Mining Digest 391 – May 17, 2019: Aging Successfully, American Leadership Declines, Ancient Grain, Andrew McCabe Interview, Artificial Intelligence, Asian Ascendancy, Better Building Challenge, Blockchain and Honesty, Botswana, California Workforce, Calorie Death, Cancer Tests, Capital Punishment Technique, Carbon Neutral California, Climate Change Solutions, Climate Restoration, Climate Warming Questions, Decriminalizing Sex Work, Electronic Deleterious Effects, End of Life Care, End of the World, Facebook Catastrophe, Farming to Save Earth, Federal Reserve Politics, Female Bravery, Food Fitness, Food Shortages, Hearing Loss Impact, Heart Muscle Regeneration, Home Care, Homeless in San Francisco, Influenza Vaccines, Journalism Business Problems, Lead in NJ Water, Longevity Explorer, Lynching in Alabama, Marshall Plan Discussion, MASH Actors, Medicare Primer, Parkinson’s Treatment, Poaching, Productivity, Public Defender, Refugee Help, Rehabilitate Prisoners, Robot Homicide, Robots in Stores, Shanghai

Exercise your ears: the 86 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 801 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aging Research 67 mins – “In How to Live Forever, Encore.org founder and CEO Marc Freedman tells the story of his thirty-year quest to answer some of contemporary life’s most urgent questions: With so many living so much longer, what is the meaning of the increasing years beyond 50? How can a society with more older people than younger ones thrive? How do we find happiness when we know life is long and time is short?  In his new book, Freedman finds insights by exploring purpose and generativity, digging into the drive for longevity and the perils of age segregation, and talking to social innovators across the globe bringing the generations together for mutual benefit. He finds wisdom in stories from young and old, featuring ordinary people and icons such as jazz great Clark Terry and basketball legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.   But the answers also come from stories of Freedman’s own mentors—a sawmill worker turned surrogate grandparent, a university administrator who served as Einstein’s driver, a cabinet secretary who won the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and the gym teacher who was Freedman’s father. You can read more about Freedman views on the power of intergenerational relationships hereHow to Live Forever is a deeply personal call to find fulfillment and happiness in our longer lives by connecting with the next generation and forging a legacy of love that lives beyond us. Freedman will discuss his new book at the beautiful Buck Institute, an organization dedicated to helping people live better longer. It is a special event you won’t want to miss.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Aging Successfully 62 mins – “BS 154 is an interview with Dr. Alan Castel, author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. In the past we have discussed how our brain changes as we age, but it turns out successful aging requires more than “good genes.” Our attitudes and our behaviors have a huge impact. More importantly, it is never too early to begin preparing for successful aging.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Withdrawal from Leadership 70 mins – “The United States was once the hope of the world, a beacon of freedom and the defender of liberal democracy. Nations and peoples on all continents looked to America to stand up for the values that created the western world and to oppose autocracy and repression. Even when America did not live up to its ideals, it still recognized their importance at home and abroad. But as Bernard-Henri Lévy lays bare in his powerful and disturbing analysis of the world today, America is retreating from its traditional leadership role, and in its place have come five ambitious powers, former empires eager to assert their primacy and influence. Lévy shows how these five powers―Russia, China, Turkey, Iran and Sunni radical Islamism―are taking steps to undermine the liberal values that have been a hallmark of western civilization. Please join us for a special talk with Bernard-Henri Lévy, one of the world’s leading intellectuals.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

American Leadership Declines 61 mins – “Authors Julio Moreno and Thomas O’Keefe debate the current state of U.S. hegemony in Latin America and the Caribbean, a region where the United States first made its appearance as a world power in the late 19th century. In his new book, Bush II, Obama, and the Decline of U.S. Hegemony in the Western Hemisphere, O’Keefe assets that U.S. economic dominance and leadership in the Americas has been in noticeable decline since the start of the 21st century. In his recent co-authored book, Beyond the Eagle’s Shadow, Moreno posits that even at its height during the Cold War, U.S. power and influence in the Western Hemisphere was often contested and never complete.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Ancient Grain 58 mins – “Grain by Grain tells the story of Bob Quinn, an organic farmer from Big Sandy, Montana. Quinn was raised with traditional farming methods but learned that organic farming could create better, healthier food and bring economic opportunity to his small town. He is the founder of the international company Kamut International and the leader in reviving that ancient grain. Ultimately, Quinn’s story shows the way to a better future for American agriculture, proving that rural America can lead sustainability.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Andrew McCabe Interview 64 mins – “On March 16, 2018, just 26 hours before his scheduled retirement, FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe was fired by then Attorney General Jeff Sessions. President Donald Trump celebrated on Twitter, saying: “Andrew McCabe FIRED, a great day for the hard working men and women of the FBI – A great day for Democracy.” Now McCabe is telling his side of one of the most intriguing political episodes of 2018. In The Threat: How the FBI Protects America in the Age of Terror and Trump, Andrew G. McCabe offers a dramatic and candid account of his career and an impassioned defense of the FBI’s agents and of the institution’s integrity and independence in protecting America and upholding our Constitution…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Andrew Wheeler 52 mins – “Greg Dalton sits down for a rare interview with newly-confirmed U.S. EPA Chief Andrew Wheeler on cars, coal, and climate. Mary Nichols, Chair of the California Air Resources Board, responds to Wheeler’s position on vehicle standards, and discusses her agency’s role leading a group of states in contesting the Trump administration’s revised auto emissions rules. Also featuring Albert Cheung of Bloomberg New Energy Finance on the future of personal mobility, and Helen Clarkson of The Climate Group on getting some of the world’s biggest companies to commit to 100% renewable energy.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Artificial Intelligence 62 mins – “BS 155 is an interview with neuroscientist Paul Middlebrooks, host of the Brain-Inspired podcast. We explore the main theme of his show, which is the intersection between neuroscience and artificial intelligence (AI). We explore topics such as Deep Learning and the challenges of interdisciplinary science. Neural nets and other forms of AI may be inspired by real neurons, but they are actually very different. On the other hand the scientists working AI have developed techniques for dealing with large amounts of data. These techniques have potential for dealing with the large amounts of data now being generated in neuroscience. One large challenge is that both fields have their own jargon and it is not easy to be competent in both fields. That is why I appreciate Paul Middlebrooks effort to make Artificial Intelligence more accessible for those of us who are interested in neuroscience.” At the link right-click “FREE: audio mp3 (click to stream, right click to download)and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asian Ascendancy 67 mins – “Parag Khanna says there is no more important region of the world for us to better understand than Asia, and thus, we cannot afford to keep getting Asia so wrong. He says Asia’s complexity has led to common misdiagnoses, namely that western thinking on Asia conflates the entire region with China, predicts imminent World War III around every corner and regularly forecasts debt-driven collapse for the region’s major economies. Khanna says that, in reality, the region is experiencing a confident new wave of growth led by younger societies from India to the Philippines, that nationalist leaders have put aside territorial disputes