Media Mining Digest 333 – Mar 30, 2018: Arms Dealers, Automation Future, Bacterial Biofilms, Bell Labs Interview, Black Hat Conference, Blind Actor, Blockchain, Breakthrough Ideas, Breast Cancer Survivor, Broadband Developments, Burning Man, Central Line Infections, Chickens and Antibiotics, Christopher Steele Dossier, Civil War Myths, Climate Change Deniers, College Basketball Corruption, Ebola and Fecal Transfers, Entitlements, Environmental Movement History, Ferguson Voices, Free Speech Discussion, Gen Lansdale on Vietnam, Gun Sales Discussion, Hanna Arendt on Totalitarianism, Health Research Priorities, Hip Hop History, Iraqi Reconstruction, Irish View of the U.S., ISIS Cyber Terrorism, John Oliver, Journalism Tech Trends, KKK Background, Kushner Security Clearance, Malnutrition, Maternity Death Prevention, Mexican-American Writer, Migration in Europe, Monopolies, Mueller Firing, Music and Dance History, National Park System, NSA History, Nuclear Proliferation, Ocean Conservation Pain Control, Pain Relief, Parkland Movement, Poverty Cycle, Project Deadlines, Psychotropic Drugs, Racism in Canada, Racism in U.S. Status, Rape Kit Backlog, Slavery in U.S., Social Capitalism, Social Media Uses, Southern U.S. Culture, Teachers Pay, Technology Trends, Trade Policy, Trump Finances, Trump Personality, Tyranny, Undercover FBI Agent, Unions Future, Virtual Reality, Water Treatment, White Supremacists, Work Future, Working Women

Exercise your ears: the 170 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 733 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double or ctrl-click individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 20,217 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 118GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get even the discarded material using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 440 sources. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

40 Acres and a Mule 32 mins– “A 19th century promise, and a 21st century betrayal. The past and present of 40 acres and a mule.” At the link find the title, “The Deed, Oct 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Book Operations 19 mins – “Having already turned media and retail upside down, Amazon and other Internet businesses are preparing to turn those worlds inside out as well. Over more than two decades, Amazon has shaped the customer shopping experience – both on the Web and on the street: as an online-only e-retailer opened since 1994; then beginning in 2015, as a brick-and-mortar concern operating Amazon Books and since last summer, Whole Foods, the national supermarket chain. On a Christmas Eve visit to a crowded Amazon Books in Manhattan, Cherie Hu realized that Amazon had flipped the table on the analog environment of traditional bookselling. “From the outside, it looks like any other physical bookstore. On the inside, most of the shelves and book labels are presented in a manner that only Amazon can pull off with authority, drawing inspiration from its online user experience—and from its large swaths of consumer data,” she recalls. Hu identifies the new shopping experience as an “ingenious reversal of skeuomorphism, or the act of making digital objects represent their real-world counterparts… Amazon Books feels so refreshing and remains so popular because it turns skeuomorphism on its head: it makes the physical world conform to its digital origins, rather than the other way around,” she explains….At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Indian Conflict 53 mins – “Washington University in St. Louis professor Peter Kastor teaches a class about how the United States changed from Reconstruction to the Progressive Era.” At the link find the title, “U.S. From Reconstruction to the Progressive Era, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.491569.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Arms Dealers 54 mins – “In a UBC Wall Exchange talk from Vancouver, former South African politician and current U.K. corruption researcher Andrew Feinstein argues that the arms trade does not make us more secure. In fact, he contends that it fuels conflict, undermines economic progress and democracy, and — with its unintended consequences — endangers citizens everywhere.” At the link find the title, “Andrew Feinstein exposes “the shadow world” of global arms, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-sY4kU3xYDHHkqGG.mp3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Automation Future 54 mins – “AI and robots seem to be everywhere, handling more and more work, freeing humans up — to do what? Contributor Jill Eisen takes a wide-angle lens to the digital revolution happening in our working lives. What will happen when robots and algorithms surpass what our brains can do? Part 1 of a 3-part series.” At the link find the title, “Artificial intelligence, robots and the future of work (Encore September 13, 2017), Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-qj5OYnEa925dnTs.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bacterial Biofilms 48 mins – “Most bacteria live a sedentary lifestyle in community structures called biofilms. Vaughn Cooper tells us what bacterial biofilms are, why biofilms differ from test tube environments, and how long-term evolution experiments combined with population genomics are teaching us how bacteria really work. He also discusses using hands-on bacterial evolution activities to introduce high schoolers to future STEM possibilities. Julie’s biggest takeaways: Cells in a biofilm shift to dedicate their resources to protection rather than reproduction. This allows biofilms to be innately more resistant to antibiotics than those growing in planktonic culture. One of the least-understood parts of a biofilm cycle is the dispersal stage. What cues or signals influence some biofilm-embedded cells to leave? This is a vital part of biofilm formation, since these dispersal cells can eventually attach to a new surface and restart the process of forming a biofilm. The bead system of biofilm propagation allows Vaughn and his colleagues to study the long-term evolution of biofilms. This system, combined with population genomics, allows the study of all the different genetic changes within the population. Traditional genetic screens compare libraries of mutants to see which survive under different conditions. Rather than on libraries of mutant strains, evolution works on random mutants that arise naturally. The accessibility of sequencing technologies has changed the way scientists study evolution, as now the mutations can be found as they form, rather than being seeded into the initial mutant library screen. High schoolers using nonpathogenic bacteria can study evolution in action by developing new colony morphologies. Work with high schoolers and their teachers has shown students who do hands-on learning do better on standardized tests and that girls, especially, express higher interest in technology and an interest in STEM careers after a 1-2 week project….” At the link find the title, “076: Evolution of bacterial biofilm populations with Vaughn Cooper, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files MTM076.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bank Crisis 63 mins – “It’s been ten years since we saw suddenly unemployed Lehman Brothers bankers carrying their possessions out of their offices in boxes; since whole neighbourhoods in suburban America turned into empty ghost towns; since the British and American governments pumped trillions into the banking system, saving some institutions and abandoning others. The crash of 2008 and 2009 shook the very foundations of modern capitalism. So where are we today? Although we may have been spared a second Great Depression, post-crisis productivity has flatlined and the last decade has seen Britain’s worst pay squeeze since the nineteenth century. And according to some, the seeds of today’s political upheavals, from Brexit to Trump to the Corbyn surge, were sown during the 2008 crash, which irreparably damaged public trust in the establishment and its institutions. To look back at this critical moment for the global economy and examine its repercussions today, Intelligence Squared brought together a panel of the country’s top economic experts…” At the link find the title, “Ten Years On: The Financial Crisis and the State of Modern Capitalism, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baseball Economics 62 mins – “Baseball stats guru and author Bill James talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the challenges of understanding complexity in baseball and elsewhere. James reflects on the lessons he has learned as a long-time student of data and the role it plays in understanding the underlying reality that exists between different variables in sports and outside of sports. The conversation closes with a discussion of our understanding of social processes and the connection to public policy and the ideologies we hold.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Baseball Math 38 mins – “Statistician Nate Silver on baseball and the 2016 election, recorded live at CAVEAT. [Caveat.nyc]” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Bell Labs Interview P2 36 mins – “Researchers with Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey, talk about communications and technology work they are conducting. This is the second of a two interviews with the company.” At the link find the title, “Communicators at Bell Labs, Part 2, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.494517.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bell Labs Interviews P1 69 mins – “Marcus Weldon, president of Bell Labs, talks about communications and technology research being conducted there. Bell Labs is one the world’s premier communications research facilities.” At the link find the title, “Communicators at Bell Labs, Part 1, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.488740.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Big Data Science 33 mins – “Data scientist and “Weapons of Math Destruction” author Cathy O’Neil on the dark side of big data.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Black Hat Conference 35 mins – “Communicators at the Black Hat Cybersecurity Conference – The Communicators interviewed four researchers at the Black Hat Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, about cybersecurity, how hackers operate, and how artificial intelligence is being used in the cyber world.” At the link you can watch the video and get a free copy of it, but an audio download must be purchased; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Black Hat Conference 39 mins – “Communicators at the Black Hat Cybersecurity Conference – Two cybersecurity company founders and the FBI special agent in charge of the Las Vegas region were interviewed at the Black Hat Cybersecurity Conference in Las Vegas.” At the link you can watch the video and get a free copy of it, but an audio download must be purchased; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Blind Actor 22 mins – “George Wurtzel gives us a inside look and his philosophical approach to his involvement with the New Subaru TV commercial. We are including an audio described version of the audio from the Subaru commercial. George is George and nothing Hollywood about him as he explains the process and the experience of working on location and being part of this great commercial with such a great perspective on Blindness. George Talks about Wood Working for the Blind, WW4B, Enchanted Hills Camp, and his Hollywood accepted wardrobe… Bib Over-alls Flannel shirt and boots. Good to Go!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Power Systems 41 mins – “Freelance science journalist Kevin Begos reports from the U.S. Power and Renewable Summit in Austin, Texas, on the use of blockchain technology to make more efficient energy markets and distribution.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and TrueBit 66 mins – “Jason Teutsch is a mathematician (PhD) and computer scientist whose research focuses on distributed systems, security, game theory, and algorithmic randomness. Jason is also the founder of TrueBit – a scalable verification solution for Blockchains. In this episode, Jason and I discuss:  The computational limitations of Ethereum smart contracts. The definition of smart contract (hint: it’s not the same as a legal contract), gas, and the gas limit on Ethereum. The “Verifier’s Dilemma,” a situation whereby Blockchain miners have little to no incentives to verify transactions (which is the problem TrueBit solves). Use cases for TrueBit, including LivePeer – a decentralized video streaming platform, AI, “Interactive ICOs,” and much more. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Blockchain ARK 85 mins – “ARK provides users, developers, and startups with innovative blockchain technologies. We aim to create an entire ecosystem of linked chains and a virtual spiderweb of endless use-cases that make ARK highly flexible, adaptable, and scalable. ARK is a secure platform designed for mass adoption and will deliver the services that consumers want and developers need.” “Originally from The Netherlands, Samuel Zwaan has now lived in several countries. After his studies in comparative media studies at Utrecht University he moved to Atlanta to enjoy a more technical studies at The Georgia Institute of Technology in digital media. Here he was picked up by eBay to become a Technical Product Manager. In recent years Samuel has become interested in crypto-currencies, taking the leap to invest early 2017. He has been with Ark almost since its beginning and by being very active in the community made his way into becoming a top 51 delegate within Ark. Besides being a delegate he also sits on the Ark Community Board.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Defined 12 mins – “Freelance science journalist Kevin Begos reports from the U.S. Power and Renewable Summit in Austin, Texas, on the use of blockchain technology to make more efficient energy markets and distribution.”  At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.  

