Mining Digest 385 – Apr 5, 2019: Accountable Capitalism, Amazon Worker Organization, American Blind Abilities Act, Brazilian Politics, Cancer and Exercise, Cancers with Low Survival, Cannabis Law, Chinese Chef, Civilization Decline, Climate Change, Congo Stories, Crisis Responses, Disaster Kitchens, Domestic Terrorism, Don MacLean, Driverless Cars, Electrical Therapies, First Amendment and the Press, Food Safety, Gravity Storage, Hate Control, Heart Failure, HIV Cure, Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen, Homeless Care, Huawei CFO Arrest, IRS Investigations Decline, Kavanaugh Confirmation Impact, Latino Voters, Marijuana Farmer, Parent-Child Separation, Parkinsons Pandemic, Parolees, Political Divides, Prochlorococcus Value, Rajneesh Documentary, School Shootings, Sepsis Treatment, Sexual Harassment, Suicide, Tick-induced Allergies, Top Canadian Stories, Toronto Van Killings, Transgender Child Care, Weaponization of Social Media, White House Press Corps, Yemini Children

Exercise your ears: the 67 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 516 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 24,729 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 499 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Accountable Capitalism 46 mins – “Accountable capitalism, Dollar General, and New TV on this week’s episode with Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, Emily Peck,  and Bloomberg Opinion’s Justin Fox.At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Amazon Worker Organization 45 mins – “On today’s show, hosts April Glaser and Will Oremus discuss the latest round of “Tech CEO Goes to Washington.” On Tuesday morning, that CEO was Google’s Sundar Pichai, who appeared before the House Judiciary Committee and was asked about data privacy, location tracking, Google’s plans in China, and of course, Republicans’ favorite tech topic: conservative bias. We’ll talk about what we learned from this hearing as well as what we wish Congress might’ve asked the Google CEO. Then April speaks with two people who have been working to organize workers in Amazon fulfilment centers in Minneapolis. One is a founder with the Awood Center, Nimo Omar. She’s been organizing with the primarily East African communities that work in the Amazon warehouses on a campaign to collectively advocate for better working conditions.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Blind Abilities Act 24 mins – “In partnership with State Services for the Blind of Minnesota we are proud to present, PACER Center – Champions for Children with Disabilities. Barb and Kate sit down with Jeff Thompson of Blind Abilities in the sixth of a series of podcasts in partnership with PACER Center and State Services for the Blind. You can find the entire PACER Center series here. Barb talks about her role as Co-Director of the National Parent Center on Transition and Employment and her experiences in advocacy that led her to PACER Center. Kate shares her experiences from her journey through her kids transition from youth into adulthood. What worked and where she found answers. Join Barb, Kate and Jeff in this informative podcast about how PACER Center, State Services for the Blind and others played a role in the success of not only their kids transition into college, the work place and independence, but how Barb and Kate too, made the transition themselves in part by letting them grow.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

American Disunited 60 mins – “Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) argues that the country lacks unity and offers his thoughts on how to repair it. He’s interviewed by Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute.” At the link in After Words find the title, “[Them] (1 hr. – November 10, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Apache Helicopter 149 mins – “In mid-September I drove to Illesheim Army Airfield to meet with Caleb Marheine who flies the AH-64 Apache helicopter there. We talked about the helicopter’s systems, the cockpit, aspects of flying it as well as some of the missions.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brazilian Politics 84 mins – “Diogo and Luiza, two professors from Brazil and members of “Professores Contra o Escola Sem Partido” (PCESP) join Breht to talk about the current state of Brazilian politics, the election of Bolsonaro, Fascism, Brazilian memory, the parallels between Brazil and the US, the importance of international solidarity, and what leftists abroad can do to assist our Brazilian comrades. It gets pretty emotional towards the end, but I hope you appreciate the love and value the discussion!” At the link left-click the download arrow, select “Save File,” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Cancer and Exercise 23 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 8: 7 May 2018. Associate Professor Prue Cormie is an exercise physiologist and Principal Research Fellow at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research. She discusses the crucial role of exercise in the care of cancer patients. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Cancer with Low Survival 20 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 8: 15 October 2018. Dr Adam Walczak is Youth Cancer Services and Clinical Trials Manager with CanTeen. He discusses how to improve outcomes for adolescents and young adults with low survival cancers. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Charlotte Pence Interview 57 mins – “Vice President Mike Pence’s daughter Charlotte Pence shares important lessons she’s learned from her father. She’s interviewed by Kate Brower, journalist and author of “First in Line: Presidents, Vice Presidents, and the Pursuit of Power.” At the link in After Words find the title, “After Words with Charlotte Pence (57 min. 33 sec. – November 3, 2018),” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chinese Chef 22 mins – “At school, Nick was embarrassed by the smell of the Chinese food his parents packed him for lunch. When he decided to become a chef, he perfected French techniques under some of the top chefs in North America and Europe. Returning home, it was his grandmother’s dumplings that gave him a jolt of sensory memory that would define his current success.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Civilization Decline 63 mins – “Chris Hedges: Live at Politics and Prose – On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, Chris Hedges discusses his book America: The Farewell Tour at Politics and Prose.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change 54 mins – “On this week’s Slate Political Gabfest, Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and John Dickerson discuss the dire new climate report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the aftermath of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation, and Taylor Swift’s new engagement with politics.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” from the pop-up menu.

