Mining Digest 392 – May 24, 2019: AI Dangers, Black Lung, Broadband in Minnesota, Broadband Telemedicine, Broadband Wireless in North Carolina, California Education Issues, Chagas Disease, Childhood Obesity, Climate Action, Climate Change Emergency, Climate Change in Australia, Cohen Testimony, Comics in Classroom, Communications Issues, Communicator Workers Union President, Alcoholism Treatment, Democracy and Technology, Diabetes Insipidus, Diane Sawyer, FBI and Cybercrime, FIFO Worker Stress, HIV in U.S. Homeland Security Viewpoint, Industrial Problems and Solutions, Jonestown Survivor, Journalism Ethics, Medical AIs, Monopoly Concerns, NBA Discussion, Obesity Impact, Pearl of Lao Tsu, Pete Buttigieg, Public Policy and AI, Racial Division Healing, Radio Free Europe, Rep Joe Kennedy III, San Francisco Federal Reserve, Silicon Valley Problems, Susan Crawford on Fiberoptics, Sustainable Farming, Trump Investigation, Uganda’s Orphanage Closure, Walls Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 601 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Activism 54 mins – “What does it take to change the world for the better? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on activism—what motivates it, why it matters, and how each of us can make a difference. Guests include civil rights activist Ruby Sales, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta, author Jeremy Heimans, “craftivist” Sarah Corbett, and designer and futurist Angela Oguntala.” At the link find the title, “Changing The World, Apr 4, 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Dangers 64 mins – “Some would say that the magic of artificial intelligence, or AI, is that its users are its primary source of power. As we navigate a Facebook page or ask Alexa a question, we provide data inputs at virtually no cost. Others, such as Amy Webb, would argue that this is AI’s most dangerous characteristic. This is because our data contributions are subject to such limited oversight.  Webb is the founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that advises Fortune 500 companies, international nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. A clear lover of new experiences, reporting and data, today she is a self-described quantitative futurist. Since future trends are usually present on the fringe of society before they appear in the mainstream, Webb’s line of work uses data-driven models to report on the probabilities of the future. Her latest predictions, as laid out in her book The Big Nine: How Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity, give three scenarios for the future of artificial intelligence—optimistic, pragmatic and catastrophic. For each scenario, she provides practical measures that can be taken to address the most pressing issues…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Alcoholism Treatment 27 mins – “Scientists hope that a recreational drug could help to treat people with alcohol dependence. In the UK, MDMA – the active ingredient of the class-A drug ecstasy – has been given to a handful of alcoholics who have undergone a full detox, as part of psychotherapy sessions. The researchers hope it will help to make people more receptive to therapy, increasing their chances of recovery. City traders who can detect their own heartbeat may make better use of their instinct when making quick decisions based on the financial markets. Most people do not seem to have this skill –– but one expert believes that the heart can be a powerful source of information guiding our behaviour without us being consciously aware of it. Working on construction sites can lead to builders becoming locked into a cycle of fatigue, financial concerns and ill health. The industry’s macho culture makes it hard to talk about their worries – leaving them vulnerable to depression and even suicide. The British Mates in Mind initiative hopes to enable its predominantly male workforce to discuss their feelings. And – feeling anxious about the audience’s every move, the stand-up comedian Robin Ince explains why he lays bare his own personal worries to make people laugh.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

April Fools Day 53 mins – “Celebrate the lunch hour on April Fools’ Day by sitting at the feet of cosmic comic Swami Beyondananda, whose favorite yoga pose is tongue in cheek. Swami will help you laugh lovingly at our human foolishness till the sacred cows come home. And at least one lucky person in the audience will achieve “fool realization” as to why author Marianne Williamson has called Swami the Mark Twain of our times. Come in darkness (to get a good seat), but expect to be enlightened. And BYOF (bring your own friends), because when it comes to laughter, the more the merrier.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Astronomical Visualisation [2nd item] 28 mins – “Bitcoin encoded DNA by Ian Woolf, Kai Polsterer and Andre Schaaff talk about astronomical visualisation with Google cardboard at the Astronomical Data Analysis Software and Systems conference – ADASS, Better by Jonathan Coulton.” At the link right-click “download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Black Futures 71 mins – “The issues facing black communities are often complicated, nuanced and heavily weighted by centuries of historical injustice. Black Futures Lab, founded by Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza, works to make black people powerful in politics by transforming black communities into constituencies that build power in cities and states. The Black Futures Lab recently completed the largest survey of black people since Reconstruction, with nearly 40,000 respondents from diverse communities across the nation. The survey included questions regarding many defining characteristics, including gender, sexuality, age and other categories, and it dug into several key issues rooted in inequality and to understand better what black communities desire for their futures. Join Garza and other cultural leaders, scholars and experts for a conversation about the inaugural data results and how to use this data to create solutions with lasting impact.