Blockchain Explained 27 mins – “Alex Danco is an Associate and member of the Discover Team at Social Capital, a partnership consisting of philanthropists, capitalists, and technologists who together share the same goal of funding startups and ideas that can create value and change on a global scale. Alex is fond of thinking and writing about the future, and has authored a number of blogs that discuss the future of human society and technology all over the web. This penchant for futurism has made him grow fond of little yet novel ideas that just need a bit of capital to get started. In this episode, Alex explains how Blockchain works. He discusses what made Blockchain a necessity, how it was initially conceptualized, and why Bitcoin paved the way for its mainstream introduction. He also describes just how cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Ethereum have value, and why they are not that different from gold.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain in Agriculture 31 mins – “Dr. Nishant Dass is an associate professor and Ph.D. Coordinator in finance at Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business. His areas of expertise include major areas of financing and business management including CEO-Compensation, Corporate Governance, Mutual Funds, Trade Credit, and International Finance. He has plenty of published papers under his name with regards to financing and has extensive experience providing sage financial advice to startups and other small companies. He has recently picked up an interest in Blockchain technology, citing it as the next big thing since the internet. In this episode, Dr. Nishant Dass discusses the potential and limitations of Blockchain technology. He explains why Bitcoin is not Blockchain, the kinds of problems Blockchain can solve in the near future, and why Blockchain doesn’t guarantee truth. He also shares what he believes will happen within the next two to three years with regards to its inevitable global implementation.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain in Canada 53 mins – “Paul is President and Co-Founder of Impak Finance, a FinTech company focused on driving positive social impact. He has raised millions of dollars, and has been part of numerous exits, acquisitions, and IPOs. In August of 2017, Impak Finance made history by launching Impak Coin – a cryptocurrency for a better world. That launch became Canada’s first compliant ICO – meaning Canadian regulators reviewed the ICO and gave it a thumbs-up.” At the link find the title, “024: Impak Coin – Canada’s First Compliant ICO with Paul Allard,”Media files Paul_Allard_final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain in Developing Countries 39 mins – “David Davies is the Founder of AgUnity and AgriLedger. AgUnity enables the world’s smallest and poorest farmers to have access to a means to lift themselves out of poverty through smartphone and blockchain solutions. AgriLedger is the smartphone app AgUnity developed that records and transacts incorruptible data through blockchain technology. The app allows virtually every user to know their transactions and data are kept safe and tamper-proof. In this episode, David Davies shares his ideas and vision for the future of blockchain and the agricultural industry. He explains the different problems blockchain can solve, how their app integrates blockchain technology as well as how it can boost farmer’s income significantly.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain of Food 44 mins – “Raja Ramachandran is the CEO of Ripe.io, a company that considers itself as the Blockchain of food. Ripe.io offers solutions to food problems that involve data transparency while also providing answers to many consumer questions. Raja has a background in finance and FOREX trading and is fond of using financial technology, cloud-based systems, machine learning, and Blockchain to help solve problems around food on a global scale. In this episode, Raja shares the idea behind Ripe.io, their mission, and how they can make use of Blockchain to solve problems specific to food and agriculture. He explains why Blockchain is not the answer, but part of a solution and how consumer feedback helps make the system work better. He also describes the current application of Blockchain now as well as how he sees it being implemented in the short term.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breakthrough Ideas 44 mins – “In this episode, author and journalist Warren Berger joins us to discuss his book, A More Beautiful Question: The Power of Inquiry in Sparking Breakthrough Ideas, which examines the ways in which deep questioning fuels innovation. Warren has contributed articles and stories to The New York Times, GQ, New York magazine, and The Los Angeles Times, and was previously magazine editor for CBS and contributing editor for Wired. How questioning leads to innovation and why Warren believes the best innovation is fuelled by an endless cycle of questioning at every stage. The benefits of both informed and uninformed questioning and how these differences interplay within different work cultures. How to get into deep questioning within the constraints of existing processes and routines. At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Cancer Survivor 22 mins – “There is nothing uplifting about cancer, but there is something incredible in the way some people respond to it. In this episode, you’ll meet Jeanine Patten-Coble, a 39-year-old wife and mother who goes to bed normally one night but discovers cancer when she wakes up the next morning. Like all cancer patients, Jeanine faces a tough road ahead. But she makes an incredible discovery — that helps her not only survive but build something incredible: Little Pink Houses of Hope.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Developments 29 mins – “USTelecom President Jonathan Spalter talks about communications issues, including net neutrality and USTelecom’s recent report that suggests broadband investment has been decreasing.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Jonathan Spalter, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.493182.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burning Man 73 mins – “Marian Goodell, CEO of the Burning Man Project, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Burning Man, the 8-day art and music festival in the Nevada Desert. Goodell explains how Burning Man has evolved over the years, the principles and rules that govern the experience today, and plans for expanding the Burning Man experience around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Indian History 75 mins – “Middle Tennessee State University professor Ashley Riley Sousa teaches a class on Native Americans and capitalism in early 19th century California.” At the link find the title, “California Native Americans and Early 1800s Capitalism, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.474270.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indigenous History 54 mins – “Mohawk education advocate Roberta Jamieson believes Canada is at a make-or-break historical moment where it has a chance to recast its historically toxic relationship with First Nations for the next 150 years.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s original promise: Still waiting to be realize, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas_20180112_56832.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Indigenous Youth 54 mins – “Gabrielle Scrimshaw delivers the third annual Vancouver Island University Indigenous Lecture on the challenges Indigenous youth face, what reconciliation looks like, and how people can engage on that journey.” At the link find the title, “Gabrielle Scrimshaw on liberating the past and embracing the future, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-Cflt4ZhB-20180216.mp3 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cave Paintings 54 mins – “Neil Sandell introduces us to the French archaeologist Jean Clottes, a man who’s devoted his lifetime trying to decipher the rich, enigmatic world of cave art.” At the link find the title, “Decoding pre-historic art with Jean Clottes, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas_20180115_81486.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Central Line Infections 24 mins – “Central line infections can be deadly. And they used to be extremely common: just a decade ago, hundreds of thousands of patients got them every year. Now, that number is closer to 9,000 annually. That’s still high, but it’s a dramatic drop in just ten years. So how did that happen? On this episode of the Impact, we talk to the doctor who discovered that central line infections are, in nearly all cases, completely preventable. Physicians just need to follow a checklist to make sure the line stays safe and sterile. And we’ll explore why, if this infection is preventable, some hospitals still have several cases of them each year. This episode includes content that might be upsetting for listeners, so please be aware. Many thanks to Vox’s Johnny Harris, who originally recorded footage for this story. For more on this topic, read Sarah’s story on central line infections from 2015.” At the link find the title, “Car crash hospitals vs. plane crash hospitals, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files f953e69a-862e-482f-9742-3d3560a920ee.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chickens and Antibiotics 30 mins – “Journalist Maryn McKenna on uncovering a story about the secretive meat industry.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Christopher Steele Dossier 46 mins – “‘New Yorker’ staff writer Jane Mayer tells the story of ex-spy Christopher Steele, the man behind the unverified dossier detailing Trump’s ties with Russia. We’ll talk about how the dossier was compiled, and why so little was done about its findings during the campaign — even after Steele told the FBI. Steele also wrote a memo after the election about the possibility that Russians blocked Trump’s first choice for Secretary of State, Mitt Romney.” At the link find the title, “The Infamous Trump-Russia Dossier, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 2018_0306.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome 32 mins – “Julie Rehmeyer is a math and science journalist and author of “Through the Shadowlands: A Science Writer’s Odyssey into an Illness Science Doesn’t Understand.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Civil War Memories 75 mins – “Civil War Memory – Professor Gary Gallagher talked about Civil War memory and how people in the North and South have interpreted the legacy of the conflict from the post-war era to the present day.” At the link you can watch, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civil War Myths 34 mins – “We sat down with Nikole Hannah-Jones of the New York Times Magazine, Al Letson of Reveal, and Christy Coleman of the American Civil War Museum to talk about how they take down Civil War myths. For more Uncivil, visit our website: uncivil.show” At the link find the title, “The Takedown, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT8789065466.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Civil War Story 29 mins – “A listener voicemail sends us deep down the rabbit hole into one of the most toxic myths of the Confederacy.” At the link find the title, “The Portrait, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT5787464345.mp3” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Deniers 56 mins -”Global warming is “fake news”, or a “Chinese hoax”. So says a richly funded conservative movement that’s become a world-wide campaign. In her book, “The Merchants of Doubt”, Harvard historian of science Naomi Oreskes traces how this propaganda war started and how to fight it. Part 2 of a series on the resistance to climate change science.” At the link find the title, “Decoding the resistance to climate change: Are we doomed? Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-xjsWLfVw-20180209.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Scientist 30 mins – “Climate scientist Kate Marvel on whether climate change is to blame for Harvey, Irma, and Jose.