Media Mining Digest 349 – Jul 20, 2018: 5G Broadband Race, African Migrant Story, Bipartisan Politics, Black Lives Matter, Border Separations, California Transportation Needs, Cancer Treatment Controversy, Carter Center Operations, CEO Pay, Climate Warming Impact, Democratic Party Operations, Depression-Ativan and Doctors, DOJ Report on Hillary, Employment Shortages, Fake News Detection, Food Quality Declines, Github Explained, Gun Violence in Canada, Healthcare Programs in America, Inequality Effects, Intelligence Defined, Migrant Child Separations, Nursing Home Murders, Obama National Security Advisor, Osteoporosis Fractures, Philanthropy in America, Racism in America, Renewable Energy Controversy, Republican Party Operations, Rule of Law Discussion, Sexual Extortion, Soil Restoration, Solar Power in California, Southern Europe Economic Recovery, Suicides Increase, Summer Student Melt, Taurine Questions, Terrorism Countermeasures, Trade War with Canada, Trade War with China, Urine Test Misinterpretations, Water Infrastructure Jobs, Water Supplies, Womens Rights, Youth Leaders

Exercise your ears: the 84 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 710 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 21,911 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 140GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 460 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles.  Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Broadband Race 60 mins – “Commissioner Brendan Carr of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently spoke at Brookings on why the U.S. needs to ramp up its efforts to deploy fifth-generation, or 5G, networks. With expected peak download speeds as high as 20 gigabits per second, 5G networks can download a full-length high-definition movie in seconds. It also has lower latency and greater connectivity to enable specialized tasks and functions, including remote precision medicine, connected cars, and augmented reality. 5G will also enable better end-to-end machine connections, which will drive the burgeoning economy of the “internet of things” (IoT) and related applications….” At the link find the title, “The future of 5G: A fireside chat with FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180626_Falk_FCC_Carr.mp3” and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

African Migrant Story 64 mins – “A story about someone who’s desperately trying – against long odds – to make it to the United States and become an American. Abdi is a Somali refugee living in Kenya and gets the luckiest break of his life: he wins a lottery that puts him on a short list for a U.S. visa. This is his ticket out. But before he can cash in his golden ticket, the police start raiding his neighborhood, targeting refugees.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Risks 18 mins – “Will we create a super-intelligent AI and forget to give it a conscience? How far is too far when it comes to AI? Listen to this free Komando on Demand podcast as I explore the real risks that face all of us as the AI world gets bigger and smarter.” At the link find the title, “The dangers posed by artificial intelligence are real, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files The dangers posed by artificial intelligence are real.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthony Bourdain 119 mins _ “To celebrate the life of Anthony Bourdain, Neil deGrasse Tyson is revisiting his two-part interview with him from 2013, as a single, commercial-free episode with new thoughts and recollections by Neil. Featuring comic co-host Eugene Mirman and NYU Professor of Nutrition Marion Nestle.” At the link click the square with three dots, right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bipartisan Politics 28 mins – “From time to time, so-called moderate Democratic legislators cross party lines to work with Republicans.  Do you ever wonder if voters from red states appreciate those gestures? More importantly, what kind of impact do these collaborations and compromises end up making in the crafting of policy? This week on Sea Change Radio, we take a deep dive into the political pool with John Stoehr, a columnist with the Washington Monthly and New Haven Register. Stoehr explores the heterogeneity of the Democratic party (and how the Republican party contrasts with that), asserts that the Trump Administration’s dereliction of duty in Puerto Rico is yet another impeachable offense, and talks about whether it’s important for politicians to avoid the obstructionist label.”

Black Lives Matter 88 mins – “This year is on track to potentially be one of the deadliest in terms of police-caused deaths in the contemporary United States. And, as data from past years demonstrate, Black Americans are killed by police at disproportionately high rates. From Ferguson, Missouri, to St. Paul, Minnesota, and from Oakland to New York City, the Black Lives Matter movement has helped raise public awareness of this discrepancy and of police violence against black people. But what do we know about where, and in what context, Black Lives Matter demonstrations take place? Or about how marginalized communities respond to state repression?” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Separations 19 mins – “Post reporter Mary Jordan helps us look back at a week of conflicting statements and rapid reversals amid an outcry over immigration policy and border separations.” At the link find the title, “A week of mixed messaging on border separations, J” right-click “Media files 5b2d7ae8e4b0e01e1e6c82dd_1351620000001-300030_t_1529707244758_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Engineering 56 mins – “In his new book The Biological Mind: How Brain, Body, and Environment Collaborate to Make Us Who We Are, Dr Alan Jasanoff from MIT argues against what he calls the cerebral mystique, which is the tendency to view the human brain as much more autonomous and mysterious than it really is. Our conversation (BS 146) brings together several key ideas that have been discussed on past episodes of Brain Science, but our emphasis is on the fact the Mind is not just the Brain because the Mind is created by the interaction of the Brain with both the Body and its environment. Failure to appreciate the biological nature of our Minds has consequences in many aspects of our lives, including how we approach both mental health and issues of social justice.” At the link “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Transportation Needs 150 mins – “The need to invest in California’s transportation system is dire and after years of seeking a solution to the state’s transportation crisis, the state legislature passed and the governor signed SB 1, also known as the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, increasing transportation funding by $54 billion over a decade. SB 1 provides the first significant, stable and ongoing increase in state transportation funding in more than two decades. This free, half-day summit hosted by the Mineta Transportation Institute looks at how SB1 funds are being implemented and documents the strategies that state, local and regional governments and transportation agencies are taking to address California’s transportation needs.” At the link find t”he title, “Mineta Transportation Summit: Paving the Way to a Better Future — The Implementation of SB1 Funds — Segments 1 & 2, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180622_FEA_Mineta 1 and 2 For Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link as’ from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Treatment Controversy 69 mins – “Dr. Thomas Seyfried, a professor at Boston College, will present surprising information that shakes the whole foundation of cancer treatment research. His own research reveals that cancer can be considered a single disease with a common pathophysiological mechanism involving dysfunction of mitochondria. The gene mutations observed in various cancers and all other recognized cancer hallmarks are considered downstream effects, and not causes, of the initial disturbance of cellular energy metabolism. Learn how to empower yourself to more healthily address the causes, with the goal of healthily treating and preventing cancer….without chemicals, drugs and side effects. Dr. Seyfriend states that  “cancer cell growth and progression can be managed by following a whole-body” approaches. Dr. Thomas Seyfried is a trailblazer in the arena of conquering cancer.  