Media Mining Digest 350 – Jul 27, 2018: American Diplomacy Ends, American Radicals Investigations, Animal Rights Activists, Anthrax History, Canadian Floods Increase, Child Removal as in Slavery, Children in Crates, Cooperative Communities, Cree Nation Homes, Cyberwar, Detroit Recovery, Disability Economics, Doctor with Spina Bifida, Echolocation, Environmental Racism, Environmental Summit, Exactis Data Collection, Fake Science News, Farm Workers Union, Floods Increase in Canada, Fugee Academy, Gangs in Central America, Guatemalan Volcano, Guns and Industrial Revolution, Homeostasis, India Transformation, Innovation versus Maintenance, Investigative Journalist Techniques, Iraqi Refugees, ISIS Survivors in Canada, Job Insights, Juneteenth Celebration Killer fungus, Korematsu v. United States, Lyft and Aira, Mafia Opposition, Marijuana Legalized in Canada, Mexican-American War, Microbes and Metals, Outrage and Trump, Ovarian Cancer, Political Tribes, Prosthetic Trends, Refugees from Central America, Rwanda Neurosurgeon, Sea Level Rise, Serial Killers, Sexual Harassment in Medicine, Smartphone Photography, Snapchat Addiction, Supreme Court Annual Summary, Toronto Gun Violence Problem, Uber Fatality Report, Universal Credit (Social Security), VR History, Won’t You Be My Neighbor

Exercise your ears: the 84 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 710 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 21,914 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-B at this link, files C-E link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 140GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 460 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles.  Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Adler in Shanghai 24 mins – “During the Second World War, a Jewish refugee [Ferdinand Adler] escaped the Nazis and fled to Shanghai. There, he taught music to a group of orphans, but abruptly disappeared in 1947. The Chinese-Canadian son of one of those orphans, Fang Sheng, grew up hearing stories of this man, and set out to solve the mystery of what happened to him.” At the link find the title, “Finding Adler: The music and mystery of the Jewish refugee who shaped the lives of a Chinese family, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-rnOufQa8-20180619.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Advice Columnists 51 mins – “we’re talking about what advice columnists have had to say over the years about life and love. Author Jessica Weisberg says our questions are the same, it’s the answers that have changed. What are people getting from advice columns? Have you ever written to a columnist with maybe an etiquette question or something more personal? The journalist Jessica Weisberg has a new book that profiles advice columnists and what they’ve had to say over the years about life, love, and money. Weisberg says that over time the questions are the same, it’s the answers that have changed. Tuesday, she joins us along with advice columnists Amy Dickinson and Utah’s own Ann Cannon.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Diplomacy Ends 43 mins – “In Hollywood movies diplomats always get a bad rap. I’m picturing Claude Rains as “Mr. Dryden” in Lawrence of Arabia looking, as Clyde Rains always does, somewhat reptilian as he hunches over a map of the Middle East with General Allenby, smirking secretively. Hollywood diplomats are slippery. Untrustworthy. More often than not, they turn out to be double agents. On screen, definitive action plays better than careful talk or compromise. This is true of America in general and of our politics in particular—we’re just not comfortable with ambiguity. Leave that to the French. Americans are about gettin’ things done. But the geopolitical world is complex, and allegedly getting more so every day. Meanwhile, over the last several presidencies, America has quietly been shifting its foreign policy approach from diplomacy to military muscle. With the current president, the gutting of the State Department in favor of the Pentagon is starting to look like Friday the 13th part whatever. My guest today is investigative journalist and former State Department official Ronan Farrow. He won the Pulitzer Prize for his his work in the New Yorker on the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse scandal. His new book is War on Peace, The End of Diplomacy and The Decline of American Influence — and the title is pretty much self-explanatory.” At the link find the title, “147. Ronan Farrow (investigative journalist) — A Failure to Communicate, May, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY1155411093.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

American Radical Investigations 82 mins – “Writer and historian Aaron Leonard, the author of Heavy Radicals, joins Brett to discuss the Revolutionary Union/Revolutionary Communist Party of the 60’s and 70’s, of which Aaron was a member for 30 years. Topics include Marxism-Leninism-Mao Zedong Thought, the FBI, Red China, Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), The Weather Underground, Police Infiltration of Leftist organizations, the Black Panther Party, Bob Avakian, Mao Zedong, and much more!” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Anesthesia Effects 26 mins – “Before anesthesia, there were stories of people preferring death to surgery; of hopping off operating tables and running. But are we truly fully unaware? Or does a part of us retain some memory of what happens when we’re under?” At the link find the title, “Under the knife and unaware? What happens when we’re under anesthesia, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-9yy9420Z-20180625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Rights Activists 52 mins – “…we’re talking about a group of activists who snuck onto factory farms in Utah to document the living conditions of pigs and turkeys. Their actions highlight the reality of industrial meat production and the debate over animal rights. Last year, animal rights activists snuck onto factory farms in Utah to document the living conditions of turkeys and pigs. They say their findings show abusive treatment of the animals. Now, they face multiple felony charges for what the meat-processing company calls unethical and irresponsible behavior. Journalist Glenn Greenwald says the criminal case amounts to corporations using the justice system to settle scores. Monday, we’re talking about industrial meat production and the debate over animal rights.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Anthrax History 31 mins – “This month, Benjamin interviews Dr Jamie Stark, a Research Fellow in the Centre for History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Leeds. Jamie is an expert on the history of anthrax, a lethal disease caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. He has extensively researched the appearance (and social role) of anthrax in the UK town of Bradford in the late 19th century. Jamie has a new book out on the subject, entitled The Making of Modern Anthrax. We discuss this, and the subject at large, in this in-depth podcast.” At the link find the title, “Anthrax in 19th century Bradford, Jan, 2014,” right-click “Media files 2014-01-09T02_25_14-08_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comedian Baratunde Thurston 24 mins – “At what point do sex robots become sex slaves? How are bandwidth and storage capacity changing our lives? Can you have a “personal brand” and “be yourself” at the same time? In this week’s episode of Big Think’s Think Again podcast, host Jason Gots is joined by author and tech pundit Baratunde Thurston, “a philosopher comedian fighting for the future.” Interview clips from Rick Smolan, Lawrence Krauss, and Guy Kawasaki launch a discussion of human potential, social status, identity, and how Kim Kardashian’s butt didn’t actually “break the internet”.” At the link find the title, “7. Baratunde Thurston (Comedian, Cultural Critic) – Stupidity Scaled/Robot Rights/Brand You, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files PP7554249428.