Mining Digest 382 – Mar 15, 2019: Adaptability, Alpha Males, American and Chinese Agriculture, Astronaut Life, Black Ballerina, Boxing Injuries, Brexit Controversy, Canadian Auto Industry, Canadian Oil Reduction, Cancer Researcher, Carbon Tax, Climate Change in 11 Years, Climate Change Targets, Climate Solutions, Clothing Pollution, Dementia Victim, Democracy Upgrade, Digital Nomads, Entrapment, Evolutionary Ecology, Existential Hope, Facebook Issues, Federal Reserve Activity, Female Genital Mutilation, Fentanyl Crisis in Canada, Finite and Infinite Games, Fire Death Identification, Ground Sinking Problem, Gun Trauma Surgeons, Heart Transplants and Phages, Holocaust Music, Huawei and 5G, Indigenous Women Assaults, Journalism Evolution, Journalist of the Year, Listening and Understanding, Marijuana and Sex, Medical Device Failures, Migration Issues, Millennial Shopping Habits, Minimalist Living, Mosquito Control with Gene Drives, Pharmacy Primary Care, Racism in Canada, Rappers Beef, Refugees in Canada, Russian Hacking, School Bullying, Six Letter DNA, Social Media Deletion, Soil Building on Farms, Sterilized Indigenous Women, Syrian Refugee, Termite Mounds, Trans Oil Pipeline Discussion, US Constitution, Vancouver and China, Vaping by Teens, Venezuelan Politics, White Helmets in Syria, Yemen Starvation

Exercise your ears: the 100 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 701 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,486 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Adaptability 32 mins – “In this episode we talk about adaptability as one of the most important skills to have for the future. The current chaotic state of the world often leaves people feeling scared and helpless. We discuss how to move into a more resourceful mindset. We talk about mental flexibility, self-sovereignty, modern nomadism, minimalism, the need for retooling, and other options that can help us become more adaptive and transition more readily into the world of the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ai WeiWei Documentary 28 mins – “Chinese artist Ai Weiwei has turned his lens on the massive scale of the global refugee crisis in a powerful documentary, Human Flow. He says this crisis is not limited to refugees and represents the human condition.” At the link find the title, ‘Human crisis’: Ai Weiwei’s documentary showcases plight of refugees,” right-click “Download ‘Human crisis’: Ai Weiwei’s documentary showcases plight of refugeesand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Alpha Males 16 mins – “In this fascinating look at the “alpha male,” primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males — generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping — and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. “Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male,” de Waal says.” At the link left-click the “Share” button, right-click the “Download” button select “Save Page As“ from the pop-up menu.

American and Chinese Agriculture 35 mins – “Brady Sidwell is the owner of Sidwell Strategies, a commodity brokerage that provides a variety of risk management solutions that caters towards those in the agricultural industry. They help farmers manage price risks by trading futures and options on the commodity market. Before focusing on this type of business, Brady enjoyed traveling to 95 countries and working in a lot of them. The experiences he had on his many trips allowed him to form a better understanding of how the economy on agriculture works from a global perspective and apply that to his business. Brady joins me today to share his passion for helping farmers and how it led to the start of Sidwell Strategies. He shares his academic and career highlights, some of the countries he’s worked in and what he learned from them. He describes how China is trying to emulate how Americans look at farming as well as the difference between farmers from either country. He also discusses some of their projects for the coming months.” At the link and bottom of the page left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Astronaut Life 25 mins – “Have you got what it takes to be an astronaut? Major Tim Peake did. He beat 8,172 applicants for a spot on the European Space Agency’s astronaut training programme. He began his intensive training in 2009, which involved living in extreme environments such as semi-submerged caves and at sea. Six years later, Tim was launched into space and he began his stint on the International Space Station (ISS). In his 2,720 orbits of the Earth, he ran the London Marathon from the ISS treadmill, completed his first space walk and much more besides. Ian Sample sat down with Tim to discuss the selection process, the training involved in becoming an astronaut and whether he felt prepared for life in space.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Barn Preservation 57 mins – “Barns have an important historical significance in New Hampshire, and are a major part of our landscape. But as these barns age, how can we preserve and restore them for new uses today?” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Ballerina 26 mins – “Last month a U.K company announced it will now make ballet shoes in colours that reflect the diverse skin tones of dancers, but one woman dared to dance against prejudice long before this.” At the link find the title, “Meet Raven Wilkinson, the black ballerina who blazed a trail long before shoes came in brown and bronze,” right-click “Download Meet Raven Wilkinson, the black ballerina who blazed a trail long before shoes came in brown and bronzeand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Boxing Injuries 24 mins – “Even though legendary Canadian boxer George Chuvalo is “now in cognitive decline,” he still perks up at the mention of his fights against Muhammad Ali, according to Chuvalo’s son Mitchell. “He has trouble now contextualizing things, knowing what day it is, knowing where he is, but that Ali reference always brings him back to some degree of being lucid,” Mitchell Chuvalo told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. Mitchell Chuvalo told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Brexit Controversy 25 mins – “After British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal was defeated in parliament Tuesday, what’s next for the troubled process? And what does it all mean for the people living in uncertainty?” At the link find the title, “‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financier,” right-click “Download ‘Dark times ahead,’ but Brexit will be worth it in the long term, says financierand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brexit Discussion 15 mins – “Theresa May’s Brexit plan is one step closer to reality. But members of the British Prime Minister’s party are resigning and she could be removed from power. CBC London correspondent Nahlah Ayed explains how we got here and what it means for the future of the United Kingdom and the EU.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link AThe day after Stan Lee’s death, we look at the comic book legend’s impact on popular culture. And New York Magazine and Vulture staff writer Abraham Riesman explains why Stan Lee’s legacy is just a complicated as the superhero stories he helped create.