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Climate Warming Impact 56 mins – “The evidence is everywhere: forests retreating, glaciers melting, sea levels rising. Droughts, floods, wildfires and storms have increased five-fold over the past 50 years. And we’re only just beginning to feel the strain of climate change. It’s estimated that rising sea levels will threaten 30 million people in Bangladesh alone. Miami could disappear within a generation. Despite all of these dire events and projections, the attacks continue — on climate scientists. Part 1 of a 2-part series. This episode features Clive Hamilton.” At the link find the title, “Are We F–ked? Decoding the resistance to climate change, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-rU3Y2y0lnzwzmN8.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clock History 10 mins – At the link find the title, “269 – How Do We Measure Time? 5+ Innovative Ways, Jan 15,” right-click “Media files ede_269-cn4.mp3” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloudfare Internet Service 32 mins – “Cloudflare’s Matthew Prince talks about hate speech on the internet and the First Amendment issues it raises. He questions whether he did the right thing by booting a neo-Nazi group off his service, and therefore off the internet.” At the link find the title, “Communicators with Matthew Prince, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.490935.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coal Miner Strike 52 mins – “Colorado State University-Pueblo professor Fawn-Amber Montoya teaches a class about the Ludlow coal miners’ strike and massacre that took place in the early 20th century in Colorado.” At the link find the title, “Ludlow Coal Miners’ Strike and Massacre, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.473139.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Basketball Corruption 46 mins – “The NCAA and the FBI’s full court press into corruption in college basketball. It’s huge.” At the link find the title, “The NCAA, The FBI And Corruption In College Basketball, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_589576941.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commerce Regulation Uses 53 mins – “An unassuming string of 16 words tucked into the Constitution grants Congress extensive power to make laws that impact the entire nation. The Commerce Clause has allowed Congress to intervene in all kinds of situations — from penalizing one man for growing too much wheat on his farm, to enforcing the end of racial segregation nationwide. That is, if the federal government can make an economic case for it. This seemingly all-powerful tool has the potential to unite the 50 states into one nation and protect the civil liberties of all. But it also challenges us to consider: when we make everything about money, what does it cost us?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Decency Act 31 mins – “Representative Ann Wagner (R-MO) and NetChoice counsel Carl Szabo talk about efforts to combat online sex trafficking, including legislation proposed by the congresswoman, which Mr. Szabo opposes.” At the link find the link, “Communicators with Representative Ann Wagner and Carl Szabo, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.491045.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cooperative Extensions 37 mins – “Dr. Jason de Koff is an Associate Professor and Extension Specialist at Tennessee State University. He holds a Ph.D in agronomy from Purdue University and has received numerous awards including the NACAA Achievement Award and the TAAA&S Communications Award (Learning Module Southeast Region) in 2016. Dr. de Koff joins me on today’s episode to discuss how cooperative extension programs are helping to spread unbiased information throughout the agriculture industry to help improve the future of agriculture. He also explains how cooperative extensions are encouraging the future of careers in agriculture, how they are helping new farmers get started in the agriculture industry, and how drones can be used in agricultural production.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Counterfeit Confederacy Money 22 mins – “A small shopkeeper in Philadelphia unwittingly stumbles into a con that helps take down the Confederacy.” At the link find the title, “The Paper, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT6610280328.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Threats 10 mins – “Hacking, fake news, information bubbles … all these and more have become part of the vernacular in recent years. But as cyberspace analyst Laura Galante describes in this alarming talk, the real target of anyone looking to influence geopolitics is dastardly simple: it’s you.” At the link click the share circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cultural Heritage 55 mins – “Wade Davis thinks we need to pay more attention to the values, the voices, and the concerns of Indigenous peoples. We have a lot to learn by listening more carefully. Wade Davis in a discussion with Paul Kennedy, with excerpts from a lecture at the Ontario Heritage Trust.” At the link find the title, “Wade Davis: Light at the edge of the world, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-D5S7rH5sZ956ByO.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DACA Status 48 mins – “Gun control is in the spotlight, but what about an immigration deal? Is there the political will to get it done?” At the link find the title, “Can An Immigration Deal Get Done? Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_590948923.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Types 27 mins – “[First of three items.] New research suggests there are five distinct types of diabetes and not just the two in the medical text books. Claudia Hammond talks to BBC News health reporter James Gallagher and lead researcher Leif Groop of the Lund University Diabetes Centre in Sweden about this new proposed classification of this globally rampant condition. How might it affect how people with the various different types are treated in the future. Professor Groop is now working with doctors in India and China to see how the incidence of the different diabetes types varies from one region of the world to another. The science of getting angry because you are hungry. Katy Takatsuki investigates a question from World Service listener Abi Gurjar about the phenomenon known as ‘hanger’. There is some real research behind the link between an empty-stomach and the descent of the red mist. CIMAvax is a lung cancer vaccine devised and developed by researchers in Cuba. It works in a novel way compared to other cancer immunotherapies developed elsewhere in the world and it seems to be unusually effective at bringing late stage lung cancer under control. Now it’s being trialled in the USA in collaboration with Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center – lung cancer vaccine (CIMAvax) trial in New York state. It is the first Cuban anti-cancer agent to be tested in the USA. Roswell Park president Candace Johnson explains the excitement around this promising Cuban therapy, and talks about its Cuban origins. BBC News reporter James Gallagher also talks to Claudia about the winners of this year’s Brain Prize, and they remember Sir Roger Bannister the neurologist (rather than the first athlete to run a mile in less than 4 minutes). “ At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dishwasher Inventor 4 mins – “Today, the birth of the dishwasher. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them….” At the link left-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1476,” select and click “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Dixie Song History 30 mins – “We dig deep into the anthem of the Confederacy, and learn that almost everything we thought we knew about it… was wrong.” At the link find the title, “The Song, Nov 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dodd-Frank Law 47 mins The Senate is poised to pass a major rewrite of the Dodd-Frank law. It could offer critical relief to mid-sized lenders, but also remove some consumer protections.” At the link find the title, “The Bipartisan Effort To Weaken Wall Street Regulations, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_591955893.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Musher 6 mins – “While visiting Shelburne recently, NHPR’s Sean Hurley heard about Sally Manikian. She’s a local dog musher – yes, that’s unusual, but for reasons more than that, reasons he couldn’t quite discover, she’d caught the town’s attention.  What, he wondered, made Sally Manikian so … well, interesting to her neighbors? He went to find out….” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Early Education 49 mins – “In our collective zeal to reform schools and close the achievement gap, we may have lost sight of where most learning really happens — at home.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola and Fecal Transfers 49 mins – “Colleen Kraft talks about treating Americans who became sick with Ebola during the west African outbreak and were evacuated to her hospital for treatment. In the second half, Kraft talks about her experience performing fecal transfers, and explains why she sees the gut microflora like a garden. Julie’s biggest takeaways: The patient conditions couldn’t be more different between the Liberian care centers and Emory University. The nursing ratio, access to both basic and experimental medicines, and even environmental conditions such as air conditioning created drastically different healthcare experiences between the two. While Ebola is a deadly disease, the symptoms such as headache, fever, and diarrhea are much more common than the bloody hemorrhaging often described. Patients can lose up to 10 liters of fluid each day! Fecal microbiota transfer is a more appropriate name than transplant; new microbes overlaid on top of the dysbiotic flora will reshape the microbiota already present. While FMT is currently used only to treat C. difficile (aka C. diff), forthcoming studies will determine if FMT can decrease risk of an antibiotic-resistant infection by displacing resistant bacteria. At the link find the title, “074: Treating Ebola in America and Fecal Transfers with Colleen Kraft, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files MTM074.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Waste 52 mins – “It’s not often I truly feel that a guest changes my paradigm on the spot – but this is an exception. This week we speak with Bryan Caplan about his newest book, The Case against Education: Why the Education System Is a Waste of Time and Money. As Bryan explains, despite being immensely popular–and immensely lucrative—education is grossly overrated. Bryan argues that the primary function of education is not to enhance students’ skill but to certify their intelligence, work ethic, and conformity—in other words, to signal the qualities of a good employee. In fact, decades of growing access to education have not resulted in better jobs for the average worker but instead in runaway credential inflation, yet employers still reward workers for costly schooling they rarely if ever use. Therefore, his recommendation is to cut education spending. Caplan draws on the latest social science to show how the labor market values grades over knowledge, and why the more education your rivals have, the more you need to impress employers. He explains why graduation is our society’s top conformity signal, and why even the most useless degrees can certify employability. He advocates two major policy responses. The first is educational austerity. Government needs to sharply cut education funding to curb this wasteful rat race. The second is more vocational education, because practical skills are more socially valuable than teaching students how to outshine their peers. Bryan Caplan is professor of economics at George Mason University and a blogger at EconLog.