His groundbreaking book, Cancer As A Metabolic Disease, shook the foundations of the ways cancer causes and treatment are viewed.” At the link find the title, “Dr. Thomas Seyfried: Healthy Cancer Treatment, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180620_MLF Thomas Seyfried for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carl Zimmer on Heredity 61 mins – “Celebrated science journalist Carl Zimmer helps unravel some of the deepest mysteries surrounding our genetic blueprint and the traits that appear in generation after generation. Through the years and technological advancements we’ve learned that heredity isn’t just about genes that pass from parent to child. It continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. Drawing on scientific research and his own experiences with his two daughters, Zimmer offers a fascinating new way to understanding heredity and who we really are.” At the link find the title, “Carl Zimmer: Understanding Heredity, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180619_SV Carl Zimmer For Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carter Center Operations 66 mins – “In a world that often seems beset by turmoil, come for an important discussion of how ongoing dialogue can significantly reduce violent confrontation and aid desperate populations. The Carter Center was founded in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn, in partnership with Emory University, to advance peace and health worldwide. A nongovernmental organization, the center has helped to improve life for people in more than 80 countries by resolving conflicts and advancing democracy, human rights, and economic opportunity. Hrair Balian leads the Carter Center’s conflict resolution efforts, which are underway in Israel-Palestine, where the Center supports a 2-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; in Liberia, to advance access to justice in a post-war setting, paying special attention to the needs of marginalized populations; in Syria ,where the center is working toward a political solution to the catastrophic war by exploring governance and constitutional reform options; and in Europe and the United States to prevent the rise of violent extremism….” At the link find the title, “The Carter Center’s Hrair Balian: Reducing Global Conflict, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180621_FEA_Hrair_Balian_For_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CEO Pay 22 mins – “Politicians have argued for decades that CEOs are overpaid. But there’s this precise moment in the 1990s when CEO pay suddenly shot up. We find out what happened.” At the link find the title, “#682: When CEO Pay Exploded, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180622_pmoney_pmpod682rerunv2-ba8abab6-cced-44c4-8b32-d1ad16630a39.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Shelter Fire in Guatemala 27 mins – “On 8th March, 2017 a fire engulfed part of the Virgen de la Asuncion children’s home on the outskirts of Guatemala City. 41 teenaged girls died. A further 15 were seriously injured, and are still recovering from burns. The President of Guatemala, Jimmy Morales, declared 3 days of national mourning. But the story that soon emerged revealed a child protection crisis of epic proportions. Virgen de la Asuncion was supposed to be a refuge for children affected by abuse, neglect or who had become entangled in Guatemala’s gang culture. Often girls were placed in the home for their own protection, to keep them from the clutches of traffickers and drug dealers who operate with impunity in poor neighbourhoods. But conditions at the home were appalling. Designed for 400, it was home to hundreds more boys and girls. And far from being a sanctuary for the children, there was a terrifying culture of abuse – sexual and physical. On 7th March, 2017 more than 100 of the children and young people broke out. Most were rounded up in the local area by the police. As punishment, they were locked up. And in protest, in the room where the girls were corralled, one of them set fire to a mattress. Assignment meets families, explores the fate of others who lived at the home, and talks to welfare workers. Why did no one heed the loud warning bells about Virgen de la Asuncion?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Education 52 mins – “Thirty Million Words: A Public Health Approach to Early Childhood Education, Jun, 2018. At the link find that title, right-click “Media files BUR8266068759.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Single Women Issues 66 mins – “Forty years ago, China enacted the one-child policy, only recently relaxed. Among many other unintended consequences, it resulted in both an enormous gender imbalance — with a predicted 20 million more men than women of marriage age by 2020 — and China’s first generations of only-daughters. Given the resources normally reserved for boys, these girls were pushed to study, excel in college and succeed in careers, as if they were sons. Now living in an economic powerhouse, enough of these women have decided to postpone marriage — or not marry at all — to spawn a label: “leftovers.” Unprecedentedly well-educated and goal-oriented, they struggle to find partners in a society where gender roles have not evolved as vigorously as society itself, and where new professional opportunities have made women less willing to compromise their careers or concede to marriage for the sake of being wed. Further complicating their search for a mate, the vast majority of China’s single men reside in and are tied to the rural areas where they were raised. This makes them geographically, economically and educationally incompatible with city-dwelling “leftovers,” who also face difficulty in partnering with urban men, given the urban men’s general preference for more dutiful, domesticated wives. Part critique of China’s paternalistic ideals, part playful portrait of the romantic travails of China’s trailblazing women and their well-meaning parents who are anxious to see their daughters snuggled into traditional wedlock, Roseann Lake’s focuses on the lives of four individual women against a backdrop of colorful anecdotes, hundreds of interviews and rigorous historical and demographic research to show how these “leftovers” are the linchpin to China’s future.” At the linkf ind the title, “Leftover In China: The Women Shaping the World’s Next Superpower, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180621_MLF Leftover in China for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Warming Impact 51 mins – “Do you live somewhere that might actually benefit from climate change? Rising temperatures and seas will produce losers and winners. Some parts