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Auto Industry 27 mins – “In the wake of General Motors’ decision to close its facility in Oshawa, Ont., McMaster University professor and former Unifor economist Jim Stanford argues the company is more concerned about Wall Street shareholders than the Canadian workers it employs.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian Indigenous Stories 24 mins – “Politicians may lie, but in a functional government they can be held to account by political opponents and the public, according to Senator Murray Sinclair. That option was not available to the Indigenous people in Canada who were lied about by politicians for generations, he told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “The people of Canada have been misled about who we are — not only as Indigenous people, but as Canadians — and we need to make sure that they all know the truth,” he said. The First Nations judge spoke to Tremonti as part ofThe Current’s special edition on truth, exploring who suffers most when it gets sidelined. Murray chaired Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which heard from some 6,200 former students of Canada’s Indian residential schools.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian Oil Reduction 20 mins – “Alberta Premier Rachel Notley says the temporary cut in oil production may be a short-term stopgap for what she has called a “crisis” on oil prices, but she’s promising upgrades and more pipelines as long-term solution.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian 1965 Plane Crash 39 mins – “Uncover: Bomb On Board – Episode 1. A bomb exploded on Canadian Pacific Flight 21 killing all 52 people on board. Chuck was on the ground. Didi’s dad was on the plane. Witnesses offer insight into what happened July 8, 1965 – and why no one has ever been held responsible.” At the link find the title, “S2 E1: The Crash,” right-click “Download S2 E1: The Crash” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian Serial Killer 46 mins – “Ron Moffatt was wrongly convicted of murder in the 1950s, and kept his experience secret for many years. He’s now telling his story in a new book. In 1956, Ron Moffatt was taken into a small interrogation room by police in Toronto. “[They] stuck me up against the wall and they played good cop, bad cop,” Moffat told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “In them days it was quite normal for police to use physical violence against suspects. He threatened it; it never happened but he threatened it,” he said. Moffatt was 14 years old at the time. The “terrified” teenager had been picked up by police over the brutal murder of seven-year-old Wayne Mallette. You’ll say anything to get out of that room, and stop them from questioning you. – Ron Moffatt Moffatt was innocent — he had been miles away from the scene of the murder. But under pressure of interrogation, he confessed. The Boy on the Bicycle tells the story of Moffatt’s wrongful conviction of the murder of a 7-year-old boy in 1956. (Five Rivers Chapmanry Publishing)…” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Canadian-Chinese Human Rights Issues 21 mins – “If the diplomatic row with China is escalating, has Canada’s response has been too soft? MP Erin O’Toole thinks the prime minister should be doing more.” At the link find the title, Trudeau’s refusal to call Chinese president is ‘ridiculous,’ says MP Erin O’Toole,” right-click “Download Trudeau’s refusal to call Chinese president is ‘ridiculous,’ says MP Erin O’Tooleand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Cancer Researcher 25 mins – “James Allison is an immunologist who rejected scientific orthodoxy early in his career, but has earned the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his revolutionary work on cancer treatment. Not all scientists who go rogue reap the rewards however, so where’s the line between confidence and stubbornness?” At the link find the title, “James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?,” right-click Download James Allison won a Nobel for defying scientific orthodoxy. What about the mavericks that don’t succeed?and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon Tax 16 mins – “As COP24 tries to set rules for how the world deals with environmental issues, we look at why the Canadian government has chosen carbon pricing as a key tool in addressing climate change. CBC reporter Nahlah Ayed gives us an overview of what’s happening at COP24, and energy economist and Simon Fraser University professor Mark Jaccard explains why carbon pricing is a costly political move.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Action 22 mins – “An activist is arguing that nations must mobilize to fight climate change in the same way that they did during the Second World War.  “We are too late in the game for gradualism … or for individualism — the idea that ‘I’ll take care of my emissions, you take care of your emissions,'” said Margaret Klein Salamon, a former clinical psychologist and the founder and director of The Climate Mobilization. Instead, Klein Salamon’s organization calls for an “immediate ban of all new fossil fuel infrastructure, and a 10-year timeline for retiring the fossil fuel infrastructure that we do have.” “What we envision is a rapid transition of our entire economy and society, with all hands on deck,” she told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Climate Change Consensus 15 mins – “British author and carbon pricing expert, George Marshall, explains the psychology of climate change communication and describes the work he’s done in Canada on this front – to bridge the political divides.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in 11 Years 23 mins – “As part of The Current’s special edition on climate change, we talk to two experts about the level of commitment needed to tackle the problem – and why that action isn’t taking place.” At the link find the title, Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change, right-click “Download Activist urges WWII-level global effort to fight climate change and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Targets 20 mins – “As the UN talks on climate change are extended in Poland, Green Party leader Elizabeth May tells us that those expecting decisive action will be disappointed.” At the link find the title, ‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities,” right-click “Download ‘Do we want to survive or not?’: Elizabeth May says climate change talks too focused on technicalities and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Solutions 22 mins – “As industries change around plans to cut greenhouse emissions, will the “green jobs” that replace them match the pay and benefits of the fossil fuel sector?” At the link find the title, Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal miner,” right-click “Download Some jobs in new energy industries come with a pay cut of $50K: coal minerand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Clothing Pollution 50 mins – “The clothing industry is a top polluter, but some companies are working to be kinder to the environment. The CEOs of Patagonia and Eileen Fisher talk about their shared value of social consciousness. Rose Marcario and Eileen Fisher delve into why a holistic approach, one that goes beyond a single company and its bottom line, is essential to doing business that’s good for everyone. They give tips on the clothing materials they prefer, the power of women-led initiatives, and why wearing clothes longer is key to helping the planet.