Mining Digest 376 – Feb 1, 2019: Acid Rain, Ambulance Strike Teams, Border Wall Discussion, Brexit Discussion, Broadband Networking Concepts, Burkina Faso Murder, Cancer Bone Pain, Coal Company Compensation, Communicating on the Internet, Controversial Western Monuments, Crimes Against Humanity, Democracy Subversion, Digital Journalism History, Drinking Water in Canada, Ebola Research, Falling Man Photo, Government Shutdown Impact, Guantanamo Bay Operations, Gun Violence in Canada, Hate Speech Control, Keto Diet Discussion, Mao’s Great Famine, MDMA Discussion, Millennial Burnout, Money Issues, Opioid Experience, Polygamy in Canada, Presidential Criticism by Intelligence Community, Preventive Medicine, Taser Death Case, Tax Rate Discussion, Technological Trends, Toxic Politics, Trans Mountain Pipeline, Vaccine Safety, Work Improvement, Zero Energy Homes, Zip Building System

Exercise your ears: the 62 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 504 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,135 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Acid Rain 33 mins – “Remember acid rain? If you were a kid in the 1980s like our hosts were, the threat of poison falling from the sky probably made some kind of impression on your consciousness. But thanks to the work of scientists, government, the media, and the pope—that’s right, the pope—the problem was fixed! Well, mostly fixed is probably more accurate. This complicated story spans 27 years, six U.S. presidents, and ecologist Gene Likens’s entire career. Discover the insidious details in the second chapter of our three-part series on environmental success stories.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Ambulance Strike Teams 39 mins – “In 2018, Paramedics Plus, the 911 ambulance provider for Alameda County, sent resources to Paradise to assist with emergency medical services and the search and rescue task force. The strike team provided mutual aid and helped with evacuations, including hospitals and nursing facilities during the most devastating fire in loss of life and property in California wildfire history. On the show with co-hosts Sam Bradley and Jamie Davis are Dr. Joe Holley from Paragon Medical Education Group and paramedic Mike Marsh, director of operations for Paramedics Plus, Alameda County, California. Mike comes on the show to discuss the use of ambulance strike teams in mutual aid response to the Camp forest fires in northern California late last year.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Americans and Bolshevik Revolution 44 mins – “One hundred years ago, Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik Party seized power in a revolution that would change the world. They would establish the world’s first Marxist state, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, a few years later. As the 20th century wore on, the USSR became the United States’s chief military and ideological foe. On this episode of BackStory, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan explore how that distant revolution had an immediate impact in the United States.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Wall Discussion 47 mins – “There is growing chaos at the southern border, as some officials say the Trump administration’s focus on deterrence at the border has left them unable to handle and properly house thousands of families. We’ll get a reality check on the ground.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 11 minsIn Britain this week, a divided House of Commons will vote on Theresa May’s Brexit deal. We take a look at what’s at stake.” At the link find the title, “‘Moment of truth’ nears for Brexit, but not everyone is worried, says academic,” right-click “Download ‘Moment of truth’ nears for Brexit, but not everyone is worried, says academic” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Networking Concepts 38 mins – “Many of us are accustomed to Internet access from companies that own the infrastructure, offer only a few options, and are one of a small number of providers. For the most part, we’ve learned to accept that model, but will it ever change? This week’s guest, President of EntryPoint Networks Jeff Christensen, explains why that model is broken and how we can fix it through software defined networks (SDNs). We can turn that model around to put control in the hands of users. EntryPoint works primarily with municipalities to develop open access networks that separate infrastructure from services. As you’ll hear from Jeff, this approach takes the open nature of the Internet even further to encourage innovation, competition, access to goods, services, information, and ideas. EntryPoint’s approach turns the traditional closed system most American’s are used to on its head….” [“Ammon, Idaho, is treating fiber network infrastructure as a utility – to the benefit of residents, providers and the municipality itself. Is this small town demonstrating the future of broadband…..Using standard utility financing mechanisms results in annual payments of less than $200 (less than $17 per month) for properties receiving fiber….”] At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Planning Tool 30 mins – “In September 2018, we announced that we would begin working with NEO Partners LLC to bring the Community Networks Quickstart Program to local communities interested in exploring the possibilities of publicly owned broadband networks. For this week’s podcast, Christopher talks with the people behind the program, Glenn