of the world will see more moderate weather and economic gains, while others are already seeing sagging property prices and economic losses. But higher temperatures are more than just an economic issue. “Many people think oh it’s just the temperature, but actually temperature affects everything,” says Solomon Hsiang, Chancellor’s Associate Professor of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He co-authored a 2017 paper in the journal Science that outlines the impacts of a warmer world on human health and migration, violent crime, food production and wealth distribution. “This idea that the temperature affects our judgment and our ability and willingness to engage in violence, that’s something that we studied a lot in our research,” says, Hsiang adding that one of the most robust statistical regularities they’ve found is that “hot days, hot weeks, hot months are associated with higher rates of violent crime, all types of crime: sexual assault, regular assault, murder.” Hot days are also associated with reduced incomes. Hsiang and his colleagues have followed actual U.S. counties over time and found that if the diurnal average is above 85 Fahrenheit, “people earn roughly $20 less at the end of the year… The analogy is every time it’s a hot day I take 20 bucks and I just throw it away.”… At the link find the title, “Climate Winners and Losers, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180617_cl1_WinnersAndLosers.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Creator 31 mins – “After noticing more and more people sign up for yoga in the late 1990s, Chip Wilson bet everything on an athletic apparel company aimed toward young professional women. What started as a small pop-up store in Vancouver eventually became the multibillion-dollar brand Lululemon Athletica, spawning a new fashion trend and forever changing what women wear at the gym. PLUS, for our postscript “How You Built That,” how Mike Sorentino developed the EyePatch Case, an iPhone case that cleans and protects the phone’s built-in cameras.” At the link find the title, “Lululemon Athletica: Chip Wilson, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180614_hibt_lulu.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coral Discussion 65 mins – “The TWiM team travels to ASM Microbe 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia to speak with Christina Kellogg about her career and her research on coral microbial ecology.” At the link find and right-click the title, “download TWiM#178” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corn Genetics 49 mins – “Mexico is the center of origin for maize, and there is a substantial interest in protecting the genetic integrity of this limited resource.  At the same time Mexico’s population is growing, and farmers potentially find utility in growing genetically-engineered corn, as resistance to insects and lower pesticide use are attractive traits.  There is an intricate balance between feeding a population and ensuring farmer profit versus preservation of a genetic resource. In this week’s podcast Dr. Paul Vincelli (@pvincell) interviews Dr. Sol Ortiz Garcia, the Commission on Biosafety of Genetically Engineered Organisms.  How much GE maize is cultivated in Mexico?  Is it a threat?  Is there evidence of transgene flow from imported feed?  These are important questions, as the topic of genetic integrity of natural populations is a frequent area of discussion and debate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Party Operations 58 mins – “Democrats are desperate to retake part of Congress. Their best shot is the House. This fall, they’ll be slugging it out with Republicans—but in the meantime, they’re slugging it out with each other. The progressive and moderate wings of the Democratic party are going head-to-head in Democratic primaries all over the country right now, wrestling over what the party should be and stand for. This week, we have the story of a candidate in one primary like that.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democratic Party Operations 60 mins – “To understand the identity crisis within the Democratic Party, you could look to the 2006 midterm election … and the story of a junior congressman named Rahm Emanuel, who needed to win 15 seats in the House to restore his party to greatness.” At the link find the title, “How to Flip the House: The 2006 blue wave, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5b32b2b3e4b0272e5db812aa_1351620000001-300040_t_1530049208756_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Depression-Ativan and Doctors 21 mins – “The death of Chris Cornell and calling my doctor” At the link right-click “Download (8540)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Publishing 39 mins – “Even well into the digital age, publishers have persisted in maintaining processes that confine their businesses to a specific format (usually, the book) and to a single business model. Forward-thinking editors, however, demand freedom to reuse and repurpose content in innovative, high value ways, especially on mobile devices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dinosaurs 51 mins – “Dinosaurs are once again stomping and snorting their way across the screen of your local movie theater.  But these beefy beasts stole the show long before CGI brought them back in the Jurassic Park blockbusters.  Dinosaurs had global dominance for the better part of 165 million years. Compare that with a measly 56 million years of primate activity. We bow to our evolutionary overlords in this episode.  Our conversation about these thunderous lizards roams freely as we talk with the paleontologist who discovered Dreadnoughtus – the largest land lizard unearthed to dateKenneth Lacovara asks that we please stop using the term “dinosaur” to refer to something outmoded, when in fact the dinos were among the most well-adapted, long-lived creatures ever. Plus, intriguing dino facts: if you like eating chicken, you like eating dinosaurs, and how T-Rex’s puny arms helped him survive.” At the link right-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

DNA and Rosalind Franklin 39 mins – “The race to determine the structure of DNA has a dark subtext that is frequently ignored when discussing this seminal discovery in biology.  Competing groups at Cambridge and King’s College set their sights on resolving this important question. King’s College recruited a bright young x-ray crystalographer, a scientist that used energy to examine molecular structure. Her name was Dr. Rosalind Franklin.  While teams in this old-boy’s network pushed forward, Franklin used her skills to generate data to answer the question.  Her data would provide the information needed to determine the structure of DNA.  However, she was not credited beyond a tiny footnote, and died at 37 never realizing how her data illuminated the discovery of DNA’s double-helical structure.  The story is told by Dr. Mark Lawler of Queens University in Belfast, Northern Ireland.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DOJ Report on Hillary 22 mins – “Post reporter Devlin Barrett joins us for a special episode to talk about the Justice Department inspector general’s report on the FBI investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server.” At the link find the title, “The DOJ report on Comey: What you should know, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5b242006e4b0e01e1e6c7b15_1351620000001-300030_t_1529094153498_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Early Childhood Education 53 mins -”Our lecture this week is presented by the Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College.  