in favor of integration, and today’s infrastructure investments are the platform for the next generation of digital innovation. Khanna asserts that in the 19th century, the world was Europeanized; in the 20th century, it was Americanized; and now, in the 21st century, the world is being Asianized. He says far greater than just China, the new Asian system taking shape is a multi-civilizational order spanning from Saudi Arabia to Japan, Russia to Australia, Turkey to Indonesia—linking five billion people through trade, finance, infrastructure and diplomatic networks that together represent 40 percent of global GDP. Khanna says Asia is rapidly returning to the centuries-old patterns of commerce, conflict and cultural exchange that thrived long before European colonialism and American dominance. He will detail his view that as Asia determines its own future, it will determine ours as well…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Better Building Challenge 58 mins – “On March 26, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Better Buildings Challenge visited Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)’s Showcase Project Santee Education Complex, to recognize LAUSD for the energy productivity advances made in its schools. Better Buildings Partner LAUSD opened the 338,000-square-foot Santee Education Complex in July 2005 as the first new four-year high school for the Los Angeles Unified School District in more than 35 years. Santee is on schedule to achieve 30% annual energy savings this year. As a result of these upgrades, the school expects to achieve a 23% annual cost savings, equal to more than $195,000 yearly. Tune in as we speak with Maria T. Vargas, Director of the Better Buildings Challenge at the Department of Energy, and Christos Chrysiliou, Director of Architectural & Engineering Services at LAUSD.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain and Honesty 12 mins – “From big banks to diamond dealers, companies are experimenting with blockchain, an open and distributed ledger, to make transactions more transparent and trustworthy. Could this technology mean the end of cooked books?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Botswana 62 mins – “From the Okavango Delta to the Central Kalahari Game Reserve, Botswana draws in wildlife and nature lovers from around the world. It also has one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies and a highly advanced banking system. It has had a democratic government for over 50 years. Charles Frankel and Graham Johansson discuss what draws people to Botswana and the factors that contribute to the country’s success relative to the rest of Africa.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

California Employment Issues 69 minsCalifornia’s powerhouse economy, the fifth largest in the world, relies on a skilled, healthy and available workforce. Yet employers say that job candidates often lack the skills they need—and they cannot grow as a result. Meanwhile, many workers make low wages that are stagnant, despite ever higher living costs. Often workers lack access to quality job training and are increasingly shut out of California’s middle class. As one of the state’s largest philanthropic funders, with $2.3 billion in assets and annual grantmaking of nearly $100 million, The James Irvine Foundation envisions a California where all low-income workers have the power to advance economically. The foundation recently commissioned a survey of California workers, finding that nearly half are struggling with poverty.  Join business and community leaders for a discussion of the California workforce and how to increase the skills, qualifications and well-being of employees in ways to benefit individuals, their families, their employers and the California economy—ultimately restoring the state’s vibrant middle class.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

California Workforce 69 mins – “California’s powerhouse economy, the fifth largest in the world, relies on a skilled, healthy and available workforce. Yet employers say that job candidates often lack the skills they need—and they cannot grow as a result. Meanwhile, many workers make low wages that are stagnant, despite ever higher living costs. Often workers lack access to quality job training and are increasingly shut out of California’s middle class. As one of the state’s largest philanthropic funders, with $2.3 billion in assets and annual grantmaking of nearly $100 million, The James Irvine Foundation envisions a California where all low-income workers have the power to advance economically. The foundation recently commissioned a survey of California workers, finding that nearly half are struggling with poverty.  Join business and community leaders for a discussion of the California workforce and how to increase the skills, qualifications and well-being of employees in ways to benefit individuals, their families, their employers and the California economy—ultimately restoring the state’s vibrant middle class.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Calorie Death 47 mins – “Not all calories are the same, so why are we still using them as the measure for nutrition?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Canadian View of Britain 28 mins – “Neil MacGregor visits different countries to talk to leading political, business and cultural figures to find out how they, as individuals and as members of their broader communities, see Britain. In Canada, Neil hears from French-Canadian film director, Denys Arcand; writer and Booker Prize nominee, Madeleine Thien; and Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs, Chrystia Freeland.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Cancer Tests 16 mins – “Associate Professor Judy Kirk is an oncologist and Head of the Familial Cancer Service at Westmead Hospital in Sydney. She discusses genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancers, and issues a caution for physicians ordering them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Capital Punishment Technique 20 mins – “After finding out about a distant forebear’s execution, J Robert Sneyd acted as an expert witness in a US court to try to prevent the use of a new drug for lethal injection, appalled that untrained government workers were using lifesaving drugs to kill ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Carbon Neutral California 51 mins – “Just 10 years ago, an entire state running on 100 percent renewable electricity was considered fanciful. But this dreamy vision became reality when, with the backing of big utilities, California committed to 100 percent use of zero-carbon electricity by 2045. The stakes were raised even higher with a statewide pledge to go carbon neutral by 2045. What will it take for California to achieve such a feat? What are the impacts on the fuel and transportation industries? Will Governor Gavin Newsom embrace climate initiatives started by former Governor Jerry Brown? Join us for a discussion on California’s surprise gambit to take the world’s fifth largest economy to net zero with John Hofmeister, former president of Shell Oil; Bob Holycross, global director of Sustainability and Vehicle Environmental Matters at Ford Motor Company; and Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Climate Change 49 mins – “Join us in presenting Katharine Hayhoe with the eighth annual Stephen Schneider award. Established in honor of Stephen Henry Schneider, one of the founding fathers of climatology who died suddenly in 2010, the $15,000 award recognizes a natural or social scientist who has made extraordinary scientific contributions and communicated that knowledge to a broad public in a clear and compelling fashion. “For many years, Katharine Hayhoe has been a unique voice in the climate communication world. With her patience, her empathy and her abiding Christian faith, she has been able to reach audiences that other climate scientists have not been able to reach,” says juror Naomi Oreskes, professor of the history of science at Harvard University. Hayhoe will be joined by fellow scientist Noah Diffenbaugh, professor and senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University. They will be in conversation on communicating climate change in a transparent, engaging and accessible manner.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Climate Change Solutions 50 mins – “When it comes to cutting emissions, there are many paths to success. Sweden, France, South Korea and Ontario have all taken steps to replace fossil fuels with nuclear, hydro and renewable energy. Norway has ambitions to swap its dependence on oil for clean energy in relatively short order. China is expanding electric car and battery production in an effort to stake out leadership in 21st century industries. But the absence of U.S. climate leadership is causing heads of state to ease off their goals. In France, violent protests against higher diesel taxes are casting a shadow over efforts to raise the price of fossil fuels to combat climate change. Join us for a discussion about who’s moving ahead and who’s moving backward in the transition to a clean energy economy.