Fishbine and Nancy DeGidio. Glenn and Nancy have combined their talents to create the CN Quickstart Program as a way for local communities to focus on realistic possibilities early in the long process toward better connectivity through public investment. Christopher, Glenn, and Nancy discuss some of the insights communities gain with the program. In addition to discovering which incumbents already operate in the region and where, Glenn and Nancy have the data to provide information about what fiber resources are already in place. Both elements help communities considering networks look at the possibilities of competition. With data from each unique community, the CN Quickstart Program can provide information about potential fiber, wireless, and hybrid community networks and where those routes could travel. The program can provide cost estimates to help local leaders determine which options would be affordable for their community. Not than a replacement for a feasibility study, but a complement, a community that begins their feasibility study with results from the program will be able to direct a consultant toward the vision that they’ve been able to more accurately fine tune. Glenn and Nancy also talk about why they decided to develop this tool and what they hope to accomplish, along with hopes for communities that use the CN Quickstart Program.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burkina Faso Murder 20 mins – “Canadian citizen Kirk Woodman was abducted and killed in Burkina Faso this week, while Quebec woman Edith Blais went missing in the country weeks ago. We speak to two experts about who is behind the violence, and why.” At the link find the title, “Fear a ‘prominent feature’ in Burkina Faso, as armed presence grows, says expert,” right-click “Download Fear a ‘prominent feature’ in Burkina Faso, as armed presence grows, says expert” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Bone Pain 19 mins – “Bone pain is the most common type of pain from cancer and is present in around one third of patients with bone metastases, currently, improvements in cancer treatments mean that many patients are living with metastatic cancer for several years. Christopher Kane, NIHR academic clinical fellow in palliative medicine at Leeds University School of Medicine, and Michael Bennett, St Gemma’s professor of palliative medicine at University College London join us to discuss the management of cancer induced bone pain.” At the link find the title, “Management of cancer induced bone pain, 30 Jan 2015,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Story 33 mins – “New York Times best-selling author and co-founder of the Omega Institute Elizabeth Lesser returns to “SuperSoul Conversations” to further discuss her sister’s battle with cancer and their two-year spiritual quest to reconnect. Elizabeth talks about the spiritual journey she and her sister, Maggie, shared as they built an eternal sacred bond during Maggie’s final days. In her book “Marrow: A Love Story,” Elizabeth writes about the importance of knowing ourselves down to the “marrow” of who we are in order to love with greater depth and courage. Elizabeth also shares how observing Maggie, as she prepared for death, made her believe more strongly in an afterlife.” At the link find the title, “Elizabeth Lesser: The Marrow of Who We Are 2019-01-16,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, then click “Download” to get the podcast.

Coal Company Compensation 20 mins – “Canadian plans to stop using coal have left one U.S. company crying foul. Westmoreland Coal owns seven Canadian coal mines, and claims that it should be receiving part of the $2 billion in government compensation being offered to the Canadian companies being told to phase out operations.” At the link find the title, “U.S. company trying to sue Canada over coal phase-out made a bad bet, says academic,” right-click Download U.S. company trying to sue Canada over coal phase-out made a bad bet, says academic” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communicating on the Internet 27 mins – “Tarleton Gillespie, author of [Custodians of the Internet], talks about his book that explores content moderation on social media platforms. He also discusses the role that Congress could play.” At the link find the link, “Communicators with Tarleton Gillespie (28 min. 53 sec. – December 28, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commuting in America 36 mins – “The average American commute in 2016 was 26 minutes and 36 seconds.  It’s less than a minute longer than the previous year, but multiplied over a year, it means the typical American spent more than 9 full days getting to and from work.  Brian, Joanne and Ed discuss the rise of commuting in the 19th century with the advent of the streetcar, and then the explosion of the suburbs in the mid 20th century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Confederate Statues 45 mins – “Communities from New Orleans to Charlottesville, Virginia have been debating the presence of Confederate monuments. On this episode of BackStory, Ed, Nathan and Brian discuss when and why many of the nation’s Confederate statues were erected, and what they stood for. They’ll examine the many meanings of the Confederate flag and hear a Civil War re-enactor take a closer look at his Southern heritage.