Mining Digest 377 – Feb 8, 2019: Amazon Threat, Andrew Yang for President, Animal Extinctions, Anxiety in America, Asian Americans, Black School Girl Activism, Cellphone Privacy Discussion, Climate Change and Gender Equality, Congressional Violence, Conversion Therapy, Digital Print Disruption, Edward Burtynsky, Emoluments, Global Warming, Government Finances, Government Staff Operations, Hasidic Jews Documentary, Hate Speech, Hong Kong, Horseshoe Crab Blood, Infectious Disease Insights, Jellyfish Book, John Lewis Reflects, John Wayne Movies, Journalism Experiment, Labor Market in U.S., Lake Success, Life Value, Local News Death, Lolita Book Background, Magnitsky Act, Mark Pincus, Methylene Blue, Nobel Prize, Partisan Dysfunction, Patient Spotlight, Phage Therapy, Photographer Lynsey Addario, Prejudice Patterns, Price of a Life, Rosanne Cash, Rules for a Flat World, S&P 500 Index Underperforms, Samuel Beckett, Sexual Reproduction, Sit-ins and Civil Rights, Slants Issue, Solitude, Sports Contributions, Surveillance Economy, Tariffs and Trade, Technology Acceleration, Trade and Treaty Law, Virtual Reality Treatment, War Reporting

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 676 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,198 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 157GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 496 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Amazon Threat 21 mins – “Some time later this year, Amazon could become the first trillion-dollar company in American history. Its valuation has already doubled in the last 14 months to about $800 billion, and Jeff Bezos, its founder and CEO, is officially the richest man on the planet. There are ways in which Amazon seems to be the greatest company in American history. It’s revolutionized the global shopping experience and expanded into media and hardware, while operating on razor-thin margins that have astonished critics. But some now consider it the modern incarnation of a railroad monopoly, a logistics behemoth using its scale to destroy competition.So what is Amazon: brilliant, dangerous, or both? That’s the subject of the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, our new podcast on technology and culture.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andrew Yang for President 52 mins – “In the American Dream sweepstakes, Andrew Yang was a pretty big winner. But for every winner, he came to realize, there are thousands upon thousands of losers — a “war on normal people,” he calls it. Here’s what he plans to do about it.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Animal Extinctions 54 mins – “How we make decisions about what to save, and how we explore the idea of “conservation triage.” So do we choose pipelines or killer whales? And is this an argument about money – or about values that transcend it?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive and can be downloaded.

Anthropocene Age 10 mins – “Geologists are now hotly debating – though, when it comes to geologists, that’s probably a relative term – whether humans have altered the planet so radically that we’ve ushered in a new epoch. The last epoch began about 12,000 years ago, when the Pleistocene ended and glaciers slid away from much of North America, Europe, and Asia. Now, scientists face the question of whether one species could possibly have changed the geology of the Earth as much as continent-shaping glaciers, cooling oceans, and mass extinctions. Author Diane Ackerman, who has spent much of her career exploring humans’ relationship with nature, says that much of what we create – and then toss in landfills – will indeed change Earth’s geology….” At the link you can listen, but not download the file; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anxiety in America 48 mins – “Modern anxiety cuts across national borders and social classes, but in America right now its artisanal flavor is a blend of soaring, media-driven dreams and dwindling probabilities of making a living while pursuing them. And nobody’s more eloquent or wickedly funny about this reality than Ruth Whippman, the author of AMERICA THE ANXIOUS. I’m genuinely, sustainably happy that she’s here with me today.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Americans 56 mins – “…My guest today doesn’t suffer fools gladly. His pen is sharp and uncompromising, even when he turns it on himself. Wesley Yang writes essays mostly about outsiders and outliers. Some try to fit in. Some try not to. Some succeed. Some fail by succeeding. His new book of essays, which contains some of the best writing I’ve ever read, is called THE SOULS OF YELLOW FOLK. It was just justly named one of NY Times 100 notable books of the year. And I’m so glad it’s brought him to Think Again.” At the link you can listen, but can’t download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Autonomous Vehicles 29 mins – “Earlier this summer, I went to Mountain View, California, to visit the headquarters of Waymo, the autonomous vehicle company that spun off from Google, and get driven around in one of its cutting-edge cars. The model waiting for me in the parking lot was deceptively fuddy-duddy: a white Chrysler Pacifica, outwardly distinguished from the typical minivan by a small black dome on the roof, which houses a family of cameras, sensors, radars, and lasers. Rarely is an experience made more boring by the presence of lasers, but this is that rare experience: The ride itself was astonishingly tranquil. Making use of technology that’s a bit like a multi-sensory echolocation, the car turned smoothly out of the parking lot. It navigated through several wide intersections. It decelerated calmly. It stopped politely for pedestrians. When I got out of the car, it seemed almost tedious to point out that a minivan drove itself pretty much perfectly. It was only later, upon reflection, that the sentence returned to me with proper emphasis: The minivan … drove itself … pretty much perfectly. And that means it’s time to start thinking about what happens when cars just like it can drive millions of other people perfectly, too.