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barred Owl Shootings 24 mins – “Barred owls are being culled in large numbers in the Pacific Northwest, in an effort to save their close cousins, the endangered spotted owl. Is it fair to kill one species to save another? conservationists disagree, but it’s a question that will become more pertinent as climate change forces animals to migrate.” At the link find the title, “The magnificent bully: Why thousands of barred owls are being shot by U.S. conservationists, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-SRMFpbvl-20180622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biological Diversity – “Stewart Brand and Paul Saffo will discuss the Pace Layers framework for how a healthy society functions, which Stewart introduced in his book The Clock of Long Now (01999). More than fifteen years after its debut, this concept continues to be influential and inspiring. From January 02015. The Pace Layers idea is illustrated by a simple diagram showing six layers which function simultaneously at different speeds within society. They range from Nature (the slowest) to Fashion (the fastest, shown at the top). As the layers progress, Stewart proposed, their differing speeds help make a society more adaptable. Cultures can be robust and healthy precisely because these layers come into conflict. Each level should be allowed to operate at its own pace, safely sustained by the slower levels below and kept invigorated by livelier levels above. Though originally conceived as a tool for thinking about society, Pace Layers has had broad influence as experts in other disciplines have applied its framework to their areas including consulting and systems thinking. Jeff Veen of True Ventures (formerly Adobe, Adaptive Path, and Wired) recently said that Pace Layers provides a vocabulary to think about the stacked layers of contemporary design. Phil Libin, CEO of Evernote, has called the Pace Layers chapter in The Clock of the Long Now “the most profound thing I’ve ever read.” Today in a networked world where everything seems to be about speed, awareness of the slower layers and perspective on how all layers interact can give insight into what the future may hold.” At the link find the title, “Pace Layers Thinking: Stewart Brand, Paul Saffo, Jun, 2017,” right-click “Media files salt-020150127-brand-saffo-podcast.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Colorado 29 mins – “Late last year, Larimer County, Colorado, commissioned a broadband feasibility study to examine the possible solutions toward better connectivity across its more than 2,600 square miles. This week, three guests from Larimer County are here to discuss the community’s plan as it’s taking shape, Broadband Program Manager Drew Davis, Director of Economic and Workforce Development Jacob Castillo, and CIO Mark Pfaffinger. The interview was one of several Christopher conducted while at the Mountain Connect conference in Vail. Drew, Jacob, and Mark discuss the results they’ve recently received from phase one of the feasibility study, the residential survey….” At the link right-click “ download this mp3 file directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Broadband in Colorado 32 mins – “The State of Colorado has made some changes in the past few years that are improving broadband deployment, especially in rural areas. In this episode of the podcast, Christopher talks about some of those changes with Tony Neal-Graves, Executive Director of the Colorado Broadband Office. While Christopher was in Vail at the Mountain Connect event, he and Tony sat down to have a conversation about broadband and deployment in Colorado. In addition to discussing his shift from the private to public sector, Tony gets into changes in state law, including last session’s adjustments to Colorado’s right of first refusal….” At the link right-click “download this mp3 file directly…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Floods Increase28 mins – “In 2014, Burlington, Ont. was hit with a so-called “weather bomb” leaving many with flooded basements. But it also kicked off city-wide efforts to adapt to the new reality of disruptive weather events.” At the link find the title, “Is Canada prepared for climate change? Adaptation is key, say experts, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-eGkx7XO5-20180625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Resident Schools 19 mins – “Since meeting Mi’kmaq grandmother Charlotte Morris, 13-year-old Syrian refugee Basel Alrashdan has immersed himself in Indigenous history. When he takes his Oath of Citizenship, he’s hoping to use the opportunity to highlight Indigenous treaty rights.” At the link find the title, “How overcoming adversity brought together a Syrian teen and Mi’kmaq grandmother, June, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-OqfIOGZh-20180629.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Child Removal as in Slavery 19 mins – “Both Canada and the U.S. have a long history of removing children from the care of their parents, and one historian says the rhetoric in use today is the same as during the time of slavery.” At the link find the title, “Rhetoric around migrants in U.S. has parallels to slavery, says historian, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-wXiB9OCM-20180621.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Children in Cages 21 mins – “Images of young children in cages have shocked the world this week, as a zero-tolerance immigration policy saw families separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Current’s Julie Crysler was in McAllen, Texas, meeting people on both sides of the immigration debate.” At the link find the title, “Migrant crisis: When media leaves, nothing will change, says mayor of town on U.S.-Mexico border, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-Q39fBSrZ-20180622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comedian Baratunde Thurston 24 mins – “At what point do sex robots become sex slaves? How are bandwidth and storage capacity changing our lives? Can you have a “personal brand” and “be yourself” at the same time? In this week’s episode of Big Think’s Think Again podcast, host Jason Gots is joined by author and tech pundit Baratunde Thurston, “a philosopher comedian fighting for the future.” Interview clips from Rick Smolan, Lawrence Krauss, and Guy Kawasaki launch a discussion of human potential, social status, identity, and how Kim Kardashian’s butt didn’t actually “break the internet”. At the link find the title, “7. Baratunde Thurston (Comedian, Cultural Critic) – Stupidity Scaled/Robot Rights/Brand You, Aug, 2015,” right-click “edia files PP7554249428.mp3” and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cooperative Communities 29 mins – “On this week’s program, coproduced with the Democracy Collaborative, Laura reports on a transatlantic experiment in cooperative community wealth building. In Preston, Lancashire, England, a formerly industrial city, the birthplace of the industrial revolution in many ways, they’ve seen ten years of austerity and partly out of need, and partly out of aspiration they’re practicing, experimenting, with a new model, the Preston model, and it’s inspired by a model in another formerly industrialized city: Cleveland, Ohio, the Evergreen Cooperative model.” At the link find the title, “Democratizing Wealth, Expanding Power – The Preston Model, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files lfs_ep199_preston.