the social media giant in China that provides instant messaging, online social games, music, shopping, microblogging, movies, and group and voice chat software. It is in these online worlds that the rural migrants come close to the modern China they came for.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disinformation Discussion 136 mins – Conspiracy theories arise online and off about the Florida school shooting. A Twitter bot purge significantly reduces the follower counts of conservative users, but Twitter claims it’s not political. Google removes the ‘view image’ button from search results to appease photographers, and a federal judge says that embedding a tweet can be a copyright infringement. Has Google become too big? Plenty of examples featured in a New York Times article suggest that Google has been trying to suppress competition, prompting some critics to say the government should step in. Edible Arrangements also goes after Google because its competitors show up in search results. Google AI can now predict heart attacks through an eye scan.” At the link left-click “Download Options,” right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eastern Coyote 14 mins – “Chris Schadler is a wild canid biologist, and for about 25 years, her specialty has been the coyote. The first confirmed case of coyotes in New Hampshire was an individual found in a trap in Holderness in the mid 1940s. But they have likely been here longer, because as Schadler points out, they didn’t parachute into Holderness, they will have migrated south from Canada.” At the link left-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emotional Courage 19 mins – “Psychologist Susan David shares how the way we deal with our emotions shapes everything that matters: our actions, careers, relationships, health and happiness. In this deeply moving, humorous and potentially life-changing talk, she challenges a culture that prizes positivity over emotional truth and discusses the powerful strategies of emotional agility. A talk to share.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise the Brain 13 mins – “What’s the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory — and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Girl.com 25 mins – “Michelle Miller grew up in Wisconsin and always had an interest in agriculture.  When she reached college she traded in rural life for the big city, working in LA at designer stores and living a big city life.  But has Farm Babes go, she would find her way from Rodeo Drive to driving to the rodeo. Since, she has been critical of those that marginalize farmers and farming, and has been a powerful voice for agriculture and associated technologies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fashion Waste 10 mins – “What happens to the clothes we don’t buy? You might think that last season’s coats, trousers and turtlenecks end up being put to use, but most of it (nearly 13 million tons each year in the United States alone) ends up in landfills. Fashion has a waste problem, and Amit Kalra wants to fix it. He shares some creative ways the industry can evolve to be more conscientious about the environment — and gain a competitive advantage at the same time.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fear Confrontation 11 mins – “Luvvie Ajayi isn’t afraid to speak her mind or to be the one dissenting voice in a crowd, and neither should you. “Your silence serves no one,” says the writer, activist and self-proclaimed professional troublemaker. In this bright, uplifting talk, Ajayi shares three questions to ask yourself if you’re teetering on the edge of speaking up or quieting down — and encourages all of us to get a little more comfortable with being uncomfortable.” At the link click the “share” circle on the TED video, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Background 19 mins – “Act 1 – The “Real” Ferguson by Moral Courage Project” [Six more acts at the link.] At the link find the title, “Act 1 – The “Real” Ferguson, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 338420004-fergusonvoicespod-act1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gang Death Reconciliation 12 mins – “On one awful night in 1995, Ples Felix’s 14-year-old grandson murdered Azim Khamisa’s son in a gang initiation fueled by drugs, alcohol and a false sense of belonging. The deadly encounter sent Khamisa and Felix down paths of deep meditation, to forgive and to be forgiven — and in an act of bravery and reconciliation, the two men met and forged a lasting bond. Together, they’ve used their story as an outline for a better, more merciful society, where victims of tragedy can grow and heal. Prepare to be moved by their unimaginable story. “Peace is possible,” Khamisa says. “How do I know that? Because I am at peace.” AT the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Medicine 30 mins – “Professor Sir John Burn, has made Newcastle on Tyne a centre for research on genetics and disease. He was one of the first British doctors to champion the study of genes in medicine back in the 1980s. More recently his research with families with a propensity to develop certain cancers has shown the benefits of taking aspirin as a prevention against the disease. John Burn was part of the team that set up the Centre for Life on derelict industrial land near the River Tyne, where the public can watch research in action. It now attracts a quarter of a million visitors each year to its public science centre. John Burn was knighted for services to medicine in 2010 and was one of first 20 ‘local heroes’ to have a brass plaque on Newcastle Quayside in 2014, alongside Cardinal Hume, Alan Shearer and Ant and Dec.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Get Rich Slowly 30 mins – “Our guest this week is J.D. Roth started blogging in 1997, before “blog” was even a word. In 2006, he founded GetRichSlowly.org, a site devoted to common-sense personal finance. He sold Get Rich Slowly in 2009 then bought it back in 2017. His mission in life is to help everyday people master their money and achieve their financial goals.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Commons 12 mins – “We all share one planet — we breathe the same air, drink the same water and depend on the same oceans, forests and biodiversity. Economist Naoko Ishii is on a mission to protect these shared resources, known as the global commons, that are vital for our survival. In an eye-opening talk about the wellness of the planet, Ishii outlines four economic systems we need to change to safeguard the global commons, making the case for a new kind of social contract with the earth.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GMO Consumption 35 mins – “Dr. Alison Van Eenennaam is arguably the most effective voice in communication about biotechnology, especially in animals.  In today’s podcast she makes her third visit to Talking Biotech. In 2017, she and co-author Amy Young published a review of the literature that examined the presence of transgenic DNA or proteins in milk, meat and eggs. The data show that DNA and proteins from plants are digested to their component parts and pose no unusual risk. Milk meat and eggs from animals consuming GE products are no different from the same products from animals on alternative diets.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu .