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Death Definition 19 mins – ““In the vast majority of circumstances, families and care providers in the intensive care unit are on the same page,” says Dr. Brian Goldman on Taquisha McKitty’s case. The 27-year old woman has been declared brain dead by five doctors, but is breathing with the assistance of a ventilator at the request of her family. Their fight to keep her alive is now before the Ontario Court of Appeal. Dr. Goldman, emergency physician and host of CBC Radio’s White Coat Black Art, explains how the case sheds light on the complications of defining death.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Victim 28 mins – “There is no defined legal test to ascertain if someone is fit to enter into a marriage, which means that vulnerable adults, like those with dementia, are at risk of being exploited. We look at one such case, and hear from experts who say greater protections are needed for those who are at their frailest.” At the link find the title, “He married her in a ‘campaign’ to take her money: How a woman with dementia fell into a predatory marriage,” right-click “Download He married her in a ‘campaign’ to take her money: How a woman with dementia fell into a predatory marriage,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Upgrade 59 mins – “Our guest in this episode is Pia Mancini, a political scientist and activist from Argentina, who has spent most of her career researching and experimenting how we can upgrade democracy for the modern world. She is the co-founder of Open Collective, which supports groups to quickly set up a collective, raise funds and manage them transparently, and Democracy Earth, an open source and decentralized democratic governance protocol for any kind of organization. Today we talk about how democracy can function better in the age of internet, why we are seeing signs of the return of the city-state, how to build a self-sovereign identity, pros and cons of liquid democracy, and how to enable large scale cooperation in decision making.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diane Ladd 90 mins – “Oscar-nominated actress Diane Ladd pays a visit to the studio to talk about her favorite movie directors, her days as a “Copa Girl,” the importance of homegrown film production and the joys of collaborating with daughter Laura Dern and ex-husband Bruce Dern. Also, Barbara Stanwyck sends flowers, John Carradine opens doors, Robert Duvall turns on the charm and Diane drops by the set of “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.” PLUS: Making “Chinatown”! Celebrating Roger Corman! The genius of Tennessee Williams! Martin Scorsese encourages improvisation! And Diane indulges Gilbert’s obsession with “Carnosaur”!” At the link right-click “Download” and select ”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Nomads 45 mins – “In this episode, we talk about our experiences with the digital nomad lifestyle and how it has shifted our perspectives on the world over the past six years. This modern-day nomadism also relates to the tribal nomadic lifestyle that humans led for thousand of years before agriculture was invented. We discuss the benefits and downsides of this kind of life, and how our relationship to time, location, finances, education, future, different cultures, politics, and society have changed with the experience of being digital nomads.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

E. Coli on Romaine Lettuce 20 mins – “With more people going hungry as the world’s population increases, Haspel told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti that using valuable crop acreage to grow a vegetable like lettuce may not be the best idea.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

EL Chapo Arrest 19 mins “U.S. prosecutors say Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán is a brutal cartel kingpin that ran the largest drug trafficking organization in the world. As his criminal trial begins in Brooklyn, former DEA agent Andrew Hogan explains how El Chapo managed to evade the law for so many years.” At the link find the title, ”Inside the hunt for alleged Mexican drug lord El Chapo,” right-click “Download Inside the hunt for alleged Mexican drug lord El Chapoand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Entrapment 21 mins – “’From the justice system’s point of view, you also have these bigger questions about how to conduct terrorism investigations, and investigations into these elaborate societal issues where we have fears about the crimes that people might commit.’ Today on Front Burner, senior reporter for CBC Vancouver, Jason Proctor, explains why a B.C. couple accused of planning a bomb plot had their convictions stayed due to entrapment and abuse of process by the RCMP.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolutionary Ecology 22 mins – “Could the fate of the world hang on the potency of beetle sperm? A new study suggests fertility in male beetles can be negatively impacted by heat waves, and its author argues that has implications for other species and the wider biosphere. “Beetles do all sorts of different things … they turn over nutrients, they’re important to things like soil fertility,” said Matt Gage, professor of evolutionary ecology and leader of the University of East Anglia research group that published the study.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Existential Hope 126 mins – “Humanity is at a turning point. For the first time in history, we have the technology to completely obliterate ourselves. But we’ve also created boundless possibilities for all life that could enable  just about any brilliant future we can imagine. Humanity could erase itself with a nuclear war or a poorly designed AI, or we could colonize space and expand life throughout the universe: As a species, our future has never been more open-ended. The potential for disaster is often more visible than the potential for triumph, so as we prepare for 2019, we want to talk about existential hope, and why we should actually be more excited than ever about the future. In this podcast, Ariel talks to six experts–Anthony Aguirre, Max Tegmark, Gaia Dempsey, Allison Duettmann, Josh Clark, and Anders Sandberg–about their views on the present, the future, and the path between them….” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Facebook Breakup 19 mins – “This week, lawmakers all over the world sat down to grill Facebook about privacy and fake news. Canada’s reps were especially harsh on the tech giant and one MP posed a tough question: Is Facebook just way too big? Breaking up a major American company isn’t common. But in the past – banks, telecom companies, and even an oil giant were broken up by the U.S. government. Could that happen with tech giants today? Tim Wu, professor at Columbia Law School and author of The Curse of Bigness, breaks it down.