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eleanor Roosevelt on Human Rights 29 mins – ““Some of us have too much of this world’s goods​… and we are thereby separated too widely from each other,” ​wrote Eleanor Roosevelt, the subject of Blanche Wiesen Cook‘s three-volume biography​. ​For Women’s History​ ​Month, Laura speaks to Cook about ​Eleanor – the First Lady of the World – and why her work still resonates. ​Plus, a documentary by filmmaker Ross Watne on Arthurdale, the ​​experimental​, government-funded community Roosevelt ​championed in Depression-era West​ ​Virginia….” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Entitlements 59 mins – “Hoover Institution senior fellow John Cogan discusses his book, [The High Cost of Good Intentions], which looks at the history of federal entitlement programs in the U.S. over the past 200 years.” At the link find the title, Q&A with John Cogan, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.492148.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Movement History 45 mins– “Temple University professor Andrew Isenberg teaches a class about the rise of the environmental movement in the 1970s and how it impacted consumer and production practices.” At the link find the title, “Origins of Environmental Consumerism, Se” right-click “Media files program.475920.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming 3 Acres in California 95 mins – “Elizabeth and Paul Kaiser raise a little under three acres of vegetables at Singing Frogs Farm in Sebastopol, California, where they have been farming since 2007. Their ecological farming model rests on a foundation of no-till production, but incorporates many more elements to build soil organic matter and soil biology to support an economically viable operation. Elizabeth and Paul dig deep into the ecological and production principles that undergird their success, from soil management to transplant production and crop planning strategies. We take a look at their use of hedgerows for soil building, climate management, and insect management, including their tips for installing and maintaining these important ecological tools. And we discuss employee management within their complex, non-linear production system, as well as the economics of their production system. Perhaps most importantly, Paul and Elizabeth emphasize the ways that observation and their responses to their observations provided the foundation for building what they consider to be an example, and not a model, of their ecological production system.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ferguson Voices 28 mins – “Act 2 – History’s Rhyme by Moral Courage Project” Discussion of Ferguson people, culture and politics. At the link find the title, “Act 2 – History’s Rhyme, Aug, 2017,” right-click “Media files 339452595-fergusonvoicespod-act2.mp3” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Toxicology 63 mins – “Join Dan (@drusyniak) &howard (@heshiegreshie) as they explore the exceptions to dose response with Dr. Andrew Stolbach (@toxicologist12). Learn about hormesis, hysteresis, what a peck is and why Dan insists on wearing a hair shirt.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Free Speech Discussion 57 mins – “Whether it’s redressing historical wrongs, new hate speech legislation, or safe spaces as a human right: when does the desire to accommodate aggrieved groups become censorship? And what’s truly at stake? A debate from London’s “Battle of Ideas”.” At the link find the title, “Censorship and Identity: Free speech for me but not for you, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-912PgfxV-20180309.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Freeway Pollution 8 mins – At the link find the title, “275 – How Close is Too Close to Live by the Highway?, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ede_275-br5.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Frugal Life 46 minsFrugal living. If you take it to the extreme you just might live the life you’ve always dreamed of.” At the link find the title, “Extreme Frugality In The ‘Frugalwoods, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_591246222.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gen Lansdale on Vietnam 50 mins – “Benjamin Wittes interviews Max Boot on Boot’s new book, “The Road Not Taken,” for the Hoover Book Soiree.” At the link right-click “Direct download: HooverBoot_mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Equity 67 mins – “I recently hosted a CFR roundtable meeting with Valerie Jarrett, senior advisor to the Obama Foundation, a board member of Lyft and Ariel Financial, and a senior advisor to the media company Attn. As one of President Obama’s closest and most trusted senior advisors from 2008 to 2016, Jarrett raised gender issues to the top of the agenda when she chaired President Obama’s White House Council on Women and Girls and oversaw the Offices of Public Engagement and Intergovernmental Affairs. While working in the Obama White House, Jarrett promoted policies like equal pay, a higher minimum wage, paid leave and sick days, affordable childcare, as well as international women’s human rights. Since leaving office, Jarrett has continued to champion women’s issues, for example in launching and co-chairing the Galvanize Program, which seeks to support women for leadership roles in political and economic life.” At the link you can listen, but not download the audio file; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gender Myths 53 mins – We talk to science journalist and author Angela Saini about her latest book Inferior: How Science Got Women Wrong and the New Research That’s Rewriting the Story.” At the link find the title, “Science Got Women Wrong, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files 18f88661-4834-4ae5-9719-dbf327019051.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

German Social Conflict 54 mins – “Sociologist Aladin El-Mafalaani sees anti-immigrant cries to build walls, and hate-fuelled politics counter-intuitively: a sign that integration is working. Conflict, he argues, is the necessary consequence of new arrivals at a metaphoric dinner table.” At the link find the title, “Fighting at the table: Conflict as successful integration,Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas_20180111_37567.mp3 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Commons 14 mins – “We all share one planet — we breathe the same air, drink the same water and depend on the same oceans, forests and biodiversity. Economist Naoko Ishii is on a mission to protect these shared resources, known as the global commons, that are vital for our survival. In an eye-opening talk about the wellness of the planet, Ishii outlines four economic systems we need to change to safeguard the global commons, making the case for a new kind of social contract with the earth. Naoko Ishii leads the Global Environment Facility (GEF), a public financial institution that provides around US$1 billion every year to help tackle our planet’s most pressing environmental problems.” At the link click the “Shared” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Surveillance 48 mins – “American University lecturer Aaron Bell teaches a class about privacy laws and federal surveillance of civil rights leaders.” At the link find the title, “Federal Surveillance and Civil Rights, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.493330.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Depression Food 50 mins – “Food During the Great Depression Iowa State University Professor Pamela Riney-Kehrberg taught a class on food during the Great Depression. She described the ways families tried to stretch their money and food supply, often by gardening, buying cheap ingredients, and eating the same thing over and over.” At the link you can watch, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gun Sales Discussion 48 mins – “In the post-Parkland era, some retailers won’t sell guns to anyone under 21. Some investors are dumping shares. Is this just PR or the start of something big?” At the link find the title, “Gun Control Is Happening — At Walmart And Dick’s, Not In Congress, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_591648695.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guns and Crime 32 mins – “Journalist Melinda Wenner Moyer on the research linking guns and crime.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Hacking Back Against Russia 34 – “Those who have experienced a cybercrime know the feelings of frustration and helplessness that come along with it. A hacker could be halfway across the world when they attack you, and you might have no way of figuring out who it was or catching them even if you could. So frustrating.But is there really nothing we can do? Are we really so helpless against cybercrime? Don’t be so sure.” At the link find the title, “Hack Back, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ML_Se2_Ep_10_Hackback_MST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hanna Arendt on Totalitarianism 55 mins – “Was Adolph Eichmann not ultimately responsible for the destruction of six million Jews? Or were Jews themselves partially to blame for their own fate? Fifty years ago, the political philosopher Hannah Arendt published a famous book that seemed to imply these things, and created an instant uproar that has never ended. Roger Berkowitz, Adam Gopnik, Rivka Galchen and Adam Kirsch debate the reality behind Hannah Arendt and her ideas.” At the link find the title, “The Human Factor: Hannah Arendt, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-y35YhDZp-20180308.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Research Priorities 28 mins – “Its now widely agreed that one of the key ways of reducing the current high level of “waste ” in biomedical research is to focus it more squarely on addressing the questions that matter to patients – and the people and medical staff that care for them. In this interview, Tessa Richards – the BMJ’s patient partnership editor, talks to Katherine Cowan, independent consultant and a senior advisor the the James Lind Alliance, which has pioneered patient involvement with their research priority setting partnerships.” At the link find the title, “Katherine Cowan – Reaching A Priority, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 407621220-bmjgroup-katherine-cowan-reaching-a-priority.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Herpes Vaccine 16 mins – “David Knipe is the Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Harvard Medical school. A virologist, Dr. Knipe focuses his research efforts on the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) – the virus we have to thank for genital herpes. An astonishing 20% of Americans have been infected with HSV-2, and whether they’ve had a recognizable outbreak of sores or not, they can still carry the virus. Once you contract the HSV-2 it lays low in your nerve cells, waiting for the right moment to create watery blisters that eventually burst and release more virus particles. Dr. Knipe is interested in how the cells lead these two, very different lives: quiet and quiescent inside the nerve cell and loud and lytic in the epithelium on the surface of the body. Genital herpes is no picnic, but the effects of HSV-2 infection are worst in people with depressed immune systems and in newborns; babies who pick up the virus during birth may suffer from neurological damage, brain damage, or even death. There is no cure for genital herpes, and no means of getting rid of HSV-2, only ways of managing outbreaks. But there is some hope of relief; Dr. Knipe’s lab has developed a vaccine that will enter the trial phase soon….” At the link find the title, “MTS22 – David Knipe – Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2),” right-click “Media files Meetthescientist-MTS22DavidKnipeHerpesSimplexVirus2HSV2262.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip Hop History 58 mins – “Fordham University professor Mark Naison teaches a class on the history of hip hop and why it originated in the Bronx.” At the link find the title, “Why Hip Hop Began in the Bronx, Sept, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.474121.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Health Care 46 mins – “Keeping the elderly in their own homes. Most of us want to. But who will care for them? And what about the costs? The crisis in home health care.” At the link find the title, “A Looming Crisis In Home Health Care For The Elderly, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_589239191.