Gun Violence Students 24 mins – “…What’s going on in South Florida, a lot of the discussion right now is very different than I’ve ever seen post-shooting. And I think it’s specifically because these kids have decided to make their voices heard, and they’re not mincing words,” Cox said. “I think that’s cracking through a little bit in a way that it hasn’t before.” And when you look at these teenagers showing up on CNN and speaking in front of large crowds, you have to ask the question: Can they do that? Can these teenagers take the momentum of this moment and use it to force the government and the president to make significant changes to the country’s laws on guns? This is the question we explore in this week’s episode of “Can He Do That?” We talk to Cox about his experiences writing about children traumatized by gun violence, and how and why families and teenage victims choose to become activists. And we talk to national reporter Wesley Lowery, who recounts his recent interviews with Douglas student activists and explains why their campaign may yet gain traction with lawmakers. He also talks about the similarities, and the differences, between the reaction to “Never Again Marjory Stoneman Douglas” protesters, and similar teenage activists involved in the Black Lives Matter movement.” At the link find the title, “Will Trump strike a deal on the Dream Act?, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5a875e00e4b0cadd3c51b98e_1351620000001-300040_t_1518820868587_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Finances 57 mins – “In New Hampshire, visitors to some emergency rooms have received shockingly high bills after treatment, often involving charges for out-of-network doctors, who provided care at hospitals that were part of their insurance plans.  Wednesday morning at 9, The Exchange takes a closer look at this “balance-billing.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care in Canada 18 mins – “Jocalyn Clark and Danielle Martin discuss Canada’s healthcare system as part of The Lancet’s Canada Series.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s global leadership on health, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files TL_Feb_18_Canada.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Technology 11 mins – “If you’re undergoing surgery, you want the best surgical team to collaborate on your case, no matter where they are. Surgeon and entrepreneur Nadine Hachach-Haram is developing a new system that helps surgeons operate together and train one another on new techniques — from remote locations using low-cost augmented reality tools. Watch the system in action as she joins a surgeon in Minnesota performing a knee surgery, live on her laptop from the TED stage in New Orleans. As Hachach-Haram says: “Through simple, everyday devices that we take for granted, we can really do miraculous things.” (This talk contains graphic images of surgery.)” At the link click the “share” circle on the TED video, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Evolution 5 mins – “Think we’re winning the battle against HIV? Maybe not, as the next wave of drug-resistant viruses arrives. In an eye-opening talk, TED Fellow Edsel Salvana describes the aggressive HIV subtype AE that’s currently plaguing his home of the Philippines — and warns us about what might become a global epidemic.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Emotions 11 mins – “Do human emotions have a role to play in science and research? Material researcher Ilona Stengel suggests that instead of opposing each other, emotions and logic complement and reinforce each other. She shares a case study on how properly using emotions (like the empowering feeling of being dedicated to something meaningful) can boost teamwork and personal development — and catalyze scientific breakthroughs and innovation.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Issues in New Hampshire 58 mins – “After the Parkland Florida school shooting, police respond to a number of threats at high schools in New Hampshire, and the House of Representatives votes down a bill would have allowed firearms on state college campuses.  Senate Republicans propose a bill to reauthorize Medicaid expansion for another five years.  And a bill to raise the minimum marriage age in New Hampshire to 16 years of age is headed for a full House vote.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Human-Robot Interactions 13 mins – “We already live among robots: tools and machines like dishwashers and thermostats so integrated into our lives that we’d never think to call them that. What will a future with even more robots look like? Social scientist Leila Takayama shares some unique challenges of designing for human-robot interactions — and how experimenting with robotic futures actually leads us to a better understanding of ourselves.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human-Robot Interactions 13 mins – “We already live among robots: tools and machines like dishwashers and thermostats so integrated into our lives that we’d never think to call them that. What will a future with even more robots look like? Social scientist Leila Takayama shares some unique challenges of designing for human-robot interactions — and how experimenting with robotic futures actually leads us to a better understanding of ourselves.” At the link left-click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanity Future 51 mins – “Back in the old days, if your species was faced with an existential threat, you were stuck hoping for some advantageous mutation. Maybe an extra fin or a slightly more sophisticated eyeball. Outwitting fate was pretty much out of the question. And as much as we might prefer to just go binge-watch something and forget about it, there are several plausible scenarios whereby humanity could face extinction in the too-close-for-comfort future. Happily, thanks to our very large brains and thinkers like my guest today, theoretical physicist Dr. Michio Kaku, we have options. Dr. Kaku’s latest book is The Future of Humanity: Terraforming Mars, Interstellar Travel, Immortality, and Our Destiny Beyond Earth.” At the link find the title, “136. Michio Kaku (physicist) – Timid Monkeys on Mars, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY4461753806.