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cree Nation Homes – “In the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (or OCN), they’ve come up with their own home-grown solution to a national housing crisis. Paul Kennedy made a mid-winter visit to the reserve – situated at the junction of the Opasquia and Saskatchewan Rivers, in Northern Manitoba – to see community members building the first small wooden house.” At the link find the title, “One House Many Nations: Building tiny homes to solve a national crisis, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-D1Ij5oWE-20180621.mp3” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Crowdfunding Research 24 mins – “This month, we spoke to Dr Lee Stanish, a research associate from the University of Colorado in Boulder. Lee is using crowdfunding – an internet-based donation system – to fund her latest project, which will investigate whether microbes can be used to trace methane contamination from natural gas ‘fracking’ in well water. We talked to Lee about the project, her experiences with crowdfunding and her thoughts on its future as a funding stream.” At the link find the title, “Crowdfunding research, Feb, 2014,” right-click “Media files 2014-02-19T03_57_52-08_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberwar 26 mins – “Foreign governments are targeting our information, our infrastructure and even our democracy. But what constitutes an act of war in the digital age? When does espionage become an outright attack? Meet the soldiers in the fight for cyber security.” At the link find the title, “The Next Battlefield: Hacking as Warfare, J” right-click “Media files WSJ2687429759.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyberwar 37 mins – “New York Times national security correspondent David Sanger says U.S. officials worry that foreign powers have planted malware that could knock out critical infrastructure, including electric power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Death Investigations 27 mins – “Three family members died in their Mississauga home over a period of several years, but it was only after the third death that police established a suspicious pattern. The Current talks to investigators about how they approach the scene of a death, and where mistakes can be made.” At the link find the title, “What makes it a murder? Coroner’s office inquiry into ‘concealed homicides’ after Mississauga deaths, Jun, 2018” right-click “Media files current-OwgvtaVH-20180619.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Recovery 12 mins – “In 2009, journalist and screenwriter Drew Philp bought a ruined house in Detroit for $500. In the years that followed, as he gutted the interior and removed the heaps of garbage crowding the rooms, he didn’t just learn how to repair a house — he learned how to build a community. In a tribute to the city he loves, Philp tells us about “radical neighborliness” and makes the case that we have “the power to create the world anew together and to do it ourselves when our governments refuse.” At the link left-click the share circle, select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

Disability Economics 50 mins – Roughly one in five Americans has a disability. Those numbers increase with age and vary across race and gender. And every single one of those people is carving out an economic life. Marketplace is covering the economics of disability in an hourlong special. We can’t get to everything in this episode, so we’re focusing on some of the pillars of the economy: education, work and health care. Tune in to the episode above to hear stories about how people with disabilities access the economy and share your own stories by visiting us on Facebook or Twitter.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabled Children Aging Out 54 mins – “On June 12, White Coat, Black Art hosted a town hall meeting on ‘aging out’ at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. Parents, caregivers gathered to talk about the crisis of care they face when children with disabilities and complex needs ‘age out’ of the pediatric system that has supported them for their entire lives.” At the ink find the title, “Crisis of Care: A town hall meeting for families and their disabled children who are aging out of the system, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-cwgYRTLR-20180706.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Doctor with Spina Bifida 27 mins – “Dr Paige Church, developmental paediatrician talks about her life as a doctor with spina bifida.” At the link find the title, “She hid it for years, but now this doctor is talking about her own disability, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-BdS2koB9-20180628.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Echolocation 43 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss how some bats, dolphins and other animals emit sounds at high frequencies to explore their environments, rather than sight. This was such an unlikely possibility, to natural historians from C18th onwards, that discoveries were met with disbelief even into the C20th; it was assumed that bats found their way in the dark by touch. Not all bats use echolocation, but those that do have a range of frequencies for different purposes and techniques for preventing themselves becoming deafened by their own sounds. Some prey have evolved ways of detecting when bats are emitting high frequencies in their direction, and some fish have adapted to detect the sounds dolphins use to find them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment Discussion 67 mins – “Richard Reinsch, editor of Law and Liberty and the host of the podcast Liberty Law Talk, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Enlightenment. Topics discussed include the search for meaning, the stability of liberalism, the rise of populism, and Solzhenitsyn’s indictment of Western values from his Harvard Commencement Address of 1978.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Racism29 mins – “The Current explores issues of race facing all Canadians today, from environmental racism, to gentrification of traditionally black communities, to how the #MeToo moment is excluding black women and the violence they live under.” At the link find the title, “Facing Race: Highlights from The Current’s town hall event in Halifax, Jun, 2018,”right-click “Media files current-IJyH6XvV-20180628.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Summit 52 mins – “IDEAS host Paul Kennedy moderates the fifth Muskoka Summit on the Environment, a panel discussion about “Restoring our Relationship with the Natural World.” Six guests join Kennedy in a discussion about the environment.” At the link find the title,”Restoring our relationship with nature from lake beds to treetops, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-35q4qKLA-20180625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exactis Data Collection 33 mins – “Data broker Exactis tracks about 400 traits on every American. That information is now out in the wild. A hacker can drain your bank account using your email address. Listen to this Komando On Demand Podcast for a deep look into how this data got leaked by the company and what you need to do now.” At the link find the title, “What is Exactis — and how did it leak the data of nearly every American, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files What is Exactis and how did it leak the data of nearly every American.mp3” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fake Science News 48 mins – “Science is under attack from quack experts and self-appointed activists, warns a top doctor who has been caught in the crossfires. He makes the case.