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Black Lung 54 mins- “Howard Berkes joins us to talk about his reporting of an epidemic of black lung disease that is suffocating and killing the country’s coal miners. Federal regulators and the mining industry have done little to help. NPR’s Howard Berkes has reported on mine safety and regulation for almost a decade. Lately, he has teamed up with reporters at PBS’s Frontline to document an epidemic of black lung disease that is suffocating and killing the country’s coal miners. They’ve shown how federal regulators and the industry have consistently failed to protect vulnerable mine workers, who are often forced to choose between their livelihoods and their lives. Berkes joins us to talk about his reporting and its impact.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Comedian 28 mins – “On a typical episode of the Community Broadband Bits podcast, you’ll hear from a guest whose community may be in the process of deploying a publicly owned fiber network, or an elected official who has championed a broadband-friendly policy for their city or town. Sometimes we talk to local business leaders or cooperative board members who’ve led their communities toward better connectivity. For the first time ever, we have a comedian on the show this week — Ron Placone. What does this mean? Not that the issue of publicly owned networks is joke material, but that it’s something that people from all walks of life care about. Ron is host of the streaming show, “Get Your News on With Ron,” a show driven by its audience. He has a popular YouTube channel and is regularly on the Jimmy Door Show and The Young Turks, often discussing municipal networks and the importance of network neutrality….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Minnesota 36 mins – “Brent Christensen, Chief Operating Officer of Christensen Communications, came into our Minneapolis office to sit down and have a chat with Christopher this week for podcast 346. Their interview comes a short time after Christopher and several other Institute for Local Self-Reliance staff took a tour of the Christensen Communications facilities. Brent has an additional role as President and CEO of the Minnesota Telecom Alliance (MTA) a group that advances policies encouraging expansion of broadband connectivity. Brent describes some of the ways MTA has helped Minnesota and local leaders establish policies to help private sector telecom companies bring better connectivity to local communities, especially in rural areas. He and Christopher spend time discussing Minnesota’s Border to Border Broadband Program and why they think it’s been a success.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in North Carolina 22 mins – “While in North Carolina at the recent Let’s Connect! speaking tour, Christopher sat down with Greg Coltrain, Vice President of Business Development of RiverStreet Networks. Greg participated in panel discussions in all three communities where the community meetings occurred: Albemarle, Fuquay-Varina, and Jacksonville. RiverStreet Networks is the product of evolution of what began as Wilkes Communications. They’ve acquired several local providers in different areas across the state and are set on bringing high-quality Internet access to rural North Carolinians. In this interview, Greg shares some of the cooperative’s history, including information on how they’ve funded their deployments. Greg also discusses his experience on the practical side of cooperative life, such as comparative operating costs between fiber and copper, working with electric cooperatives, and the ins and outs of leasing assets from public entities. Christopher and Greg also talk about future plans that RiverStreet has to partner with North Carolina’s electric cooperatives across the state to bring connectivity to more people in rural areas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Telemedicine 36 mins – “This week, we have another interview that Christopher recorded while he was at the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas. Dr. Robert Wack from Westminster, Maryland, where the town is partnering with Ting Internet, sat down for a conversation on telemedicine. As the United States’ healthcare system continues to degrade, hospitals, doctors, and other caregivers are looking for new and efficient ways to provide better care for their patients. Broadband is a tool that healthcare professionals are already using for preventative care, consultation, and treatment from a distance. Dr. Wack and Christopher discuss some of the innovations within the healthcare industry that use connectivity, data, and human engagement. These approaches reduce costs and help patients by reducing the stress that accompanies unnecessary trips to the emergency room or can identify when a patient requires medical intervention from the security of their home. Christopher and Dr. Wack also discuss some of the new challenges that accompany these innovations and strategies for bringing these programs to large groups of people, rather than focusing on small populations.