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Issues 25 mins – “Roger McNamee was an early adopter of Facebook, and an early believer. While he was once even an adviser to founder Mark Zuckerberg, today McNamee is one of the tech giant’s fiercest critics. He speaks to host Anna Maria Tremonti about his new book Zucked: Waking up to the Facebook Catastrophe.” At the link find the title, “Why a former Facebook advisor says the ‘like’ button was ‘beginning of the end’ of company’s good old days,” right-click “Download Why a former Facebook advisor says the ‘like’ button was ‘beginning of the end’ of company’s good old days,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve Activity 21 mins – “U.S. President Donald Trump has lambasted the Federal Reserve for repeatedly hiking interest rates. But Stanley Fischer, the former vice-chair of the central bank, says it’s not doing much to help the president get what he wants.” At the link find the title, ‘Don’t do it’: Trump’s criticism of central bank could backfire, warns former vice-chair,”right-click “Download ‘Don’t do it’: Trump’s criticism of central bank could backfire, warns former vice-chairand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Genital Mutilation 26 mins – “Nice Nailantei Leng’ete narrowly escaped undergoing a female genital mutilation (FGM) when she was eight years old. She’s since been on a crusade to eliminate the practice, known as “the cut,” which still threatens millions of girls in Africa.” At the link find the title, “Meet the Kenyan woman urging village elders to abandon female genital mutilation,” right-click “Download Meet the Kenyan woman urging village elders to abandon female genital mutilationand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl Crisis in Canada 18 mins – ““If we were doing something killing thousands of Chinese, we would hear from them loud and clear,” says former Canadian ambassador to China, David Mulroney. He argues that Canada needs to pressure China to do more to stop the flow of fentanyl, and questions why PM Justin Trudeau didn’t apply more diplomatic pressure at the G20 this week.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Finite and Infinite Games 18 mins – “In this episode we are discussing the concepts from the book “Finite and Infinite Games” by James P. Carse. It’s a great book that explores game theory as a general framework for how to operate in life. It applies to every area: work, relationships, business, politics, how we treat nature etc. We talk about what finite and infinite games are, and how to recognize which game we are playing. We also go over examples and practical applications that can help with gaining perspective and making wiser choices.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fire Death Identification 21 mins – “As wildfires rage on in California, forensic workers face the grim task of identifying the remains of those who could not escape. In the past week, several fires in the state have destroyed nearly 9,000 homes and scorched more than 570 square kilometres. There are at least 300 people unaccounted for, while the death toll has now climbed to 56.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Fungi 57 mins – “We learn about the miracle of fungi, from mushrooms, to yeast, to mold on your shower curtain. Fungi are in a vast yet little-known kingdom of their own, closer to animals than plants, and one of the oldest and largest organisms on earth.  In addition to tasty mushrooms foraged in fall, we learn about the important role fungi plays in the ecosystem, their relationship to trees, and promising areas of research for the future.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Giraffologist 28 mins – “Canadian biologist Anne Dagg was denied tenure decades ago, despite her pioneering research on giraffes. She’s finally getting recognition in her field – and she wants to make sure young women scientists today don’t have to fight the way she did.” At the link find the title, “How a Canadian ‘giraffologist’ stuck her neck out to fight sexism in academia,” right-click “Download How a Canadian ‘giraffologist’ stuck her neck out to fight sexism in academia,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GM Plant Closure 20 mins – “Large factory closures, like the one announced by General Motors in Oshawa, Ont., carry with them a high human cost and potential political fallout, argues an historian. “I think there’s a deep sense of betrayal that runs across working-class communities right now,” Steven High, a professor at Concordia University’s centre for oral history and digital storytelling, told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Ground Sinking Problem 20 mins – “We hear from scientists who are saying we need to pay more attention to something called subsidence, or sinking ground, because they say is being exacerbated by climate change.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Guantanamo 22 mins – “When U.S. President Donald Trump signed the order to keep Guantanamo Bay open, he shut down the State Department office responsible for closing it and resettling released detainees. That office, called the Special Envoy for Guantanamo Closure, was also responsible for tracking inmates already released. Now several have gone missing. ..One of the missing is Abu Wa’el Dhiab, “a Syrian man, a hunger striker and thorn in the side to the prison here, who was resettled in Uruguay during the Obama administration,” said Carol Rosenberg, the journalist who uncovered the problem in a McClatchy investigation. She told The Current’s Michelle Shephard that Dhiab ran away and is “now in south central Turkey, going in and out of al-Nusra-controlled Syria, Idlib province.” …Responsibility for tracking the former inmates was moved to the office of U.S. Ambassador Nathan Sales, but the staff who had negotiated the resettlement deals were all deployed elsewhere, Rosenberg said. “They now have brand new staffers — Trump appointees — trying to catch up and manage these deals that went untended for at least a year.” The Current requested a comment from the U.S. State Department and from the Republican chairs of the House and Senate committees with responsibility for Guantanamo. They declined to comment or did not reply. …There is also a risk to the detainees themselves, Rosenberg said, explaining that two men who were resettled in Senegal have since been deported to their native Libya. The U.S. originally did not send them there, due to fears for their safety. “After two years in Senegal, something went wrong apparently with U.S.-Senegalese relations, and the Senegalese put those two men on a plane, one of them against his will … and sent him back to Libya, even though he said he’d be killed there,” Rosenberg said….” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Gun Trauma Surgeons 24 mins – “As part of One Bullet, The Current’s series on gun violence, we speak to two trauma surgeons who are faced with the reality of what bullets do to bodies.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Heart Transplants and Phages 24 mins – “This week, improving heart xenotransplants, and soil bacteria versus phages.” At the link find the title, “06 December 2018: Heart xenotransplants and phage fighting, 5 Dec 2018,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hibernating Humans 20 mins – “A group of U.S. scientists are exploring whether the genes of the fat-tailed dwarf lemur of Madagascar could hold the key to human hibernation. “What the dwarf lemur does is basically suspend the metabolic regulation of body temperature,”  Peter Klopfer explained to The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. “It becomes like a snake or a lizard — cold-blooded.” The dwarf lemur will go into torpor for six to seven months of the year, he added, noting it’s the only primate known to have this capability.