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Workers Union 48 mins – “Dolores Huerta co-founded the first farm workers union alongside Cesar Chavez. But she’s not as well-known, and director Peter Bratt believes it’s because she was a strong defiant woman… Few people know the name Dolores Huerta, but she’s among the most important activists in American history. Huerta was an equal partner with Cesar Chavez in co-founding the first farm workers unions. Together they fought for racial and labor justice, a struggle she continues to this day, at age 88. Director Peter Bratt joins us to discuss his documentary film about Huerta’s lifelong battle for civil rights. It’s also about the personal sacrifices and unconventional choices of a complicated woman.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Floods Increase in Canada 29 mins – “In 2014, Burlington, Ont. was hit with a so-called “weather bomb” leaving many with flooded basements. But it also kicked off city-wide efforts to adapt to the new reality of disruptive weather events.” At the link find the title, “Is Canada prepared for climate change? Adaptation is key, say experts,” right-click “Media files current-eGkx7XO5-20180625.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Microbiology P1 19 mins – “This month’s episode of Microbe Talk is something a bit different – the first in a two-part special on forensic microbiology. In part one, we’re exploring the microbes of death and decay – and how they can be used by forensic scientists to work out when and how someone has died. We spoke to writer Mo Costandi about his recent experiences visiting body farms in Texas, where scientists study the process of decomposition. Mo wrote an article for the Wellcome Trust’s Mosaic on the subject (which is well worth reading), so we asked him to the Society’s offices to find out more about what happens to our bodies after we die. We also hear from forensic scientist Dr Gulnaz Javan, who is conducting research into the “thanatomicrobiome”, or microbes of death, at one of these facilities. Gulnaz and her team take samples from cadavers and the surrounding soil in order to study the microbial communities present at different stages of decomposition. She talked to us about a recent paper from her group that discusses their early findings. …” At the link find the title, “Forensic Microbiology Part 1: Microbes of Death, Aug, 2015,” right-click “Media files 2015-07-23T01_16_59-07_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Microbiology P2 15 mins – “Could the mud and soil a person walks through be used to identify where they’ve been? In part two of our forensic microbiology special, we look at the ways that soil from crime scenes can help pinpoint the whereabouts of people and objects in police investigations. We spoke to Professor Lorna Dawson from the James Hutton Institute about her work on criminal cases, and how microbiology is being used to enhance the field of soil forensics.” At the link find the title, “Forensic Microbiology Part 2: Secrets of Soil, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files 2015-08-20T03_35_09-07_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fugee Academy 21 mins – “A school in the Deep South is changing hearts and developing minds with a “tough love approach” that works. Meet founder Luma Mufleh and her students.” [refugee academy] At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Gangs in Central America 21 mins – “Migrants aren’t fleeing the so-called Northern Triangle countries to pursue the American dream. They’re risking their lives to escape gang violence, according to a Central American analyst.” At the link find the title, “Why migrants are desperate to flee Central America to cross U.S. border, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-0MJUUpaI-20180628.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic History of Mankind 52 mns – “we’re going to try to give A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived. It’s actually the title of geneticist Adam Rutherford’s new book. It describes the history of humankind through genetics. Geneticist Adam Rutherford says race doesn’t exist, but racism does. It illustrates the reason he wrote his ambitiously titled book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived. Researchers are uncovering more and more information about our evolutionary past, but there’s still a massive disconnect between what the layperson understands about human genetics and what science has to teach us. Rutherford joins us to talk about the story of our species and why getting it right really matters.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genomic Epidemiology 44 mins – “Jennifer Gardy talks about whole-genome sequencing as a technique to address public health issues using genomic epidemiology. She talks about her research on TB and new DNA sequencing technologies, including her vision for microbial genetic sequencing as one piece of the puzzle in the future of public health…. “I’m excited to see how this [microbial DNA sequencing] work fits in into an overall public health landscape. It’s cool to sequence genomes and make some reports about transmission networks, but that’s just one small part of a very big public health system that is trying to keep populations healthy. It requires so many different people, from nurses and doctors on the frontline to policy makers behind the scenes to social scientists who are interacting with patients or care providers to people that are understanding the economics of these things… when you start to see how these different pieces of the puzzle fit together, I think there’s a lot of opportunities in the future for making microbial genomics just one piece of a large interdisciplinary puzzle of people that are working together across different fields to address a disease from multiple different angles.” At the link find the title, “085: Using DNA technologies to answer epidemiological questions with Jennifer Gardy, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files MTM085.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guatemalan Volcano 27 mins – “Volcanologist Eliza Calder explains why the eruption of Volcán de Fuego in Guatemala on 3rd June was so devastating. It left at least 110 people dead and over 200 people missing. It’s thought that the local populations were so acclimatised to the rumblings and explosions of the ‘persistently active’ volcano, that they were slow to take action when it violently erupted. Electric Fog Nets Nets strung up to capture water droplets in the form of fog and mist are an old technology for getting fresh water in dry parts of the world. But they are ‘passive’ they rely on the water droplets in the air randomly coming into contact with the net. But new work by MIT engineer Kripa Varanasi has shown that if you apply an electrostatic force to the net, it ‘actively’ attracts the charged water droplets to it. Thereby increasing the amount of water collected. Fishing for DNA Bacteria have the remarkable ability to take up DNA from their surroundings and incorporate it into their genomes. This ability allows the organisms to introduce variation and traits into their genetic code – traits such as antibiotic resistance or virulence. The trouble is, microbiologists knew little about how they performed this important procedure known as ‘natural transformation’. But now a group of scientists in the US have filmed (under very high magnification) the moment a bacterium reaches out with a special filament appendage (called a pilus) to snatch a piece of free floating DNA from its surroundings. And it looks a lot like going fishing!” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is include in the blog archive.