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Japanese Senior Population 31 mins – “Japan has the fastest ageing society in the world with more than a quarter of its population over the age of 65. It currently has 66,000 centenarians, more than any other country. Toshiko Katayose and Aki Maruyama Leggett explore some of the innovative ways in which Japanese people are adapting to living longer. For over 20 years Toshiko Katayose edited Japan’s most popular magazine for senior readers. Now 67 and facing retirement, she reveals how her generation of baby-boomers born after World War Two, are overturning stereotypes about old age and how businesses are responding to these more demanding silver consumers. She visits Japan’s first supermarket built specifically to serve older shoppers which offers everything from crystal-studded walking sticks to try-before-you-buy coffin experiences.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux for Protection P1 63 mins – “This week, System76.com sponsors our show and sends us a couple of laptops to help us transition 100% to Linux.” At the link find the title, “066-Switching to Linux-Part 1: Hardware, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 397154370-user-98066669-066-switching-to-linux-part-1-hardware.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux for Protection P2 60 mins – “This week we continue our transition to 100% Linux by discussing considerations for choosing the most appropriate operating system.” At the link find the title, “068-Switching to Linux-Part 2: OS Choices, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 404086575-user-98066669-068-switching-to-linux-part-2-os-choices.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Research 53 mins – “Neuroscientist Rodrigo Quian Quiroga has written a wonderfully accessible book called The Forgetting Machine: Memory, Perception, and the “Jennifer Aniston Neuron. “ I interviewed him for BS 141 because I wanted to hear the real science behind his work. The key idea of his book his that perception and memory are based on similar principles. Our perceptions are largely created by our brains, but the same is also true for our memories. Our memories are dynamically recreated with each recall. This has important and surprising implications. We also explored WHY. Our brains have the capacity to remember much more than they do, because its resources are focused on creating meaning. In the interview we discuss the experiments that support these conclusions.” At the link “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mesh Wi Fi 26 mins – “.[First item.] Mesh WiFi vs. Cheap WiFi Router Steve in Tampa writes, “I am moving into a three story townhouse that is wired with Cat5 to most rooms. Need WiFI. Mesh networks cost between $200-400. You can buy a WiFI router for less than $40. Tthe throughput may not be as great as a mesh system and hand off not as smooth, but for streaming Netflix, web surfing, etc. is it really worth it to get the mesh setup (at this point in time)?” Speed and handoffs aren’t the only advantages mesh gear like Netgear’s Orbi or Eero will offer, and we’d spend at least $90 for a good AC router. Deets in the video!  Contour Unimouse Review Contour’s new ergonomic Unimouse promises “Comfort In Motion.” Does this adjustable mouse deliver? Watch the video to find out in our review!  Block Ads With Pi-Hole! Don tweeted @tekthing, “Setup a pi-hole on my raspberry pi a couple months ago and am loving all the crap that it blocks from my home network. Is this the best way to block adds and bad sites?” We explain how Raspberry Pi-Hole works, and its advantages and disadvantages in the video! (We talked about them more in depth in TekThing Episode 121!)  CPU Wattage Confusion @MarkCooper tweets: “@TekThing how do more powerful CPUs in the same family use fewer watts? An i5 6600k is rated at 91 watts but the much faster i7 6700 non k is rated at 65 watts?” One word: overclocking. First up, check out About Intel Processor Numbers, a guide to decoding their CPU names…. K = unlocked. We explain why that makes for higher wattage in the video!” At the link right-click “Download Episode 165” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind Wandering 59 mins – “When was the last time you were bored? I mean really, well and truly, staring at the patterns in the wallpaper bored? Statistics suggest that you’re probably listening to this show on a smartphone. Which means you own a smartphone. Which means it’s probably always close at hand, full of apps and podcasts to distract you the instant that uncomfortable feeling of boredom creeps in. Which means your brain almost never gets the chance to sit with that restlessness and come up with creative alternatives, from daydreaming to doing something brilliant (or at least less boring) in real life. If that’s not you, awesome. But it’s a lot of us these days. My guest today, Manoush Zomorodi, is the host of Note to Self – a popular radio show and podcast on how we live with technology. An experiment she did on the show with the eager help of 20,000 fans became the subject of her new book Bored and Brilliant: how spacing out can unlock your most productive and creative self.” At the link find the title, “127. Manoush Zomorodi (journalist) – The Upside of Downtime,” right-click “Media files PP6565567104.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Researcher 12 mins – “What do we really know about mosquitoes? Fredros Okumu catches and studies these disease-carrying insects for a living — with the hope of crashing their populations. Join Okumu for a tour of the frontlines of mosquito research, as he details some of the unconventional methods his team at the Ifakara Health Institute in Tanzania have developed to target what has been described as the most dangerous animal on earth.