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Climate Philanthropy 49 mins -”Donor Power: The Influence of Climate Philanthropy” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Restoration 49 mins – “Peter Fiekowsky founded Healthy Climate Alliance with the intention of restoring the climate to its preindustrial climate health. He hopes to accelerate an emerging array of innovations to reduce the level of carbon in the atmosphere and to preserve and rebuild Arctic ice. While reducing emissions is important, he promotes climate restoration as both possible and essential—a strategic business strategy. The Silicon Valley tech entrepreneur and physicist runs the Healthy Climate Alliance along with his daughter Erica Dodds, executive director. They will point to profit-making enterprises that are sequestering carbon into building materials and pragmatic other land- and ocean-based technologies for restoring our climate. They will highlight and share with the audience an understanding of how companies and individuals can take strides to implement change for a healthier climate, their mission to restore the climate by reducing atmospheric CO2 levels to 300 parts per million and, thus, “giving our children a healthy climate like our grandparents had.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Climate Warming Questions 49 mins – “The world is warming, so why is the Midwest suffering record cold temperatures? How is global warming impacting oceans? What’s the connection between wildfires and climate change? Climate science is complex, vast and often difficult to understand. We’ll explain the fundamental basics you’ll need to answer friends and family who ask about climate change—or question if it’s even happening. Join us for climate science 101 with climate communications guru David Fenton and science experts Ben Santer and Katharine Mach, who will debunk common myths that arise from distortions of accepted science.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Czechoslovakia 67 mins – “When Norman Eisen moved into the U.S. ambassador’s residence in Prague and returned to the land his mother had fled after the Holocaust, he was startled to discover swastikas hidden beneath the furniture in his new home. These symbols of Nazi Germany were remnants of the residence’s forgotten history, and evidence that we never live far from the past. Looking into the building’s history, Eisen discovered a remarkable story stretching back over 100 years. In his new book, The Last Palace, Eisen tells a captivating tale of the upheavals that transformed Europe over the past century and of four remarkable people who have called the ambassador’s residence home. Otto Petschek, an optimistic Jewish financial baron who built the palace, and Shirley Temple Black, famed child star and U.S. ambassador, both lived there. Eisen dives into the personal and political history that shaped both a country and a continent. Join us for a conversation about history, diplomacy and the triumph of liberal democracy in the face of tragedy and dictatorship.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Decriminalizing Sex Work 59 mins – “…James Burch is St. James Infirmary’s policy and advocacy officer. He began his work at the Southern Center for Human Rights where he investigated human rights conditions in Georgia and Alabama’s prisons, jails, and court systems. He studied civil rights law at the Georgetown University Law Center. Burch clerked briefly at the ACLU of Southern California before moving to the Bay Area. In the Bay, Burch organized with the Frisco 500 before joining APTP and assuming the role of policy coordinator. He joined St. James Infirmary in January of 2019. Toni Newman is the executive director of St. James Infirmary in San Francisco. St. James Infirmary is a peer-based occupational health and safety clinic located in San Francisco, CA, offering free, compassionate, and non-judgmental health care and social services for former and current sex industry workers. Newman is a 1985 graduate of Wake Forest University and current candidate for her Juris of Doctorate (JD). Additionally, she is a best selling author, noted for I Rise—The Transformation of Toni Newman, released in 2011…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Electronics Deleterious Effects 51 mins – “What does it take to get people off their phones and into the outdoors? Research has shown the deleterious effects of electronics on weight, sleep and cognitive development in children, who in 2018 spent nearly four hours a day glued to their screens. Other barriers such as income and proximity to nature make access to the outdoors extremely challenging for some families. Meanwhile, doctors have started prescribing hikes over medications, and terms such as “forest schools” and “unstructured playtime” are new buzzwords. When it comes to climate, an understanding and appreciation of the natural world is vital to comprehending the dramatic changes happening to our planet. So how do we encourage outdoor curiosity and conservation in a generation raised on screen time? Can phones and video games help facilitate engagement with nature?” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Empathy 39 mins – “Perhaps you’ve had experiences at work or your community where, while helping someone in crisis, you found yourself overextended. Or maybe you’ve seen an opportunity to help someone in the past and held back because it felt to risky or dangerous. How do you typically engage in relationships? How does your engagement shift when you are in a professional role? How does a challenging situation or crisis impact how you engage? Sustaining empathy requires attention. Awareness of how you engage in challenging times can become your superpower. Come learn the empathy rising framework for showing up in challenging situations and leave with tips for sustaining yourself while on empathy adventures.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

End of Life Care 59 mins – “Growing up as an American-born daughter of immigrant parents, Dr. Sunita Puri always tried to live up to her parents’ expectations and the examples they set. While completing medical school at UCSF, a troubling issue seemed to arise. Between her mother’s experiences as an anesthesiologist and her own conversations with her family about their faith, the disconnect between the traditional medical objective of lengthening life at any cost and her family’s spiritual teachings became more and more apparent. It was this tension that ultimately drew her to palliative medicine, a practice that aims not to simply extend life, but to improve its quality, especially in patients living with fatal illnesses. In her new book, Dr. Puri recounts the most instructive—and often heart-wrenching—stories she has experienced in this line of medicine, intertwining them with the childhood memories of her family that have shaped who she is today. The lessons are not black and white but nuanced in ways that medicine often isn’t. When the only remaining treatment options have the possibility to extend life, but come with severe side effects, how does a physician have an honest conversation with the patient and their family about the “pros” and “cons” of their choices?…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