Our speaker is University of Chicago Professor of Surgery, Dr. Dana Suskind.  Dr. Suskind’s lecture is titled “Thirty Million Words: A Public Health Approach to Early Childhood Education.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Employment Shortages 57 mins – “How are tariffs and international trade disputes impacting our state? We also take a look at summer employment, including the shortage of workers. And, how do large companies mergers impact the little guys?At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News History 27 mins – “Fake news may seem new, but in reality, it’s as old as American journalism. This week, we look at a tension at the heart of news coverage: Should reporters think of the audience as consumers, or as citizens? Should the media give people what they want, or what they need?” At the link find the title, “Fake News: An Origin Story, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180625_hiddenbrain_hb Andie Tucher fake news spotlight-final_mix.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake News Detection 51 mins – “Students in Uganda are the guinea pigs for a new scientific discipline – researchers are teaching them to be the first firewall against alternative facts. Academics from Uganda and Norway worked with 10,000 students in classrooms across Kampala to find out how well children can fight back against false information, in this case about health care.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake Reviews 19 mins – “Fake product reviews are wrecking the internet. But help is on the way: From a bodybuilding fake review hunter.” At the link find the title, “#850: The Fake Review Hunter, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180627_pmoney_pmpod850v2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food and Nutrition 53 mins – “We at The BMJ care about food, and if our listener stats are to be believed, so do you. In this podcast we talk to a few of the authors of a new series, published next week on bmj.com, which tries to provide some insight into the current state of nutritional science – where the controversies lie, where there’s broad agreement, and the journey of our understanding of nutrition.” At the link find the title, “Nutritional science – why studying what we eat is so difficult. Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 455667405-bmjgroup-nutritional-science-why-studying-what-we-eat-is-so-difficult.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Quality Declines 54 mins – “Rising carbon dioxide levels is turning rice and fish into junk food; Hurricanes are slowing down and settling in to do more damage; Scientists say restrictions on neonic pesticides aren’t enough – we need a ban; AI researchers develop a way to trick facial recognition systems; Crocodile Bach – what classical music does to a reptile’s brain; Where was the Higgs boson particle ‘hiding’ before it was discovered?” At the link find the title, “Rising CO2 levels making food less nutritious, neonicotinoids and bees, tricking facial recognition systems, slowing cyclones, crocodiles’ brains on Bach, and more, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files quirksaio-l15hraqV-20180608.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Github Explained 54 mins – “GitHub, WhatsApp, and Australia on this week’s episode with Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, Emily Peck, and Paul Ford.” At the link find the title, “The Put a Fork In It Edition, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY4199583619.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

GMO Controversy 52 mins – “Are GMOs the answer to our planet’s food shortage? Or are they jeopardizing our health, crops and climate by creating a destructive cycle of Roundup resistance? Like many issues these days, it depends on who you believe. Supporters of genetically modified organisms say that altering the DNA of corn and other crops is just another tool in the farmers’ toolbox – an innovation that will help feed a world whose food production has been disrupted by climate change. John Purcell, who heads up Monsanto’s vegetable division, brushes characterizations of his company as the “most hated” in the world. Twenty years in, he remains excited about their vision of changing agriculture for the better. “That’s what got me and a lot of the biologists that came to Monsanto excited,” he tells the Climate One audience. “Because we wanted to find new ways to help farmers, and we wanted to do it in a sustainable fashion, and we want to make sure all the tools of modern biology are being used.” As an example, he cites major improvements made in corn production. “You can produce more corn with less land, less water, less energy and with a more positive carbon footprint than you could 30 years ago.” But GMO opponents maintain that modified plants are dangerous to our health because of their resistance to pesticides such as Monsanto’s Roundup, which has been linked to cancer and is frequently used to battle bugs that could destroy crops….” At the link find the title, “Rounding Up the Facts on GMOs, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180624_cl1_Rounding Up Facts PODCAST.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence in Canada 21 mins – “More than a decade after the ‘summer of the gun,’ Toronto has seen a recent spike in shootings, including two little girls at a playground. Some argue policing and prevention strategies need a new approach.” At the link find the title, “Increase in Toronto shootings will continue without new strategy, argues anti-gun advocate, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-ssE1gt31-20180619.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Programs in America 68 mins – “Don’t miss this behind-the-scenes peek into what is going to happen over the next decade as the nation grapples with health care costs, quality and access. Speakers will discuss how public policies and politics, incentive changes for doctors and hospitals, new entrants, and new technologies like artificial intelligence are likely to emerge and evolve and how these trends are going to impact healthcare for patients. Kocher served in the Obama administration and is a partner at Venrock and focuses on health care IT and services investments. Mendonca is a senior partner emeritus from the Washington D.C. and San Francisco offices of McKinsey & Company, a global management consulting firm. He is a lecturer at the Stanford Business School and serves on the Board of Governors of The Commonwealth Club.” At the link find the title, “Health Care in America—What Happens Now?, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180619_MLF Healthcare in America for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Reproduction 33 mins – “At two weeks old, the human embryo has only just begun its months-long journey to become a baby. The embryo is tiny, still invisible to the naked eye. But inside it, an epic struggle plays out, as a nomadic band of cells marches toward a mysterious destiny, with the future of humanity resting on their microscopic shoulders. This episode was reported by Molly Webster, and produced by Jad Abumrad. With scoring and original composition by Alex Overington and Dylan Keefe. Additional production by Rachael Cusick, and editing by Pat Walters. The “Ballad of the Fish” and “Gonads” was composed and sung by Majel Connery, and produced by Alex Overington.