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homelessness 17 mins – “The number of people officially recorded as sleeping on the streets of England rose from 1768 in 2010 to 4751 in autumn 2017.1 Charities estimate the true figure to be more than double this. Danny Dorling, Halford Mackinder professor of geography at the University of Oxford joins us to explain what’s fuelling that rise, why the true extent of the problem is far larger, and what steps need to be taken to tackle the epidemic.” At the link find the title, “We must not get to the stage of thinking that [homelessness] is normal, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 393401430-bmjgroup-we-must-not-get-to-the-stage-of-thinking-that-homelessness-is-normal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indian Secularism 56 mins – “Political scientist Neera Chandhoke makes a heartfelt argument for a secular India. Against the growing tide of Hindu nationalism and India’s history of inter-religious strife, she draws on Western and Indian thinkers to make the case for diversity.” At the link find the title, “What happens when we stop asking questions: Why India must be secular, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas_20180110_78144.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Canadians 56 mins – “Canadians like to pretend that Indigenous peoples have some special place, that they shape our society in some significant way, but history — as well as contemporary actions and attitudes — might suggest otherwise. In a country where just about all of us are immigrants, Indigenous people are creating new structures and rediscovering old values. A discussion from the Stratford Festival featuring Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Jarrett Martineau and Alexandria Wilson.” At the link find the title, “First Nation, Second Nation: A discussion about the state of Indigenous people in Canada today, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-c7JF2nMyCoo86i9.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Process 14 mins – “In 1988, Matt Goldman co-founded Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create “aha moments” — moments of surprise, learning and exuberance — frequent and intentional rather than random and occasional. Now Goldman is working to apply the lessons learned from Blue Man Group to education, creating Blue School, a school that balances academic mastery, creative thinking and self and social intelligence. “We need to cultivate safe and conducive conditions for new and innovative ideas to evolve and thrive,” Goldman says.” At the link click the share circle, left-click “Download Audio” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Impact 57 mins – “Our relationship with technology has intensified in this century with a rapturous embrace of Internet technologies and the gadgetry put in our hands by big technology companies. But even as we’ve made these technologies an extension of ourselves and experience the world and ourselves through them, our culture is starting to take a step back to re-examine the impact they’re having on us. Interview with Nicholas Carr, Franklin Foer, Jean Twenge, and Clive Thompson.” At the link find the title, “The Enright Files:Your brain on digital technology, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-yZSJTiZT-20180305.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Reconstruction 31 mins – “From February 12 to 14, representatives of governments, NGOs, and private businesses from around the world met in Kuwait for a conference that was intended to raise $85 billion for rebuilding destroyed areas and resettling displaced Iraqis in formerly ISIS-controlled territory. In the end, the Kuwait conference raised $30 billion. Was this a failure for Iraqi reconstruction, or the start of a longer process? Is Baghdad equipped to handle and spend even that lower amount of reconstruction funding? Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.” At the link find the title, “Iraqi Reconstruction with Aleksandra Zittle, Shelly Culbertson, and Geoffrey Batt, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 405599601-the-washington-institute-iraqi-reconstruction-with-aleksandra-zittle-shelly-culbertson-and-geoffrey-batt.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Irish View of the U.S. 59 mins – “Caitriona Perry, former Washington correspondent for RTE, Ireland’s public service broadcaster, talks about her book, [In America], which chronicles her encounters with Trump supporters during the 2016 presidential election season.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Caitriona Perry, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.495643.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

ISIS Cyber Terrorism 32 mins – “What governments and powerful organizations regularly use, others will find ways to use as well. Cyber activity fits so incredibly well with terrorism. Actors can remain hidden, or reveal themselves to the world; Create propaganda campaign, or aim for real damage. Join us on this episode of Malicious Life, as we learn the story of ISIS, and its cyber warfare activity.” At the link find the title, “Cyber Terrorism, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ML_Se2_Ep_09_V2_Isis.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israeli Cyber Trojan Horse 22 mins – “The early 2000s were an interesting time in Information Security. This is roughly the period when malware transitioned from viruses written by teenagers for fun, to cybercrime tools in the hands of sophisticated criminals. This week’s story took place in that time frame – and was a precursor of that transition. It is also a cautionary tale about power and temptation.” At the link find the title, “The Trojan Horse Affair, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ML_Se2_Ep07 TrojanHorse_MST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jewish Supreme Court Justices 59 mins – “Historian and rabbi David Dalin talks about his book, [Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court], in which he examines the lives and legacies of the eight Jews who have served on the court.” At the link you can watch the video and get a free copy of it, but an audio download must be purchased; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

John Oliver 48 mins – “On ‘Last Week Tonight,’ Oliver dives into often obscure stories, like NRA TV and the laws that govern televangelism. He describes the show’s style as “the slowest improv you’ve ever seen.” At the link find the title, “‘Last Week Tonight’ Host John Oliver, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 2018_0307_copy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Tech Trends 59 mins – “After Words with Bob Schieffer – Bob Schieffer talked about his book Overload, in which he examines the impact of changing technology on journalism. He spoke with Susan Glasser.” At the link you can watch, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Justice Ginsburg 87 mins – “Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaks with National Constitution Center President and CEO Jeffrey Rosen as she marks 25 years since her appointment to the Supreme Court.” At the link find the title, “Justice Ginsburg Reflects on 25 Years on the Supreme Court, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.496264.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

KKK Background 59 mins – “Musician and author Daryl Davis talks about his efforts over the past 30 years to befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan to try to understand their hatred and to convince them that they are wrong.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Daryl Davis, Nov, 2017, right-click “Media files program.491363.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean War 57 mins – “Korean War and Civil-Military Relations – Professor Joseph Glatthaar talked about the Korean War, General Douglas MacArthur’s removal from command by President Harry Truman, and civil-military relations.” At the link you can watch, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Kushner Security Clearance 46 minsPresidential adviser and first son-in-law Jared Kushner’s security clearance downgraded. Can he still do the job? Should he?” At the link find the title, “Jared Kushner’s Future In The White House After A Security Clearance Downgrade, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_590006548.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Licensing 46 mins – “In some states, you need a license not just to be a doctor — but an interior designer, a tooth-filer, a hair braider. We’ll talk to a few people who are trying to change the system to make it easier to do work.” At the link find the title, “You Need A License For That, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_588900827.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lost Cause Civil War 27 mins – “From the cemetery to the big screen, a 150 year old push to rewrite American history.” At the link find the title, “The Spin, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files GLT2685706128.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malnutrition 59 mins – “In this presentation, Dr. Ryan Hurt discusses malnutrition by first describing the concept of nutritional risk in both hospital and ambulatory patients. He then explains how to recognize the complications associated with sarcopenia in elderly populations as well as different strategies to diagnose and treat patients at high nutritional risk.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Maternity Death Prevention 32 mins – “The United States has an astoundingly high maternal death rate. It is three times higher than the UK, eight times higher than Norway, and still climbing. But California does way better than the rest of the country. Over the last decade, doctors in the state have banded together and worked to bring their maternal death rate down. Today on The Impact, we’ll tell you the story of that effort, and show you how it helped save one woman’s life. One of our health care reporters, Julia Belluz, has done some amazing in-depth reporting on this issue. You can read her story here.” At the link find the title, “How California saves moms from dying in childbirth, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files 0c48d055-ba4c-401b-b453-d9f80ddfe672.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Diagnostics 39 mins – “Hope is a photographer. One day her body begins to betray her. It starts with her eyes.” At the link find the title, “#42 Blindspot, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files GLT1831496070.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Morale in Britain 44 mins – “In this year’s Nuffield Summit round table we’re asking, how can the NHS become a good employer? At the moment, there is a recruitment and retention crisis across the workforce, doctors and nurses are leaving the NHS in droves, rota gaps are prevalent. A recent BMA survey showed that the majority of junior doctors are now planning to take a career break. So against this backdrop, what can the NHS do to nurture it’s employees, and make medicine an exciting proposition for the millennial, and subsequent, generations.” At the link find the title, “Nuffield Summit 2018 – HR in all policies, how the NHS can become a good employer, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 410102595-bmjgroup-nuffield-summit-2018-hr-in-all-policies-how-can-the-nhs-be-a-good-employer.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Care 60 mins – “After Words with Art Levine Art Levine talked about his book Mental Health, Inc.: How Corruption, Lax Oversight, and Failed Reforms Endanger Our Most Vulnerable Citizens, in which he reports on the mental health industry. In his book, he looks at treatment facilities and pharmaceutical companies and highlights clinicians who are challenging traditional methods of treatment. Mr. Levine is interviewed by Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman.” At the link you can listen or watch, but downloads must be purchased; however, a copy of the audio file is included in the blog archive.