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mutual Responsibility 15 mins – “As CEO of the Global Fund for Women, Musimbi Kanyoro works to support women and their ideas so they can expand and grow. She introduces us to the Maragoli concept of “isirika” — a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another — something she sees women practicing all over the world. And she calls for those who have more to give more to people working to improve their communities. “Imagine what it would look like if you embraced isirika and made it your default,” Kanyoro says. “What could we achieve for each other? For humanity?” Let’s find out — together.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Never Again 50 mins – “Since the Parkland school shooting, the student-led #NeverAgain movement has kept gun control in the headlines. This week, we look at how the movement began — and how pro-gun internet trolls have tried to undermine its message. Plus, how the world of Black Panther taps into a long history of black liberation struggles, and why Black History Month, in the Trump era, can feel both righteous and corporate, dignified and farcical.” At the link find the title, “Back to the Future, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files otm022318_pod.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nunes Memo 44 mins – “On Friday, Rep. Devin Nunes, the House intelligence committee chairman, released a controversial and long-awaited memo alleging surveillance abuses by the Justice Department and FBI against Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign. In this special edition of the Lawfare Podcast, Quinta Jurecic, Orin Kerr, David Kris and Benjamin Wittes unpack the memo, its charges, and what those charges mean for the Mueller investigation and the future of surveillance oversight.” At the link find the title, “Special Edition: Memo #Released,, Feb 2018,” right-click “Direct download: 18_0202 Nunes Memo Emergency Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” fromthe pop-up menu.

Nunes Memo Controversy 19 mins – “…The Nunes memo is a four-page document, created by the staff of House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), that alleges the FBI abused its surveillance authority, particularly when it sought a secret court order to monitor a former Trump campaign adviser. It is the work product of Nunes’s months-long effort to investigate the FBI and Justice Department and their ongoing probe into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia. The memo describes how a research effort funded by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee ended up playing a role in the FBI obtaining a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court warrant to surveil former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. The research effort was that of former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele, who produced a now infamous dossier of lurid allegations against Trump. Steele had been hired for his work by Fusion GPS, an opposition research firm that had itself been hired by Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee. Republicans have used that information to portray the monitoring of Page as a political ploy by Clinton and the Democrats, which they say casts doubt on the integrity of the Russia investigation. It must be noted, though, that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court process is generally a robust one, and it is virtually impossible that the bureau would have relied solely on unverified information in Steele’s dossier to obtain the warrant….” At the link find the title, “Special episode: The Nunes memo and what it means, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5a74f1abe4b0cadd3c51a6b0_1351620000001-300040_t_1517613488762_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Plastic Pollution 12 mins – “Can we solve the problem of ocean plastic pollution and end extreme poverty at the same time? That’s the ambitious goal of The Plastic Bank: a worldwide chain of stores where everything from school tuition to cooking fuel and more is available for purchase in exchange for plastic garbage — which is then sorted, shredded and sold to brands who reuse “social plastic” in their products. Join David Katz to learn more about this step towards closing the loop in the circular economy. “Preventing ocean plastic could be humanity’s richest opportunity,” Katz says.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pakistani Girls 13 mins – “Shameem Akhtar posed as a boy during her early childhood in Pakistan so she could enjoy the privileges Pakistani girls are rarely afforded: to play outside and attend school. In an eye-opening, personal talk, Akhtar recounts how the opportunity to get an education altered the course of her life — and ultimately changed the culture of her village, where today every young girl goes to school.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Patient Questions 29 mins – “Its now widely agreed that one of the key ways of reducing the current high level of “waste ” in biomedical research is to focus it more squarely on addressing the questions that matter to patients – and the people and medical staff that care for them. In this interview, Tessa Richards – the BMJ’s patient partnership editor, talks to Katherine Cowan, independent consultant and a senior advisor the the James Lind Alliance, which has pioneered patient involvement with their research priority setting partnerships. In this conversation they talk about how these work, the challenge of navigating between different groups with what are often very different views and agendas, and why she thinks healthy debate on divergent views is no bad thing. Its now widely agreed that one of the key ways of reducing the current high level of “waste ” in biomedical research is to focus it more squarely on addressing the questions that matter to patients – and the people and medical staff that care for them. In this interview, Tessa Richards – the BMJ’s patient partnership editor, talks to…” At the link find the title, “Katherine Cowan – Reaching A Priority,” Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 407621220-bmjgroup-katherine-cowan-reaching-a-priority.