Congo Stories 68 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, John Prendergast and Fidel Bafilemba discuss their book Congo Stories, with actor Ryan Gosling, who provided photography, and journalist Chouchou Namegabe.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Connecting Technology 30 mins – “Some people thought the laying of the trans-Atlantic cable might bring world peace, because connecting humans could only lead to better understanding and empathy. That wasn’t the outcome—and recent utopian ideas about communication (Facebook might bring us together and make us all friends!) have also met with a darker reality (Facebook might polarize us and spread false information!). Should we be scared of technology that promises to connect the world? Guests include: Robin Dunbar, inventor of Dunbar’s Number; Nancy Baym, Microsoft researcher.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crisis Responses 55 mins -”Between natural disasters, targeted attacks, and everyday run-of-the mill accidents, we hear about crises happening to other people on the news all the time. This week, Piya speaks with people who were there when crisis struck, to find out how they responded… and what their reaction says about them.” At the link find the title, “1101 #91: Crisis Reactors,” right-click Download #91: Crisis Reactorsand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disaster Kitchens 75 mins – “On this episode of Live at Politics and Prose, José Andrés discusses his book We Fed An Island.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Domestic Terrorism 19 mins – “Daryl Johnson tried to warn Homeland Security about the growing momentum behind right-wing extremists. He was not well-received. On Friday’s show, how the actions of the Obama and Trump administrations fueled far-right violence. Plus, there’s election shadiness happening in Kansas. Slate’s Mark Joseph Stern explains.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Don McLean 12 mins – “It was late in 1971 when the singer-songwriter Don McLean released his song “American Pie.” Today, everybody still seems to know all the words … but nobody seems to know what those words really mean. Who is the “jester [who] sang for the king and queen/ In a coat he borrowed from James Dean?” And what was it that “touched [the singer] deep inside/ The day the music died”? Don McLean himself helps break down the song, along with author Raymond I. Schuck. Then, singer Garth Brooks talks about his love for the song and about performing it onstage with McLean. American Pie” was recently chosen by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Recording Registry.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Driverless Cars 33 mins – “The first pedestrian killed by a car in the Western Hemisphere was on New York’s Upper West Side in 1899. One newspaper warned that “the automobile has tasted blood.” Today, driverless cars present their own mix of technological promise and potential danger. Can the reaction to that 1899 pedestrian tragedy help us navigate current arguments about safety, blame, commerce, and public space?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electrical Therapies 35 mins – “We’ve used electricity to treat our brains for thousands of years, from placing electric fish on our heads to cure migraines to using electroconvulsive therapy to alleviate depression. But over time, our focus has shifted from restoring health to augmenting our abilities. Should we be wearing battery-powered caps to improve our concentration or implanting electricity-emitting devices to expand our thinking capacity? Guests include Bryan Johnson, CEO of Kernel.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Amendment and the Press 49 mins – “This week Dahlia Lithwick looks at freedom of the press through the lens of legal scholarship. Lithwick is joined by professor Lisa Sun of Brigham Young University’s J. Reuben Clark Law School and RonNell Andersen Jones, the Lee E. Teitelbaum chair and professor of law at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law. Their article “Enemy Construction and the Press” was published in the Arizona State Law Journal last year.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety P1 30 mins – “Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 1.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Safety P2 21 mins – “Pulitzer Priz​e–winning journalist Deborah Blum talks about her book The Poison Squad: One Chemist’s Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the 20th Century, Part 2.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fourteenth Amendment 12 mins – “There’s a clause in the 14th Amendment that people wanting to change it continue to come back to: “and subject to the jurisdiction thereof.” Professor Garrett Epps of the Atlantic joins us to explain why it’s absurd for Trump to think he can end birthright citizenship with an executive order —and also why it’s not absurd to talk about him wanting to change it.