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Hockey Player 24 mins – “Retired NHL goaltender ‘Cujo’ opens up about difficult childhood. Former goaltender Curtis Joseph spent 19 seasons in the NHL, playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames. From a young age, Curtis Joseph knew that he was adopted. But it wasn’t until he was a grown man playing in the NHL that the former goaltender — known as Cujo — finally met his biological mother. When he did, he knew exactly what he wanted to say: he thanked her for having him. “She wanted somebody to give me the life that she … felt that she couldn’t give me at 16 years old,” Joseph told The Current’s Michelle Shephard. Neglected as a child, Curtis Joseph was driven to succeed in NHL nets He remembers her being shy. And if she was anything like him, she may have also felt a bit of guilt, he said. Joseph, who grew up in an institution for mentally ill patients run by his adoptive parents, delves into how his childhood paved the way for his hockey career in his new autobiography Cujo: The Untold Story of My Life On and Off the Ice.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Holocaust Music 24 mins – “When music theory professor Patricia Hall played a recording during one of her lectures, the audience became visibly uncomfortable, their arms clenched around their bodies. Titled The Most Beautiful Time of Life, the recording was of an upbeat foxtrot. But it was originally arranged and performed by prisoners in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Huawei and 5G 20 mins – “The arrest of a Chinese tech executive in Vancouver was followed by the detention of two Canadians in Beijing. We look at the geopolitical fallout surrounding Huawei, and whether Canada is stuck in the middle of a U.S.-China fight.” At the link find the title, “Conflict inevitable with Canada stuck in middle of U.S.-China row: expert,” right-click “Download Conflict inevitable with Canada stuck in middle of U.S.-China row: expertand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei’s CFO Arrest 21 mins – “’It’s incredibly hard to overstate the significance of this arrest.’ CBC’s economics reporter Peter Armstrong breaks down why Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou for extradition to the U.S. is such a big deal.” At the link find the title, “Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFO,right-click “Download Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFOand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Indigenous Women Assaults 22 mins – “An Anishinaabe criminal lawyer is concerned that a bill promoting harsher sentences for people who commit crimes against Indigenous women may actually end up hurting the group it’s trying to protect. Promise Holmes Skinner says she’s seen many cases in which assaults are committed by one Indigenous woman against another, and worries that if the bill passes, they’ll face more and longer jail time for minor offences.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Jewish WW II Refugee Rejects 16 mins – “Eva Wiener describes her voyage across the Atlantic and how she feels about Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s upcoming apology for Canada having turned her ship back. Also, CBC Ottawa Senior Reporter Catherine Cullen describes the politics of the apology.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism Evolution 24 mins – “Anna Maria Tremonti speaks to Alan Rusbridger, the former editor of the Guardian whose 20-year tenure involved explosive investigations and ushering the newspaper in the digital age.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Journalist Person of the Year 19 mins – “‘In the middle of a battle,’ journalist Maria Ressa, named among Time’s Person of the Year, won’t back down ‘I’m not about to render my entire life and career meaningless by not standing up when it matters,’ Ressa says Maria Ressa was honoured as one of Times Magazine’s People of the Year 2018 for her work as a ‘guardian’ of the truth. Criticism of the bloody drug war in the Philippines has been stymied by lies and aggression on social media, according to one of the journalists honoured among Time Magazine’s Person of the Year. Since his election in June 2016, President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs has reportedly resulted in the extrajudicial killings of 4,500 people, as police crack down on suspected drug dealers. ‘I’m not about to render my entire life and career meaningless by not standing up when it matters,’ Ressa says.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Listening and Understanding 27 mins – “In today’s world of either broadcasting or consuming information, people seem to have forgotten how to really listen. In this episode, we explore how we have arrived at this point where we can no longer listen to other people or our environment, and how to re-learn that crucial skill. We talk about different ways of listening, frameworks we can use to understand people better, as well as practical steps towards becoming better listeners.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mandela Supporter 14 mins – “Dikgang Moseneke was imprisoned on Robben Island when he was 15, where he befriended Nelson Mandela. After a lifetime fighting for justice, he says that Mandela’s lessons still hold true in today’s political climate.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marie Colvin Death 24 mins – “War correspondent Marie Colvin reported the plight of the helpless from conflicts in the world’s most dangerous places, with a tenacity that eventually cost her her life. Lindsey Hilsum, her friend and fellow war correspondent, tells us about Colvin’s life – a life lived on the edge.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana and Sex 24 mins – “Carlen Costa, who is also a relationship psychotherapist, advises couples who may already use pot or who are now introducing cannabis in their intimate relationship, to take it slow and always talk. “Communication is the key to a really positive relationship,” Costa told The Current’s guest host Piya Chattopadhyay. “Talk about how it helps you, how it supports you and how it will help increase your desire, pleasure and arousability.” Stanford University School of Medicine researchers unveiled a link between marijuana and the frequency of sexual intercourse in a 2017 study, indicating frequent marijuana users have about 20 per cent more sex than those who don’t smoke pot. The study’s senior author, however, cautioned that it should not be misinterpreted as having proven a causal link.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Marijuana Legalization in Canada 19 mins – “’This really is the beginning of a cultural shift,’ says Solomon Israel, cannabis reporter for the Winnipeg Free Press. Nearly two months into cannabis legalization he breaks down the complaints – from low quality to short supplies – and the positives – including the benefits that legal weed provides for medical research.