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Personal Space 57 mins – “As a young student Dr. Michael Graziano helped discover peripersonal neurons, which are neurons that detect when objects are coming near our bodies. In his new book The Spaces Between Us: A Story of Neuroscience, Evolution, and Human Nature, Graziano takes us through two decades of research into how these neurons work. Peripersonal neurons make it possible for us to move through our lives without constantly bumping into the objects and people around us, but because they work outside our conscious awareness we take them for granted. Graziano  concludes The Spaces Between Us with the compelling story of his son’s dyspraxia, a condition that highlights how vital these neurons really are. In BS 142 we explore these ideas, and Dr. Graziano explains why he wrote this book in a style meant to be accessible to a general audience.” At the link “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philosophy of Water 10 mins – “How do we find fulfillment in a world that’s constantly changing? Raymond Tang struggled with this question until he came across the ancient Chinese philosophy of the Tao Te Ching. In it, he found a passage comparing goodness to water, an idea he’s now applying to his everyday life. In this charming talk, he shares three lessons he’s learned so far from the “philosophy of water.” “What would water do?” Tang asks. ‘This simple and powerful question … has changed my life for the better.’” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Planet Money Q&A 24 mins – “We ponder the price of chicken, safe haven currencies, and the cash value of coupons. Why? Because you asked.” At the link find the title, “#828: You Asked For More,” right-click “Media files 20180302_pmoney_pmpod828.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Plant Breeder Pioneer 33 mins – “Dr. Maxine Thompson is a trailblazer.  With her education and profound interest in plant breeding, she defied a male-dominated establishment and became a plant breeder at a major university.  She would establish a decades-long career in plant breeding at Oregon State University, traveling the world on collection missions and making critical selections that define the roots of the OSU Hazelnut Breeding Program, still thriving today.  Now in retirement she continues to breed plants, namely the Haskap Berry (Lonicera caerulea), a flavorful fruit slightly different from the blue honeysuckle. We enjoy an inspirational discussion about her training, her career, and the tremendous barriers she faced as a woman in science.  We also discuss her current plant breeding interests and the development of the Haskap Berry.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Populism 57 mins – “Is it a positive wave or a troubling pattern? In this age of anxiety over joblessness and immigration, populist leaders in Hungary, Poland, Turkey, Sweden and the Philippines are tapping in. Is populism, as the 1960’s American historian Richard Hofstadter called it, “a paranoid style of politics”? Or is it what others describe as “the essence of democratic politics”?” At the link find the title, “Is There a Culture War Against Populism? Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-piv69i4e-20180302.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Protest Clothing 13 mins – “No one thinks twice about a woman wearing blue jeans in New York City — but when Nobel laureate Malala wears them, it’s a political act. Around the globe, individuality can be a crime, and clothing can be a form of protest. In a talk about the power of what we wear, Kaustav Dey examines how fashion gives us a nonverbal language of dissent and encourages us to embrace our authentic selves.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Identity 24 mins – “At what point do sex robots become sex slaves? How are bandwidth and storage capacity changing our lives? Can you have a “personal brand” and “be yourself” at the same time? In this week’s episode of Big Think’s Think Again podcast, host Jason Gots is joined by author and tech pundit Baratunde Thurston, “a philosopher comedian fighting for the future.” Interview clips from Rick Smolan, Lawrence Krauss, and Guy Kawasaki launch a discussion of human potential, social status, identity, and how Kim Kardashian’s butt didn’t actually “break the internet”.” At the linkf ind the title, “7. Baratunde Thurston (Comedian, Cultural Critic) – Stupidity Scaled/Robot Rights/Brand You, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files PP7554249428.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race and Identity in Canada 29 mins – “Meet Byron Cruz, the man migrant workers call for medical help when they’re worried a trip to the doctor could cost them their livelihoods.” At the link find the title, “Why migrant workers call this man for medical help instead of seeing a doctor, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-DGX4onvP-20180302.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Racism in America 45 mins – “Recorded on January 25, 2018 Shelby Steele, a Hoover Institution senior fellow and author of Shame: How America’s Past Sins Have Polarized Our Country , joins Peter Robinson to discuss race relations in the United States. Steele tells stories about growing up in segregated Chicago and the fights he and his family went through to end segregation in their neighborhood schools. He draws upon his own experiences facing racism while growing up in order to inform his opinions on current events. Steele and Robinson go on to discuss more recent African-American movements, including Steele’s thoughts on the NFL protests, Black Lives Matter, and recent rumors about Oprah Winfrey running for office.” At the link find the title, “Shelby Steele On “How America’s Past Sins Have Polarized Our Country, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180208-steele.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Sickness 72 mins -”Today’s interview features Dr. Lauren Jackson, a nationally known expert in the field of tumor and normal-tissue radiobiology. She is especially recognized for her expertise in medical countermeasure development for acute radiation sickness and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure. Lauren is the deputy director of the Division of Translational Radiation Sciences within the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Lauren, who also goes by Isabel, received her bachelors in science in microbiology from North Carolina State University in 2006, and her PhD in pathology from Duke University in 2012. She currently is a principal or collaborating investigator on a number of industry and federally sponsored contracts and research grants. She has published extensively on the characterization and refinement of animal models of radiation-induced normal tissue injury that recapitulate the response in humans. Models developed in Lauren’s laboratory have gone on to receive FDA concurrence as appropriate for use in medical countermeasure screens. Lauren is a senior associate editor for Advances in Radiation Oncology, a journal of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology, and serves as an ad hoc reviewer for several peer-reviewed journals. She also is the author of several book chapters on normal tissue tolerance to radiation, mechanisms of injury, and potential therapeutic interventions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rainbow Packs 12 mins – “School supplies. May seem like a simple thing – but basic supplies like pencils, crayons and erasers might be all it takes to excite a child to learn.