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fracking Industry 45 mins – “On this week’s episode, Emily Peck, Felix Salmon, Anna Szymanski, and Bethany McLean discuss: Looking Back, or Around, at the Crisis; Permian Oil Auction Gets Record $1 Billion as Bidding Soars; Saudi America by Bethany McLean; All The Devils Are Here by Bethany McLean and Joe Nocera; Shaky Ground: The Strange Saga of the U.S. Mortgage Giants by Bethany McLean; The Smartest Guys in the Room by Bethany McLeanAt the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geriatric Care for Orientals 54 mins – When we imagine old age, we tend to picture — and fear — mental decline, physical breakdown, and loss of independence. This week, Piya speaks with people facing additional challenges in the process of getting older… just because of who they are.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Google and Amazon Operations 44 mins – “On today’s show, host Will Oremus will talk about the employee uprising at Google and the changes that it and other tech companies have made to their sexual harassment policies in response. Joining him is Caroline O’Donovan, senior technology reporter for BuzzFeed News, who was there to cover the employee walkouts in person and has continued to report on the fallout. And then, a story that has been making headlines for months and finally reached its culmination this week with a big announcement. That would be Amazon’s HQ2 contest—or maybe now it’s HQ2.5, or HQ2 and 3, HQ2a and HQ2b. Whatever you call it, we’ll talk about the company’s decision to open not one but two new headquarters. One will be in Arlington, Virginia, just outside D.C. And the other in Long Island City, just across the East River from Manhattan. That, of course, prompted an outcry from critics around the country, not to mention all the cities that weren’t chosen. Here to help Will make sense of all this will be Tim Bartik, a senior economist at the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research. He’s done some fascinating research on the incentives that cities offer to companies to try to get them to locate there—and whether it really pays off for their residents in the long run.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gravity Storage 100 mins – “With power generation in the grid becoming more diverse and decentralized, energy storage is becoming more and more important. Eduard Heindl‘s gravity storage is an approach to storing electrical energy as potential energy by lifting huge masses cut out of the ground. While this sounds crazy, there are lots of reasons why this makes sense. In the episode we discuss then need, the general approach, the construction process and some of the engineering challenges. We also look at the innovation process, the path from the idea to something that is ready to be built.” At the link right-click “Download MP3 File directly” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hate Control 55 mins – “From strident political divides, to protesting other people at rallies, to numerous stories of harassment and assault…it feels like hate is all around us today. This week, Piya speaks with haters and their targets, and asks: How do you cut through hate?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas 54 mins – “This week: grab a hot cocoa, cuddle up under a blanket and have a listen to these warm and cosy stories for the holidays. Featuring: Soul Music, The Allusionist, The Nod, Every Little Thing, Only Human and The Feast.” At the link find the title, Comforting Podcasts to Warm Up Your Holiday, right-click Download Comforting Podcasts to Warm Up Your Holiday” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Failure 21 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 3: 2 August 2018. Associate Professor John Atherton is Director of Cardiology at Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital. He discusses updated guidelines for the management of heart failure, with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

HIV Cure 26 mins – “A man known as the “London Patient” has seemingly been “cured” after receiving a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. It’s only the second time in history a procedure like this has been executed successfully.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

HIV Trends 55 mins – “This week, Piya asks Canadians who have HIV what’s changed about life with the virus in the 30 years since the first World AIDS Day in 1988.” At the link find the title, “#93: World AIDS Day Turns 30,” right-click “Download #93: World AIDS Day Turns 30and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen 50 mins – “In this Thanksgiving bonus episode, Working takes a detour from MOMA to visit one of New York City’s biggest emergency food programs, Holy Apostles Soup Kitchen. Jordan talks to Michael Ottley, the director of operations of the program about tracking down turkeys for Thanksgiving, feeding 1,000 people a day, and how he had to convince Yelp to take down a rave review that was sending hordes of tourists to their kitchen for free meals.