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Device Failures 30 mins – “A new investigation led by CBC/Radio-Canada, the Toronto Star and the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists found concerns in the way medical devices are approved and monitored in many countries, and patients who have suffered as a result.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Medical Implant Problems 24 mins -”After Amanda Dykeman gave birth to her third son, she had a medical device implanted to stop her from getting pregnant again. Almost right away, she felt something was wrong. “I bloated out to where I looked pregnant, I started experiencing migraines so severe they were debilitating, my regular periods then became irregular and full of clots,” she told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. The implanted device was Essure, a small metal coil that is placed in the fallopian tube. …when her symptoms arose, she found groups on social media where hundreds of women were reporting the same issues. “I was shocked because, like I said, my physician had made it seem like such a cakewalk, and when all these women kept joining and joining with the same symptoms, you kinda gotta put two and two together and realize there’s something wrong with this device.” Health Canada warned of potential complications with Essure in 2016. The Current contacted Bayer, the company that makes Essure, and received the following statement: “We were very sorry to hear that a patient experienced difficulties. …”New investigation reveals implanted medical devices approved in Canada despite risks Bayer didn’t create Essure, but it bought the company that did, 11 years after the device was approved for use. Bayer voluntarily discontinued the sale of Essure in Canada for commercial reasons, but said its decision was driven by a decline in patient demand, and not a product recall. In July, the company announced in a press release that it will stop selling the product in the U.S. on Dec. 31, 2018…. A joint investigation by CBC/Radio-Canada and the Toronto Star, in collaboration International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, has found problems with approval and monitoring process for many medical devices, from pacemakers to breast implants.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Meyers-Briggs Personality Test 25 mins – “Using the Myers-Briggs personality test is a way to engineer a workforce while appearing to care about employees’ self fulfillment, says Merve Emre, the author of The Personality Brokers: The Strange History of Myers-Briggs and the Birth of Personality Testing.” At the link find the title “Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says author,”right-click “Download Myers-Briggs tests in the workplace help the employer, not the employee, says authorand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migrant Caravan in Mexico 18 mins – “A caravan of about 4,000 migrants is heading north through Mexico. Their journey has become heavily politicized. CBC’s senior correspondent Susan Ormiston describes what she’s seen during her travels with the migrants.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Issues 20 mins – “Dr. Joanne Liu was working in Central America when a father facing the threat of violence shared a story that stunned her. He told Liu, the international president of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), he could no longer live with the feeling that he might return home from work one day to find his child abducted. So, the family fled, Liu said. According to the United Nations, there were 258 million migrants worldwide in 2017. Some have left home willingly for work or family, but others — like the father in Central America — have been forced to run from violence and other threats. Roughly 68 million people around the world are forcibly displaced, and there are more than 25 million refugees, the UN says.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive. 

Millennial Shopping Habits 24 mins – “Vox’s Rebecca Jennings spent a week trying direct-to-consumer products marketed at young consumers. But her experience wasn’t as ideal as marketers claim.” At the link find the title, A millennial writer tested all the online products you can’t afford, and was seriously disappointed,” right-click “Download A millennial writer tested all the online products you can’t afford, and was seriouslydisappointedand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimalist Living 25 mins – “In a world of stuff, there’s a movement that sells the idea of space as a path to happiness. But some critics see this lifestyle trend as self-centered, and say it includes its own kind of consumerism that only people with money can afford. “ At the link find the title, “Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?,” right-click “Download Minimalism: Upper-class luxury or liberating lifestyle?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Missionary Chau Death 19 mins -”A 26-year-old Christian missionary was killed last month when he snuck onto a remote island in the Indian Ocean. John Allen Chau hoped to preach to an uncontacted tribe, but he was killed. His death has sparked a debate: was he a martyr, or misguided?” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Mohawk Tannery Problem 6 mins- “Most of New Hampshire’s riverside mills and factories have closed. But they’ve left their mark – and in some cases, a lot of toxic waste. For decades, Nashua has struggled with what to do with waste from the Mohawk Tannery, a factory that produced leather for sixty years. Now, the city is considering a private-public partnership to clean it up, but the details are still up for debate.” At the link right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mosquito Control with Gene Drives 27 mins – “Gene drive technology, which can introduce and spread a specific genetic trait through an entire species, is near the point where it leaves the lab and enters the real world. Some experts are calling for a global agreement on how the technology should be deployed, which could make for a showdown between scientists and policy makers at a UN meeting on biodiversity later this week.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Oyster Cage Freeze Problem 9 mins – “An early freeze is causing havoc for oyster farmers in P.E.I.[Prince Edward Island], where more than 1,000 people are employed in the industry. We spoke to one oyster grower about the challenges they’re facing.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Pharmacy Primary Care 25 mins – “With a number of Canadian provinces allowing pharmacists to take on new responsibilities – such as administering rapid strep tests or prescribing contraceptives – some experts say expanding pharmacists’ responsibilities could be good for patients and the health-care system.” At the link find the title, Could expanding the role of pharmacists alleviate pressure on the health-care system?” right-click “Download Could expanding the role of pharmacists alleviate pressure on the health-care system? and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism in Canada 27 mins – “”When the agency that’s supposed to protect you is also an agency that you fear, there is really little place for you to find shelter,” says Jorge Barrera, a reporter with CBC’s Indigenous Unit, in relation to a disturbing new report about the Thunder Bay Police Service. Ontario’s police watchdog Gerry McNeilly says “systemic racism” exists at an institutional level inside the police force. And the consequences of this racism are so severe that he’s recommending nine cases involving the deaths of Indigenous people be re-opened and re-investigated. Today on Front Burner, we look at how Thunder Bay Police failed Indigenous people.