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secret Societies 46 mins – “Every time he sees a triangle these days, my 10-year-old son points and says “Gasp! the illuminati!” This is a meme he and all his friends absorbed from YouTube. It’s interesting that several centuries after the Illuminati first appeared, as basically a idealistic secret boys’ club, followed by the Freemasons, these kinds of shadowy organizations still exert so much power on our imaginations. That’s because power doesn’t always come in the shape of Queens, Presidents, CEOs or Members of Parliament. Often it exists in the more or less invisible relationships between people. My guest today is renowned historian Niall Ferguson. His new book The Square and the Tower: Networks and Hierarchies, from the Freemasons to Facebook looks at the two ancient power structures that continue to move the world today.” At the link find the title, “135. Niall Ferguson (historian) – The Ghost of Future Past, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY7109509754.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senior Helpline 14 mins – “A 24-hour helpline in the UK known as Samaritans helped Sophie Andrews become a survivor of abuse rather than a victim. Now she’s paying the favor back as the founder of The Silver Line, a helpline that supports lonely and isolated older people. In a powerful, personal talk, she shares why the simple act of listening (instead of giving advice) is often the best way to help someone in need.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Harassment in Medicine 27 mins – “This week, White Coat, Black Art has stories of up-and-coming female doctors who have been harassed, abused and even assaulted by the higher-ups who are supposed to be mentoring them into the world of medicine. Many of the women say they were too afraid to file complaints fearing the power senior doctors have over their career prospects.Those who have complained find the system often does more to protect the alleged perpetrators. We canvas provincial colleges for how they are handling #Metoo allegations and hear from a lawyer who has repeatedly called for the end of self-regulation for doctors. She says these new allegations back up her assertion that the hierarchical nature of medical education is ripe for abuse, and needs more oversight. NOTE: Corrected version.” At the link find the title, “#MeToo in Medicine, Mar, 2018,” right-click “whitecoat-kAYuK82a-20180306.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sex Science 53 mins – “Valentine’s Day, StarTalk style: Celebrate the science of love, sex, relationships, and more in this “Best of” episode featuring Neil deGrasse Tyson, sex columnist Dan Savage, biological anthropologist Dr. Helen Fisher, bestselling science author Mary Roach, Kristen Schaal, and Chuck Nice. (Warning: Adult Content.)” At the link left click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment in New Hampshire 50 mins – “In the months since #MeToo went viral on social media, millions of people across the globe have broken the silence on their stories of sexual assault and harassment. But where do we stand in New Hampshire? How has the Granite State responded to the Me Too movement? What conversations are we having? What actions are we taking? Months ago, we asked listeners if they used that hashtag, and whether they’d be willing to share their stories and perspectives with us. In this episode, you’ll hear from those women, as well as those who study trauma and how to respond to it. You’ll hear how one man is moving forward in the age of “Me Too,” and what a University of New Hampshire research center is doing to prevent sexual assault and harassment.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Strategist 16 mins – “’The only way we’re going to make substantial progress on the challenging problems of our time is for business to drive the solutions,’ says social impact strategist Wendy Woods. In a data-packed talk, Woods shares a fresh way to assess the impact all parts of business can have on all parts of society, and then adjust them to not only do less harm but actually improve things. Learn more about how executives can move beyond corporate social responsibility to “total societal impact” — for the benefit of both a company’s bottom line and society at large.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Energy Off Grid 14 mins – “There’s an energy revolution happening in villages and towns across Africa — off-grid solar energy is becoming a viable alternative to traditional electricity systems. In a bold talk about a true leapfrog moment, Amar Inamdar introduces us to proud owners of off-grid solar kits — and explains how this technology has the opportunity to meet two extraordinary goals: energy access for all and a low-carbon future. “Every household a proud producer as well as consumer of energy,” Inamdar says. “That’s the democracy of energy.” (Followed by a brief Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson)” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South African President 25 mins – “Becky Milligan looks back at the extraordinary life of South Africa’s new president. From humble beginnings, he became a lawyer, established the country’s most powerful trade union organisation and was a key player in negotiating the end of apartheid. After losing out at an earlier attempt to become president, he turned to business and rapidly became one of South Africa’s richest men – while also attracting controversy over allegations about his role during the Marikana massacre of striking miners. As he takes power, what really makes him tick?