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Wireless in North Carolina 22 mins – “It’s cold in our Minneapolis office this week, but two of our staff — Christopher Mitchell and Katie Kienbaum — are off enjoying mild January weather in North Carolina. They’re conversing with the good folks in three different communities, where they also met up with this week’s podcast interviewee, Alan Fitzpatrick, CEO of Open Broadband. Alan and Christopher have a practical conversation about what it’s like to be in the fixed wireless Internet access business these days. As they discuss, the model for today’s WISPs isn’t like it was in the past, which is one of the reasons fixed wireless companies such as Open Broadband are able to provide service so much more advanced. In addition to talking about technology, Alan touches on the birth of the company, some of their hardest challenges and how they overcome them, and he gets a little nostalgic remembering their first gigabit customer.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Education Issues 67 mins – “Education Week magazine reported in 2017 that among all states, California’s K–12 public education ranked 41st in conditions that help children succeed, 39th in school finance and 30th in achievement. So what can we expect in 2019? In a major upset against his opponent Marshall Tuck, Tony Thurmond was elected California State Superintendent of Public Instruction this past November. He was the endorsed candidate of the California Democratic Party and all five 2018 California Teachers of the Year. He previously represented the 15th Assembly District, which encompasses the northern East Bay. Thurmond became the second African-American to hold the office and fourth African-American to win statewide office in California following Wilson Riles. Prior to being elected to the Assembly in 2014, he was a member of the Richmond City Council, a board member of the West Contra Costa Unified School District and social services administrator. Come hear his plans for improving California’s schools.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Chagas Disease 27 mins – “On this edition of Science Studio we meet two UTEP professors, Igor Almeida, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences, and Katja Michael, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry.  They have received $6 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to improve treatment and develop new diagnostic tools to assess post-therapeutic outcomes for patients with Chagas disease.” At the link right-click the “Play” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chaos Agents 50 mins – “Family separation, a re-framed immigration debate and Trump’s misleading executive order: why news fatigue about the border isn’t an option. This week, we explore multiple sides of the asylum policy — including the view from Central America. Plus, a look back at US repatriation policy in the 1930’s, and six decades of American culture wars. 1. Dara Lind [@DLind] and Dahlia Lithwick [@Dahlialithwick] on how Trump’s family separation policy attempts to re-frame the immigration debate, and why news fatigue isn’t an option. Listen. 2. Carlos Dada [@CarlosDada] on the way the family separation and zero-tolerance asylum policy are changing the way Central Americans see the United States. Listen. 3. Francisco Balderrama on the mass expulsion of Mexican immigrants and their American-born children from the United States during the Great Depression. Listen. 4. Brian Lehrer [@BrianLehrer] on six decades of culture wars in the United States. Listen.” At the link right-click the download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Childhood Obesity 15 mins – “Professor Louise Baur is Head of Child and Adolescent Health at the University of Sydney. She discusses the prevention and treatment of paediatric obesity in Australia. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Rhinosinusitis 36 mins – “Patients who experience chronic rhinosinusitis may way for a considerable period of time before presenting, because they believe the condition to be trivial. In this podcast, Alam Hannan, ENT Consultant at the Royal Throat Nose and Ear Hospital in London, explains why that belief is not founded, and describes which treatments can be effective at providing relief.” At the link find the title, “Chronic Rhinosinusitis, 8 Feb 2019,” right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Action 51 mins – “With the Green New Deal in the national spotlight, a vigorous debate is happening: How ambitiously and broadly must the United States act on climate? Are issues such as economic equity, job security and public health outside the frame of climate action—or are they fundamental to its success? Progressive Democrats contend a holistic solution would tackle all of the above. Critics such as former Representative Barney Frank (D–MA) argue that society can only handle so much change at once. How bold does action need to be to avoid the worst impacts of climate change—and at what cost to citizens? Are environmental justice and human health central to the success of the climate action, or are they just a nice bonus? How can policy and innovation work together to decarbonize the economy?Join us for a special recording of the Climate One podcast and radio show at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, featuring Harvard’s John Holdren and Gina McCarthy and hosted by Greg Dalton.