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Humanitarian Aid Agency Transparency 88 mins – “Today’s aid and development actors, including humanitarian agencies and development finance institutions, operate in a far more complex landscape than 10 years ago when the drive for aid transparency gained momentum. This makes transparency more critical now than ever. To have the biggest possible impact on communities in need, it is vital that all aid and development information is available in a timely, detailed, open, and comparable manner.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Inequality Effects 30 mins – “Wealth inequality has skyrocketed in the UK, as has anxiety, stress and mental illness. Could the two be linked? Richard Lea investigates” At the link find the title, “The psychological effects of inequality – Science Weekly podcast, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 07-62930-gnl.sci.180608.gj.the_psychological_effects_of_inequality.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Defined 57 mins – “This episode features Stuart Ritchie, intelligence researcher and author of the book “Intelligence: All That Matters.” Stuart responds to some of the most common conceptual objections to the science of IQ testing. Can we even define intelligence? Aren’t there lots of different kinds of intelligence? How do we know the tests are measuring intelligence at all instead of something like motivation or familiarity with the style of testing? Does it undermine the meaningfulness of IQ as a metric that people can improve over time, with practice, or over generations?” At the linkr ight-click “Download Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Israel’s Future 60 mins – “On June 25, the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings hosted Member of Knesset Yair Lapid for an Alan and Jane Batkin International Leaders Forum. M.K. Lapid joined for a public conversation on his vision for Israel’s future. M.K. Lapid, the former finance minister of the State of Israel, discussed a wide-ranging set of issues confronting Israel today, from its position in the Golan Heights, its strategy toward the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, to the state U.S.-Israel alliance and bipartisan support for Israel in the United States. A former journalist, television presenter, and author, Lapid founded the centrist Yesh Atid Party in 2012. The party garnered a surprising 19 seats in its first elections, and was the second largest party in the Knesset. Yesh Atid today polls as the main opposition challenger to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party.” At the link right-click “Audio Only” window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kennedy Shooting Commission 28 mins – “President John F. Kennedy was shot dead in Dallas on 22nd November 1963. Shortly afterwards the 24-year-old Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested, initially for the murder of a police officer. Within hours he was charged with assassinating the president. Two days later, although in police custody, Oswald was shot dead by nightclub owner Jack Ruby. The new President Lyndon B. Johnson quickly set up a commission under US Chief Justice Earl Warren. Its job was to investigate the murder of the president and circumstances surrounding it. Burt Griffin, Sam Stern and Howard P.Willens, worked on the report now openly consider its merits and whether it uncovered the truth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyft Creator 43 mins – “In 2006, John Zimmer was a college student and ride-hailing wasn’t yet “a thing.” But a class on green cities got him thinking about the glut of underused cars on the road. Eventually, he co-founded Lyft, a company that has helped make ride-hailing a fixture of American urban living. PLUS in our postscript “How You Built That,” an update with Kyle Ewing, who almost set fire to his living room making Terraslate, a tough waterproof paper.” At the link find the title, “Lyft: John Zimmer, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180622_hibt_lyft.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health in First World Countries 28 mins – “Wealth inequality has skyrocketed in the UK, as has anxiety, stress and mental illness. Could the two be linked? Richard Lea investigates” At the link find the title, “The psychological effects of inequality – Science Weekly podcast, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 07-62930-gnl.sci.180608.gj.the_psychological_effects_of_inequality.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Child Separations 19 mins – “Both Canada and the U.S. have a long history of removing children from the care of their parents, and one historian says the rhetoric in use today is the same as during the time of slavery.” At the link find the title, “Rhetoric around migrants in U.S. has parallels to slavery, says historian, J” right-click “Media files current-wXiB9OCM-20180621.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Family Separations 19 mins – “Post reporter Mary Jordan helps us look back at a week of conflicting statements and rapid reversals amid an outcry over immigration policy and border separations.” At the link find the title, “A week of mixed messaging on border separations, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5b2d7ae8e4b0e01e1e6c82dd_1351620000001-300030_t_1529707244758_44100_160_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

NGO Financial Transparency 88 min – “On June 20, the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings and Publish What You Fund co-hosted the launch of the sixth Aid Transparency Index. The report, which assesses 45 of the world’s largest donors, is the only independent global measure of aid transparency.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Nursing Home Murders 19 mins – “Susan Horvath has lost faith in long-term care after her father was murdered by Elizabeth Wettlaufer. She’s also not confident an inquiry looking into how her crimes went undetected for a decade will result in any improvements.” At the link find the title, “Daughter of Wettlaufer’s last victim unconvinced inquiry will result in changes to system, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-WO0heGcP-20180615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obama Communications Director 67 mins – “Pfeiffer was one of President Obama’s longest-serving advisors, working on two presidential campaigns and spending 6 years in the White House as communications director and senior advisor to the president. Now he co-hosts the wildly popular Pod Save America podcast, along with Jon Favreau and Tommy Vietor, which brings insiders’ expertise to bear in a twice-weekly discussion about the latest happenings in the White House and Congress. Pfeiffer shares never-before-heard stories about working in the Oval Office and reflects on those years of massive change that helped rewrite the rules of politics. He addresses the current political landscape and offers a hopeful message for where our country can go from here.” At the link find the title, “ Dan Pfeiffer: Co-Host of Pod Save America and Former White House Communications Director, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180627_SV_Dan_Pfeiffer_For_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obamas National Security Advisor 67 mins – “The Obama years were a historic moment in American history. For nearly ten years, Ben Rhodes was at the center of everything that happened—first as a speechwriter, then as deputy national security advisor and a close presidential aide and confidant. From the early days on the campaign trail to the final hours in the Oval