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Physician P1 63 mins – “Today’s episode is the second of a two-part interview with IHMC Senior Scientist Dr. Jonathan Clark, a six-time Space Shuttle crew surgeon who has served in numerous roles for both NASA and the Navy. Part one of our interview, episode 55, ended with Jon talking about the tragic death of his wife, astronaut Laurel Clark. She died along with six fellow crew members in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster in 2003. February marks the 15th anniversary of the disaster. Today’s episode picks up with Jon talking about becoming part of a NASA team that investigated the Columbia disaster. Ken and Dawn also talk to Jon about the extensive research he has been doing on the neurologic effects of extreme environments, and also about the instrumental work he has been doing in developing new protocols to benefit future aviators and astronauts.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Physician P2 80mins – “Today’s episode is the first of two-part interview with IHMC Senior Scientist Dr. Jonathan Clark, a six-time Space Shuttle crew surgeon who has served in numerous roles for both NASA and the Navy. In a wide-ranging conversation with Ken and Dawn, Jon talks about his 26-year career in the Navy, his extensive research on the neurologic effects of extreme environments on humans, and the tragic death of his wife, astronaut Laurel Clark, who died along with six fellow crew members in the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster in 2003.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Technology on Earth 11 mins – “Danielle Wood leads the Space Enabled research group at the MIT Media Lab, where she works to tear down the barriers that limit the benefits of space exploration to only the few, the rich or the elite. She identifies six technologies developed for space exploration that can contribute to sustainable development across the world — from observation satellites that provide information to aid organizations to medical research on microgravity that can be used to improve health care on Earth. “Space truly is useful for sustainable development for the benefit of all peoples,” Wood says.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Seafood 59 mins – “On November 13-14, 2017, the Aquarium of the Pacific and the Honda Marine Science Foundation convened and facilitated a forum on “Sato-umi in the Anthropocene.” The forum was designed to explore a number of approaches to “integrated” coastal management, in particular those that cross the land-sea boundary, some of which have been practiced for thousands of years, to see if lessons could be extracted to elevate awareness and stimulate action to reduce vulnerability in the “new normal” of rising sea level. Join us as we talk with forum speakers, Drs. Jerry Schubel, Mike Orbach, and Jim Fawcett, to learn ways humans can manage our coastal areas more sustainably.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terror in Moscow Theater 26 mins – “[First item.]This episode features Bob’s interview with the filmmaker Dan Reed about his 2003 documentary “Terror in Moscow”, about the 2002 attack by Chechen terrorists on a Moscow Theater. Reed had access to remarkable footage filmed by the terrorists themselves and used it to present an extraordinary view of the crisis. Then, Bob revisits his interview with Matthew Heineman about his documentary “Cartel Land” in 2015. Heineman’s relationship with his subjects allowed him to capture moments of violence, corruption, and even adultery — all recorded with the subjects’ full participation.” At the link find the title, “Bob’s Docs Episode Two: Access, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files otm20170809_podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Threat Protection Online 72 mins – “This week we talk about Standard Notes, present a new Offense/Defense, and answer your listener questions.” At the link find the title, “062-Keeping Your Data Private with Standard Notes,” right-click “Media files 382586711-user-98066669-062-keeping-your-data-private-with-standard-notes.mp3”and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Traumatic Brain Injuries 45 mins – “Today’s episode features one of the nation’s leading physicians and researchers who has spent years studying and treating traumatic brain injuries. Dr. Flora Hammond is a professor and chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Indiana University School of Medicine. She also is the Chief of Medical Affairs and Medical Director at the Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana. She has been a project director for the Traumatic Brain Injury Model System since 1998. Shortly before we conducted this interview with Dr. Hammond, she and a team of physicians and scientists at Indiana University received a $2.1 million grant to continue research into people who suffer traumatic brain injuries and how these injuries affect the lives of patients as well as their families….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Triathlon Athlete 13 mins – “A 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bicycle ride and then a full-length marathon on hot, dry ground — with no breaks in between: the legendary Ironman triathlon in Kona, Hawaii, is a bucket list goal for champion athletes. But when Minda Dentler decided to take it on, she had bigger aspirations than just another medal around her neck. She tells the story of how she conquered this epic race, and what it inspired her to do next.” At the link click the “Share” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribal Formation 69 mins – “The evidence is clear that humans value being good members of their tribes much more than they value being correct. We will choose to be wrong if it keeps us in good standing with our peers. In this episode, we explore how that affects politics and science communication, and how it is driving our growing partisan divide.” At the link right-click “Direct download: 122-Tribal Psychology v4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the poop-up menu.