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Climate Change Emergency 47 mins – “Climate change is a public health emergency and physicians are “morally bound to take a lead role” in confronting the challenges, says the doctor making the claim. She’s with us.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change in Australia 15 mins – “Associate Professor Paul Beggs is an environmental health scientist at Macquarie University, and a coauthor of the MJA-Lancet Countdown on climate change and health. He discusses Australia’s vulnerabilities, policies and progress. With MJA news and online editor Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Coders Discussion 64 mins – “When we think of the people behind the most influential technological advances of our day, we usually imagine the leaders of the industry but forget the armies behind them: coders. Dedicated to the pursuit of higher efficiency, these lovers of logic and puzzles are able to withstand unbelievable amounts of frustration; they are arguably the most quietly influential people on the planet. In his new book, Coders: The Making of a New Tribe and the Remaking of the World, Clive Thompson argues just that. Through increasingly pervasive artificial intelligence, coders have a larger and larger role to play. Thompson analyzes how embedded this industry is in our lives, questioning the lack of geographic and demographic diversity in the sector while outlining his optimistic view on the opportunities that this age of code can unlock. Join us for a conversation about this frequently misunderstood industry culture and a refreshingly enthusiastic take on its future.  Thompson is a freelance journalist and one of the most prominent technology writers. He is a longtime contributor to The New York Times Magazine and a columnist for Wired.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Cohen Testimony 62 mins – “On Wednesday, Michael Cohen—the former executive vice president of the Trump Organization, former deputy finance chairman of the Republican National Committee, and former personal lawyer to Donald Trump—paid a visit to the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Cohen accused the president of campaign finance violations after taking office. He alleged that he was present when Roger Stone gave Trump advance notice of the WikiLeaks dump of the hacked DNC emails. And he claimed that the president’s statements in a meeting with Jay Sekulow led Cohen to conclude that the president wanted Cohen to make false statements to Congress. So we cut out all of the bickering, all of the procedural obstructions, and all the rest of the frivolity, to bring you just the one hour of testimony you need to hear.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Cohen_Bonus_Ep.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Comics in Classroom 11 mins – “Comic books and graphic novels belong in every teacher’s toolkit, says cartoonist and educator Gene Luen Yang. Set against the backdrop of his own witty, colorful drawings, Yang explores the history of comics in American education — and reveals some unexpected insights about their potential for helping kids learn.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P1 Issues 31 mins – “Representative Mike Doyle (D-PA), chairman of the House subcommittee overseeing technology and communications, talks about net neutrality, hate speech on the internet and social media, and mergers such as the proposed T-Mobile/Sprint deal.” At the link find the title, “Rep. Mike Doyle Mar 15, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P2 33 mins – “C-SPAN interviews digital leaders and officials at the State of the Net conference. This week’s guests include, Rebecca Slaughter (D), a commissioner at the Federal Trade Commission, and Neil Chilson, a fellow at the Charles Koch Institute. At the link find the title, “State of the Net 2 Feb 9, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Communications Technology P3 26 mins – “C-SPAN interviews digital leaders and officials at the State of the Net conference. This week’s guests discuss the debate over when speech needs to be removed from media platforms and European Union digital issues.” At the link find the title, “Online speech & EU digital issues Apr 12, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Communications Workers Union President 28 mins – “Christopher Shelton, president of the Communications Workers of America, talks about the union’s opposition to the T-Mobile/Sprint deal, Congress’s role on the issues, 5G and more.” At the link find the title, “Christopher Shelton, Communications Workers Feb 22, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diabetes Insipidus 44 mins – “Diabetes is synonymous with sugar, but diabetes insipidus, “water diabetes”, can’t be forgotten. Between 2009 and 2016, 4 people died in hospital in England, when lifesaving treatment for the condition was not given. In this podcast, we hear some practical tips for non-specialists to aid diagnosis, and how patients should be managed during hospital admission.” At the link find the title,”Diabetes Insipidus – the danger of misunderstanding diabetes, 01 Mar 2019,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Online Speech 76 mins – “We’re never going to get a global set of norms for online speech, but do the platforms pick our global values and constitutionalize them? Something to tie them to the mast when hard issues arise? What would those values even be? Kate Klonick and Thomas Kadri along with panelists, Chinmayi Arun, Kendra Albert, and Jonathan Zittrain with moderation by Elettra Bietti, engage in this discussion.