Office, Rhodes captures Obama’s historic presidency in his book The World as It Is. Rhodes witnessed the the Arab Spring and later the Osama bin Laden raid in the Situation Room. He was there when the administration reached a nuclear agreement with Iran and also when they led secret negotiations with the Cuban government to normalize relations. Join us for the full story of Rhodes’ partnership—and, ultimately, friendship—with a man who also happened to be a historic president of the United States.” At the link find the title, “Ben Rhodes: National Security Under Obama, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180626_FEA Ben Rhodes for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Osteoporosis Fractures 82 mins – “There are 1.5 million osteoporosis fractures per year in the US. Dr. Eric Meinberg explores the steps to prevent osteoporosis, calculating your risk and treatment of various types of fractures. Then, Ralph Marcucio, PhD explores what the research shows about age and orthopaedic healing. Recorded on 05/15/2018. (#33737)” At the link right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Particle Physics 28 mins – “Frank Close is a theoretical particle physicist and a pioneer of popular writing about physics. His first book aimed at a non-specialist audience, The Cosmic Onion, was published 35 years ago. His latest, Half Life, is the story of physicist and spy, Bruno Pontecorvo. Frank has also had a distinguished research career studying the fundamental structure of matter. It was during his PhD in the late 60s that quarks were discovered. These are the fundamental entities we now know make up particles such as protons and neutrons, which in turn make up the nuclei of atoms, and therefore all of us and everything around us. Frank Close went on to make a name for himself studying what holds the quarks together inside matter. Among his many best-selling books was his thorough account of the controversial claims about the discovery of cold fusion – the idea of unlimited fusion energy in a test tube – and which brought the remarkable story to the world’s attention in his book Too Hot to Handle. Frank has spent most of his working life around the Thames Valley – at the Rutherford Appleton Labs, and now at the University of Oxford where is an emeritus professor of physics. In front of an audience at the Cheltenham Science Festival Jim al-Khalili discusses physics and writing with Frank Close.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philanthropy in America 71 mins – “Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy is the seminal publication on charitable giving in the United States. For over 60 years, fundraisers, nonprofit leaders, donors and volunteers, scholars, and other individuals who work in or with the charitable sector have counted on Giving USA to provide the most comprehensive charitable giving data available. First published in 1956, Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy is the longest-running, most comprehensive report on philanthropy in the United States. At this event, conducted in association with CCS Fundraising, Foundation Center West and The Commonwealth Club, local philanthropic and nonprofit leaders will review national, exclusive data pertaining to Bay Area giving, with a special focus on trends in tech philanthropyPhilanthropic giving—whether to hospitals, universities, the arts or local nonprofits—impacts the lives of all citizens and determines a range of services available in our communities now and in the future.” At the link find the title, “Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy is the seminal publication on charitable giving in the United States. For over 60 years, fundraisers, nonprofit leaders, donors and volunteers, scholars, and other individuals who work in or with the charitable sector have counted on Giving USA to provide the most comprehensive charitable giving data available. First published in 1956, Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy is the longest-running, most comprehensive report on philanthropy in the United States. At this event, conducted in association with CCS Fundraising, Foundation Center West and The Commonwealth Club, local philanthropic and nonprofit leaders will review national, exclusive data pertaining to Bay Area giving, with a special focus on trends in tech philanthropyPhilanthropic giving—whether to hospitals, universities, the arts or local nonprofits—impacts the lives of all citizens and determines a range of services available in our communities now and in the future.” At the link find the title, “Giving USA: The Annual Report on Philanthropy in America, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180612_FEA Philanthropy.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philanthropy in Asia 66 mins – “As enormous wealth continues to be created in Asia, the region’s ultra-high-net-worth individuals are turning their hand to philanthropy. But their path continues to manifest quite differently from the United States and Western Europe. Drawing upon exclusive interviews with ultra-high-net-worth individuals and case studies of successful social initiatives, this talk will examine why and how Asia’s traditional and newer philanthropists are giving.” At the link find the title, “Dr. Ruth Shapiro: Is Asia Philanthropic? Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180614_FEA_Ruth_Shapiro_for_podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in America 78 mins – “According to celebrated author and sociologist Michael Eric Dyson, 1963 was a defining year for the civil rights movement in the United States—universities in the South were integrated, four young girls were killed in a church bombing, and a quarter of a million Americans marched on Washington to hear Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. That same year, Attorney General Robert Kennedy sought out cultural leaders like James Baldwin, playwright Lorraine Hansberry, psychologist Kenneth Clark and activist Jerome Smith to explain the rage that threatened to engulf America. According to Dyson, every fundamental argument about race in America was heard in that room. Fifty-five years after this historic year, the tense intersection of conflict between conscience and politics—between morality and power—in addressing race continues on with Black Lives Matter. In his new book What Truth Sounds Like, Michael Eric Dyson confronts a difficult situation directly: whether we embrace political resolution or moral redemption to fix our fractured racial landscape in this country. Dyson believes the future of race—and of democracy itself—hangs in the balance. Michael Eric Dyson is an op-ed columnist for The New York Times and professor of sociology at Georgetown University. He has authored numerous books on black culture and both the history and future of race relations in the United States.” At the link find the title, “Michael Eric Dyson: America’s Unfinished Race Conversation, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180618_FEA Michael Eric Dyson For Podcast_EXPLICIT.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Renewable Energy Controversy 57 mins – “Controversy Explodes over Renewable Energy, Aug, 2017” At the link find that title, right-click “Media files buck081117.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Party Operations 60 mins – “2010 was the year of the Tea Party, the year of backlash against Obama, and the year of the biggest shift of power in the House in a century. But it’s also the year that Republicans executed a little-noticed strategy that cemented their place in power.” At the link find the title, “How to Flip the House: The secret heist of 2010, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 5b317344e4b0272e5db8113b_1351620000001-300040_t_1529967433197_44100_128_2.