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consumer Culture 52 mins – “It’s the most wonderful time of the year! Or is it? The holiday season is notorious for bringing out the beast in shoppers. On this episode of BackStory, the Guys plunge into the history of shopping in America—the glitz and glamour, the overflowing shelves, and the cheesy Muzak. They’ll consider the role that consumption played in the revolutionary politics of the colonies, look at the curious rash of shoplifting among well-heeled women in the country’s first department stores, and reveal the connection between the Wizard of Oz and window shopping.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Controversial Western Monuments 91 mins – “A panel of historians discussed controversial monuments in the West. Topics included 19th century statues and plaques in the American West that honor missionaries, early settlers, and U.S. military leaders who had a hand in killing and forcing the removal of devastated Indian tribes. They also compared monuments in the American south and west. This talk is part of the Western History Association Annual Meeting.” At the link the material can be viewed and heard, but a download must be purchased; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Crimes Against Humanity 242 mins – “The Asia-Pacific War of 1937-1945 has deep roots. It also involves a Japanese society that’s been called one of the most distinctive on Earth. If there were a Japanese version of Captain America, this would be his origin story.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Protection 42 mins – “Ian Bassin on Protecting Democracy – Ian Bassin served in the White House Counsel’s office under President Obama. At the dawn of the Trump administration, he became the impresario behind the litigating organization Protect Democracy, which has become an increasingly cross-ideological mechanism for using litigation to protect democratic values. Benjamin Wittes sat down with Ian to talk about the differences between Protect Democracy and more traditional litigating organizations, what sort of projects they do take on, and what sort of projects they don’t take on. And they talked about the role litigation can and cannot play in preserving the norms that make democracy vibrant.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 384.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Subversion 44 mins – “Greg Miller on “The Apprentice: Trump, Russia and the Subversion of American Democracy” – “Last week, Jack Goldsmith got on the phone with Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post journalist Greg Miller to discuss Miller’s new book, “The Apprentice: Trump, Russia and the Subversion of American Democracy.” Miller’s book chronicles Russia’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the interactions among members of the Trump campaign, transition, and administration, and officials and representatives of the Russian government. Goldsmith and Miller discussed how Miller approached writing the book, the extraordinary series of apparent connections and contacts between Trump associates and the Russian government, and what Russian President Vladimir Putin might have gained from his brazen interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 381.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Journalism History 57 mins – “Kara Swisher: Hi, I’m Kara Swisher, editor at large of Recode. You may know me as someone who likes CNN a little better just because Donald Trumps hate it, but in my spare time I talk tech and you’re listening to Recode Decode from the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today in the red chair is Meredith Artley, the editor in chief of CNN.com and the senior vice president of CNN Digital Worldwide. That’s a big title, Meredith. Previously, she worked at the New York Times, the International Herald Tribune and the Los Angeles Times. Meredith, welcome to Recode Decode….” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drinking Water in Canada 25 mins – “CBC’s Connie Walker explains to The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti why many residents in Garden Hill First Nation still do not trust their tap water.” At the link find the title, “Why Garden Hill First Nation is leery of its tap water,” right-click “Download Why Garden Hill First Nation is leery of its tap water” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Ebola Research 15 mins – “Karen Grépin examines the pledges made to the Ebola crisis, how much has actually reached affected countries, and the lessons to be learnt The World Health Organization was first alerted to the current outbreak of Ebola virus disease on 23 March 2014,1 but it was not until 8 August, after a meeting of the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee, that it declared a public health emergency of international concern.2 This official declaration set into motion an international response to contain the outbreak. The international response has been called both too small and too slow, and this may have contributed to the ongoing spread of the disease.3At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ehrlichs Portrait 30 mins – “Though they lived decades apart, Adolphe Dessauer and Abdelwahhab Azzawi share similar stories. They were both esteemed physicians who faced violence and persecution in their home countries. They both sought refuge abroad and found safety, only to find themselves facing a new struggle—getting permission to practice medicine in their new homes. Dessauer, a Jewish doctor, fled Germany for the United States in 1938. Azzawi, a 36-year-old ophthalmologist from Syria, found asylum in Germany in 2015. Both men’s lives were spared through the generosity of their new countries, but they had to struggle to give back in the most meaningful way they could—by sharing their medical expertise. In 2016 every American Nobel laureate in science was an immigrant. And it wasn’t just that year; U.S. winners often are born abroad. Yet as global an enterprise as science has become, navigating bureaucracy and straddling boundaries seems to be as difficult in the 21st century as during World War II. This podcast was inspired by a painting once owned by Adolphe Dessauer. The painting is now part of the CHF exhibition Things Fall Apart.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