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Technology 50 mins – “On the latest episode of Recode Decode, Recode’s Kara Swisher spoke with Nuala O’Connor — the president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology — about how the group is currently lobbying the government and tech companies. O’Connor said there’s a “holy war” going on among the tech companies that have unprecedented power in societies around the world. “Maybe it’s an inappropriate phrase,” she said. “I think you are going to see a race, hopefully to the top, on this is how we treat our customer, and data is part of the equation. It’s old-time customer trust. It’s old-time respect for the customer.” “Knowing your customer is fine, but are you using the information you have gleaned about them in a way that, yes, furthers your corporate interest, but furthers their needs, and not in a way that is adverse?” O’Connor asked. “This tech sector is not in a good place right now. It’s in an incredibly disregulated place, literally and figuratively. I am short-term, a little pessimistic, but long-term optimistic that there’ll be enough public pressure … and ultimately government action to constrain some of the worst uses.” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Diane Sawyer 27 mins – “Award-winning journalist and news anchor Diane Sawyer opens up about her career, her tireless curiosity and what fuels her passion. Diane talks about the biggest lesson her father taught her and what she learned from working in the Nixon White House during his resignation. She also shares an idea that she says can truly spark lasting change.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Technology in Medical Education 26 mins – “19 November 2018. Dr Helen Wozniak, from the Office of Medical Education at the University of Queensland, and Dr Peter de Jong from the Centre for Innovation in Medical Education at Leiden University in the Netherlands, discuss digital technologies’ role in medical education. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI and Cybercrime 79 mins – “On Thursday morning, Susan Hennessey spoke to former FBI director James Comey about encryption, China, Attorney General Bill Barr’s comments to the Senate about the opening of the Russia investigation, and more.” At the link right-click “Direct download: comey_verify_mixdown.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FCC O’Rielly 31 mins – “FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly (R) talks about how the internet will operate now that net neutrality rules have ended, children’s programming rules, and the impact of a federal court’s approval of the proposed AT&T and Time Warner merger.” At the link right-click “Michael O’Rielly, FCC June 22, 2018,” select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FCC Wheeler 29 mins – “Former FCC Chair Tom Wheeler (D), discusses the end of net neutrality, his signature achievement, on June 11. The current GOP-led FCC voted to replace open internet regulation with FTC regulation under Title 1. Privacy and mergers are also discussed.” At the link find the title, “Tom Wheeler June 9, 2018” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FIFO Worker Stress 27 mins – “Dr Jennifer Bowers is managing director of Rural and Remote Mental Health. She discusses the psychological distress experienced by fly-in, fly-out workers. With MJA news and online editor, Cate Swannell.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV in U.S. 11 mins – “President Donald Trump’s call to end the domestic HIV epidemic in his 2019 State of the Union address may have taken some listeners by surprise. Many Americans consider HIV to be a plague of the past — a problem now resolved. For others, the initiative seems at odds with the Trump administration’s other health policy priorities, which include efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, restrictions on access to reproductive health services, and opposition to harm reduction for people who inject drugs — approaches that have undermined both access to health care and the civil rights of people in many of the communities hit hardest by HIV. Yet the effort is welcome and the goal is achievable, assuming it is informed by the latest advances in science and public health, as well as by earlier bipartisan initiatives to tackle HIV on the global stage. The past three decades have seen enormous progress in confronting HIV, even in the absence of an effective vaccine or a cure. An ever-expanding array of antiretroviral drug combinations has transformed HIV infection from a “death sentence” to a chronic and manageable condition. Treatment has also been shown to eliminate the risk of HIV transmission to sexual partners, and new prevention methods, including needle-exchange programs and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with antiretroviral drugs, are highly effective.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” to get the podcast.