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rule of Law Discussion 71 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick moderates a discussion of civil rights and legal norms in the Trump era with the ACLU’s David Cole, president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, Vanita Gupta, former White House chief ethics counsel under President George W Bush, Richard Painter, and former US attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, Joyce White Vance.” At the link find the title, “Bonus: Live From the ACLU, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files SLT7816734951.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexism in Britain 26 mins – “Research shows that sexism is more prevalent in open-concept offices because women feel overexposed and have no privacy.” At the link find the title, “Open-plan offices leave women subject to sexism at work, research suggests, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-Y5LFE7jS-20180628.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Extortion 69 mins – “Corruption, Gender Inequality, and the MeToo Movement Tuesday, June 18, 2019, 6:05 PM” At the link find this title, right-click “Media files Audio (Edited).mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shoe Production Impact 28 mins – “Take a look at the shoes you’re wearing right now. You’ve probably logged more than a few miles in them already. But what kind of journey did they take before they ended up on your feet? This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak to Spencer Wise, an author whose debut novel, The Emperor of Shoes, is set in an international shoe-manufacturing enterprise. We discuss the labor conditions of the Chinese shoe factories Wise visited, explore the environmentally treacherous practices of leather tanning, and talk about how over generations a small family business moved into the modern global economy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Soil Restoration 75 mins – “Journalist and author Moises Velasquez-Manoff talks about the role of dirt in fighting climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Velasquez-Manoff explains how changes in farming can allow dirt and plants to absorb carbon and potentially reduce climate change. At the end of the conversation he discusses the state of the science on hygiene, parasites, and auto-immune disorders that he discussed in his previous appearance on EconTalk in 2014.” At the link find the title, “Moises Velasquez-Manoff on Cows, Carbon Farming, and Climate Change, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files VelasquezManoffclimate.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power in California 21 mins – “California has a ton of solar power. But as soon as night falls, it’s gone. Today on the show: How to bottle the sun.” At the link find the title, “#848: The World’s Biggest Battery, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180615_pmoney_pmpod848.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southern Europe Economic Recovery 53 mins – “The Political Economy of Recovery in Southern Europe (2014-2018), Jun, 2018.” At the link find that title, right-click “Media files BUR8581676065.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stacey Adams 66 mins – “It’s almost a cliché: it’s good to be different. However, it’s hard to believe this when there are a plethora of experiences and challenges that hinder anyone who exists beyond the structure of traditional power. But today, there are women, people of color, members of the LGBTQ community and millennials in the world who are ready to make a difference. Stacey Abrams, Former Georgia House minority leader and candidate for governor of Georgia, wants to show everyone that there is truth in the cliché and value in the struggle against traditional power structures. In her new book, Minority Leader: How to Lead from the Outside and Make Real Change, she emphasizes the importance of knowing your own passion, regardless of the scale or target. She discusses personal stories about launching a company, starting a daycare center for homeless teen moms and running a successful political campaign to show how ambition, fear, money, and failure function in leadership. Join this special conversation about how being in the minority can provide unique and vital strength!” At the link find the title, “Stacey Abrams: Leading from the Minority Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180627_FEA_Stacy_Abrams_For_Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicides Increase 58 mins – “Several high-profile suicides have been the focus of a national conversation, and recent numbers show that the rate in New Hampshire is up nearly 50 percent over the past 20 years. The Exchange on Thursday, June 14, will examine what’s causing this rise in suicide deaths, and how N.H. is approaching this difficult topic. Mental health professionals urge people suffering from suicidal thoughts to seek help by contacting the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, which is available 24 hours a day at (800) 273-8255.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Summer Student Melt 26 mins – “As many as 40 percent of students who intend to go to college don’t actually show up to their new campuses in the fall. Education researchers call this phenomenon “summer melt,” and it has long been a puzzling problem. These kids have taken the SATs, written college essays, applied to and been accepted by a school of their choice. Often they’ve applied for and received financial aid. So why would they not show up at college? This week, we bring you a 2017 episode looking more closely about the problem — and one way to address it.” At the link find the title, “Summer Melt, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180618_hiddenbrain_hb_pod_78 summer melt-rebroadcast_june_2018.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Taurine Questions 18 mins – “You see it in energy drinks. It is in our food, supplements, it naturally occurs in multiple organs, and most people don’t know anything about it.” AT the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terrorism Countermeasures 68 mins – “Darshan-Leitner, the founder and director of the Israel Law Center, will discuss the unconventional Israeli task force Harpoon, which was created to combat terrorism. Leitner has appeared on CNN, BBC, Fox News, among other media outlets, and will explain the unconventional ways Israel’s espionage service Mossad waged financial warfare against extremist organizations and regimes funding worldwide terrorism and how Harpoon’s cloak-and-dagger campaign became the blueprint for American efforts to fight threats such as ISIS.” At the link find the title, “Harpoon: Combatting Terrorism, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180625_MLF Harpoon for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tesla the Inventor 63 mins – “Nikola Tesla invented the radio, robots and remote control. When his first breakthrough ― alternating current ― pitted him against Thomas Edison’s direct-current empire, Tesla’s superior technology prevailed. Although penniless later in life, he never stopped imagining. In the early 1900s, he designed plans for cell phones, the Internet, death-ray weapons and interstellar communications. Drawing on letters, technical notebooks