El Chapo Trial 21 mins – “As the trial of suspected Mexican drug kingpin El Chapo resumes in a New York courtroom, so too does a compelling-yet-bloody story of drug trafficking, cartel warfare and incredible violence. But would a conviction do anything stop the flow of illegal drugs.” At the ink find the title, “Trial of El Chapo won’t resolve the corruption that empowered him, says journalist,” right-click “Download Trial of El Chapo won’t resolve the corruption that empowered him, says journalist” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Express Yourself 17 mins – “The way we’re taught to live has got to change, says author Casey Gerald. Too often, we hide parts of ourselves in order to fit in, win praise, be accepted. But at what cost? In this inspiring talk, Gerald shares the personal sacrifices he made to attain success in the upper echelons of American society — and shows why it’s time for us to have the courage to live in the raw, strange magic of ourselves.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Falling Man Photo 36 mins – “Do you remember this photograph? In the United States, people have taken pains to banish it from the record of September 11, 2001. The story behind it, though, and the search for the man pictured in it, are our most intimate connection to the horror of that day. Thus begins Tom Junod’s “The Falling Man,” which over the past fourteen years has become one of the magazine’s most-read stories of all time. It’s a story that is as enthralling and complicated today as when it was first published in 2003. Inspired by the infamous photograph of one of the people forced to jump from the World Trade Center, captured by Richard Drew on 9/11, Junod reveals why he felt it was his responsibility to bring the photo—and the anonymous falling man pictured—to light.” At the link find the title, “The Falling Man, by Tom Junod, Sep 2016,” right-click “Play Now”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fetal Gene Manipulation 28 mins – “How did a scientist in China pull off his experiment using gene-editing technology on embryos without anyone knowing, and what impact has he had on the ethics of CRISPR research?” At the link find the title, “U.S. scientist says he tried to stop Chinese researcher from making first gene-edited babies,” right-click “Download U.S. scientist says he tried to stop Chinese researcher from making first gene-edited babies” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Thinker 94 mins – “Duncan Trussell – actor, comedian and the host of Duncan Trussell Family Hour, is back on Future Thinkers for the second time. In this episode we talk about some of the pressing topics of our time, like developing individual and collective consciousness, evolving the structure and functioning of the human society, and the importance of a consistent spiritual practice for understanding ourselves and the world we live in.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Editing Control 28 minsGene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.” At the link find the title, “There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist,” right-click “Download There needs to be a global policy to govern gene editing, says molecular biologist” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Shutdown Impact (first item) 37 mins – “US Shutdown effect on tech – As the stand-off between President Trump and the Senate continues life goes on – but with so many services relying on IT how are everyday activities being affected? And what about cybersecurity, according to reports, this is one area that’s been hard hit – Anthony Zurcher the BBC’S Senior North America Reporter tells us more. [then] Ageism in Tech -So is your mid-thirties too old to start a start-up? According to a new survey of 500 US start-up founders, the age at which age bias kicks in by investors is 36! Leah Fessler writes for the tech news website Quartz on work, gender and relationships and tells Click how surprised she was about the findings. [then] Sans Forgetica – a font to remember – Today there are hundreds of thousands of typefaces and fonts in the open market. The latest addition to this rich typography collection is Sans Forgetica, the typeface that was designed and recently launched by the researchers at the Melbourne’s Royal Institute of Technology (RMIT University). Still in its infancy, and with promising results, the project aims to help with memory retention. Snezana Curcic reports. [then] The Big Issue adds AR -How does a print magazine develop if it can’t have an online presence? The UK based magazine “The Big Issue” aims to support homeless people by allowing them to sell the magazine on the streets, having an online presence would significantly impact their returns, so the magazine has just published its first AR issue. As Ben Sullivan, Digital Editor at The Big Issue, explains they can add exclusive content without having a negative impact on their vendors.