End of the World 56 mins – “The End of the World, in collaboration with HowStuffWorks, was one of the best new podcasts of 2018! The podcast is hosted by Josh Clark, co-host of the award-winning podcast Stuff You Should Know, and presented by iHeartMedia. On the show, Josh discusses the existential risks humankind faces and how new technology seeks to address them. He is joined by a number of experts across the podcast’s ten episodes, from astrobiologists to philosophers to economists and transhumanists. All ten episodes are available on Audible, iTunes, Spotify, and more. Clark’s compelling and insatiable curiosity will guide listeners through a dark debate around the astoundingly odd and unique nature of human intelligence and how that might either destroy or save the species. Tune in as we talk with Josh about what he has learned and his hopes for the future!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Facebook Catastrophe 66 mins – “If you had told Bay Area technology investor Roger McNamee even three years ago that he would soon be devoting himself to stopping Facebook from destroying our democracy, he would have howled with laughter. He had mentored many tech leaders in his illustrious career, but few things had made him prouder, or had been better for his own bottom line, than helping Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of the world’s largest social network. Still a large shareholder in Zuckerberg’s creation, McNamee had every good reason to stay on the sidelines as the dark side of Facebook came to light. But he couldn’t stay quiet. McNamee’s new book, Zucked, is about the outspoken investor’s efforts to come to terms with the serious damage Facebook was doing to our society. McNamee set out to try to change the massive social network and other tech companies that use design tools to addict and manipulate its users. With the election of Donald Trump, and the emergence of one horrific piece of news after another about the malign ends to which the Facebook platform has been put, McNamee has dedicated his energies to have people understand the threat of Facebook and other social networks. He will discuss what we can do to hold the companies responsible and to protect our public health and political order.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Fair Trade Certification 56 mins – “On December 21, 2018, we spoke with Dana Geffner, Executive Director of the Fair World Project, about Fair Trade issues for cocoa farmers. On today’s episode, we will focus on: what is happening in the fair trade movement today that is exciting; how fair trade is relevant in today’s current political climate and is connected directly to current issues such as immigration; and how to make educated purchasing decisions.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming to Save Earth 60 mins – “One of the best-kept secrets in combating the climate crisis and the loss of biodiversity and agricultural productivity is a return to an agriculture model that sustained people and the planet prior to the age of industrial agriculture. The answer to the future of farming is to look to the past. Beginning from the modern sustainable agricultural and slow food movement, California’s early pioneers in organic farming have redefined the meaning of sustainability. The new models for an earth-friendly, food-healthy system have drawn from the teachings of Rudolf Steiner—noted scientist, philosopher and founder of the Waldorf School. Interestingly, he was instrumental in helping European farmers combat the rapid decline in seed fertility, crop vitality and animal health on their farms. Join fourth-generation winemaker Paul Dolan, former chairman of the Wine Institute and former president of Fetzer Vineyards, who led a transformation that put the company at the forefront of organic viticulture and sustainable business. Today, besides growing and making biodynamic wines, Dolan is a leader in redefining the farming system, with a focus on regenerative agriculture and biodynamic farming.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Federal Reserve Board Politics 46 mins – “President Trump wants his allies Stephen Moore and Herman Cain to join the Federal Reserve. Are politics and monetary policy on a collision course?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Bravery 56 mins – “How many of us go crazy trying to do it all, and do it all perfectly? How many obsess over tiny errors and avoid taking on big opportunities or challenges for fear of failing or embarrassing ourselves? Why is failure, big or small, not seen as a viable option for so many of us? Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani’s popular TED Talk called for the need to teach bravery, not perfection, especially for women constantly finding themselves under enormous amounts of pressure to perform. In her new book, Brave, Not Perfect, Saujani asks us to rethink what our goals are supposed to look like and instead live life boldly, assuring us that it is more powerful to find something unexpected in the mistakes than it is to play it safe. Join us as Saujani offers stories from other brave women, shares best practices for making bravery the new standard for women across the country and details her own journey in getting there.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Food Fitness 59 mins – “This discussion about how to eat “The When Way” will not only present the science behind the optimal ways of eating based on your daily rhythms and changing circumstances but also offer easy-to-remember guidelines for how to adjust your diet to maximize the 24-hour cycle of life. Our speakers will explain why nutrition timing matters as well as what’s on the plate. The result: better health, weight loss and the ability to use food to prevent disease.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Food Shortages 58 mins – “10 BILLION – WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE?, a new film by Valentin Thurn, and Winner of the Social Justice Award for Documentary at the Santa Barbara Film Festival. In 2050, the population of the world is set to hit a staggering 10 billion. This is a huge increase on today’s figure of seven billion, and according to a range of experts and the food industry, it will contribute to serious food shortages. In his search for solutions to this acute problem, filmmaker, bestselling author and self-proclaimed “food fighter” Valentin Thurn travels the world in search of ecologically and economically responsible alternatives to the mass means by which most of our food is currently produced. Tune in as we talk with Valentin on this episode!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hearing Loss Impact 14 mins – “…there is a lot of other evidence that the use of hearing aids, or hearing, does mitigate against dementia, falls, and depression. We found in some of our studies of our Medicare supplemental population that hearing loss was a larger impact on quality of life than diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, any of the other common clinical conditions. Helen Keller, who was both blind and deaf said, “Blindness separates people from things, but hearing loss separates people from people.” At the link right-click “Download” (bottom of page) and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Heart Muscle Regeneration 15 mins – “The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the human body — a big factor in making heart failure the number one killer worldwide. What if we could help heart muscle regenerate after injury? Physician and scientist Chuck Murry shares his groundbreaking research into using stem cells to grow new heart cells — an exciting step towards realizing the awesome promise of stem cells as medicine.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Home Care 56 mins – “New technology is constantly being developed for home care. What solutions work best, and how can technology successfully enhance the very personal side of home care? We will explore how to find the right balance between using and not using technology with home care. This technology may allow your aging parents and loved ones to remain safely at home.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Homeless in San Francisco 56 mins – “Every night, more than 130,000 people go to sleep homeless in California. An estimated 25,000 of them are in the San Francisco Bay Area: sleeping on couches, in cars or sometimes in tents on the sidewalk. At this point, people from coast to coast know that the Bay Area is in the midst of a housing crisis. But what is the city doing to address the affordable housing and homelessness crisis? Come hear from some of the Bay Area’s leading experts on issues surrounding homelessness. From working on the service and legal sides to fighting for policy changes to having experienced homelessness themselves, our speakers will discuss the state of the crisis, how we got here and where we’re headed next.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Housing in San Francisco 51 mins – “For the average income earner, obtaining a comfortable place to live seems out of reach. Some people travel great distances to get to their jobs. Others live in a crowded household in order to afford the rent or mortgage. Building more housing seems to be the logical goal, but where and what type? Join the conversation with Kristy Wang from the San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR) and Laura Foote from YIMBY (Yes In My Back Yard), with Shelly Sutherland, a realtor at Compass, who will moderate the discussion.