and other primary sources, Munson pieces together the magnificently bizarre personal life and mental habits of this farsighted and underappreciated mastermind. Strikingly handsome and impeccably dressed, Tesla spoke eight languages and could recite entire books from memory. Yet his most famous inventions were not the product of fastidiousness or linear thought, but of a mind fueled by both the humanities and sciences. He conceived the induction motor while walking through a park, reciting Goethe’s Faust, and then worked tirelessly to offer electric power to the world, to introduce automatons that would reduce life’s drudgery, and to develop machines that might one day abolish war.” At the link find the title, “Tesla: Inventor of the Modern, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180618_MLF_Tesla for podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade War with Canada 30 mins- “Jacob Weisberg is joined by Slate’s Jordan Weissmann to talk about Trump’s showdown with Trudeau on tariffs and the future of NAFTA.” At the link find the title,”The Sewage of Trump’s Trade War, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY4570637630.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade War with China 23 mins – “President Trump says China is stealing U.S. technology. So we looked into one case. And things got a little complicated.” At the link find the title, “#849: It Takes Two To Make A Trade War Fight, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 20180620_pmoney_pmpod849.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Turkish Politics 87 mins – “Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has called snap presidential and parliamentary elections for June 24. Following the failed coup attempt in July 2016, the constitutional referendum in April 2017 that approved a more powerful executive presidency, and recent economic turbulence, Turkish politics have become increasingly volatile. Recent polls suggest it is likely that Erdoğan will win the presidency in a run-off, but his Justice and Development Party (AKP) will lose its majority in parliament. What would be the domestic, economic, and foreign policy implications of such a mixed result? And what would a renewed mandate for Erdoğan mean for Turkey’s democracy, economy, and relations with the United States and Europe?” At the link right-click “Audio Only” window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urine Test Misinterpretations 21 mins – “You know all those people on social media wanting mandatory drug testing for welfare recipients? Perhaps, reasonable in theory, if the test wasn’t frequently producing false-positives and false-negatives. Making accurate clinical decisions is always challenging, but particularly with urine drug testing. The consequences of misinterpretation can be awful.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Researchers Discussion 60 mins – “At Europic 2018, a meeting on picornaviruses in the Netherlands, Vincent speaks with Sasha Gorbalenya, Jim Hogle, Ann Palmenberg and Frank van Kuppeveld about their careers and their research.” At the link find and right-click the title, “Download TWiV 497 ” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Infrastructure Jobs 117 mins – “As the U.S. economy continues to grow, many communities are struggling to translate this growth into more equitable and inclusive employment opportunities. Meanwhile, many of the country’s infrastructure assets are in urgent need of repair or restoration, and the workers responsible for carrying out these efforts are in short supply. However, these two challenges offer an enormous economic opportunity: infrastructure is well positioned to offer more durable careers to a wide variety of workers. The country’s water infrastructure embodies this opportunity, including the need to hire, train, and retain a new generation of skilled workers focused on constructing, operating, designing, and governing the country’s various infrastructure systems. This responsibility falls to water utilities, other employers, workforce development partners, as well as local, state, and national leaders to develop a water workforce to meet ongoing demands, ideally connected to the diverse residents and communities they serve.” At the link right-click “Audio Only” window and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water Supplies 28 mins – “This week, we continue our “Best Of” series by featuring our conversation with Professor Thilo Hoffman from the Department of Environmental Geosciences at the University of Vienna. Hofmann is studying the role of nanoparticles in water. Are they harmful? Is it easy to remove them? How would we remove them? To answer some of these questions, listen in to this edition of Science Studio.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Watergate Scandal 50 mins – “What if we were living through the next Watergate? That’s the idea of the podcast Slow Burn, about the scandal that brought down President Nixon. Host Leon Neyfakh joins us to talk about a precarious political chapter and its implications today. What if we were living through the next Watergate? That’s the question behind the podcast Slow Burn, about the scandal that brought down President Nixon. It tries to capture what it was like to live at a time when a paranoid president accused of obstructing justice was the subject of a long-running investigation. Then, as now, nobody knew how it all would end. Slow Burn host Leon Neyfakh joins us to explore a precarious chapter of history and how it can help us make sense of what’s happening today.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wolf in Yellowstone 21 mins – “In 2006, a wolf was born in Yellowstone who would become a legend in her own time. For more about the 06 Female and the debate surrounding wolves in Yellowstone, be sure to check out Jeff Hull’s article in Outside Magazine and Nate Rott’s special report for NPR.” At the link right-click “Download” and select Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Womens Rights 66 mins – “The Opportunity to Thrive: Girls’ Education in Humanitarian Crises Thursday, July 05, 2018, 11:21 AM” At the link find this title, right-click “Media files Audio.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Youth Leaders 67 mins – “The recent March for Our Lives nationwide protests against gun violence, led by teenage survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, were some of the largest youth protests since the Vietnam War. But young people have been fueling social change in America for decades, from the civil rights movement and Vietnam War protests to the undocumented youth and Black Lives Matter movements. Twenty-two million American teens will turn 18 by the 2020 election, giving youth tremendous power during a critical moment in our nation’s history. What will the future look like under their leadership? When we create space for young people, support their advocacy and listen to their voices, they speak truth to power and we all stand to win. That’s why, for this event, we’re handing them the microphones. Join some of the Bay Area’s brightest young leaders as they discuss the issues they care about, the policies they’re working to change and the tools and strategies they’re using to grow their movements.” At the link find the title, “The Hope of Our Future: Youth Leaders In Their Own Words, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files cc_20180619_FEA_Hope_Of_Our Future For Podcast.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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