Homeland Security Viewpoint 66 mins – “The Department of Homeland Security seems to appear in the headlines and in the media more and more often. Covering everything from terrorism prevention, law enforcement, disaster recovery and public safety, the department’s goals can often seem self-contradictory and overly politicized, especially today. Few people understand this better than Janet Napolitano, who served as the Secretary of Homeland Security from 2009-2013. In her new book, How Safe Are We? Homeland Security Since 9/11, Napolitano unabashedly acknowledges the shortcomings and challenges facing the Department of Homeland Security today, especially the politicization of border security and our lagging cybersecurity sector. But she also makes a pragmatic and honest case for its successes and explains the ways in which Homeland Security does indeed make us safer. Join us for a discussion that chronicles the evolution of our national security and cuts through the political noise that too often dominates these conversations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Industrial Problems and Solutions 77 mins – “Many Americans are horrified about the dysfunction and abysmal results from Washington, D.C., say Katherine Gehl and Michael Porter, and they argue that they have a realistic approach to changing this. They say our political problems are not due to a single cause but rather to a failure of the nature of the political competition that has been created—a systems problem. Come for a rare visit with two of America’s top business thinkers as they turn their focus to realigning America’s political system through the Gehl Porter politics industry theory. Katherine M. Gehl is a business leader, author and speaker. She was president and CEO of Gehl Foods, a $250 million high-tech food manufacturing company in Wisconsin, where she led a transformational growth strategy and received multiple awards before selling the company in 2015—in part to dedicate more time to political reform… Michael E. Porter is an economist, researcher, author, advisor, speaker and teacher…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Jonestown Survivor 62 mins – “Jackie Speier was 28 when she joined congressman Leo Ryan’s delegation to rescue defectors from cult leader Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple in Jonestown, Guyana. Ryan was killed on the airstrip tarmac, and Speier was shot five times at point-blank range. While recovering from what would become one of the most harrowing tragedies in recent history, Speier had to choose: Would she become a victim or a fighter? The choice to survive against unfathomable odds empowered her with a resolve to become a vocal proponent for human rights. From the formative nightmare that radically molded her perspective and instincts to the devastating personal and professional challenges that would follow, her memoir, Undaunted, reveals the perseverance of a determined force in American politics. Deeply rooted in Speier’s experiences as a widow, a mother, a congresswoman and a fighter, hers is a story of true resilience, one that will inspire other women to draw strength from adversity in order to do what is right—no matter the challenges ahead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Journalism Ethics 49 mins – “The Lincoln Memorial debacle showed how vulnerable the press are to a myriad of social and political forces. This week, we examine how the outrage unfolded and what role MAGA hat symbolism might have played. And, a graphic photo in the New York Times spurs criticism. Plus, a reality show that attempts to bridge the gap between indigenous people and white Canadians. 1. Bob’s thoughts on where the Lincoln Memorial episode has left us. Listen. 2. Charlie Warzel [@cwarzel], tech writer, on the zig-zagging meta-narratives emerging from the Lincoln Memorial episode, and the role played by right-wing operatives. Listen. 3. Jeannine Bell [@jeanninelbell], professor at Indiana University’s Maurer School of Law, on MAGA hat symbology. Listen. 4. Kainaz Amaria [@kainazamaria], visuals editor at Vox, on the Times’ controversial decision to publish a bloody photo following the January 15 attack in Nairobi, Kenya. Listen. 