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Influenza Vaccines 16 mins – “Professor Kristine Macartney is Director of the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance. She talks about the two enhanced influenza vaccines now available for Australians over the age of 65 years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jerry Brown Interview 68 mins – “Join us for the first joint public appearance by the former governor and first lady since leaving office. Here’s a rare opportunity to hear their views on issues impacting the state, the United States and the world, in addition to learning about their unique relationship. Come for an engaging, unabashed and lively conversation, and bring your questions. Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown Jr. served four terms as California’s governor in addition to being the state’s attorney general and mayor of Oakland. He graduated from UC Berkeley and attended Yale Law School. His achievements include: eliminating the state’s multibillion dollar budget deficit, cutting the state’s unemployment rate to a record low, adding nearly three million new jobs, expanding health coverage, and enacting sweeping reforms in the areas of public safety, immigration, workers’ compensation, water, pension, education, housing and economic development. Under Brown, California also established nation-leading targets to protect the environment and fight climate change. Anne Gust Brown married Governor Brown in 2005 and served as unpaid special counsel to the governor. Gust Brown grew up in Michigan and graduated from Stanford University and the University of Michigan Law School. She previously served as general counsel and chief administrative officer at Gap Inc. and helped run a number of Governor Brown’s successful campaigns.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Journalism Business Problems 66 mins – “The news media is facing unprecedented crises: plummeting public trust and unrelenting attacks from the president of the United States. How do the “merchants of truth” navigate this new world? Jill Abramson worked as executive editor for The New York Times and offers an unparalleled view into the story of the news business, fighting for survival through a series of crises—first the digital revolution and then the president’s unprecedented war on the press. Abramson’s new book, Merchants of Truth, profiles four powerful news organizations as they grapple with upheaval: Buzzfeed and Vice, upstarts that captivated young audiences, and The New York Times and The Washington Post, two legacy papers that were slow to adapt to digital changes. Each struggled with crises in business, technology, resources and credibility.Abramson’s book focuses on the digital revolution and disruption of the news business, but the last sections of the book focus on fight for facts during a presidency whose war against journalists as “enemies of the people” has fueled public distrust of news sources. While the industry changes, the vital question remains: Can an informed press stand its ground?” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Lead in NJ Water 56 mins – “The levels of lead in Newark, New Jersey’s drinking water are some of the highest recently recorded by a large water system in the United States. Experts agree that there is no safe level of lead exposure. Pregnant women and children are most at risk: Even low lead levels are associated with serious, irreversible damage to developing brains and nervous systems. For years, the city has had the greatest number of lead-poisoned children in New Jersey. This likely stems from a variety of exposures to lead, including from contaminated tap water and other sources. Indeed, 2016 tests revealed 30 public schools with elevated water lead levels. Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), together with the Newark Education Workers Caucus, is fighting in court to ensure that the residents of Newark have access to safe, clean drinking water every time they turn on the tap.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Explorer 54 mins – “Richard Caro will describe the Longevity Explorers’ most recent explorations. The explorers are a unique sharing, evaluation and ideation community made up of older adults (in their 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s) and their friends, families and caregivers. The presentation will include promising products the explorers have tried, ideas the explorers have been discussing related to improving the quality of life for older adults and some ideas for products we wish someone would develop. The Longevity Explorers program is an initiative enabled by Tech-enhanced Life.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Lynching in Alabama 56 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy investigates the painful reality that succeeding in business is not always an advantage in America. In fact, if you were black in the Jim Crow South, it could get you killed. Elmore Bolling, a successful entrepreneur, was lynched in Lowndes County, Alabama in 1947 when his youngest daughter, Josephine Bolling McCall, was five years old. Over 70 years later, Bolling is now honored in the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, which opened in Montgomery last year. In her book, The Penalty for Success, McCall tells the story of her father’s murder and the impact it had—and still has—on her family and her community. She offers a revealing narrative that challenges us to rethink the reality of life for both blacks and whites in the rural South during Jim Crow, where whites used lynching to destroy competition from black business owners as part of a pattern of racial violence that terrorized African-Americans for generations and has yet to be adequately addressed in America.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

M*A*S*H Actors 68 mins – “M*A*S*H is the most beloved and one of the most watched TV shows of all time. It set viewing records that have never been broken and is ranked as one of the top 25 shows of all time. In this exclusive podcast, actors from this legendary show gather together for an uproarious and totally candid conversation about how they learned to connect with one another to create their special brand of entertainment on the screen and lifelong friendships off-camera. Join Alan Alda (“Capt.Benjamin Franklin “Hawkeye” Pierce”),Loretta Swit (“Maj. Margaret “Hot Lips” Houlihan”),Jamie Farr (“Sgt. Maxwell Q. “Max” Klinger),Mike Farrell (Capt. B. J. Hunnicutt), and Gary Burghoff (Cpl. Walter “Radar” O’Reilly) for this intimate gathering of your M*A*S*H pals. The gang invites you to share in the memories and the laughter. Mostly the laughter — after all this is the 4077th. This episode is sponsored by the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, please visit aldacenter.org/vivid for more details.” At the link find the title, “The Actors from M*A*S*H — On How M*A*S*H Changed Our Lives, 02/05/2019,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marshall Plan Discussion 61 mins – “Monday Night Philosophy features author Benn Steil, winner of the 2018 American Academy of Diplomacy Douglas Dillon Prize for best book. Steil will discuss the gripping history behind the Marshall Plan. In the wake of World War II, with Britain’s empire collapsing and Stalin’s on the rise, U.S. officials under new Secretary of State George C. Marshall set out to reconstruct Western Europe as a bulwark against Communist authoritarianism. Their massive, costly and ambitious undertaking would confront Europeans and Americans alike with a vision at odds with their history and self-conceptions. In the process, they would drive the creation of NATO, the European Union and a Western identity that continues to shape world events.  Focusing on the critical years 1947 to 1949, Steil’s account brings to life the Prague Coup, the Berlin Blockade, the division of Germany, and Stalin’s determination to crush the Marshall Plan and undermine American power in Europe. As Putin’s Russia is again rattling the world order, the tenuous balance of power and uncertain order of the late 1940s is as relevant as ever.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Medical AI 62 mins – “One of America’s top doctors reveals how artificial intelligence (AI) will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman to disastrous effect. The doctor–patient relationship—the heart of medicine—is broken: Doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound. In his latest book, Deep Medicine, Topol reveals how AI can help. AI has the potential to transform everything doctors do, from note-taking and medical scans to diagnosis and treatment, greatly cutting down the cost of medicine and reducing human mortality. By freeing physicians from the tasks that interfere with human connection, AI will create space for the real healing that takes place between a doctor who can listen and a patient who needs to be heard.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive. 