Trump Funding Cuts 24 mins – “Since President Trump entered office, he’s promised a radical restructuring of the federal government — including significant cuts to the size of the federal workforce. But that hasn’t happened yet. On this episode, we ask: What’s the hold-up?” At the link find the title, “Does the President have the power to downsize the government?, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5aa2f8cce4b09008fdb02baa_1351620000001-300040_t_1520629967944_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Q and A 24 mins – “The podcast Trump Inc. is a collaboration between WNYC Studios and ProPublica. A team of investigative reporters is examining whether and how the Trump family is profiting from the presidency, and they’ve organized the show around an “open investigation” so listeners and tipsters can contribute and follow along. We featured the first episode on our podcast feed a few weeks ago, and this week we’re checking back with Episode 4. Ilya Marritz of WNYC and Eric Umansky of ProPublica speak with David Farenthold of The Washington Post about what he’s been able to learn about President Trump’s business dealings, and take calls from listeners with questions about possible profits and motives.” At the link find the title, “Follow The Money, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files otm022718_podextra.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trusts and Employee Privacy 76 mins – “This week Jason co-hosts with Michael to discuss trusts, employment privacy, and DNA testing.” At the link find the title, “064-Trusts Update & Employment Privacy,” right-click “Media files 389494014-user-98066669-064-trusts-update-employment-privacy.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Twitter Co-founder 51 mins – “Recorded on November 9, 2017 With social networks like Facebook and Twitter in abundance, the effects of networks on society in the twenty-first century are inarguable. However, Niall Ferguson, author of The Square and the Tower, argues that networks are not a new phenomenon and have been impacting human culture from the beginning of history. Niall Ferguson and Peter Robinson discuss networks and hierarchies throughout history in this episode of Uncommon Knowledge. Ferguson breaks down what he means by networks and hierarchies using the imagery of the Piazza Del Campo in Siena, where the Torre del Mangia, representing the hierarchy, casts a long shadow over the Piazza Del Campo, representing the network. Ferguson argues that this powerful imagery invokes the essence of his book and the intertwined nature of networks and hierarchies within society. Ferguson goes on to discuss the importance of networks in social movements throughout history, including Martin Luther and the Reformation, Paul Revere and the American Revolution, Joseph Stalin and the Soviet Union, and social media and Donald Trump. He argues that a networked world is a dangerous world, in that it allows movements and societies to advance in unexpected ways.” At the link find the title, “Niall Ferguson’s The Square and the Tower, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180124-ferguson.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 46 mins – “How do you know that you’re really where you are right now? I mean, where are you getting this sense of place from? A bunch of data from at least some of your five senses enters your brain where it’s cross-referenced with categories from memory. You’re making a probabilistic calculation: This sure looks, feels, and smells like my office. Jeremy Bailenson, my guest today, has been experimenting with cutting edge virtual reality for over a decade now. His Virtual Human Interaction Lab studies the ways VR’s unique sense of presence—of putting you into a different place (and maybe time) from the one you’re in can be used for education, healing, and—yes—generally making the world a better place. His new book is called: EXPERIENCE ON DEMAND: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do.” At the link find the title, “133. Jeremy Bailenson (VR expert) – Through the Looking Glass, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY5796828900.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Letters P1- Intro 3 mins – “Hundreds of letters, written between brothers fighting in the Pacific during World War II. Almost one a day, for every day of the war. The letters detail everything from the monotony of training, to the struggles of the Great Depression back home, to the prospects for the Chicago Cubs, and ultimately the horrors of some of the most intense and significant battles of the war in the Pacific. In this podcast, you’ll hear the story of these brothers — the Eyde brothers — and of World War II, as told through their letters, in their own words….” [Three more parts are available at the link.] At the link find the title, “An introduction, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5a224091e4b08952b5972441_1351620000001-300040_t_1512194196338_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Letters P2 , 1941: The calm 22 mins – “Meet the Eydes, four brothers from Rockford, Ill., living through the Great Depression. Even with two away at basic training, and Adolf Hitler’s conquest of Europe well underway, war still seemed a remote possibility. Until the unthinkable. Actors: Michael Ball (Ralph), Zachary Burgart (Frank), Jeff Chiang (John), Brendan Wentz (Sanford).” AT the link find the title, “1941: The calm, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5a274b47e4b08952b59724fc_1351620000001-300040_t_1512524618768_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Letters P3, 1942: The start 18 mins – “With the country at war, the Eyde brothers await their fates. Frank and Ralph inch closer to action, as they anxiously try to keep younger brother John away from the front lines.” At the link find the title, “1942: The start, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5a3064fae4b08952b5972651_1351620000001-300030_t_1513121022274_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Letters P4, Discussion: Part I 21 mins – “The actors in this podcast are all veterans themselves. They join Dan to discuss their experiences reading the letters, and what is universal about the story of the Eyde family.” At the link find the title, “ Discussion: Part I, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 5a306836e4b08952b597265c_1351620000001-300030_t_1513121855545_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War Letters P5, 1943-1944: Battles 18 mins – “Frank has seen his first combat, as Ralph and John prepare for their own deployments. Facing war has the brothers engaged in intense battles — both physical and mental. Actors: Michael Ball (Ralph), Zachary Burgart (Frank), Jeff Chiang (John), Brendan Wentz (Sanford).” At the link find the title, “ 1943-1944: Battles, Dec 2017, “Media files 5a395db0e4b08952b5972809_1351620000001-300030_t_1513708981550_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Washington’s Cook 11 mins – George Washington had a negro cook named Hercules and this is his story. At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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