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bisbee Mine Strike 52 mins – “In July 1917, striking miners in Bisbee, Arizona, were rounded up, loaded into cattle cars, and left in the desert to die. Known as the Bisbee Deportation, it split the community along political, class, and racial lines. It’s a traumatic story that rattled filmmaker Robert Greene, who created a unique documentary called Bisbee 17 that explores the town and its ghosts. Tuesday, we’re rebroadcasting our conversation with Greene about Bisbee’s past and what it can teach us today.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black School Girl Activisim 13 mins – “Around the world, black girls are being pushed out of schools because of policies that target them for punishment, says author and social justice scholar Monique W. Morris. The result: countless girls are forced into unsafe futures with restricted opportunities. How can we put an end to this crisis? In an impassioned talk, Morris uncovers the causes of “pushout” and shows how we can work to turn all schools into spaces where black girls can heal and thrive.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Border Wall Solution 52 mins – “…we’re talking about the central sticking point in the ongoing federal shutdown: The wall. Hundreds of miles of physical barriers already separate the United States and Mexico, and former Border Patrol Chief Mark Morgan says they are so effective it’d be irresponsible not to build more of them. But do walls actually work to keep people and drugs from entering America? Or would the country be better served if Washington addressed other problems with our immigration policy? GUESTS Mark Morgan is the former chief of the US Border Patrol. He’s a former US Marine and spent 20 years at the FBI before joining Customs and Border Protection.

Cartoonist 63 mins – “…My guest today is Jessica Abel. She’s an accomplished artist herself—a graphic novelist who did a kind of graphic docu-novel called OUT ON THE WIRE about how some of the greatest radio shows and podcasts are made, including Snap Judgment, Radiolab, and This American Life. In the course of figuring out how to steer her own creative ship she’s learned invaluable lessons about how to help others do the same. Her most recent book GROWING GILLS and her Creative Focus Workshops offer creatives a personalized process for figuring out what they want to make and how to balance those goals with the rest of their busy lives.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cellphone Privacy Discussion 26 mins – “In the wake of the terrorist attacks in Paris, the battle between privacy versus public safety has become ever more relevant. Law enforcement agencies maintain that the same encryption you use on your cell phone to keep your private information safe has become a tool for criminals and terrorists. Scripps News and the Toronto Star teamed up over the past several months, investigating how law enforcement are losing the war over access to information they need to solve crimes. (Read their full investigation here.) On the latest DecodeDC podcast, we go inside the battle between those who say law enforcement needs access to private information and those who argue encryption is essential for privacy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Gender Equality 14 mins – “If we really want to address climate change, we need to make gender equity a reality, says writer and environmentalist Katharine Wilkinson. As part of Project Drawdown, Wilkinson has helped scour humanity’s wisdom for solutions to draw down heat-trapping, climate-changing emissions: obvious things like renewable energy and sustainable diets and not so obvious ones, like the education and empowerment of women. In this informative, bold talk, she shares three key ways that equity for women and girls can help stop global warming. “Drawing down emissions depends on rising up,” Wilkinson says.” At the link left-click “Share,” click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Audio” from the pop-up menu, then “Save File” and “OK” from the next pop-up menu to get the podcast. David Bier is an immigration policy analyst at the Cato Institute‘s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cold War Science 60 mins – “This week we’re looking back at where some of our modern ideas about science being objective, independent, and apolitical come from. We journey back to the Cold War with historian and writer Audra Wolfe, talking about her newest book ‘Freedom’s Laboratory: The Cold War Struggle for the Soul of Science’.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Congressional Violence 58 mins – “If you think our country is fractured now, Yale historian Joanne Freeman’s latest book will shock you. She’s chronicled the pandemonium that was Congress in the decades before the Civil War. And it wasn’t just rhetoric flying. There was bullying, fist fights and canings. In 1838, a Kentucky representative actually killed a Maine congressman in a duel. Freeman joins us to talk about Congressional violence and the public’s demand for politicians who would literally fight for their rights.