Medicare Primer 60 mins – “If you are approaching the Medicare qualifying age of 65 and Medicare seems like one big alphabetical maze to you, you are not alone. For most, a true understanding of how Medicare works, what options are best for you, and when or how to sign up is not clear at all. Learn the ABC and Ds of Medicare as well as the realities of what to expect and what not to expect. Here’s what every boomer needs to know before they turn 65.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Montreal Protocol 10 mins – “The Montreal Protocol proved that the world could come together and take action on climate change. Thirty years after the world’s most successful environmental treaty was signed, atmospheric scientist Sean Davis examines the world we avoided when we banned chlorofluorocarbons — and shares lessons we can carry forward to address the climate crisis in our time.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Operation Hope 67 mins – “John Hope Bryant is an entrepreneur, author, advisor and one of the nation’s most recognized empowerment leaders. He is the founder, chairman and CEO of Operation Hope and the Bryant Group Companies and The Promise Homes Company, the largest for-profit minority-controlled owners of institutional-quality, single-family residential rental homes in the U.S. He is also one of the top-selling African-American business authors in America. Along with Crown Prince Haakon of Norway and Professor Pekka Himanen of Finland, Bryant is also a co-founder of Global Dignity. Global Dignity is affiliated with the Forum of Young Global Leaders and the World Economic Forum. In his new book, The Memo, Bryant argues that true power in this world comes from economic independence, but too many people don’t have enough money left at the end of the month. His message is simple: The supermajority of people who live in poverty, whom Bryant calls the invisible class, as well as millions in the struggling middle class, haven’t gotten “the memo”—until now. Come for an engaging discussion on achieving financial literacy and approaching wealth with a completely new attitude … and about how the path to liberation is hiding in plain sight.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Parkinson’s Treatment 22 mins – “Simon Lewis is professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Sydney’s Brain and Mind Centre. He discusses new ways of approaching the treatment and management of Parkinson disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poaching 68 mins – “Catherine Semcer of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa. The conversation discusses how allowing limited hunting of big game such as elephants and using revenue from hunting licenses to reward local communities for habitat stewardship has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching. Semcer draws on her experience as former Chief Operating Officer of Humanitarian Operations Protecting Elephants and also discusses recent efforts to re-locate lions in Mozambique.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Political Issues 70 mins – “Join us as we discuss the biggest, most controversial and sometimes the surprising political issues with expert commentary by panelists who are smart, are civil and have a good sense of humor. Our panelists will provide informative and engaging commentary on political and other major news, and we’ll have audience discussion of the week’s events and our live news quiz!” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Productivity 66 mins – “Stressed at work but can’t find time to de-stress and meditate? Need to be creative but running into mind blocks? Sidetracked by trivia instead of getting work done? Stanford’s Leah Weiss, author of How We Work: Live Your Purpose, Reclaim Your Sanity, and Embrace the Daily Grind, will show us how to sidetrack anxiety and enter a creative state even if we’re not feeling like it. She will provide other practical examples as well.  During this interactive session, we will learn how to integrate useful tools derived from mindfulness into our actual workdays. Come learn what Stanford’s Graduate School of Business is teaching about how to incorporate evidence-based meditation and mindfulness practices directly into the workday, reaping the benefits of improved productivity, creativity and happiness without having to set aside a special time or place. Weiss’ class at Stanford usually has a long waitlist, so sign up for this session before it sells out!” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Public Defender 56 mins – “Join us as Michelle Meow brings her long-running daily radio show to The Commonwealth Club one day each week. Meet fascinating—and often controversial—people discussing important issues of interest to the LGBTQ community, and have your questions ready. This week’s guest is Manohar Raju. Raju is the newly appointed public defender for San Francisco. Before being chosen by Mayor London Breed to succeed the late Jeff Adachi, Raju worked in the public defender’s office for 11 years, some of which he spent as director of training and then as felony manager. Previously he worked at the Contra Costa Public Defender’s Office. Raju did his undergraduate studies at Columbia University and earned his Master’s in South Asian studies from the University of California Berkeley. He also attended UC Berkeley for law school. He is a founding member of Public Defenders for Racial Justice.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Refugee Help 61 mins -”The Middle East member-led forum presents a distinguished panel, including: Hassan El-Masri, a Palestinian who volunteers to help refugee artists throughout the world; Karaman Mamand, a Kurdish Iraqi educator and human rights activist; Karen Ferguson, executive director of the northern California branch of the International Rescue Committee, which provides comprehensive services for refugees whose lives are shattered by conflict and disaster; and Aisha Wahab, who was recently elected to the Hayward City Council and is one of the first Afghan-American officials elected in the United States. The panel will discuss how we can help refugees and welcome the stranger in the face of war, strife, indifference and travel bans.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Rehabilitated Prisoner 57 mins – “Chris Wilson offers a fresh perspective on our criminal justice system, on crucial issues of mass incarceration and on the importance of second chances. Growing up in Washington, D.C., Wilson was surrounded by violence and despair. He feared for his life as his family was shattered by trauma, his neighborhood was beset by drugs and his friends died one by one. One night when he was 17, Wilson was cornered by two men. He shot one of them, killing him. A year later, at 18, he was sentenced to life in prison with no hope of parole. Wilson writes, “I just got on this planet. I don’t even have a mustache yet. And my life is over. But his life wasn’t over. Behind bars, Wilson began reading, working out and learning languages. He even started a business. He wrote a list of things he intended to accomplish. He called it his master plan. He revised it regularly and followed it religiously. And, in his 30s, Wilson did the impossible: He convinced a judge to reduce his sentence. Six years later, he came out of jail determined to teach others about the selflessness, work ethic and professional skills that led to his second chance.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Robot Homicide 53 mins – “A couple of years ago a cute little robot was sent out to hitchhike, to prove how well humans and robots could get on. It was an exercise in trust, and it went very wrong. Hitchbot was found decapitated, slumped next to some bins in Philadelphia. The robot’s head has never been found. Neither has the “killer”. Robots are machines, they are tools to help humans. But we seem unable to stop anthropomorphising them, and manifesting the worst of ourselves onto these machines we make ourselves, and increasingly in our likeness. We explore robot torture, and whether there is an ethical issue with harming a machine, other than damage to property. Does it display a lack of empathy in a person? We also explore the flipside – robots designed to do our worst – in war. There is a rising chorus of governments wanting to ban automated weapons or robots from the battlefield and we hear from the campaign to stop killer robots which argues that killing must never be automated. That seems obvious but does putting humans in control actually raise questions of its own? We also meet Norman—a psychopathic robot—and hear about what happens if the brains behind machines (AI) go bad, thanks to human programming. We meet a robotics maker who specialises in entertainment robots, but has been repeatedly asked to make assassins, and he explains how worrying the human robot relationship could be. We also take a resurrected Hitchbot for lunch, and ask what the robot’s story says about us all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Robots in Stores 46 mins – “There are robots roaming the aisles of Walmart and other grocery stores. Monitoring inventory, cleaning up spills and potentially replacing workers. Automation is coming to a supermarket near you.