Guns and Industrial Revolution 48 mins – “When you think of the industrial revolution what comes to mind? Steam engines probably. Lone genius inventors. Factories and coal mines, perhaps. And depending on your professional interests and political leanings, either suffering laborers in sweat shops or the Great Onward March of Civilization. Did anybody think of guns? According to my guest today Stanford historian Priya Satia, guns are inextricably bound up with industrialization and it is our long and ever-changing relationship with these tools, toys, trade goods, status symbols, and instruments of war that makes them such a persistent fact of life to this day. Priya Satia’s latest book is EMPIRE OF GUNS: the Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution.” At the link find the title, “153. Guns: The Genie and the Bottle – Priya Satia (Historian), Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY5660791796.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeostasis 61 mins – “Why can’t we all just get along? And conversely, why do we sometimes get along so well, building cathedrals, inventing Democracy, symphonies, and stuff that that? According to my guest today, the answer is as old as life itself. In the behaviors of the most ancient forms of bacteria, single-celled organisms without a nucleus, we can see the seeds of civilization as we know it, for better and for worse. They form collectives. They go to war. The key is homeostasis—the imperative of all life to avoid harm and seek to flourish. I’m delighted to be speaking today with neuroscientist and philosopher Antonio Damasio. He heads the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California and is the author of DESCARTES’ ERROR and the new book THE STRANGE ORDER OF THINGS: Life, Feeling, and the Making of Cultures.” At the link find the title, “144. Antonio Damasio (neuroscientist & philosopher) – Where is My Mind?, Apr, 2018,” right-click “Media files PPY3756582503.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hummingbird Love Charms 27 mins – “Forensic ornithologist Pepper Trail has been investigating the apparent rise in a black-market trade for chuparosas: love charms made with the bodies of dead hummingbirds that appear to be growing in popularity in Hispanic-American communities.” At the link find the title, “Why are dead hummingbirds showing up for sale? Investigating the love charm black market, Jun, 2018,” right-click”Media files current-rX7plKFC-20180621.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Icelandic Sagas P2 48 mins – “More than a thousand years ago, rebel Vikings and other settlers fleeing from Norway settled on a craggy, uninhabited island in the north Atlantic: Iceland. There they built a new world pretty much from scratch, with a new legal system, a new social order and – eventually – a new language. They also created stories about who they were. Philip Coulter time-travels into the heart of the Icelandic sagas.” At the link find the title, “A Map of the Heart, Part 2: The Icelandic Sagas, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-0gMolUcu-20180619.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Children Separation 48 mins – “Family separation and stricter asylum laws are “immoral,” says Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. He joins us as we talk about the situation at the border.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment 52 mins – “…what would it mean to impeach President Trump? Constitutional lawyer Joshua Matz says impeachment is democracy’s ultimate weapon. He joins us to explain how impeachment works, when it should be used, and the perils of seeking to end a presidency. There’s a lot of chatter these days about impeaching President Trump for a long list of alleged misconduct. But what would it mean to use democracy’s ultimate weapon against him? Constitutional lawyer Joshua Matz says impeachment was intended as a last resort for removing a would-be tyrant, not as a silver bullet for advancing partisan agendas or fixing a broken political system. He joins us Monday to explain how impeachment works, when it should be used, and the perils of seeking to end a presidency. Joshua Matz is a graduate of Harvard Law School, a constitutional lawyer, and the publisher of the blog Take Care, which provides legal analysis of the Trump presidency. Along with Harvard constitutional scholar Laurence Tribe, he’s the co-author of the book To End a Presidency: The Power of Impeachment” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Incrementalism 49 mins – “What do Renaissance painting, civil-rights movements, and Olympic cycling have in common? In each case, huge breakthroughs came from taking tiny steps. In a world where everyone is looking for the next moonshot, we shouldn’t ignore the power of incrementalism.” At the link find the title, “In Praise of Incrementalism (Rebroadcast), Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 097256fd-76c3-4feb-8bbf-57704753df45.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

India Transformation 29 mins – “India in the throes of a fascism that echoes what we have in America. The country is undergoing a political upheaval with PM Modi at its front, and fueled by increased violence towards Muslims, queers, Dalits, women, and more. Our guest, Arundhati Roy, covers this vast breadth of ground in her second novel in 20 years, ‘The Ministry of Utmost Happiness’, is now out in paperback. Music selection: “Into the Sun” by Grupal featuring Thenmozhi Soundararajan, from Grupal’s album Migration Music. Support theLFShow” At the link find the title, “Bodies, Borders, Resistance, Rebirth: Arundhati Roy, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files lfs_ep200_arundhati.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation versus Maintenance 44 mins – “Has our culture’s obsession with innovation led us to neglect the fact that things also need to be taken care of?” At the link find the title, “In Praise of Maintenance (Rebroadcast), Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ecdb32fd-3d10-4cf0-902a-e8250d70f5ba.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Insect Paint 27 mins – “Insects such as fruit flies provide important insights into human biology and medicine. But should we worry whether insects experience pain and suffering in scientists’ hands? Entomologist Adam Hart visits the Fly Facility at the University of Manchester where researcher Andreas Prokop describes the many insights that experiments on the fruit fly Drosophila have provided on aspects of human biology and health. Globally billions of these little flies have died in the pursuit of this knowledge. Should we give a second thought about the deaths of these creatures? Do insects have the capacity for pain and the experience of suffering? It depends which scientist you ask. Lars Chittka of Queen Mary University of London says his work on bumble bees suggests that we can’t assume they do not. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University in Canada is not convinced by existing arguments for insect consciousness.” At the link right-click “Download” and select the quality of audio download from the pop-up menu.

Investigative Journalist Techniques 33 mins – “At Evidence Live this year, the focus of the conference was on communication of evidence – both academically, and to the public. And part of that is the role that investigative journalism has to play in that. At the BMJ we’ve used investigative journalistic techniques to try and expose wrong doing on the part of government and industry – always…” At the link find the title, “‘When an investigative journalist calls, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files 461968788-bmjgroup-when-an-investigative-journalist-calls.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Iraqi Refugees 26 mins – “Majed El Shafie and Mavis Himes have become lifelines for Yazidi refugees who have settled in Canada – as well as those still living under ISIS rule.” At the link find the title, “Government must do more to help Yazidi refugees, says advocate , Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-bbYikQf7-20180620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. .