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Care 14 mins – “Vol 209, Issue 5: 3 September 2018. Dr Andrew Davies is the founder and Medical Director of Homeless Healthcare, servicing the medical needs of Perth’s homeless population. He talks with MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Huawei Canadian Arrest Impact 22 mins – “The tone here is that this is an an innocent woman. So why would you treat her like a criminal? And the idea is, if you have handcuffed someone you have presumed their guilt,” says Nathan VanderKlippe, the Globe and Mail’s Asia correspondent. Tensions between Canada and China are high after the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou and the subsequent detention of former Canadian diplomat Michael Kovrig. Today on Front Burner, Nathan explains China’s side of the diplomatic dispute and breaks down how this story is playing out in Beijing.” At the link find the title, How the Huawei arrest is playing out in China,” right-click “Download How the Huawei arrest is playing out in Chinaand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei CFO Arrest 22 mins“It’s incredibly hard to overstate the significance of this arrest.” CBC’s economics reporter Peter Armstrong breaks down why Canada’s arrest of Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou for extradition to the U.S. is such a big deal.” At the link find the title, “Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFO,” right-click “Download Spying, industrial espionage and the arrest of Huawei’s CFOand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infrastructure Funding 21 mins – “Both policy makers and investors are supporting the increased use of private funds to finance new and renewed public infrastructure. This sounds like a good idea, but is it realistic? How do these public private partnerships, called P3s, work? What are their advantages and risks? To teach us more about P3s, we talk with David Pennington, managing director at BMO Capital Markets, who guides both public agencies and private investors on the path to P3s for infrastructure.” At the link find the title, “Private Financing for Public Infrastructure,Posted November 26, 2018,” right-click “Listen to this episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IRS Investigations Decline 18 mins – “Budget cuts have crippled the IRS, allowing tax cheats to run rampant. ProPublica’s Jesse Eisinger says the agency’s ability to pursue criminal cases is in collapse because of budget cuts and the fact that the agency still has the same number of auditors it had in 1953. So who benefits from this? And why does it matter?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kavanaugh Confirmation Impact 56 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick talks with Sen. Jeff Merkley of Oregon about the “deep wounds” in the Senate following Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. And she’s joined by Vox’s Matthew Yglesias, who brings his nihilism about the institution of the Supreme Court to the show.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Latino Voters 37 mins – “León Krauze talks with Roberto Suro, professor of public policy and journalism at the University of Southern California, about the much-buzzed-about Latino vote and the 2018 midterms. And John Di Domenico returns with more tweets.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Farmer 46 mins – “In this episode, Jordan goes back to Green Dragon in Denver to talk with Ryan Milligan, the company’s co-owner and head of cultivation. He quickly learns that the hardest part of farming marijuana definitely isn’t growing the plant.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Lawyer 46 mins – “Marshall Custer wasn’t planning on going into the marijuana industry after he graduated from law school. But as he tells host Jordan Weissmann in this episode, it’s turned out to be a booming business. You just have to be a little careful about knowing exactly who your clients are.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Liaison Officer 29 mins – “As it turns out, doing business in an industry that only recently became (semi)legal involves a lot of red tape—and messing up even a small bit of paperwork can be a disaster that might get a marijuana dispensary shut down or fined. That’s why compliance specialists like Katelin Edwards, of Terrapin Care Station, are some of the most important workers in the world of cannabis, even if you don’t hear much about them. Jordan talks to Katelin about the pressure of making sure the dispensary hews to every rule and regulation, as well as her less nerve-wracking duties as community liaison, supporting local charities and showing that yes, even a “weed company” can be a positive influence on the community.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Lobbyist 44 mins – “In the final episode of Working With Weed, Jordan talks to ​Peter Marcus, who is the communications director and head of political outreach for Terrapin Care Station in Boulder, Colorado. Like most positions in this newly legalized industry, lobbying for the interests of cannabis businesses means​ working without a roadmap. But for someone like Peter, that’s what makes things interesting. Whether he’s working to pass an unprecedented public cannabis consumption bill or unexpectedly explaining to a room full of anti-weed activists that no, everyone in the cannabis industry is ​not​ secretly in the mob, things are never run-of-the-mill for him.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Midterm Election Discussion 44 mins – “The 2018 midterm elections are the most important elections of our lifetimes … at least since the previous election. It’s a topic discussed in this week’s Political Gabfest podcast, which is hosted by Emily Bazelon, David Plotz, and John Dickerson. Special guest David Axelrod, former chief strategist for Barack Obama, dropped by to discuss the intersections of politics and violence and also Trump’s attempts to steer the election coverage leading up to the midterms.