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Guantanamo Bay Operations 74 mins – “This week on the National Security Law Podcast, co-hosts Bobby Chesney and Steve Vladeck are joined by Michel Paradis (lead counsel for the defense in the al-Nashiri military commission case) and Captain Brian Mizer (learned counsel for the defense in that case).  Tune in for an extensive discussion of the upcoming D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals argument (Jan. 22) in the al-Nashiri case, as well as for broader discussion of the state of the military commission system.  As an added bonus after that interview, we also return briefly to the topic of a potential “national emergency” declaration by President Trump, in order to go into the details as just what can and cannot be done with money subject to 10 USC 2808 and 33 USC 2293 if and when such a declaration occurs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 25 mins – “As part of One Bullet, The Current’s series on gun violence, we speak to two trauma surgeons who are faced with the reality of what bullets do to bodies.” At the link find the title, “Gun violence takes a heavy toll on families of victims, says trauma surgeon,” right-click “Download Gun violence takes a heavy toll on families of victims, says trauma surgeon” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence 43 mins – “Nearly two decades after a promising Toronto high school basketball star was gunned down, police are still waiting for someone to come forward and identify the shooter.” At the link find the title, “Waiting for a witness,” right-click “Download Waiting for a witness” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence in Canada 22 mins – “Eight years after she was shot to death by her spouse, Lynn Kalmring’s homicide still weighs on friends, family and the lawyer who defended her killer. As part of our One Bullet series investigating the impact of gun violence in Canada, we look at the dramatic effect Kalmring’s death continues to have on the people close to her.” At the link find the title, “A heavy burden,” right-click “Download A heavy burden” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Violence in Canada 23 mins – “On the morning of Aug. 25, 2004, an armed man with a long history of spousal abuse took a stranger hostage in front of Union Station in downtown Toronto. The gunman had just tried to kill his estranged wife at a nearby food court and was cornered by police in a tense standoff that captivated Canadians and ended with a sniper’s bullet.” At the link find the title, “ Fatal sniper bullet was ‘only solution’ to end 2004 Union Station standoff, negotiator says,” right-click “Download Fatal sniper bullet was ‘only solution’ to end 2004 Union Station standoff, negotiator says,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech Control 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. She’s former ACLU president, and she argues that censorship just doesn’t work. The way to resist hate speech, she says, is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us Wednesday to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen is a scholar of constitutional law and civil rights. She’s a professor at New York Law School, and served as president of the national ACLU for 18 years. Her latest book is called Hate: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not CensorshipAt the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Future 64 mins – “Are we doing enough to protect our planet? According to world-renowned scientist and Astronomer Royal Martin Rees, humanity has reached a critical moment, and there is no plan B for Earth. With our world changing at a rapid pace, Rees explains why the future of humanity is bound to the future of science. He offers a compelling look at how advancements in biotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence, if applied wisely, can help address these growing challenges and threats.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kepler’s Snowflake 27 mins – “The Six Cornered Snowflake, a booklet written by Johannes Kepler as a New Year’s gift, sought to explain the intricate and symmetrical shape of winter’s tiny stars of snow. His insightful speculations about minerals and geometry were the beginning of the modern understanding of crystals. Philip Ball tells the story of how Kepler became a key figure in the scientific revolution of the 17th Century. He was a precocious mathematician who became an adviser to Emperor Rudolf II in 1600. Although he contributed to the idea that the sun, not the earth, was the centre of the solar system, his role at the court was to be an astrologer. Philip brings the story of the shape of the snowflakes up to date. It was only 20 years ago with the development of the maths of fractals that we got to understand the formation of the myriad patterns of snowflakes.” At the link right=click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Keto Diet Discussion 10 mins – “A large number of health care professionals are on the Keto diet, and they’re trying to convince their colleagues that it can help fight disease, but not everyone’s convinced.” At the link find the title, “White Coat Black Art’s Dr. Brian Goldman talks about the popular Keto diet,” right-click “Download White Coat Black Aarts Dr. Brian Goldman talks about the popular Keto dietand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mao’s Great Famine 73 mins – “Historian Frank Dikötter of the University of Hong Kong and author of Mao’s Great Famine talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Dikötter chronicles the strategies Mao and the Chinese leadership implemented to increase grain and steel production in the late 1950s leading to a collapse in agricultural output and the deaths of millions by starvation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martin Luther King Jr 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the future Pulitzer Prize–winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary; later, Wills traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years after its publication, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr. Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching profile of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link find the title,’Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case! by Garry Wills, 14 Nov 2016,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MDMA Discussion 39 mins – “Molly, Ecstasy, MDMA… whatever you want to call it, it’s all the same thing. This week, we’re turning up the bass and checking out what does it do to your brain. Is it bad for you? Could it be a potential medicine? To find out, we talk to public health researcher Prof. Joseph Palamar, DEA special agent James Hunt, and neuroscientist Prof. Harriet de Witt.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Millennial Burnout 27 mins – “A Buzzfeed essay arguing millennials have become the burnout generation has struck a chord with many people since it went viral this month, but one woman says burnout isn’t a new phenomenon solely affecting white, middle-class people.” At the link find the title, “Why one writer says burnout carries ‘a different weight’ for people of colour,” right-click “Download Why one writer says burnout carries ‘a different weight’ for people of colour” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Miscommunications 59 mins -”Based on his recently released, expanded edition of the award-winning Perception and Deception: A Mind-Opening Journey Across Cultures, Joe Lurie will present a spirited and insightful exploration of cross-cultural miscommunications in an increasingly globalized, polarizing world. With YouTube, tweets, refugees and fake news rapidly crossing cultures without context, Lurie shares a timely, intriguing and sometimes tragic array of intercultural encounters gone wrong because of cultural misperceptions across the globe, in the worlds of migration, diplomacy, commerce and technology. David Lennon, former managing editor of the Financial Times, called Lurie’s book “brilliant!” According to Lennon, the book offers: “Terrific and timely insights and tools for understanding culture clashes in a hyper-connecting world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Money Issues 23 mins – “How does one ask their employer for more money? The short answer, according to Refinery29’s Lindsey Stanberry, is just do it. “It’s hard. And it’s not fun,” Stanberry tells Greta this week. “I mean, you just have to ask.” It’s a new year. And now — RIGHT NOW — is the time to get your finances in order. So we’re talking with a financial expert who’s going to tell you to know your numbers, to know your worth, and — most importantly — to get out there and get that money. Stanberry is the author of “Money Diaries: Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About Your Finances… And Everyone Else’s.” She’s also the work and money director at Refinery29, an online magazine. She’s full of invaluable tips for taking charge of your money situation. So get excited: You’re about to be the boss of your bank account.” At the link find the title, ‘Jan 11, 2019, Get That Money.,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nationalism 63 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy investigates why the world is grappling with a fierce resurgence of “us versus them” nationalism. Veteran political reporter and author John Judis analyzes the underlying causes of the nationalist revolt and its global impact, arguing that nationalism is an inescapable aspect of politics that the Left has ceded to the Right. The result: the rise of leaders such as Donald Trump in the United States and Viktor Orbán in Hungary. Judis looks to the future and urges leaders to identify and reclaim what is valid in nationalism while recognizing that it is in a country’s national interest to work together with strong international institutions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Abuse Treatment 20 mins – “Fifty people who use street drugs will be regularly prescribed opioid pills to crush up and inject, as part of a new “safe supply” program launching in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Can the initiative help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses?” At the link find the title, B.C. ‘safe supply’ pilot aims to help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses, says advocate,” At the link right-click “Download B.C. ‘safe supply’ pilot aims to help entrenched addicts avoid overdoses, says advocate” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Experience 37 mins – “America’s got an opioid problem. So where do we go from here? What  can actually help people struggling with opioid addiction? We speak to Dr. Anna Lembke, Dr. Marvin Seppala, and a patient we call Mischa.