5. Vanessa Loewen, executive producer of the Canadian documentary series First Contact and Jean La Rose, CEO of the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, on their televised effort to bridge the gap between indigenous and settler Canadians. ListenAt the link right-click the download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean Ambassadors 63 mins – “Following President Trump’s second summit with North Korea’s Kim Jong-un, what does the future hold for relations between South and North Korea as well as between both Koreas and the United States? Here is a chance for a rare visit with the U.S. and South Korean Ambassadors who are closely involved with these issues. They will discuss the economic and political relationship between the United States and South Korea and the outlook for diplomacy with North Korea and the entire region. On August 30, 2017, Cho Yoon-je was nominated as the Republic of Korea’s ambassador to the United States by President Moon Jae-in. Cho was part of the emeritus faculty at Sogang University’s Graduate School of International Studies. He completed both a master’s and doctorate in economics at Stanford University. Harry B. Harris Jr. was sworn in as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Korea on June 29, 2018. Prior to his nomination, Harris was an admiral in the U.S. Navy, serving as commander. U.S. Pacific Commander Harris graduated from the Naval Academy and went on to receive an MPA from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and an MA from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. From January 2017 until April 2018, he was the U.S. Navy’s longest-serving Naval Academy graduate still on active duty.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Medical AIs 62 mins – “One of America’s top doctors reveals how artificial intelligence (AI) will empower physicians and revolutionize patient care. Medicine has become inhuman to disastrous effect. The doctor–patient relationship—the heart of medicine—is broken: Doctors are too distracted and overwhelmed to truly connect with their patients, and medical errors and misdiagnoses abound. In his latest book, Deep Medicine, Topol reveals how AI can help. AI has the potential to transform everything doctors do, from note-taking and medical scans to diagnosis and treatment, greatly cutting down the cost of medicine and reducing human mortality. By freeing physicians from the tasks that interfere with human connection, AI will create space for the real healing that takes place between a doctor who can listen and a patient who needs to be heard.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.  

Monopoly Concerns 29 mins – “Tim Wu discusses his book, [The Curse of Bigness.] He says today’s big technology companies are buying up small companies to prevent competition, and have impacts similar to Standard Oil and U.S. Steel, when they dominated the economy.” At the link find the title, “Tim Wu Apr 5, 2019,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

NBA Discussion 40 mins – “Rage at referees is all the rage in professional sports. Michael Lewis visits a replay center that’s trying to do the impossible: adjudicate fairness.” At the link find the title, “Ref, You Suck!, Apr 2019” right-click “Play” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Impact 26 mins – “Discussion with Obesity commission co-authors Bill Dietz (George Washington University, USA) and Boyd Swinburn (University of Auckland, New Zealand), plus three personal testimonies about the impact of obesity relating to stigma, indigenous culture, and health.” At the link find the title, “Global action to confront the pandemics of obesity, undernutrition, and climate change,” right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pearl of Lao Tzu 51 mins – Legend says the Pearl of Lao Tzu was found in 1934 after a diver drowned trying to pry it from the mouth of a giant clam. The writer Michael LaPointe has traced the pearl’s unbelievable story through a tangled web of fact and fiction. Legend says the Pearl of Lao Tzu was found in 1934 after a diver drowned trying to pry it from the mouth of a giant clam. Once the world’s largest pearl, it has been valued between $100,000 and $100 million. According to the writer Michael LaPointe, the pearl’s true worth is in the myths that have grown on it, and in the stories of the characters who would give everything to acquire it. LaPointe joins us to spin the yarn of the pearl and talk about unweaving a beguiling web of fact and fiction.” At the link right-click “Listen” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pete Buttigieg 74 mins – “South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg joins Dan in the studio for a conversation about his presidential campaign, how Democrats can win back the Midwest and what he’s bringing to the table as the youngest candidate in the race.” At the link find the title, “2020: Pete Buttigieg on freedom and farting cows, 1 Mar 2019,” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://traffic.megaphone.fm/DGT9209523273.