ISIS Survivors in Canada 21 mins – “After surviving sexual slavery under the brutal rule of ISIS, Yazidis who escaped to Canada cannot find closure because of family members who are still missing, languishing in refugee camps or still in ISIS hands. They want Canada to do more to reunite them.” At the link find the title, “’I know the Yazidis are going through hell’: ISIS survivors in Canada plead for help for family left behind, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-Q5OhQiou-20180620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Job Insights 44 mins – “Welcome to Episode 7 of Job Insights with Serina Gilbert and Jeff Thompson. We focus on Employment, Careers, enhancing opportunities and bringing you the latest innovations from across the Vocational Rehabilitation field to ensure your choices lead you down the career pathway that you want and succeed in gainful employment. From getting started with services, to assessments, Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) to gaining the skills to succeed and tools for success, Job Insights will be giving you tips and tricks to help your journey to employment and break down the barriers along the way…Career Connectis an app from the American Foundation for the Blind and has many resources that will help you navigate your pathway to the career you want.” At the link find the title, “JobInsights 7: The Job Hunt – Resources, Resumes and Strategies,” right-click “Media files 6JobInsightsFinal.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Juneteenth Celebraton 49 mins – “Juneteenth is a holiday most Americans have never heard of but should know about. We’ll look at the history and the stories behind the holiday.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Killer Fungus 12 mins – “Fungal diseases cause an estimated 1.5 million deaths each year – more than malaria. Despite this, fungi are often overlooked compared to other pathogens like bacteria and viruses. In this extra edition of the podcast, we sent Anand Jagatia along to the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition to find out more about the dangers of killer fungi, and the world’s biggest Petri dish…” At the link find the title, “Microbe Talk Extra: Killer Fungus, Jul, 2016,” right-click “Media files 2016-07-06T04_35_01-07_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korematsu v. United States 48 mins – “What happens when the Supreme Court, the highest court in the land, seems to get it wrong? Korematsu v. United States upheld President Franklin Roosevelt’s internment of American citizens during World War II based solely on their Japanese heritage, for the sake of national security. In this episode, we follow Fred Korematsu’s path to the Supreme Court, and we ask the question: if you can’t get justice in the Supreme Court, can you find it someplace else?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Commands 21 mins – “Bill needs some help! Listeners share tips and help for other listeners. George asks for a book. Daniel has problems writing to disk.” At the link find the title, “Jun 20: #347 · Using the Terminal,” right-click “download: [mp3]” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lyft and AIRA 21 mins – “Blind Abilities once again teams-up with Aira to present a review of Lyft, a ride-sharing service who not only has an accessible mobile app for both iOS and android, but who works hard on inclusivity for disabled riders. Join Jeff and Pete as they chat with Tommy Hayes, Lyft Sr. Policy Partnerships Manager, and Marco Salsiccia, Accessibility specialist about the company’s commitment to accessibility, their partnership with Aira, ….” At the link find the title, “Presenting Lyft: An Accessible App, A Partnership With Aira, and An Announcement for NFB 2018 Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files LyftAira.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mafia Opposition 24 mins – “Alex Perry’s new book looks at the women who are fighting to bring down the Mafia, and inspiring people across Italy to say enough is enough.” At the link find the title, “Lea Garofalo was killed by her Mafia family. Now she’s the face of anti-mob protests, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-QgFMLI62-20180615.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalization 49 mins – ‘Recreational pot is legal in many states, now comes the battle over where it can be sold. Cities and towns want their say.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalized in Canada 7 mins – “Canada is on its way to being the first industrialized country in the world to legalize pot nationally. The contentious Bill C-45 to legalize recreational marijuana passed on Tuesday.” At the link find the title, “The Senate passed the pot bill. What happens now?, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-cqqmmqwy-20180620.mp3 12:00 PM” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legalized in Canada49 mins – “Canada is on its way to being the first industrialized country in the world to legalize pot nationally. The contentious Bill C-45 to legalize recreational marijuana passed on Tuesday.” At the link find the title, “The Senate passed the pot bill. What happens now?, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-cqqmmqwy-20180620.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexican-American War 43 mins – “Melvyn and guests discuss the 1846-48 conflict after which the United States of Mexico lost half its territory to the United States of America. The US gained land covered by the states of Texas, Utah, California, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and part of Colorado. The outcome had a profound impact on Native Americans and led to civil war in defeated Mexico. It also raised the question of whether slavery would be legal in this acquired territory – something that would only be resolved in the US Civil War, which this victory hastened.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbes and Metals 18 mins – “How could you convert the dust, leaves and cigarettes that litter the side of the road into something useful and valuable? In this month’s podcast, we spoke to Dr Angela Murray from the University of Birmingham about using microbes to turn waste into high-end products. We hear about a patented technology to convert road dust into precious metal catalysts, and how cleaning up heavy metal pollution can be used to make powerful crystals called quantum dots (pictured).” At the link find the title, “Of Microbes And Metals, Nov, 2015,” right-click “Media files 2015-11-26T09_57_16-08_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Microbiome Impact 27 mins – “Are we on the cusp of a new approach to healthy living and treating disease? BBC Health and Science correspondent James Gallagher explores the latest research into how our second genome, the vast and diverse array of microbes that live on and in our bodies, is driving our metabolism and our health. Recent DNA analysis by the Human Microbiome Project detailed the vast and diverse array of microbes in and on our body – bacteria, archaea, fungi and viruses. It has been described as our second genome – a source of huge genetic diversity, a modifier of disease, an essential component of immunity, and an “organ” that influences not just our metabolism but also our mental health. Unlike the human genome which is fixed at birth, this “second genome” can be manipulated in many ways. Researchers have suggested that our gut microbiome has a major role in the development of chronic conditions such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. Now the work has moved onto detailed analysis of the microbes in people with specific problems and measures to change the microbiome. In this major three-part series, James Gallagher investigates the key research shaping our ability not just to read our microbiome and look at predispositions, but to change it for the better. From the ability to manipulate it to stem chronic disease, to the role it plays in determining our health from birth, to its surprising influence on our brain and behaviour – should we now think of ourselves not as self-sufficient organisms, but as complex ecosystems colonized by numerous competing and health-giving microbes?” At the link right-click “Download” and select the quality of audio download from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Family Separations 50 mins – “Family separation, a re-framed immigration debate and Trump’s misleading executive order: why news fatigue about the border isn’t an option. This week, we explore multiple sides of the asylum policy — including the view from Central America. Plus, a look back at US repatriation policy in the 1930’s, and six decades of American culture wars. …” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Family Separations 36 mins – “New Yorker writer Jonathan Blitzer has been in El Paso, Texas, reporting on immigration and family separation. “I’ve been meeting women who are crying so violently they can barely speak,” he says….