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Conversion Therapy 51 mins – “A study shows that after certain conversion therapy efforts, LGBTQ kids are nearly three times more likely to attempt suicide. Monday, we’re talking about it and about efforts to ban conversion therapy for youth in Utah.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Deep Networks 26 mins – “Even as machines known as “deep neural networks” have learned to converse, drive cars, beat video games and Go champions, dream, paint pictures and help make scientific discoveries, they have also confounded their human creators, who never expected so-called “deep-learning” algorithms to work so well. No underlying principle has guided the design of these learning systems, other than vague inspiration drawn from the architecture of the brain (and no one really understands how that operates either)….”At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Print Disruption 12 mins – “Holiday book sales for 2018 helped the publishing industry to enjoy a small sales bump over 2017, according to numbers reported this week by NPD BookScan. And while bestsellers enjoyed the lion’s share of notoriety in the media as well as in bookstores, the reign of individual titles lasted only briefly. “If there is one takeaway, writes PW contributor Liz Hartman, it is what she calls, ‘an electoral college vs. the popular vote discrepancy,’ when it comes to the noise surrounding certain books and the actual sales numbers. Many of the books that one would expect to command top-of-the-list status, or to last longest, did not,” reports Andrew AlbanesePW senior writer. For example, “the political Trump-inspired books that grabbed the lion’s share of media attention—and sold very well—had plenty of time to stick to the lists, but didn’t,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff, Fear by Bob Woodward, and James Comey’s A Higher Loyalty, were all on the hardcover bestseller list for less than 15 weeks. Fire and Fury performed the best—it lasted 14 weeks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As”’ from the pop-up menu.

Edward Burtynsky 55 mins – “World-famous environmental photographer Edward Burtynsky and IDEAS host Paul Kennedy both grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario. In fact, their childhood homes were less than 300 metres apart, and paper-boy Paul delivered a daily dose of newspaper comic strips to eventual visual artist Ed. They return to their old home town and revisit their roots, including the site of the now-dismantled GM Plant # 1, where both of their fathers worked; and the new subdivision that’s recently replaced Meadowvale School, where they both started kindergarten, so many decades ago “ At the link find the title, “Paul and Ed’s Excellent Adventure,” right-click “Download Paul and Ed’s Excellent Adventure” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emoluments 41 mins – “This week Attorneys General from DC and Maryland alleged in a lawsuit that payments by foreign governments to President Trump’s businesses violate anti-corruption clauses in the Constitution. With a president who is also a real estate tycoon, reality TV star, and personal brand — and who actively receives revenue via each of these personae — the possibilities seem endless for political corruption, particularly in light of the Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, which forbids the receiving of gifts, titles, and emoluments from foreign countries without Congress’s consent. The problem, according to law professor Jed Shugerman, is that without access to Donald Trump’s tax documents, it’s impossible to know the full extent of his financial dealings — and thus difficult to move forward on any potential corruption charges. Bob talks with Shugerman about a legal strategy that could bring Trump’s entanglements into the light. But Trump’s taxes are only necessary if we define “corruption” as the explicit exchange of payments for favor, or “quid pro quo.” This definition, which the Supreme Court used in the controversial Citizens United ruling and which countless politicians have leaned on ever since, argues that unless you can demonstrate explicit exchange, you can’t prove, or prosecute, corruption. But according to Zephyr Teachout, author of Corruption in America, this was never what America’s founders envisioned when they set out to fight corruption. Brooke talks with Teachout about the overwhelming passion for anti-corruption present at the founding of the nation, the “bright line” rules it inspired, and how we have drifted so far from our original understanding of the concept.” At the link find the title, “No One Is Above the Law, Jun 2017,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Glaciers 29 mins – “Have you ever noticed that scientists historically are mostly white men? Do you think that this fact has skewed some scientific findings? Well, our guest today on Sea Change Radio has certainly noticed. This week, we speak to glaciologist M Jackson, who’s drawn attention from the right wing for the feminist perspective she applies to her research. We discuss her new book, The Secret Lives of Glaciers, dive into her research, and examine how and why science has been influenced