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Mayor 66 mins – “Celebrate Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day with an intimate conversation with San Francisco Mayor London Breed. Following her election in 2018, Mayor Breed is the city’s first African-American female mayor and just the second woman to ever hold the office, elected during a historic year for women’s representation in local and national politics. The mayor has lived a life of public service. Prior to her election as District 5 supervisor in 2012 and her service as Board president from 2015–2018, she served as executive director of the African American Art and Culture Complex in the Western Addition for 10 years. She also served as a San Francisco Redevelopment Agency commissioner for five years and in 2010 was appointed by the then Mayor Gavin Newsom to be a San Francisco fire commissioner. Join INFORUM as we hear from Mayor Breed on the priorities for her administration, with a lens of economic justice, on the biggest issues of our day, including housing, criminal justice reform, education and public safety.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Shanghai 66 mins – “On the eve of the People’s Republic of China’s 70th anniversary, journalist and author Helen Zia discusses the desperate exodus out of that country’s biggest and most sophisticated city—a port so notorious that its name was synonymous with evildoing. Her new nonfiction book, Last Boat out of Shanghai: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution, is the first English language account of this mass flight, an event that mirrors the Jews and other intellectuals fleeing Berlin as Hitler came to power and the frantic rush for evacuees to enter the American embassy as Saigon fell. This is the history of a generation of Chinese intellectuals dispersed throughout the world. The story remained untold, even in China, until Zia interviewed more than 100 survivors of this late 1940s and early 1950s exodus. Many endured great hardship and nativist hostility, including the McCarthy inquisition in the United States, as they tried to find safety for themselves and their families. Their offspring include Maya Lin, I.M. Pei, Amy Tan, Steven Chu, Elaine Chao, David Henry Hwang, Chang-lin Tien, Gish Jen and many other notables. Zia’s first book, Asian-American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People, was a groundbreaking history of Asian-Americans in the United States.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Silicon City 68 mins – “San Francisco is changing at warp speed. Famously home to artists and activists, and known as the birthplace of the Beats, the Black Panthers and the LGBTQ movement, in recent decades the Bay Area has been reshaped by Silicon Valley, the engine of the new American economy. The richer the region gets, the more unequal and less diverse it becomes, and cracks in the city’s facade―rapid gentrification, an epidemic of evictions, rising crime, atrophied public institutions―have started to show. Inspired by Studs Terkel’s classic works of oral history, writer and filmmaker Cary McClelland spent several years interviewing people at the epicenter of the recent change, including venture capitalists, coders, politicians, protesters as well as native sons and daughters to the city’s newest arrivals. The crisp and vivid stories of Silicon City’s diverse cast capture San Francisco as never before.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Silicon Valley Ethics 66 mins – “Is Silicon Valley at a breaking point? The power of technology has been called into question amid the growing number of data breaches, disinformation and lack of privacy. Kara Swisher reflects on what has brought Silicon Valley to this point, the ethical challenges facing tech companies and prognosis for the future.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Slave Trade Abolition in Britain 53 mins – “Michael Suarez is the director of the Rare Book School at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. A renowned historian, author and worldwide leader of rare book scholarship interests, he co-edited The Oxford Companion to the Book. Suarez will provide us with a compelling, richly illustrated description about how a group of printers were instrumental in making the antislavery movement happen in England. Their broadside engraving with an image diagramming human cargo on the Brookes, a slave ship, became a force for political change in the worldwide abolitionist movement.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Slavery in Canada 55 mins – “Why is it common knowledge that we saved runaway slaves from the United States, but few know that Africans and Indigenous peoples were bought, sold and exploited, right here? In the first of a two part series, contributor Kyle G. Brown asks how slavery was allowed to continue for some 200 years, and be one of the least talked-about aspects of our history. Part 1 of a 2-part series.” At the link find the title, “Canada’s slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavement,” right-click “Download Canada’s slavery secret: The whitewashing of 200 years of enslavementand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Lanterns 56 mins – “CleanChoice Energy, a renewable energy company that empowers people and businesses to cut emissions and live cleaner lives, has launched a new product to provide solar lanterns to families in need around the world. For every customer that makes the switch to clean energy through the Clean Lights Plan, CleanChoice Energy will send a solar lantern to families in need. An estimated 1.1 billion people – 14% of the global population – do not have access to electricity according to the International Energy Agency. Tune in as we talk with Kate Colarulli, VP, Retention Marketing and PR for CleanChoice Energy about this program and many more offered by the company.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Future 66 mins – “The free market, limited government development model has been an ecological and social disaster for the developing world. Sustainable and equitable development is possible only with the active involvement of a strong central state that can guide the economy, protect the environment and prioritize meeting its people’s basic needs. In his latest book, The Sustainable State, Chandran Nair shows that the market-dominated model followed by the industrialized West is simply not scalable. The United States alone, with less than 5 percent of the world’s population, consumes nearly a quarter of its resources. If countries in Asia, where 60 percent of the world’s population lives, try to follow the western lead, the results will be calamitous. Instead, Nair argues that development must be directed by a state that is willing and able to intervene in the economy. Corporations, which demand ever-expanding consumption, need to be directed toward meeting societal needs or otherwise restrained, not unleashed. Development needs to be oriented toward the greatest good—clean drinking water for the many has to take precedence over swimming pools for the few. Nair provides three compelling case studies demonstrating the benefits of such strong state governance and the failings of weak state governance…” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Sustainable Schools 56 mins – “Sustainable Jersey for Schools is a free program available to all public schools in the Garden State that want to “go green” and conserve natural resources. The program offers training, grants and certification opportunities. The program was launched in 2014 and encompasses three vital components of sustainability: people – contribute to a strong civil society that provides opportunity for all; prosperity – support local economies and wise use of community resources; and planet – practice responsible environmental management and conservation. Tune in as we talk with the Sustainable Jersey for Schools Program Director, Heather McCall; Dr. Michael Salvatore, Superintendent of Long Branch Public Schools; and four educators in the Long Branch School District. ” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Seafood 59 mins – “The challenges facing American fishermen, ranging from declining quotas to disputed science to fleet consolidation, are highlighted in a new Netflix documentary series. Rotten, “travels deep into the heart of the food supply chain to reveal unsavory truths and expose hidden forces that shape what we eat.” The series’ sixth and final episode, “Cod is Dead,” focuses on the domestic seafood industry, and the business and regulatory climate that has made it increasingly difficult for fishermen to make a living. The episode interviews fishermen, scientists, environmentalists, and other stakeholders, with special emphasis placed on industry members in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Tune in as we talk about the issues raised in ‘Cod is Dead’ with Bob Vanasse, Executive Director of Saving Seafood.