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Family Separations 48 mins – “The art of provocation from White House advisor and immigration enforcer Stephen Miller – who’s calling the shots on the forced family separations at the border.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ontario Carbon Tax Feud 21 mins – “Ontario premier-designate Doug Ford has vowed to scrap the cap-and-trade system. But critics warn the move against taxing greenhouse gas emissions will have a domino effect both politically and economically.” At the link find the title, “Doug Ford’s vow to fight federal carbon tax part of concerted effort, prof says, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-OgsEWf0E-20180620.mp3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Outrage and Trump21 mins – “Can politics maintain a civil tone when disenfranchised people feel their lives are on the line? And is it fair to ask people who feel that way to be patient?” At the link find the title, “Uncivil society: The divide between passion and practicality in U.S. politics now, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-FpiuLqEL-20180627.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ovarian Cancer 57 mins – “ABC radio presenter Jill Emberson and former swimmer and current head of Women’s Football Nicole Livingstone presents a Press Club special event ‘The Cancer Down Under Killing Too Many Women’.” At the link find the title, “National Press Club: Nicole Livingstone, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files NPCc_CancerWomen_2006_512k.mp4” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Political Tribes 55 mins – “Legal scholar Amy Chua says tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right. Legal scholar Amy Chua says Americans have a hard time understanding tribalism around the globe. We get “Capitalism vs. Communism” or “Democracy vs. Authoritarianism,” but in places like Vietnam and Iraq, we’ve underestimated the role ethnic rivalries have played. Worse yet, we’re missing that same insight at home. In her latest book, Chua argues tribalism is tearing the U.S. apart, and in order to build unity, we need to understand how identity politics have hijacked the left and the right.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Postcard Art 29 mins – “Long-distance friends Giorgia Lupi and Stefanie Posavec spent a year tracking the little things in life. Thanks yous, coffees, complaints, street sounds. And each week, they turned their small-scale data collections into whimsical hand-drawn postcards. On a minute level, they may not say much. But look at them together and they tell an intimate story. This week, Giorgia and Stefanie talk us through three weeks of data, and all the big lessons in our most mundane moments.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prosthetic Trends 15 mins – “Humans will soon have new bodies that forever blur the line between the natural and synthetic worlds, says bionics designer Hugh Herr. In an unforgettable talk, he details “NeuroEmbodied Design,” a methodology for creating cyborg function that he’s developing at the MIT Media Lab, and shows us a future where we’ve augmented our bodies in a way that will redefine human potential — and, maybe, turn us into superheroes. “During the twilight years of this century, I believe humans will be unrecognizable in morphology and dynamics from what we are today,” Herr says. “Humanity will take flight and soar.” At the link left-click the share circle, select “Download audio” from the pop-up menu.

Psychedelics 52 mins – “The writer Michael Pollan is with us to talk about his new book on psychedelics. It’s about their potential to heal mental illnesses, and to explore the subject, Pollan took a few trips himself.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees from Central America 46 mins – “With the media and political commentators focused on family separation at the U.S.-Mexico border, few are paying attention to how developments along Mexico’s southern border affect the United States. On Monday, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Stephanie Leutert, director of the Mexico Security Initiative at The University of Texas at Austin, who has spent the past several weeks in the field studying the flow of migrants from Central America into Mexico. They discussed who’s entering Mexico, why they’re doing it, why most continue on to the United States, and where the dangers lie along their journeys.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_324.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Neurosurgeon 19 mins – “When Dr. Claire Karekezi returns to her native Rwanda next month after training in Canada. She will be one of only five neurosurgeons – and the only woman – serving a population of 12 million people.” At the link find the title, “Meet Rwanda’s only female neurosurgeon who trained in Canada, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-KjgmhGuG-20180626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satire Concepts 56 mins – “Political comedy is everywhere on TV, but contributor Peter Brown is concerned: the laughter on late-night shows seems to be giving way to the earnest partisan cheering that comedian Seth Meyers calls “clapter”. Are our current politicians becoming satire-proof? Or has satire always merely preached to the choir? In search of answers Peter looks to the classic satire of Juvenal, Swift and the Arab-speaking world, as well as prominent current practitioners including Armando Iannucci, creator of “Veep” and “The Death of Stalin”. At the link find the title,”A Modest Proposal About Satire, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-e70F9m38-20180622.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scrub Typhus 21 mins – “The Reverend Dr William H Dallinger, is probably not a name you’re familiar with. However, he was an important figure in the history of early microbiology. We sent Ben to the Royal Society, to learn more about Dallinger’s life. Also this month, Ben spoke to Dr Jeanne Salje about her work on Scrub Typhus, a disease that is widespread in Southeast Asia.” At the link find the title, “William Dallinger and Scrub Typhus, Sept, 2014,” right-click “Media files 2014-09-25T02_25_16-07_00.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sea Level Rise 48 mins – “Rising seas threaten hundreds of thousands of homes along the U.S. coasts, putting at risk a lot more than real estate.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Serial Killers 32 mins – “What makes a serial killer? What drives them to kill again and again? To find out the truth about this ghastly lot, we talked to forensic psychologist Prof. Eric Hickey, criminologist Ass. Prof. Wayne Petherick, and psychiatrist Prof. Gwen Adshead.” At the link find the title, “Serial Killers: Science of the Lambs, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files GLT1230279124.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment in Medicine 27 mins – “This week: A follow to our #metoo in medicine show – A senior MD goes on the record about her experience being sexually harassed by a mentor, and details what she and others are doing to change the culture that allows for abuse. Reaction to our our Crisis of Care town hall event and we follow up on our first story of the season, about a woman who got treated for ‘food addiction’ alongside people who are addicted to alcohol and cocaine.” At the link find the title, “Season Finale: #Metoo in Medicine Part 2, reaction to our town hall and a follow up our first story of the season, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files whitecoat-pO46sL01-20180621.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-menu.