Mexican-American Writer 49 minsLuis Alberto Urrea’s ‘The House of Broken Angels’ borrows from the story of his older brother, who died of cancer. He says the book went through a dramatic rewrite after Trump became president.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration in Europe 60 mins – “Is 2018 the year that the European Union takes leadership on migration on the international stage, or where it focuses inwards on healing internal divisions and delivering on overdue migration and asylum system reforms? With two high-profile compacts on migration and refugees being negotiated by the United Nations, Europe can potentially seize the momentum to shape a new international migration framework—and fill the vacuum left by the United States’ withdrawal. But with a series of critical elections across the continent, and key states struggling to form coalition governments, Europe’s ability to set the agenda may be limited. Europe may need to first get its own house in order, passing reforms to the Dublin Regulations, hammering down citizens’ rights post-Brexit, and designing strategic legal pathways, to name a few. This webinar looks ahead at the major external and internal events affecting migration on the continent over the next year.” At the link right-click “Download(Loading)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopolies 63 mins – “…In the space of just ten years, Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft have become the biggest companies on the planet and have accrued a level of power that threatens us all. They control our data, warp our democratic discourse, and exert increasing dominance over our markets. …The power of these companies lies not just in their size, but in the 21st century’s most valuable asset, data, the oil of the digital economy, which the tech companies extract freely from us, the users. With so much data and power centralised in the hands of a few West Coast companies, the tech giants have become a serious threat to our basic freedoms and must be broken up. That’s the argument that was made at this major Intelligence Squared debate by the FT’s global business columnist Rana Foroohar and by businessman and former chairman of Channel 4 Luke Johnson. But others would argue that it’s all too easy to make the tech giants a scapegoat for the inevitable upheavals caused by the digital revolution. …Far from being untamed monopolies, the tech giants face fierce competition from each other. Yes, they should be fairly regulated. But we should champion the benefits they have brought to the wider world.” At the link find the title, “Break Up The Tech Giants, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files media.mp3” and select “Save Link As” form the pop-up menu.

Mueller Firing 35 mins – “The New York Times Thursday evening is reporting that back in June, President Trump tried to fire Special Counsel Robert Mueller—but couldn’t quite pull it off. We, however, pulled off a special edition of the podcast to go over the story. Joining Benjamin Wittes on the recorded conference call (pardon the audio quality) were Lawfare contributors Jack Goldsmith, Steve Vladeck, Carrie Cordero, and Bob Bauer.” At the link find the title, “The Spin, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_279.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Music and Dance History 84 minsBorn in Beijing and based in Berlin, Leo Zhao (AKA Dj Zhao) is a writer, revolutionary, rhythm ambassador, and musicologist, bringing a poly-cultural understanding of sound to his deeply percussive cross-genre sets. Leo joins Brett to discuss music theory and history from a radical leftist and materialist perspective. Topics include: His families history living under Mao, Laws against social dancing throughout history, music and dance stratification in class societies, the roots of American music, Slavery, Africa’s influence on music, the evolutionary and sociological underpinnings of social dance and beat-driven music, Hip Hop, New Orleans culture and history, Trap music, cultural appropriation vs. cultural exchange, the connections between oppression and music, the body and sexuality, and much more!” At the link find the title, Rebel Music, Communal Dancing, and the Class Politics of Movement, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files Music Theory Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Park System 72 mins – “Sonoma State University professor Laura Watt teaches a class on the evolution of a national park system and the effort to preserve pristine wilderness.” At the link find the title, “Landscape Preservation and National Parks, Oct, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.476050.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New Hampshire Taxes 50 mins – “New Hampshire is one of 9 states without a state income tax, and one of just two states without a broad-based sales tax either. Democrat or Republican, almost every serious candidate for governor takes the Pledge: a promise that they won’t even consider a broad-based state income or sales tax. When listener Mary Douglas moved to New Hampshire in 2005, she couldn’t make sense of the state’s strong anti-tax sentiment. For our “Only in NH” series, she asked us: why doesn’t New Hampshire have a state income tax?” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

No Income Tax in NH 50 mins – “New Hampshire is one of 9 states without a state income tax, and one of just two states without a broad-based sales tax either. Democrat or Republican, almost every serious candidate for governor takes the Pledge: a promise that they won’t even consider a broad-based state income or sales tax. When listener Mary Douglas moved to New Hampshire in 2005, she couldn’t make sense of the state’s strong anti-tax sentiment. For our “Only in NH” series, she asked us: why doesn’t New Hampshire have a state income tax?” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NSA History 35 mins – “The NSA has many means at its disposal. But how does it use these means, and for what goals? Discover the (literally) secret history of the NSA’s cyber activity. Travel with us to Russia and back, learn the origins of FISA, and find out more about the government agency so secret it was once dubbed ‘No Such Agency’.” At the link find the title, “Super Spies, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ML_Se2_Ep_08_NSA-Weapons_MST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Proliferation 84 mins – “A University of Chicago panel looks at the threat of nuclear weapons, marking the 75th anniversary of the first atomic chain reaction tested under the university’s football stadium.” At the link find the title, “Nuclear Weapons, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files program.496447.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Conservation 57 mins – “We talk to marine biologist, policy expert, and conservation strategist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson about why we need to rethink ocean conservation.” At the link find the title, “It’s Time to Rethink Ocean Conservation, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files 13237f71-7dac-4bf8-adb8-06002717bd25.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Dispute Resolution 29 mins – “Colin Rule explains how online dispute resolution works and how it has the potential to fill access to justice needs. Not all legal disputes require the input of a lawyer. Some don’t even need the input of a human. Online dispute resolution (ODR), or the use of technology to solve basic disputes, is considered by some to be an access to justice solution. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Colin Rule about how ODR works and its potential to fill access to justice needs. They also discuss where ODR originally came from, the difference between between ODR and alternative dispute resolution, and how mobile access will expand the use of this technology. Colin Rule is vice president for online dispute resolution at Tyler Technologies. Tyler acquired Modria.com, an ODR provider Colin co-founded, in 2017. At the link find the title, “The Digital Edge : Expanding Access to Justice through Online Dispute Resolution, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files episode_122.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opiate Crisis in New Hampshire 51 mins – “New Hampshire is one of the hardest hit states in the current overdose epidemic, leaving communities grasping for answers. Meanwhile, some local courts and prosecutors have dusted off an antiquated state statute called “Death Resulting” to target drug dealers. But how are courts discerning between dealers and people with active substance use disorders? On today’s show, we’ll hear a complicated and tragic story that may shed some light moving forward.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis in Hew Hampshire 13 mins – “The obituary, so stark and visceral, captured the public’s attention. It was for 24-year-old Molly Alice Parks. She died in 2015 of a heroin overdose in the bathroom of her Manchester workplace. The obit’s final line: “If you have any loved ones who are fighting addiction, Molly’s family asks that you do everything possible to be supportive, and guide them to rehabilitation before it is too late.” But what if you don’t? What if you’re lucky enough not to have a loved one battling this addiction? Given the severity of this drug crisis, it is perhaps inevitable that questions about the opioid, heroin, and fentanyl epidemic would be submitted to NHPR’s Only In NH series. The series often explores the quirks of the Granite State and some lighter topics, but serious issues facing our community can’t be ignored. Which brings us to the question submitted by a Nashua woman: What can Granite Staters untouched by the opioid crisis do to help those who are?…” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Control 27 mins – “What if your brain could naturally control pain? Professor Irene Tracey and her colleagues are trying to unlock the natural mechanisms in the brain that limit the amount of pain we feel. We hear about how children learning judo are taught special techniques and from ex-marine Chris Shirley who ran a marathon carrying a 45kg rucksack and could ignore the pain of the blisters and torn shoulder muscles. One study found that religious people feel less pain than agnostics by looking at a picture of the Virgin Mary. Neuroscientists and psychologists are beginning to understand how this is possible, how the brain can block out pain in the right circumstances, so is this something we could all benefit from? “ At the link find find the title, “Controlling Pain, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files p05wkk8y.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pain Relief 58 mins – “In this broadcast for Jan. 13, 2018, a spine surgeon motivated in part by his own struggle with chronic pain has found nonsurgical techniques for relief. We also hear from one of his patients.” At the link left-click “Download the MP3” then select the MP3 option from the next drop-down menu to get the free podcast.

Parkland Movement 50 mins – “Since the Parkland school shooting, the student-led #NeverAgain movement has kept gun control in the headlines. This week, we look at how the movement began — and how pro-gun internet trolls have tried to undermine its message. Plus, how the world of Black Panther taps into a long history of black liberation struggles, and why Black History Month, in the Trump era, can feel both righteous and corporate, dignified and farcical.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pediatric Ultrasound 27 mins – “Turns out pediatric ultrasound is more than just wiggly subjects, linear probes, and nervous parents. These little adults can be more complicated than most of us want to admit…. but FEAR NOT, we were recently at Cabofest and recorded this awesome lecture from Canadian Peds Guru Lianne McLean on HOW KIDS ARE DIFFERENT.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. to get the audio file.