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technologies Ethical Boundaries 38 mins – “After several years in the Silicon Valley “bubble,” Joe decided to step away.  Disconnect between life in the Valley and the world outside became his opportunity.  Joe Toscano formed a nonprofit called BEACON. BEACON stands for “Better Ethics and Consumer Outcomes Network.” It is a social innovation organization.  BEACON strives to connect the public to what is going on in the tech industry.  BEACON provides insights to policymakers in defining ethical boundaries of technology.   This tech insight equips them to address ethical concerns in a balanced way. BEACON works with technologists to create products that meet consumer demand and create positive social impact. Some tech leaders are content to leave it to regulators to define ethical boundaries of technology.  Through BEACON, Joe takes a holistic approach. Shaping ethical boundaries of technology has many factors to consider. The effect on the consumer, small business, local and global community as well as Big Tech must be in view.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, awlwxr “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Technology Impact on Kids 68 mins – “Everyone is looking down—but especially kids. There is something unnatural about a 15-month-old using an iPad to soothe him or herself. Many assume this is just the natural progression of our high-tech society. But what if this is causing us harm? And what if children are more vulnerable than adults? Numerous politicians are calling for reining in of the Internet. Is this necessary? Robert Lustig will answer five key questions: Is there such a thing as tech addiction? Is it similar to or different than drug addiction? Does technology lead to depression and suicide? Have our minds been hacked? Are children at more risk?  The answers to these questions will provide us with a blueprint to harnessing technology for good.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Technology Monopolies 67 mins – “What are the implications of a few massive firms controlling global industry? Tim Wu endeavors to answer this question by linking together big business, inequality and political extremism in his latest book, The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age. Wu argues the failure to curb excessive corporate power has led to greater tolerance of inequality and may even engender extreme populism, nationalism and fascism. Wu’s argument concludes that excessive corporate power poses a great threat to the health of American democracy, just as giant trusts did during the Gilded Age. Wu asserts that we must thus learn from the progressive policies of the past to overcome the consequences of extreme inequality today. Join us and learn from Wu as he discusses the problem of modern massive firms and what America can learn from its past.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Teen Vaping Ban 39 mins – “Illinois joins a growing list of states adopting “Tobacco 21” policies to combat teen vaping. Will it curb usage?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Think Resilience 56 mins – “Our guest today is Richard Heinberg, Senior Fellow-in-Residence at the Post Carbon Institute. We will discuss what our future climate might mean for us and how we can prepare for the coming changes. Richard is an American journalist and educator who has written extensively on energy, economic, and ecological issues, including oil depletion. He is the author of 13 books, and presently serves as the senior fellow at the Post Carbon Institute. Richard will draw on the extensive knowledge of the Institute and from his outstanding online video series, Think Resilience.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Transgender Experience 57 mins – “Born in Hyderabad, India, blossomed in Toronto and living in Oakland, Rimi has been on the gender journey proudly with confidence and realness. She has performed at various South Asian queer events through dance forms and poetry, depicting the anguish and eventual liberation of her gender journey, transcending the paths of survival, rejection, isolation and stress. Rimi lives in Oakland, is working in a leadership role at Walmart.com, and leads PRIDE Associate Resource Group as well, driving inclusion for TGNC lives at workplace inclusion. While staying visible and present for TGNC, Rimi finds herself vulnerable and targeted at times. Rimi seeks to have the world to accept transgender identities as equals and as capable individuals for holding jobs, earning degrees, and having relationships and a dignified life.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

Tuberculosis-Free World 28 mins – “A new Lancet Commission maps out priorities in diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and advocacy efforts to end tuberculosis by 2030. Detailed discussion with two of the Commissioners: Eric Goosby, UN Tuberculosis Special Envoy, and Paula Fujiwara from the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The podcast is introduced by Liz Zuccala from The Lancet HIV.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Valerie Jarrett 46 mins – “Her road from Chicago to the White House — our conversation with Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vegan Challenge City 56 mins – “Asheville, North Carolina declared the week of June 4-10 as the nation’s first “city-proclaimed” seven-day vegan challenge. Mayor Esther Manheimer signed a proclamation encouraging “all citizens, businesses and institutions to participate in the 7-Day Vegan Challenge to promote good health, Animal Justice, Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Climate Justice.” The challenge was organized by the City of Asheville, regional hospital, Mission Health, and no-kill shelter, Brother Wolf Animal Rescue. Tune in as we speak with Paul Berry, Executive Director for Brother Wolf about this unique event!” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Water from Wilderness 61 mins – “A 100+ years ago, no one might have imagined putting a dam in a national park. But San Francisco did just that after the 1906 earthquake and fire. Building the O’Shaughnessy Dam was not easy. Some fought the process; others still want to see the dam dismantled. Yet, for more than a 100 years, the dam has been the water center for San Francisco and millions of Californians who rely on pure water and clean energy. But can our Hetch Hetchy water and energy systems survive a changing climate? Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Jim Yager will share his new documentary film, Water from the Wilderness, about the past, present and changing climates and times.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

World Politics 68 mins – “Retired Vice Admiral Charles W. Martoglio of the U.S. Navy will discuss America’s greatest security challenge of the 21st century, the increasingly competitive rivalry posed by China and Russia teaming against American interests at home and around the world. He’ll discuss the global security environment, how China and Russia are challenging America, internal challenges faced by Russia and China, and America’s way ahead to ensure its global position in this increasingly dynamic and competitive world.” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.

YMCA in Bay Area 66 mins – “Come for a gathering of San Francisco business leaders and philanthropists. They will discuss the importance of and need to give youth a voice, enabling them to make change happen in their own communities. The conversation will focus on the disparities that exist for our youth and families and how local entities are working to close the gap in health, education and access to the outdoors.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Young Activists 74 mins – “Gun violence. #BlackLivesMatter. Climate change. Voting rights. Despite a sense of alienation from civic engagement in today’s political atmosphere, young leaders continue to take up the charge across these and other critical issues, demanding a better future, wielding their votes and pushing the country forward to create change. In his book Generation Citizen: The Power of Youth in Our Politics, Scott Warren, co-founder and CEO of Generation Citizen, recounts his personal political awakening and the long and inspiring history of young people enacting significant political change in the United States, ranging from the civil rights movement to the Parkland students’ stance against gun violence. Since its founding in 2010 when Warren was a senior at Brown University, Generation Citizen has worked with more than 50,000 students across the country to engage them in politics as the next generation of future leaders through an innovative curriculum and hands-on opportunities to dig into the civic process, creating new channels for learning and capacity building to make a difference locally and nationally…” At the link you can listen; however, a copy of the podcast is also included and can be downloaded at this blog archive.  

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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