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rappers Beef 19 mins – “On Tuesday, rapper Pusha T had a concert in Toronto interrupted by a brawl in the audience. Fans threw beer at him and tried to jump on stage. And now, a man is in life-threatening condition after being stabbed. Pusha T and Canadian rapper Drake have been in a public feud since last spring, and Pusha has accused Drake of paying members of the rowdy audience. Author and Drake biographer Dalton Higgins on how this beef developed.” At the link find the title, “Explaining Drake and Pusha T’s beef,” right-click “Download Explaining Drake and Pusha T’s beef,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 21 mins – “’Canada doesn’t have a refugee crisis. Canada has a crisis of will in terms of what we want to do,’ says refugee and immigration lawyer Zool Suleman about the influx of people crossing the American border to seek asylum in Canada. The country’s budget watchdog has now confirmed the federal cost of asylum seekers making irregular crossings and warned of a growing refugee claimant case backlog. But what does that really mean? Today on Front Burner, we shed some light on a confusing system and an issue that’s often clouded by rhetoric.” At the link find the title, “Asylum in Canada explained,” right-click “Download Asylum in Canada explained” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Refugees in Canada 24 mins – “Mohammad Amin Sadiqi is one of thousands of asylum seekers who have sought refuge in Canada by crossing the U.S. border illegally. He told The Current why he felt compelled to do it.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Hacking 22 mins – “There’s a lot of evidence to suggest that social media accounts tied to the Kremlin tried to meddle in the 2016 US presidential election, the Brexit vote, the last French election, and several elections across Europe. Turns out, they’ve been active in Canada too. Journalist Justin Ling tells us how Russian accounts have tried to spread misinformation and propaganda here, and how the Canadian government is responding, with the election one year away.” At the link find the title, “Is Canada ready for Russian election meddling?,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Bullying 24 mins – “Youth see bullying as ‘paying off for some people’ in today’s world, says expert Cruel behaviour can often lead to rewards for children, even if it harms the other children around them, according to an expert in mental health in schools. (Antonio Guillem/Shutterstock) Young people looking at today’s world could get the impression that being cruel brings rewards, according to a professor who studies anti-bullying strategies. “You only have to look south of the border to get a really good example of how somebody can be really mean but really popular at the same time,” said Tony Volk, professor in child and youth studies at Brock University in Ontario, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump. “It is not at all surprising that these youth who are growing up, who are intelligent, functional human beings, look around them and say: ‘Yeah this is really paying off for some people, maybe I should do the same thing,'” he told The Current’s Anna Maria Tremonti. If we can accept that people have a capacity for kindness, we should also accept that everybody has a capacity for cruelty. – Tracy  Vaillancourt Canada has recently seen its share of bullying and allegations of violence related to bullying.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

School Funding 34 mins – “All across the country, it seems like a given: Places with more expensive houses have nicer schools because they can raise more money. That’s just how education seems to work. Except in Vermont. Two decades ago, the state passed a radical law that aimed to equalize education funding. The law (and subsequent tweaks) made it much easier for towns with regular houses to raise money for their schools — almost as easy as it was for towns with expensive vacation homes. That’s because the Vermont funding model asks rich towns to pay higher taxes to subsidize the schools in less affluent places. On this episode of The Impact, we’ll tell you how this model came about. It’s the story of one woman named Carol Brigham, her young daughter Amanda, and their fight to save the tiny school that is the heart of their small Vermont town.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Letter DNA 14 mins – “Every cell that’s ever lived has been the result of the four-letter genetic alphabet: A, T, C and G — the basic units of DNA. But now that’s changed. In a visionary talk, synthetic biologist Floyd E. Romesberg introduces us to the first living organisms created with six-letter DNA — the four natural letters plus two new man-made ones, X and Y — and explores how this breakthrough could challenge our basic understanding of nature’s design.” At the link left-click the “Share” circle, then right-click the “Download” arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Media Deletion 25 mins – “He’s a Sillicon Valley pioneer and a scientist employed by Microsoft – but Jaron Lanier is calling on all of us to take back control and abandon social media for good. He says the catastrophic losses of personal dignity are not worth it.” At the link find the title, Can this tech pioneer convince you to delete your social media accounts?” right-click Download Can this tech pioneer convince you to delete your social media accounts? and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Soil Building on Farms 33 mins – “Joe Breker is the owner of the Coteau des Prairies, a getaway lodge that offers stunning views surrounded by prairie farms and fields. He has been farming for over 40 years and practices what the industry calls “No-till” farming, a method that prioritizes soil health. With his skills and knowledge, Joe managed to successfully operate his farm during the dry ‘80s and wet ‘90s, as well as each decade’s poor farm economy. Joe joins me today to describe how his conservative farming practices have improved their farm’s soil health. He shares how his father was a sustainable farmer and what he did to build on what his father started. He also describes what no-till farming is, how it helps to restore damaged soil and explains the science behind management practices and how it affects soil health for decades.” At the link and bottom of the page left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Stan Lee Dies 21 mins – “The day after Stan Lee’s death, we look at the comic book legend’s impact on popular culture. And New York Magazine and Vulture staff writer Abraham Riesman explains why Stan Lee’s legacy is just a complicated as the superhero stories he helped create.