Slavery in Canada P1 48 mins – “Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In the first of a two part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked-about aspects of our history. Part 1 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-fBaV8QJG-20180628.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in Canada P2 55 mins – “Is there a connection between the enslavement of African-Canadians and their overwhelming presence in the criminal justice system today? The United Nations has sounded the alarm on anti-black racism in Canada, stating it can be traced back to slavery and its legacy. In the second of his two-part series on slavery in colonial Canada, Kyle G. Brown explores the long-lasting ramifications of one of humanity’s most iniquitous institutions.” At the link find the title, “Slavery’s long shadow: The impact of 200 years enslavement in Canada, Jul, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-0GQZIAWA-20180705.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Smartphone Photography 55 mins – “Just over a decade ago, the iPhone was created, and its built-in camera soon sparked a photography revolution. We now use our smartphones to take an estimated 1.2 trillion images a year globally. We’ve gone from capturing “special” moments, to documenting virtually every aspect of our day. Printed photos in treasured albums have been replaced by intangible images — casually shared on social media, and stored virtually in the Cloud. What are the upsides, and what are we losing? Photographers, curators, and thinkers reflect on how this new image culture affects us, as well as its surprising links to earlier eras of photography.” At the link find the title, “Overlooked: Photography and the Smartphone, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files ideas-wPtKwHbT-20180626.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snapchat Addiction 21 mins – “With former Google designer Tristan Harris, who explains how far Silicon Valley will go to capture and control your eyeballs. And Snapchat artist CyreneQ, who makes her living drawing on her phone all day. For real.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Space Force 48 mins – “The president’s call for a new military command focused on future battles in outer space. We’ll look at the new Space Force.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Annual Summary 48 mins – “Justice Kennedy retires. We’ll look at that and the important cases as we wrap up a big Supreme Court term with top reporters who covered it all.” At the link find the title, “Supreme Court Term Roundup: Kennedy Retiring, Gerrymandering, Travel Ban And More, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files npr_624366456.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court News 12 mins – “There’s a reason why Supreme Court reporters know to never to take a vacation in June. The end of this season’s term brought us a head-spinning drumbeat of huge 5-4 decisions, from upholding the Muslim travel ban to dealing a huge blow to organized labor to siding with anti-abortion pregnancy centers. Understanding the Supreme Court is difficult for myriad reasons. So, with the expertise of seasoned SCOTUS reporters, in 2015 we put together a handy guide for the discerning news consumer to make sense of the court, its decisions, and its coverage. We’re revisiting it this week.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Operations 79 mins – “Hot on the heels of the Kennedy retirement announcement, we’ve got our special Supreme Court finale episode!  This is the show for you if you would enjoy detailed and amicable debate and discussion concerning: the consequences of Kennedy’s retirement for national security and other issues; what the ideological range might be for the next nominee; the Carpenter decision, its nuances, and its implications for foreign intelligence investigations; and the Travel Ban decision, the nature and justifications for “national security deference” in that case, how Kennedy may have pulled Roberts into hot water, and especially the Roberts-Sotomayor dispute over the relevance of Korematsu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Rulings 40 mins – “It’s been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We’ll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Survivalist Student 52 mins – “Born into a survivalist family, Tara Westover’s home-school education taught her to scrap metal, can peaches, and avoid doctors. Her new memoir recounts the journey from junkyard to Cambridge Ph.D. By the time she entered her first classroom when she was 17, Tara Westover knew how to operate a forklift, but had never heard of Martin Luther King Jr. or the Holocaust. Everything she knew came from her parents. That is until she taught herself enough math and English to get into BYU. Her world began to grow, but the more she learned, the more distant she grew from her family. Tara now has a Ph.D. from Cambridge. Her memoir, Educated, recounts her journey.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Story 24 mins – “In 2014, Fortune magazine ran a cover story featuring Elizabeth Holmes: a blonde woman wearing a black turtleneck, staring deadpan at the camera, with the headline, “This CEO’s out for blood.” A decade earlier, Holmes had founded Theranos, a company promising to “revolutionize” the blood testing industry, initially using a microfluidics approach — moving from deep vein draws to a single drop of blood. It promised easier, cheaper, more accessible lab tests — and a revolutionized healthcare experience. But it turns out that all those lofty promises were empty. There was no revolutionary new way to test blood. This past spring, Holmes settled a lawsuit with the Securities and Exchange Commissio, though admitted no wrongdoing. Last Friday, another nail in the coffin for Theranos came in the form of federal charges of wire fraud, filed against Holmes and the company’s former president, Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani.  The alleged fraud was uncovered by the dogged reporting of John Carreyrou, an investigative journalist at the Wall Street Journal and author of “Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toronto Gun Violence Problem 21 mins – “More than a decade after the ‘summer of the gun,’ Toronto has seen a recent spike in shootings, including two little girls at a playground. Some argue policing and prevention strategies need a new approach.” At the link find the title, “Increase in Toronto shootings will continue without new strategy, argues anti-gun advocate, Jun, 2018,” right-click “Media files current-ssE1gt31-20180619.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Uber Fatality Report 15 mins – “The NTSB today released the report into the fatal Uber Autonomous car accident. The RADAR, LIDAR, and cameras DID detect and classify pedestrian bicycle correctly. The system DID determine that emergency braking was required. But Uber disabled the systems emergency braking feature in autonomous mode. Uber also disabled Volvo’s inbuilt pedestrian safety detection system. There is also no system to alert the driver that the system detected an emergency braking scenario. Uber are rooted.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Credit (Social Security) 20 mins – “Six existing benefits have been consolidated into Universal Credit – which the Government says will make the transition between welfare and work, more simple. But a new report from Thomas Pocklington Trust is highlighting changes which it feels will leave future blind and visually impaired claimants worse off. And astronomy for the blind – Portsmouth University’s Dr Nicholas Bonne takes us through the “Tactile Universe”. The project conveys the marvels of the universe to children by using 3D models of galaxies. The more intense an area of light – the more raised it is from the surface. And blind physiotherapist Mike Cassidy gives us some tips on avoiding a repetitive strain caused by a cane.” At the link right-click “Download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

VR History 29 mins – “Though most commonly used for playing games, there are so many more productive aspects to virtual reality and augmented reality that you may not be aware of. From real estate to education, virtual reality technology is changing the world. Are we ready?” At the link find the title,”Virtual reality is about to change the world like never before” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor 52 mins – “Director Morgan Neville joins us to talk about the life and philosophy of television icon Fred Rogers. Neville’s new documentary is called Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Who doesn’t remember Mr. Rogers and trips to the Neighborhood of Make-Believe? In a documentary screening in Salt Lake this week, director Morgan Neville explores the life and philosophy of the television icon. It was Fred Rogers’ wife Joanne who told Neville not to make Fred out to be a saint in the film because he wasn’t. But he was a person who respected children and built a career with love “at the root of everything.” Morgan Neville joins us to talk about Won’t You Be My Neighbor? ” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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