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Museum Stuff 69 mins – “This Thanksgiving week BackStory is all about stuffing and being stuffed. We’ll find out about the father of American natural history dioramas, talk to a man with a condor in his freezer, discover how a mischievous raven connects Edgar Allan Poe to Charles Dickens and unravel the extraordinary story of the man who proposed stuffing the Founding Fathers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Parent-Child Separation 55 mins -”North Americans were shocked when they discovered thousands of kids were divided from their families as part of the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” immigration policy earlier this year. This week, Piya delves into different ways parent-child separation happens in the name of immigration enforcement here in Canada, with people who have directly experienced it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Parkinson Pandemic 61 mins – “The number of people with Parkinson’s in the world has doubled since 1990 and will double again by 2040, to nearly 13 million. “If you’re having an exponential rise in a condition throughout the world, that’s called a pandemic, and we haven’t addressed it as such,” says Ray Dorsey, MD, MBA, of the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. In our latest podcast Dorsey speaks with MJFF Contributing Editor Dave Iverson about the rise in Parkinson’s and strategies to prevent its onset and address gaps in care. Dorsey looks to actions from the HIV/AIDS community in the 1980s that changed the trajectory of that disease. “What led that advance wasn’t great infectious disease doctors and it wasn’t great science, although those were all important. It was the community that drove change,” he says.” At the link right-click “Download Audio File” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parolee Stories 54 mins – “Cliff Strong still wears his clothes to bed — a habit of having spent decades behind bars and never knowing who might be there when the cell doors open.  He’s been out on parole for nearly two years and currently lives at Haley House, a unique halfway house in Peterborough, Ont., run by the non-profit Peterborough Reintegration Services and funded mainly by Correctional Service Canada (CSC).  Haley House looks like your average bungalow, except its residents are mainly senior or palliative federal offenders on parole with housing conditions. Some are terminally ill and near the end of life, others have chronic diseases or trouble with mobility.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Political Divides 54 mins – “We have more ways than ever to communicate with each other. Yet even with all our discourse, it seems we’re more divided than ever too, entrenched in camps by our politics, identities, abilities and values. This week, meet people who stepped over the line as Piya asks: What can you learn from crossing divides?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Prochlorococcus Value 17 mins – “Oceanographer Penny Chisholm introduces us to an amazing little being: Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic species on the planet. A marine microbe that has existed for millions of years, Prochlorococcus wasn’t discovered until the mid-1980s — but its ancient genetic code may hold clues to how we can reduce our dependence on fossil fuels.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

School Shootings 15 mins – “After the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, we saw a group of students speed through the stages of grief and go directly to action. One year later, have they made any lasting changes to the gun control debate?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sepsis Treatment 45 mins – “You have probably treated someone with an infection and likely even with someone with SIRS criteria at some point in your career.  At what point does a simple infection become concerning to the point that you should call for a teleconsult? When does it become emergent or life threatening, demanding intervention and treatment? How can you prevent an infection from getting to that point? Once it becomes systemic how can you best manage a patient that meets SIRS criteria? When can you send a guy back to his room and when should you keep a close eye on him so that he doesn’t suddenly crash and die after discharge? At what point does sepsis turn into septic shock and become a life threatening emergency? In this episode Dennis moderates an interesting discussion on recognition and management of sepsis in Prolonged Field Care.  We have Doug and Jaybon from the ICU, Jay from the ER perspective along with Paul providing some questions and insight on prehospital and evacuation considerations.  This is a followup to Doc Jabon Ellis’ previous sepsis video podcast so if you want to “pre-read” listen to that first.  If you just want to listen to this one and still have some questions, go back and watch that one… a coupe times.  