Polypharmacy 50 mins – “Dr. Demetra Antimisiaris is discusses polypharmacy, how it can be a geriatric syndrome, and different factors in medication-use practices leading to unintentional medication-related harm. She then presents a systematic approach to management of polypharmacy as well as the potential impact of proactive medication management.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select ‘save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populism 57 mins – “Is it a positive wave or a troubling pattern? In this age of anxiety over joblessness and immigration, populist leaders in Hungary, Poland, Turkey, Sweden and the Philippines are tapping in. Is populism, as the 1960’s American historian Richard Hofstadter called it, “a paranoid style of politics”? Or is it what others describe as “the essence of democratic politics”?” At the link find the title, “Is There a Culture War Against Populism? Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-piv69i4e-20180302.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Cycle 53 mins – “With so much wealth in the world, why is there so much poverty? In the end, we’re all better off when everyone has a chicken in the pot. Poverty slows the development of all societies, and it seems obvious that we should try to eradicate it, but it seems like an intractable problem. How can we put poverty behind us, and what does our attitude towards poverty and social mobility tell us about who we are? A discussion from the Stratford Festival.” At the link find the title, “Why is there so much poverty in a rich country like Canada?, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-FNXawaRC-20180207.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Project Deadlines 44 mins – “Whether it’s a giant infrastructure plan or a humble kitchen renovation, it’ll inevitably take way too long and cost way too much. That’s because you suffer from “the planning fallacy.” (You also have an “optimism bias” and a bad case of overconfidence.) But don’t worry: we’ve got the solution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychotropic Drugs 48 mins – “Psychologist and journalist Lauren Slater, who suffers from depression and bipolar disorder, has first-hand experience with psychotropic drugs; she’s been taking medication for 35 years. “As a nation, we’re consuming them; we’re gobbling them down,” Slater tells Terry Gross. “And we don’t really know what we’re taking into our bodies.” Her new book, in part about the science and history of mood-altering drugs, is titled ‘Blue Dreams.’ Also, Kevin Whitehead reviews two new compilations of Nina Simone’s early singles.” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Lin As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 56 mins – “Canada’s history of suppressing Black activism is coming to light like never before, thanks to researchers like PhD student Wendell Adjetey. Wendell’s historical research uncovers evidence of clandestine government surveillance in the 20th century, while also bringing to life overlooked parts of this history. His work helps put in context the experiences of Canadian Black Lives Matter activists today.” At the link find the title, “The resistance of Black Canada: State surveillance and suppression, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-xnd4Ut3l-20180227.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in U.S. 46 mins – “The Kerner Commission Report on racial inequality in America. 50 years on, they’re taking another look.” At the link find the title, “The Kerner Commission On Racial Unrest, 50 Years Later, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_590040763.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape Kit Backlog 46 mins – “Across the country, hundreds of thousands of rape kits never get tested. New Mexico has a plan to fix that. We’re hearing it.” At the link find the title, “Rape Kits Often Go Untested For Decades, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_590957362.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy 46 mins – “We talk to Stanford professor of civil and environmental engineering Mark Jacobson about his research that shows it’s possible for the world to be using 100% clean, renewable energy by 2050.” At the link find the title, “100% Renewable Energy by 2050, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files 37fd4a8c-4bf3-40a9-890e-9300019d2d80.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robots Surround Us 13 mins – “We already live among robots: tools and machines like dishwashers and thermostats so integrated into our lives that we’d never think to call them that. What will a future with even more robots look like? Social scientist Leila Takayama shares some unique challenges of designing for human-robot interactions — and how experimenting with robotic futures actually leads us to a better understanding of ourselves.” At the link click “Share,” right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rural Organizing 30 mins – “Racial Literacy and Rural Solidarity, this week, Laura talks with two pairs of young activists. Jessica Campbell of the Rural Organizing Project and Lou Murrey of Stay Together Appalachia share tips on combating the right in rural communities. Then, Winona Guo and Priya Vulchi share their high school project – a crowdsourced racial literacy curriculum….” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Russian History 45 mins – “Benjamin Wittes speaks to Judge Stephen Williams about his new book “The Reformer: How One Liberal Fought to Preempt the Russian Revolution,” the story of Vasily Maklakov and the virtues of political moderation.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Williams Final.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sand Color Causes 7 mins – At the link find the title, “271 – How Does Sand Get Its Color? Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ede_271-vk4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scientific Credibility and Reputation 57 mins – “Ilaria Capua talks about running an internationally renowned animal influenza lab, and her time spent in the Italian Parliament. Accused of virus trafficking as part of a national scandal, she has since cleared her name and speaks here about the importance of scientific credibility and reputation.” At the link find the title, “077: Influenza, politics, and scientific credibility with Ilaria Capua,” right-click “Media files MTM077.mp3” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Clans 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how and why Highlanders and Islanders were cleared from their homes in waves in C18th and C19th, following the break up of the Clans after the Battle of Culloden. Initially, landlords tried to keep people on their estates for money-making schemes, but the end of the Napoleonic Wars brought convulsive changes. Some of the evictions were notorious, with the sudden and fatal burning of townships, to make way for sheep and deer farming. For many, migration brought a new start elsewhere in Britain or in the British colonies, while for some it meant death from disease while in transit. After more than a century of upheaval, the Clearances left an indelible mark on the people and landscape of the Highlands and Western Isles.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Enlightenment 57 mins – “An Edinburgh bibliophile takes Paul Kennedy through his library of amazing books that were published in Scotland in the late 18th century, during the heyday of the Scottish Enlightenment. At the time, Adam Smith, David Hume, James Boswell and The Encyclopaedia Britannica were runaway bestsellers.” At the link find the title, “A book lover, his library and the Scottish Enlightenment, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-GJaDjf1W-20180222.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scottish Enlightenment 57 mins – “Approximately 250 years ago, the windswept and unwelcoming capital of a Edinburgh became a beacon of intelligence for the entire world. Paul Kennedy walks up and down ‘The Royal Mile’, and through the planned streets and elegant squares of Edinburgh’s ‘New Town’, in search of places once occupied or visited by the likes of Adam Smith, David Hume, James Boswell and Robert Burns.” At th elink find the title, “When Scotland saved the world, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-zCkHtxKwdo3SvGE.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Seed Supply 75 mins – “Microgreen grower and local seed advocate Chris Thoreau and I talk about local seed – the challenges of it, what that means, and how practical it is. Learn how Chris grows microgreens in his online course: http://www.permaculturevoices.com/microgreens” At the link left click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Serendipity 4 mins – “…Thomas Edison, one of the great inventors of all time, once said, “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.” But he failed to mention another vital element of the inventive mind: observation. Great ideas don’t spring from empty gray matter. We need to read and learn; to see and experience. The inventive mind is fertile ground, but seeds must be planted if anything’s to burst forth. Then there’s the flip side of observation. It’s not just grist for the mill. It also helps us recognize invention when we happen to stumble upon it. A surprising number of inventions were accidental — the result of looking for one thing but finding another.” At the link left-click Click here for audio of Episode 2463,” select and click “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Singularity Discussion 54 mins – “As computers and Artificial Intelligence grow in power and capability, it seems ever more likely that we’re approaching “the Singularity”: the point where machine intelligence exceeds human intelligence. Could this be the dawn of a technological paradise? Or it could trigger humanity’s doom? What kind of an intelligence will this be — benign or terrifying — a guru, a god or a monster? And is the idea of uploading the human mind the promise of immortality or just another dream of religious transcendence?” At the link find the title, “Imagining the singularity: What happens when computers transcend us?, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-0HfoTfKS-20180208.mp3 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in U.S. 26 mins – “In 1640 three men attempted to escape indentured servitude. The outcome lay the foundation for the split in America that lead to Civil War.” At the link find the title, “The Sentence, Dec 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Capitalism 30 mins -”If you’re looking for a way to combat the online trolls and bots fomenting unrest in the U.S., comedian Negin Farsad might have a solution for you. “I guess if I were to name it, it’s a philosophy called ‘being aggressively delightful,'” she tells us. Farsad, an Iranian-American Muslim, is the co-host of the podcast Fake the Nation, the author of the book How to Make White People Laugh, and sometimes you can hear her on our very own WBEZ as a panelist for NPR’s Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me! She told us how she manages to be aggressively delightful, even when confronted with intolerance.” At the link find the title, “Feb, 2018 How To Be Aggressively Delightful With Negin Farsad,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Uses 29 mins – “BuzzFeed data reporter Lam Thuy Vo on the illuminating and obscuring nature of social media data.:” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Southern U.S. Culture 56 mins – “It’s been one year since Donald Trump’s inauguration. His official swearing-in compelled many Americans reflect on what America actually is now, politically, socially and culturally. Contributor David Zane Mairowitz is originally from America, and has been living in Europe for over fifty years. He returned to the U.S. in the spring of 2017 to travel through six southern states, where he recorded his encounters with everyday people at restaurants, churches — and gun shows. His aim: to gain insight into an America he’s now struggling to comprehend.” At the link find the title, “Travels through Trump’s America one year later, Jan, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-MwuOEp8XUgzyrp4.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Physiology 48 mins – “We talk to Alex Hutchinson, author of Endure: Mind, Body, and the Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance.” At the link find the title, “The Curiously Elastic Limits of Human Performance, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files b6d65354-45d4-4300-bd6d-7bc375e5d15c.