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sterilized Indigenous Women 20 mins – “As a senator calls for a nationwide review of the forced sterilization of Indigenous women, a lawyer representing a proposed class action detailed the women’s accounts of being sterilized without proper and informed consent. “In the throes of labour … they would be approached, harassed, coerced into signing these consent forms,” said Alisa Lombard, an associate with Maurice Law, the first Indigenous-owned national law firm in Canada.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Syrian Refugee 21 mins – “Hassan Al Kontar is now safe in Canada. But for seven long months, the Syrian refugee was stuck inside the transit area of Kuala Lumpur Airport, terrified of being deported back to Syria. Today, Hassan shares how he survived being stranded, the psychological toll of two months in detention in Malaysia, and how a group of Canadians changed this life by raising money to bring him to Whistler, B.C., as a privately-sponsored refugee.” At the link find the title, “After seven months trapped inside an airport, a refugee calls Canada home,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Termite Mounds 24 min – “Researchers have discovered a network of 4,000-year-old termite mounds in Brazil that are so big, they can be seen from space. We hear all about the discovery, and how the much-maligned termite could teach humans a lot about biofuels and even robotics.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Trans Mountain Pipeline 19 mins – “Reconsideration hearings for the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline continue this week in B.C. This is the same pipeline that the federal government bought for $4.5-billion, only to have a Federal Court of Appeal delay construction because the review didn’t consider oil tanker traffic, or consult enough with Indigenous groups. UBC professor Kathryn Harrison lays out what it might take to get the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion through, and what it could take to stop it.” At the link find the title, “What will it take to build Trans Mountain? What will it take to stop it?” right-click “Download What will it take to build Trans Mountain? What will it take to stop it?and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trans Oil Pipeline Discussion 18 mins – “A group of Indigenous leaders are meeting in Calgary this week with the oil industry to discuss options for purchasing the Trans Mountain pipeline. We hear from those on both sides of the debate.” At the link find the title, “Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councilor,” right-click Download Indigenous ownership won’t solve problems with Trans Mountain pipeline, says Squamish Nation councillorand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Truth and Beliefs 74 mins – “In a special edition, The Current looks at the state of truth in our world today: from why we believe what we believe; to who suffers most when the truth gets sidelined; and the groups and technologies being deployed on both sides of the war on reality.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

US Constitution 29 mins – “David talks to Gary Gerstle about the history of the United States Constitution and its current role in American political life.  Is it still fit for purpose in the twenty-first century and what could be done to change it?” At the link click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vancouver and China 16 mins – “Bloomberg’s Vancouver bureau chief Natalie Obiko Pearson helps us navigate the city’s complicated relationship with Chinese money. That relationship has ties to the city’s housing affordability crisis. Tackling affordability is job number one for Kennedy Stewart, who begins his work as Vancouver’s mayor today.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaping by Teens 27 mins – “David Hammond was picking out an Archie comic for his kids when he noticed a poster for vaping behind the corner store counter. Then, he spotted vaping products above the candy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Venezuela Politics 18 mins – “As a former diplomat, Ben Rowswell witnessed populist politics has taken hold in recent years, and the impact that had on countries like Venezuela. Now he’s urging citizens to organize and fight back against the threat – and he’s got an app for that.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Whaling Commercialization 20 mins – “Conservationist Paul Watson says that in three decades of a whaling moratorium, Japan has never stopped hunting under the guise of research. He argues that now, the country will at least be restricted to whaling in a much smaller area.” At the link find the title, Why one conservationist is lauding Japan’s return to commercial whaling,” right-click “Download Why one conservationist is lauding Japan’s return to commercial whalingand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

White Helmets in Syria 20 mins – “Maysoon al-Masri, a former White Helmets volunteer, was one of 117 former members of the group to be resettled in Canada as part of an international evacuation of emergency volunteers and their from Syria in July. (Andrew Lee/CBC) After a harrowing escape, more than a hundred Syrian war zone first responders and their families are being resettled in Canada, as refugees. Hear the CBC’s Murray Brewster describe their journey and why they could still be in danger.” At the link find the title, “How Canada helped save the White Helmets,” left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yellow Vest Protests 21 mins – ““If you look at the yellow vest movement in France, none of it has been about migration. It hasn’t been about cultural values.” Sophie Pedder, Paris correspondent for The Economist, says the ‘yellow vest’ protests in Canadian cities are in some ways different from the movement that inspired them in Paris. French protesters have been campaigning against everything from a fuel tax hike to the cost of living. While protests in Canada and Europe have copied their iconic uniform, the focus on immigration and the UN is different from what’s being campaigned against in France.” At the link find the title, “How and why the “yellow vest” protests spread, left-click the three dots, right-click “Download/Open” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemen Starvation 23 mins – “With over 60 per cent of the population living on the brink of famine and an estimated 85,000 children dead from malnutrition, the war has propelled the country into a devastating humanitarian crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Yemen War and Canada 25 mins – “Recent remarks from the prime minister have fuelled speculation about whether Canada will stop supplying Saudi Arabia with light armoured vehicles. We look to London, Ont., where those vehicles are made, and weigh up the ethical considerations against the livelihoods at stake.” At the link find the title, Ontario workers in ‘grey area’ as Canada considers scrapping sale of arms to Saudis,” right-click “Download Ontario workers in ‘grey area’ as Canada considers scrapping sale of arms to Saudisand select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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