UPDATE 04/17: We’ve adjusted a couple of lines of script in this episode to clarify the role of religion in Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. A previous version of this episode incorrectly implied that the 12 step philosophy considers addiction a sin and a “defect of character”. If you or someone you love is struggling with an opioid addiction, in the US you can call the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP or visit their website.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Polygamy in Canada 16 mins – “As some women in Canada’s Muslim community are speaking out against polygamous marriages in their community, a CBC reporter investigating the issue for The Fifth Estate says charges and convictions related to the practice are “extremely rare” in Canada.” At the link find the title, “Polygamy is happening in Canada’s Muslim community, but convictions are rare, says reporter,” right-click “Download Polygamy is happening in Canada’s Muslim community, but convictions are rare, says reporter” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Criticism by Intelligence Community 58 mins – “What is Too Far When Former Intelligence Community Leadership Criticizes the President? – This edition of The Lawfare Podcast grows out of an email exchange between David Kris and Jack Goldsmith over a draft article Jack had written about John Brennan and other intelligence community former leaders who were criticizing the president in public and from whom the president was threatening to pull their security clearances in response. What is appropriate for intelligence community leaders to say about the president? What is going too far? What is outside their lane? And what is required by the current moment when intelligence community leaders face a rogue elephant of a president who is violating every norm we know?” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_342.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Preventive Medicine 68 mins – “This program is part of our Food Lit series, underwritten by the Bernard Osher Foundation. Can lifestyle medicine actually change your health and well-being? In their newest book, UnDo It!, Dean Ornish and his wife Anne present a comprehensive approach to reversing many of the chronic diseases that plague Americans today. Scientifically researched, this plan includes eating well, moving more, stressing less and loving more. Dean and Anne Ornish provide everything you need to succeed in this lifestyle change, including recipes, exercises and stress relievers. Join us to learn more about how you can radically change your health with two pioneers in the health field.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Privacy Discussion 57 mins – “Kara Swisher: Hi, I’m Kara Swisher, editor at large of Recode. You may know me as the new spokesperson for Facebook Portal, but in my spare time I talk tech, and you’re listening to Recode Decode, from the Vox Media Podcast Network. Today, I’m excited to be in the studio with Cindy Cohn, the executive director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Claire Boyle, the managing editor of “Timothy McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern.” EFF and McSweeney’s teamed up late last year to put out a special issue of the literary journal about privacy, called “The End of Trust.” Cindy and Claire, welcome to Recode Decode.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spy Swaps 36 mins – “John Sipher on Spy Swaps: Past, Present, and Future – The Russian government’s recent arrest of American Paul Whelan and its charges against him have many politicians and pundits speculating about the possibility of an intended spy swap for Maria Butina. There’s a lot going on here, but there’s also a lot of misunderstanding about the history of spy swaps, what they are, and what they aren’t. Earlier this week, David Priess sat down with his former CIA colleague John Sipher to talk about it all. They discussed the history of spy swaps, the current case involving Paul Whelan, and prospects for some kind of a release.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode 379.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Taser Death Case 27 mins – “Long-time CBC journalist Curt Petrovich covered the death of Robert Dziekanski in 2007. The Polish immigrant was Tasered by RCMP officers in Vancouver airport, but Petrovich says there’s more to the story than a narrative of “four bad apple cops.” Now he’s written a book about Dziekanski, and the four RCMP officers present that night, and whether justice has been served.” At the link find the title, Reporter who covered Robert Dziekanski’s death says there’s more to the story than ‘four bad-apple cops’,” right-click “Download Reporter who covered Robert Dziekanski’s death says there’s more to the story than ‘four bad-apple cops’” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tax Rate Discussion 47 mins – “Radical? Or the right thing to do? We’ll analyze the numbers behind Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s proposal to push the top tax rate to 70 percent.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technological Trends 43 mins – “Today our guest is Kevnin Kelly, the founding editor of Wired magazine, former publisher of the Whole Earth Review, and author of many books, including his latest one called “The Inevitable“, which forecasts the twelve technological forces that will shape the next thirty years. This episode airs in two parts. In the first, we talk about what technology wants, the new sharing economy, and creating a smart environment. In the second, we look at how artificial intelligence and artificial consciousness will shape the future of work and life, what will make humans uniquely useful in this scenario, and reasons to be optimistic for the future.” At the link find the title, “Future Thinkers Podcast FTP084: Kevin Kelly – What Technology Wants and The World of Superabundan…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Toxic Politics 25 mins – “Alcide Bernard was appointed mayor of Wellington, P.E.I last week – because nobody else wanted the job. Is there a crisis in local politics, where the long hours and little pay are scaring off potential public servants?” At the link find the title, “Are long hours and little pay scaring off potential public servants?,” right-click “Download Are long hours and little pay scaring off potential public servants?” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Mountain Pipeline 18 mins – “A group of Indigenous leaders are meeting in Calgary this week with the oil industry to discuss options for purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline. We hear from those on both sides of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillor,” right-click “Download Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillor” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Safety 43 mins – “ Autism, seizures, and overloaded immune systems. Could these really be side effects of vaccines? This week, we dive  into the science to find out how safe vaccines really are. We also talk to public health researchers Prof. Dan Salmon and Prof. Amy Kalkbrenner and neurologist Prof. Ingrid Scheffer. Check out the full transcript of the show with all of the footnotes and links to the science. Credits: This episode has been produced by Heather Rogers, Wendy Zukerman, and Shruti Ravindran. Production help from Rose Rimler. Our senior producer is Kaitlyn Sawrey. We’re edited this week by Blythe Terrell and Annie-Rose Strasser. Fact checking by Michelle Harris, with help from Rose Rimler. Sound design by Martin Peralta. Music written by Bobby Lord. For this episode we also spoke with Dr. Saad Omer, Dr. Neal Halsey, Dr. Paul Offit, Dr. Frank DeStefano, and Prof. Alison Buttenheim. And an extra thanks to Bonnie Stanway,Ivona Stamatoska, Reese and Walter Ludwig, the Zukerman Family, Joseph Lavelle Wilson and – of course! – Leo Rogers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Work Improvement 58 mins – “Books and Ideas is back with an interview with Rhodes Perry, author of Belonging At Work: Everyday Actions You Can Take to Cultivate an Inclusive Organization. Human beings are wired to be social, which means feeling like we belong is actually essential to our physical and emotional health. In this interview we discuss some of the obstacles to “Belonging at Work” and practical steps toward improvement. Rhodes also shares the Platinum Rule: Treating others like THEY want to be treated, which I think should be applied in all aspects of our life.” At the link right-click “Click to play mp3 (right click to download file)” and select “Save Link as’ from the pop-up menu.

WWII Shanghai Ghetto 29 mins – “In this final episode of the series Laszlo introduces the Shanghai Ghetto, the final years of WWII and the aftermath.  Please check the show notes at the web site for all kinds of books and videos from this period.  Thanks to everyone who made it through all six episodes.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zero Energy Homes 18 mins – “So, what exactly is a Zero Energy Home?  To quote the folks at zero energy project. org, “Zero energy homes are just like any home—except better.”  They are air-tight, well-insulated, and extremely energy efficient homes that produce as much energy as they use, over the course of a year. That means that for heating and cooling, electricity, and water heating, your net payment to the power company would be zero, zilch, nothing!   You’d have no net utility bills with a zero energy house. Zero energy houses also have very little negative impact on the environment.  If all that sounds good to you, but you’re weary of looking into a zero energy house because you think that it has to be a super modern, minimalist white box of a house, think again.  These houses can be built in a variety of sizes and styles and for any climate.  If you want a zero energy house that looks very unique and unconventional, that’s fine.  But, you can also build a zero energy house that looks like any other home—like a traditional colonial or craftsman, or a Mediterranean or bungalow.  You could build a large estate house or a tiny house, or something in between, and you could make any one of those a zero energy house.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zip Building System 15 mins – “’Build tight and ventilate right.’  That’s a mantra that I’ve heard since I started educating myself about home design and construction.  A tight house is a house with minimal air leakage.  Building a tight house is important so you can save on energy costs and make your home more comfortable.  A tight house also protects the structure of your home.  Here’s how:  If a house is built tightly, it prevents warm, moist air from entering or exiting the home.  The unwanted flow of warm, moist air can lead to moisture within your home’s walls and roof, causing structural damage. Building tight can alleviate that potential problem.  You’ll also need to ventilate right.  We’ll discuss ventilation systems in a future episode. Today, we’ll concentrate one of the first steps needed to build a tight house, which is adding a continuous air barrier to your house to reduce air leakage. The Zip system by Huber Engineered Woods is a continuous air barrier that many contractors are using to build tight houses.  Most of them agree that the Zip System outperforms traditional building methods using house wrap.  Today, I’ll review Huber’s Zip System.  I’m not affiliated with the product or company, and have no personal experience with it, but I’ve noticed that over the past several years quality builders in my region consistently choose the Zip system over traditional methods, like house wrap.  Plus I’ve read many contractors’ forums and home building websites for a consensus on the Zip System.” At the link right-click “Download this episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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