I feel like these 2 episodes will help make you a better medic who will be able to accurately place a patient on the SIRS/SEPSIS spectrum and apply appropriate treatments before we get to life threatening septic shock or death.” At the link right-click “Click here to download the episode now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 54 mins – “It was one year ago this month that the hashtag #MeToo took off, motivating victims of sexual harassment and assault to go public about their experiences. This week, Piya speaks with people about how it has, or has not, changed their own lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Suicide P1 48 mins – “We are rejoined by Drew Pinsky to discuss philosophical, psychological, and sociological readings on suicide. Is suicide ever morally permissible? If it’s a symptom of mental illness rather than a chosen behavior, is it even appropriate to morally evaluate it? Last time Drew joined us, he helped us add clinical depth to an area that we’d already talked about philosophically. For suicide, while Drew has dealt with hundreds of suicidal patients, we only had one previous episode for him to bring his expertise to bear on: #4 on Camus’s “The Myth of Sisyphus” (1942). We reread this short version to reflect on the relationship between suicide and the meaning of life. For the rest, we tried to read widely from history:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Suicide P2 55 mins – “More on philosophical and psychological interpretations of and judgments about suicide with guest Drew Pinsky. Is suicide an epidemic or a choice? Could it be both? Socrates didn’t fear death and inspired Stoics and others to see suicide in some circumstances as brave. Or is it always cowardly? Does meaninglessness motivate suicide? If so, why should it? Listen to part one first or get the Citizen Edition, which will also get you access to the follow-up discussion, where Mark and Wes get more into Durkheim and talk about all the various types of explanation at work here: sociological, psychotherapeutic, experimental, evolutionary, etc.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tick-induced Allergies 26 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 7: 16 April 2018. Associate Professor Sheryl van Nunen is director of the Tick-induced Allergies Research and Awareness Centre in Sydney. She discusses tick anaphylaxis and mammalian meat allergy. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Top Canadian Stories of 2018 55 mins – “The media may move on… but for the people behind the headlines, the story continues. This week, Piya speaks with people affected by some of the year’s top news stories of 2018 to find out what their lives are like after trending.” At the link find the title,”1213 #95: See Ya, 2018,” right-click “Download #95: See Ya, 2018and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Toronto Van Killings 54 mins – “When a man in a van went barrelling into pedestrians in Toronto’s north end on April 23, people across the city and country were shocked. The attack left 10 people dead and injured 16 more. In the five months since this tragic event, Canadians have largely returned to the routine of daily life. But as those directly affected by the attack tell Out in the Open host Piya Chattopadhyay, their lives changed forever that day. A survivor, a witness and a victim’s family are now struggling to adapt to their unique new realities. Meanwhile, a former politician and a sitting mayor grapple with big decisions about how to act in tragedy’s aftermath, and how those choices could affect the future.” At the link you can listen to two parts, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Transgender Child Care 21 mins – “Vol 208, Issue 11: 18 June 2018. Associate Professor Michelle Telfer is Director of the Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Gender Service. She talks about the new Australian standards of care for trans and gender diverse children and adolescents. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File As” to get the podcast.

Weaponization of Social Media 42 mins – “Virginia Heffernan talks to Peter Singer, co-author of the book “LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media,” about how Trump began using social media to rebrand himself into political life, Mike Flynn’s Twitter habits, conspiracy theorists, and why it’s tough to disconnect (even though we know better).” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

White House Press Corps 30 mins – “On this week’s episode of my podcast, I Have to Ask, I spoke to Maggie Haberman, a White House correspondent for the New York Times and an analyst at CNN. She previously worked at the New York Post and Politico, has been at the Times since 2015, and this year was part of the team that won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the Russia story. (Full disclosure: I have known Haberman for several years and occasionally discuss politics with her; we spoke once before on the podcast, last year.) Below is an edited excerpt from the show. In it, we talk about how covering Trump has changed over the past couple of years, why the White House is so scared of the Michael Cohen investigation, and the dangers of journalists spending too much time on Twitter.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yemeni Children 20 mins – “Eric Nagourney, an international desk editor for the New York Times, explains the paper’s decision to publish harrowing photographs of malnourished Yemeni children. And Fatima Alasrar, a Yemeni and a senior analyst for the Arabia Foundation, explains why she thinks assigning blame for Yemen’s famine is complicated.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

Advertisements

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.