by centuries of white male dominance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Warming 27 mins – “Is 2018 the warmest year on record? We look at the evidence behind that claim. What part do the global oceans play in regulating the planets temperatures and what are the prospects for future extreme weather. We look at how climate change is ocean systems affecting storms and ocean waves, and the implications this could have for those of us living in coastal regions. And wild coffee species are facing extinction. This could affect commercial production of the coffee we drink. However rediscovering the coffee of the past might offer a solution.” At the link left-click “Download” and select the audio quality by right-clicking and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Finances 59 mins – “Author and columnist James Grant talks about the state of the U.S. economy and the threat posed by our ever-expanding national debt.” At the link find the title, “Q&A with James Grant,” right-click that title, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Shutdown and Walls 34 mins – “The partial shutdown of the federal government has hit day 21, equaling the longest in U.S. history. This third week of the stalemate between congressional Democrats and President Trump brought an address from the oval office, talk of declaring a state of emergency at the border and the first missed payday for federal workers. Jonah Goldberg of National Review joined Diane on the podcast to discuss how we got here and why it is so hard to move on.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Government Staff Operations 27 mins – “Dana Stroul, The Washington Institute’s newest research fellow, is a veteran Pentagon and U.S. Senate foreign policy staffer. In this podcast, Dana shares her insights about Capitol Hill’s role in making foreign policy, from the fraying bipartisan consensus on vital Middle East issues to the conflicts between the legislative and executive branches that transcend administrations. Near East PolicyCast: Conversations on Middle East issues from the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.At the link right-click the square with three dots, then click “Download file,” select “Save File,” and ”OK” to get the podcast.

Hasidic Jews Documentary 56 mins – “When you’re a Hasidic woman in Borough Park, Brooklyn, starting an ambulance corps is a radical act. Documentary filmmaker Paula Eiselt on the push-pull of identity and cultural change in her film 93Queen.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Speech 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us Wednesday to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hong Kong 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horseshoe Crab Blood 62 mins – “Horseshoe crabs are not much to look at.  But beneath their unassuming catcher’s-mitt shell, they harbor a half-billion-year-old secret: a superpower that helped them outlive the dinosaurs and survive all the Earth’s mass extinctions.  And what is that secret superpower? Their blood. Their baby blue blood.  And it’s so miraculous that for decades, it hasn’t just been saving their butts, it’s been saving ours too. But that all might be about to change.  Follow us as we follow these ancient critters – from a raunchy beach orgy to a marine blood drive to the most secluded waterslide – and learn a thing or two from them about how much we depend on nature and how much it depends on us.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infectious Disease Insights 29 mins – “January 1 to 15, 2019. The 4 moments of antibiotics. ID Consults save lifes/money. Pneumococcus deaths stable over time. Salmonella from backyard And more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jellyfish Book 50 mins – “Chances are you’ve never given jellyfish a second thought. The science writer Juli Berwald gets it. They’re not cuddly, they just bob along in the ocean, and they sting. Nevertheless, she loves them. In fact, she’s so fascinated, she’s written a book about how complicated they are, how beautiful. To her, they’re like aquatic angels, with a  demonic side: that sting. Studying jellyfish and writing about them even helped Berwald grow a spine of her own. She joins us to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

John Lewis Reflects 33 mins – “Before he became a U.S. congressman, John Lewis was one of the pioneers of the civil rights movement. John reflects on his life of activism, his friendship with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and offers wisdom for the ongoing fight for justice and equality. By the time he was 18, John was participating in lunch-counter sit-ins to protest segregation. Eventually, John rode with the brave Freedom Riders on buses through the deep South, spoke at the famous March on Washington, led the historic Selma to Montgomery march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge and was in the room when President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Today, John is a congressman from Georgia who continues his fight for civil rights, most recently leading sit-ins on the House of Representatives floor in favor of immigration reform and gun control. John says he still believes in non-violence, and says it is his obligation to pass on this tradition to a new generation of young activists, so that we may never go backward and repeat the mistakes of the past.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link Asfrom the pop-up menu.