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sun Tzu on War 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the ideas attributed to Sun Tzu (544-496BC, according to tradition), a legendary figure from the beginning of the Iron Age in China, around the time of Confucius. He may have been the historical figure Sun Wu, a military adviser at the court of King Helu of Wu (who reigned between about 514 and 496 BC), one of the kings in power in the Warring States period of Chinese history (6th – 5th century BC). Sun Tzu was credited as the author of The Art of War, a work on military strategy that soon became influential in China and then Japan both for its guidance on conducting and avoiding war and for its approach to strategy generally. After The Art of War was translated into European languages in C18th, its influence spread to military academies around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Clerk 58 mins – “Attorney Tiffany Wright talks about growing up in Washington, DC, and the obstacles she overcame to become a clerk for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with Tiffany Wright, Dec, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.490952.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survive and Thrive 60 mins – “For leaders in the 21st century, there is one pressing question: What set of skills is required to lead in crisis, and can history give us answers? Our guest this week, Harvard Business School historian and professor Nancy Koehn, has surveyed some of history’s greatest leaders and made an incredible discovery: courageous leaders are not born but made, and the power to lead resides in each of us.  Nancy examined the lives of five of the greatest leaders of all time to better understand how they led through adversity and came out the other side stronger. These extraordinary individuals include: polar explorer Ernest Shackleton; President Abraham Lincoln; legendary abolitionist Frederick Douglass; Nazi-resisting clergyman Dietrich Bonhoeffer; and environmental crusader Rachel Carson. In her book, Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times, Nancy begins each chapter by showing her protagonist on the precipice of a great crisis …At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Teachers Pay 48 mins – “West Virginia lawmakers strike a deal to give teachers a pay raise. But teachers in other states are ready to walk out. We’ll look at the crisis in teacher pay across the country.” At the link find the title, “West Virginia Teacher Strike Ends, But Walkouts Could Spread Amid Pay Crisis, Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_591621242.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Trends 35 mins – “Zach and Kelly Weinersmith on how to predict our future technologies and their new book “Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That’ll Improve and/or Ruin Everything” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Trade Policy 48 mins – “The president goes full steam ahead on tariffs. We’ll take a look at whether trade wars are as good and winnable as he says.” At the link find the title, “Are Trade Wars Good And Winnable? Mar, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_591227705.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Finances 24 mins – “The podcast Trump Inc. is a collaboration between WNYC Studios and ProPublica. A team of investigative reporters is examining whether and how the Trump family is profiting from the presidency, and they’ve organized the show around an “open investigation” so listeners and tipsters can contribute and follow along. We featured the first episode on our podcast feed a few weeks ago, and this week we’re checking back with Episode 4. Ilya Marritz of WNYC and Eric Umansky of ProPublica speak with David Farenthold of The Washington Post about what he’s been able to learn about President Trump’s business dealings, and take calls from listeners with questions about possible profits and motives..” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Trump Personality 58 mins – “Daily Caller News Foundation Editor-in-Chief Christopher Bedford examines Donald Trump’s leadership as a businessman, politician, and president of the United States.” At the link find the title, “After Words with Christopher Bedford, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.489834.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tyranny 54 mins – “Authoritarianism is on the rise around the world. And Timothy Snyder wants to push back against this tide. A history professor at Yale University who’s written widely on Europe and the Holocaust, he takes an unusual approach in his little book, “On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century”. This episode features the lecture he gave in Toronto and a follow-up conversation with host Paul Kennedy.” At the link find the title, “The Anatomy of Tyranny – Timothy Snyder, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-r0ny3EZL-2018” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover FBI Agent 58 mins – “Muslim American federal agent Tamer Elnoury discusses his experience fighting domestic terrorism in America. He is interviewed by Michael German, author of [Thinking Like a Terrorist: Insights of a Former FBI Undercover Agent].” At the link find the title, “After Words with Tamer Elnoury, Nov, 2017,” right-click “Media files program.489398.MP3-A13.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Unions Future 46 mins – “Two big cases at the Supreme Court: One about the future of unions. The other looks at data privacy overseas. We’ll weigh the evidence.” At the link find the title, “Future Of Public Unions At Stake In Supreme Court Case, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_589560636.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virtual Reality 49 mins – “Virtual reality is able to effectively blur the line between reality and illusion, pushing the limits of our imagination and granting us access to any experience imaginable….But how does this new medium affect its users, and does it have a future beyond fantasy and escapism? This week on the show, Jeremy Bailenson draws on two decades spent researching the psychological effects of VR and other mass media to help us understand this powerful new tool. He offers expert guidelines for interacting with VR and describes the profound ways this technology can be put to use―not to distance ourselves from reality, but to enrich our lives and influence us to treat others, the environment, and even ourselves better. There are dangers and many unknowns in using VR, but it also can help us hone our performance, recover from trauma, improve our learning and communication abilities, and enhance our empathic and imaginative capacities. Like any new technology, its most incredible uses might be waiting just around the corner. …Jeremy is the author of the incredible new book, Experience on Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Treatment 45 mins – “Marylynn Yates discusses how the urban water cycle and its importance in eliminating waterborne pathogens. She describes the types of microbes that can survive in water and how testing for different microbial types can affect interpretation of contamination levels. Julie’s biggest takeaways: Worldwide, water is a large source of infectious disease. Billions of people have no access to safe water and this culminates in 1.5 billion cases of diarrhea and 1.5 million deaths from contaminated water annually. The urban water cycle takes water from lakes or the ground for its first treatment before delivery to our homes. Water leaving our homes as waste water goes to a second facility where water is given a different set of treatments to eliminate disease-causing microbes before the water is returned to lakes or rivers. Different treatment facilities are needed because the concentration of contaminants is different in water before and after use in our homes. Crystal clear spring water can be deceiving, but can carry disease-causing microbes. Animals can carry protozoans such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium, which also cause disease in people. This is why treating water, even with a simple boiling procedure, is important when backpacking or camping. Bacterial sentinels such as Escherichia coli can be used to measure potential bacterial pathogen presence, but they don’t measure pathogenic protozoans or viruses. This is in part because the treatment necessary to eliminate bacteria is different than that necessary to eliminate protozoans and viruses. Some scientists argue that bacteriophage are a better measure of potential pathogenic virus present, though no regulations require phage monitoring. Others argue that detection of a spore-forming bacteria, such as Clostridium perfringens, would better predict protozoan presence.” At the link find the title, “075: Working with the Microbes in our Drinking and Waste Water with Marylynn Yates, Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files MTM075.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White Supremacists 30 mins – “Last week, we put out a special show hosted by The Guardian US’s Lois Beckett, devoted to how reporters should approach the alt-right, and white supremacy, in America, called “Face the Racist Nation.”As a bonus, we’re putting out a full interview with one of the voices in that show: Norwegian journalist Vegas Tenold, whose new book, “Everything You Love Will Burn” chronicles his time covering the far right, up close and personal, for close to a decade. Lois talks to Vegas about how he has seen the far right evolve, the mistakes he sees journalists making and his relationship with the co-founder of the racist Traditionalist Worker Party, Matthew Heimbach. In addition to listening to the full show, make sure to go to our website to check out the special quizzes we made that delve further into the sticky issues in this hour.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Win 10 Editing 27 mins – “Group Policy – GPEDIT [Editing Win 10 controls with GroupEditor.], Asus router story” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Woman at Work 15 mins – “As CEO of the Global Fund for Women, Musimbi Kanyoro works to support women and their ideas so they can expand and grow. She introduces us to the Maragoli concept of “isirika” — a pragmatic way of life that embraces the mutual responsibility to care for one another — something she sees women practicing all over the world. And she calls for those who have more to give more to people working to improve their communities. “Imagine what it would look like if you embraced isirika and made it your default,” Kanyoro says. “What could we achieve for each other? For humanity?” Let’s find out — together.” At the link click the “Shared” circle, right-click “Download Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Work Future 54 mins – “Digital platforms have been well received by customers, but for workers, they often have a dark side. And they present a major challenge for governments who are grappling with how to regulate them. Part 2 of a 3-part series.” At the link find the title, “Platform capitalism, digital technology and the future of work (Part 2, Encore Sept 20, 2018), Feb, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-ddDy4FMR-20180206.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Working Women 44 mins – “Did you know that working mothers are 50% LESS likely to be promoted than women without children? Or that only 1 in 5 senior executives is a woman? Have you ever realized that working moms are judged when they leave work early to tend to their children AND when they stay at work late (and “neglect” their families)? The truth is, we have a work environment that is not conducive to being a parent and women are the ones who tend to suffer the most. This week on the show we have a chance to talk with Mary Beth Ferrante about the struggles that working mothers face, and the ways they can get what they deserve. Mary Beth is a former Senior Vice President for a Fortune 100 Firm who has made the successful transition to a certified career coach with the International Coach Federation. She is trained in Organizational, Relationship & Systems Coaching (ORSC). In addition, she has chaired national women’s organizations and been on the Board of Directors of the Junior League of Los Angeles. Today, she works with new moms (and dads!), managers and organizations to best support new parents, discover what inspires and drives new parents in their careers. Learn more about Mary Beth at LiveWorkLead.comAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Advertisements

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
Image | This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s