John Wayne Movies 49 mins – “An American Icons segment about “The Searchers,” John Ford’s problematic masterpiece featuring John Wayne. Kurt Andersen talks with Carol Stabile about an aspect of the Red Scare that’s received scant attention: the 41 women who were blacklisted from radio and television. And how Mariame Kaba, a prison activist who’s black and Muslim, falls hard for something very white and very Christian: Hallmark Christmas movies.” At the link find the title, “A movie hallmark, and Hallmark movies, 20 Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select ”Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Changes 14 mins – “For the last decade, newspaper circulation has seen a staggering drop. Meanwhile, more than 90 percent of today’s adults get their news online.  So how are journalism outlets adjusting to a digital world? We talk with Franklin Foer, author of the book, “World Without Mind: The Existential Threat of Big Tech,” about how social media and CEOs like Jeff Bezos have changed the journalism game.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Experiment 50 mins – “Why would two intelligent women running a hugely successful podcast at one of the most respected studios in the audio world, quit to start a small journalism company built on blockchain, a technology very few people have ever heard of? To quote someone on Twitter yesterday paraphrasing Bill Clinton sounding pretty harsh, actually: “It’s the business model, stupid.” As we keep learning the hard way, as long as we get our journalism from Facebook and 24 hour cable news, we’re suckers for infotainment, propaganda, and actual fake news—not the real news Trump is always calling fake, but the real fake news trolls cook up to polarize American culture. And in these raging digital waters, non-profits and public media struggle just to stay afloat. There’s got to be a better way, right? Manoush Zomorodi and Jen Poyant thought so. Partners on the podcast Note to Self, they left to start Stable Genius Productions. It’s part of Civil, a new blockchain journalism platform. For reasons we’ll try to explain, blockchain has the potential to bring us better, more independent media. Better, more independent everything, maybe. That’s what Jen and Manoush were betting on, anyway. They document the twists and turns since that fateful decision with refreshing vulnerability on their podcast ZigZag. Its second season started on October 11th.” At the link you can listen, but can’t download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Labor Market in U.S. 71 mins – “Erik Hurst of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of the labor market in the United States. Hurst notes dramatic changes in employment rates for men and speculates about the causes. Two factors discussed in detail are declines in the manufacturing sector and the rise of high-end video games as a form of leisure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lake Success 46 mins – “Gary Shteyngart‘s new novel Lake Success is the evil doppelgänger of the Simon and Garfunkel song ‘America‘. In what is surely destined to become one of those legendary novel openings, right up there with “it was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” we meet Barry Cohen, “a man with 2.4 billion dollars of assets under management . . .” in a Greyhound Bus Terminal at 3:20 am, bleeding from his face and drunk on $20,000 of Japanese whiskey.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Life Value 75 mins – “This episode, we make three earnest, possibly foolhardy, attempts to put a price on the priceless. We figure out the dollar value for an accidental death, another day of life, and the work of bats and bees as we try to keep our careful calculations from falling apart in the face of the realities of life, and love, and loss.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Local News Death 22 mins – “Since the Internet exploded journalism’s business revenue, local newsrooms around the country have been in free fall. We speak to The Denver Post’s former managing editor and other experts to debate how to save the news—and, just possibly, democracy itself.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lolita Book Background 51 mins – “Behind Vladimir Nabokov’s brilliant and disturbing novel Lolita is a true story of a girl who was kidnapped and abused by a middle-aged man. Journalist Sarah Weinman’s book is about The Real Lolita.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Magnitsky Act 45 mins – “Jacob Weisberg talks to Bill Browder, head of the global Magnitsky Justice campaign (including the campaign that led to the Magnitsky Act), about the moment his name came up during the Trump–Putin summit in Helsinki and why Vladimir Putin wants him more than just about anybody else in the world.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mark Pincus 12 mins – “Before Mark Pincus made it big with Zynga, he made it even bigger by investing in a couple of little companies called Napster and Facebook. He talks about those early days, and what Mark Zuckerberg was really like back then.” At the link click “Download options,” right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Methylene Blue 47 mins – “When you think of cognitive enhancers, what comes to mind?  Caffeine, herbs like Bacopa Monnieri, maybe Modafinil…  but probably not a substance that has been used as a textile dye or a parasite treatment for fish, right? Meet Methylene Blue, a memory enhancer, antioxidant, and neuroprotectant. Jesse talks to Dr. Francisco Gonzalez-Lima of the University of Texas at Austin about his work studying the benefits of methylene blue and why this impressive smart drug isn’t more widely known.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Nobel Prize 60 mins – “The Nobel prizes are, well, the Nobel prize of prizes! One of the most elite prizes in the world. But where did they come from, why do they matter, and how do they influence the practice of science? This week we speak with medical historian Nils Hansson and sociologist of science Harriet Zuckerman about the origin and legacy of the Nobel Prizes, and what might help them be more representative of science in the future. And then we talk with Marc Abrahams about another prize, the Ig Nobel prizes, which are supposed to make us laugh, and then think.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Partisan Dysfunction 31 mins – “As the federal government limped along this week, the Trump administration forced thousands of furloughed workers to return to their jobs – without pay. Tensions between the president and House Leader Nancy Pelosi escalated as she urged the cancellation of the State of the Union address and the president retaliated by canceling her planned trip overseas. And a White House economic adviser said the shutdown’s impact on the economy will be worse than predicted. On today’s podcast, Diane talks to longtime political analyst Norm Ornstein, one of the most prolific chroniclers of Washington’s descent into partisan dysfunction.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Patient Spotlight 77 mins– “Participants in our discussion on person centred care in January agreed that a change in culture and better use of technology could benefit both patients and doctors.” At the link right-click the square with three dots, then click “Download file,” select “Save File,” and ”OK” to get the podcast.

Perverse Laws 75 mins – “Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse. Katz argues that certain seemingly inexplicable features of the law are the result of conflicts between multiple objectives that the law or the courts must trade off against each other. Katz also argues that structure of the law and how it is enforced are analogous to certain inevitable ambiguities of collective choice and voting theory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phage Therapy  46 mins – “Can we fight superbugs with viruses?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive and can be downloaded.

Photographer Lynsey Addario 58 mins – “My guest today, photographer Lynsey Addario, has spent over two decades traveling the world taking intimate and dramatic portraits, often of lives in crisis—the perpetrators and victims of tyranny, revolution, famine, and rape. Her work spans over 70 countries and has won her a MacArthur Fellowship and a Pulitzer Prize, but has never been gathered into a book until now. Of Love and War gives her most compelling photos the space they deserve, along with essays, interview excerpts, and letters she wrote home to process the things she was witnessing. Lynsey’s pictures offer people like myself, living out our lives in privileged circumstances, a window into the beauty, suffering, and everyday humanity of our contemporaries across the world. And like it or not, ready or not, when you stop scrolling long enough look into one of these images, it looks back into you” At the link left-click the “Square,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select ‘Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prejudice Patterns 41 mins – “We talk to David Amodia, a social neuroscientist and psychology professor at NYU and the University of Amsterdam, about the science of prejudice.” At the link find the title, “The Neuroscience of Prejudice, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Price of a Life 75 mins – “This episode, we make three earnest, possibly foolhardy, attempts to put a price on the priceless. We figure out the dollar value for an accidental death, another day of life, and the work of bats and bees as we try to keep our careful calculations from falling apart in the face of the realities of life, and love, and loss.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reproductive Rights 16 mins – “Groups who oppose abortion have used fetal personhood laws to chip away at Roe v. Wade. But these laws affect women with wanted pregnancies, as well.” At the link find the title, “January 15, 2019, What Fetal Personhood Laws Mean For Abortion Rights And Beyond,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rosanne Cash 40 mins – “Rosanne’s Cash’s new album features 10 new songs, all written and co-written by Cash, that find her “speaking out and looking inward” (The Boston Globe) from a uniquely female perspective. It features contributions from Elvis Costello, Kris Kristofferson, Colin Meloy and Sam Phillips, plus three extra tracks that appear on the deluxe edition of the record. The album’s title track was just named one of the Top 5 songs of 2018 by The New York Times.  She sat down with Brooke for an evening of talk and music at WNYC’s very own theater, The Greene Space.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rules for a Flat World 67 mins – “Law professor Gillian Hadfield of the University of Southern California and author of Rules for a Flat World talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book for regulating the digital future. Hadfield suggests the competitive provision of regulation with government oversight as a way to improve the flexibility and effectiveness of regulation in the dynamic digital world we are living in.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

S&P 500 Index Underperforms 44 mins – “Paul analyzes the 20-year returns of 10 major equity- and fixed-income asset classes. What do we have to learn?  Returns can be totally unexpected but the relationship between asset classes remain the same as they have for almost 90 years. The table below allows investors to examine the year-by-year returns of large and small U.S. equity asset classes, REITS, international large-cap blend and U.S. and international bond asset classes. This podcast examines past results as well as predictions for the next decade from both the largest investment management companies and major financial institutions (Vanguard, J. P. Morgan , GMO, Blackrock, and John Bogle). I think it’s fair to say the Callan Periodic Table is one of the best teaching tools for investors trying to come to the realization that 1. Investing includes a lot of short-term risk 2. Last year’s winner is not likely to become next year’s big winner  3. Owning many asset classes may not make you more money in the long run but it protects you from making big mistakes. 4.  You may not make the kind of returns you expect. Paul also references an article by Christine Benz, Morningstar’s Director of Personal Finance, “Experts Forecast Long-term Stock and Bond ReturnsAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Samuel Beckett 49 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Samuel Beckett (1906 – 1989), who lived in Paris and wrote his plays and novels in French, not because his French was better than his English, but because it was worse. In works such as Waiting for Godot, Endgame, Molloy and Malone Dies, he wanted to show the limitations of language, what words could not do, together with the absurdity and humour of the human condition. In part he was reacting to the verbal omnipotence of James Joyce, with whom he’d worked in Paris, and in part to his experience in the French Resistance during World War 2, when he used code, writing not to reveal meaning but to conceal it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Reproduction 60 mins – “This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We’ll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we’ll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar, then select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Sit-ins and Civil Rights 72 mins – “University of Massachusetts Amherst professor Traci Parker talks about the lunch counter sit-ins that took place in the early 1960s as part of the civil rights movement.” At the link find the title, “Sit-ins and the Civil Rights Movement,” right-click that title and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slants Issue 9 mins -”On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled that a law denying federal trademark protection to names deemed disparaging is unconstitutional. Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the unanimous decision that “it offends a bedrock First Amendment principle: speech may not be banned on the ground that it expresses ideas that offend.” The suit was brought by the Portland dance-rock band The Slants, a group of Asian-American musicians who have taken their name from an ethnic slur and worn it with pride. The musicians sued because when they tried to register trademark for their name, the US Patent and Trademark Office said, “The Slants? No no no no no no.” Bob spoke to the founder of The Slants, Simon Tam, exactly 2 years ago, when the band had just lost its appeal at the Federal Circuit Court.” At the link find the title,”The Slants Win the Day! Jun 2017,” right-click “Play Now”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solitude 56 mins– “We all have times when we want to be alone, but what is the history of solitude in America? How are experiments on dolphins connected with consciousness raising and isolation tanks? And what does Thoreau’s solitary experiment at Walden Pond have to teach us all in the digital age?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sports Contributions 57 mins – “Great athletes aren’t just great at the physical stuff. They’ve also learned how to handle pressure, overcome fear, and stay focused. Here’s the good news: you don’t have to be an athlete to use what they know. (Ep. 4 of “The Hidden Side of Sports” series.)” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Stories Value 57 mins – “A listener commented the other day on Twitter that on two completely different recent episodes of this show – one about technology and the other one about jellyfish, the same idea came up. That stories play a powerful role in shaping our real lives. This idea comes up so often, in so many different forms and contexts, that I’ve begun to think of it as maybe the crucial truth for understanding why people do the things we do. The stories we wrap around ourselves, our neighbors. our children. The invisible stories we struggle against. Nobody I know of understands this better, nor writes more cleanly and poetically about these struggles than my guest today Daniel Alarcón. He’s the co-founder of Radio Ambulante, a Spanish-language podcast now on NPR, and he’s the celebrated author of novels and short stories including his newly published collection The King is Always Above the People.At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Surveillance Capitalism 47 mins – “There are new calls for tech companies to stop selling your location to third parties. We’ll look at the economics and perils of “surveillance capitalism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Economy 28 mins – “In her new book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism, Harvard Business School’s Shoshana Zuboff argues that tech companies — like Google and Facebook — collect so much personal data for profit, that they’re changing the fundamentals of our economy and way of life. And now these companies are learning to shape our behavior to better serve their business goals. Shoshana joins Manoush Zomorodi to explain what this all means for us. We then explore whether or not it’s time to end our relationship with corporate spies. OG advice columnist Dear Abby gives us some tips to start with. We chat with philosopher S. Matthew Liao. He asks if we have a moral duty to quit Facebook. Alice Marwick explains why most people won’t leave the social network. And journalist Nithin Coca tells us what it was like for him to quit both Facebook and Google. Spoiler alert: it wasn’t easy, but he has no regrets.”” At the ink right-click “MP3” beside the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tariffs and Trade 48 mins – “Over the past few months, President Trump has announced new tariffs on imported goods from solar panels and washing machines to steel and aluminum. He has also taken swift executive action to block international mergers that he has deemed harmful to U.S. interests from occurring, and has even said he would consider withdrawing from NAFTA and related trade agreements. President Trump’s protectionist policies are a reversal of mostly free-trade orientated policies of past administrations, and his actions raise important constitutional questions about the extent of executive power over trade policy, separation of powers and the non-delegation doctrine, as well as the future of U.S. and global trade.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Acceleration 15 mins – “3-D printed food, self-driving cars, and robots everywhere. Technology is g3-D printed food, self-driving cars, and robots everywhere. Technology is going to radically alter our lives in the next fifteen years, at least according to entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa. And immigration might be the key to that change. oing to radically alter our lives in the next fifteen years, at least according to entrepreneur Vivek Wadhwa. And immigration might be the key to that change.” At the link left-click the square with three dots, left-click “Download file,” select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Terrorism in Moscow Theater 26 mins – “For the month of August we’ll be running a series of interviews Bob has done over the years with documentary filmmakers. In the OTM office, the producers have been referring to the collection as “Bob’s docs.” Over the next few weeks we’ll go through some themes of documentary film-making, from prurience to access to the personal journey. This episode is about the gift of access. This episode features Bob’s interview with the filmmaker Dan Reed about his 2003 documentary “Terror in Moscow”, about the 2002 attack by Chechen terrorists on a Moscow Theater. Reed had access to remarkable footage filmed by the terrorists themselves and used it to present an extraordinary view of the crisis. Then, Bob revisits his interview with Matthew Heineman about his documentary “Cartel Land” in 2015. Heineman’s relationship with his subjects allowed him to capture moments of violence, corruption, and even adultery — all recorded with the subjects’ full participation.” At the link find the title, “Bob’s Docs Episode Two: Access , Aug 2017” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Timing Selection 41 mins – “We talk to bestselling author Daniel Pink about his latest book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing.” At the link find the title, “The Science of Perfect Timing, Jan 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As the pop-up menu.

Tracking Concepts 29 mins – “Our lives are being tracked and sold to companies. It has become second nature to share this info with the app, but did you ever stop to think: Where does all this data go? In this podcast, you will learn who is tracking you, how they can get to your personal information and, most importantly, where your data is being sent.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Trade and Treaty Law 48 mins – “Over the past few months, President Trump has announced new tariffs on imported goods from solar panels and washing machines to steel and aluminum. He has also taken swift executive action to block international mergers that he has deemed harmful to U.S. interests from occurring, and has even said he would consider withdrawing from NAFTA and related trade agreements. President Trump’s protectionist policies are a reversal of mostly free-trade orientated policies of past administrations, and his actions raise important constitutional questions about the extent of executive power over trade policy, separation of powers and the non-delegation doctrine, as well as the future of U.S. and global trade.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Virtual Reality Treatment 31 mins – ““If you think about this kind of treatment, there’s one important component you have to consider: there’s a difference between wanting and liking” says Dr. Robert Reiner. The topic under discussion is Virtual Reality Therapy, a method for treating phobias and anxiety that Reiner has been on the forefront of for nearly three decades.  He and Jesse discuss the evolution of the treatment modality and its use in modern psychology. Also in this episode, Jesse reveals his own personal phobia — something that’s been haunting him since he was a barefoot four-year-old in a soggy Oregonian garden patch…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

War Reporting 55 mins – “War reporter Janine di Giovanni approaches her work like an anthropologist by embedding herself in conflict zones. Her goal is to understand how war, disease, and poverty have impacted human lives in war torn communities. In the 2018 Peter Stursberg Foreign Correspondents lecture, she details her experiences covering disease outbreaks, genocides and sieges in the Balkans, Africa and the Middle East.” At the link find the title, “Reporting from War: Janine di Giovanni,” right-click “Download Reporting from War: Janine di Giovanni” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wittiness 55 mins – “…a conversation about wit and wittiness. Our guest is the author James Geary, who says that wit is more than just a knack for snappy comebacks. He calls it a “fundamental operating system of human creativity.” It helps reshape the world as we know it, often with an implied punch line. Wit is wise and frisky and honest, and without it, life would be pretty boring. Geary joins us to explore the various forms of wit, how it works, and why we need it.” At the link right-click the play button beside “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

World Bank President 37 mins – “Jim Yong Kim has an unorthodox background for a World Bank president — and his reign has been just as unorthodox. He has just announced he’s stepping down, well before his term is over; we recorded this interview with him in 2015.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the end of the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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