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pete Buttigieg 65 mins – “At 37 years old, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg already has a few firsts under his belt. In 2011 and at the age of 29, he was elected mayor of South Bend, IN, making him the youngest mayor of a U.S. city with at least 100,000 residents, and the first openly gay municipal executive in Indiana. In December 2018, he announced his 2020 campaign for the presidency and is now the first millennial and the first openly gay presidential candidate. With fellow politicians like President Barack Obama touting him as the future of the Democratic Party, Buttigieg is seemingly in for an incredible year. Join INFORUM for a conversation with the presidential hopeful, moderated by Mother Jones Editor-in-Chief Clara Jeffery, as they discuss Buttigieg’s quickly rising star, the importance of representation in American politics, and his desire to be the “fresh start” he feels our country needs. At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy is included in the blog archicw.

Public Policy and AI 64 mins – “Some would say that the magic of artificial intelligence, or AI, is that its users are its primary source of power. As we navigate a Facebook page or ask Alexa a question, we provide data inputs at virtually no cost. Others, such as Amy Webb, would argue that this is AI’s most dangerous characteristic. This is because our data contributions are subject to such limited oversight. Webb is the founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that advises Fortune 500 companies, international nongovernment organizations (NGOs) and government agencies. A clear lover of new experiences, reporting and data, today she is a self-described quantitative futurist. Since future trends are usually present on the fringe of society before they appear in the mainstream, Webb’s line of work uses data-driven models to report on the probabilities of the future. Her latest predictions, as laid out in her book The Big Nine: How Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity, give three scenarios for the future of artificial intelligence—optimistic, pragmatic and catastrophic. For each scenario, she provides practical measures that can be taken to address the most pressing issues. Her lesson in foresight is an important one as AI becomes more powerful and embedded within our everyday lives. Join us for a compelling discussion on the future of artificial intelligence—and what we can do about it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Racial Division Healing 20 mins – ““Where does it hurt?” It’s a question that activist and educator Ruby Sales has traveled the US asking, looking deeply at the country’s legacy of racism and searching for sources of healing. In this moving talk, she shares what she’s learned, reflecting on her time as a freedom fighter in the civil rights movement and offering new thinking on pathways to racial justice.” At the link left-click “Share,” left-click the down-pointing arrow, right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Confrontation 56 mins – “Racism isn’t always obvious, but it can be found almost everywhere. This hour, TED speakers explore the effects of everyday and systemic racism in America—and how we can work to defeat it. Guests include authors Brittney Cooper and Monique Morris, journalism professor Pat Ferrucci, clinical psychologist Howard Stevenson, and anti-racism educator Travis Jones.” At the link find the title, “Confronting Racism, Mar 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radio Free Europe 25 mins – “In the 1950s and 60s, the CIA secretly funded Radio Free Europe, which broadcast anti-Communist propaganda behind the Iron Curtain. Kenneth Osgood, author of Total Cold War, talked about the program’s U.S. operations, which sought funds and support from politicians, corporations, and American citizens. This interview was recorded at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting in Chicago.” At the link you can listen, but a download must by purchased; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Rep Joe Kennedy III 67 mins – “Representative Joe Kennedy III, at just 38, has already made a name for himself in Democratic politics. Elected in 2012 to his first term representing Massachusetts, he quickly rose to prominence as one of the younger voices in Congress. He gained new national recognition when he was chosen to give the Democratic response to the 2018 State of the Union and recently introduced Senator Elizabeth Warren (D–MA) when she made her public  announcement to run for president of the United States in the 2020 election. Since he took office, Kennedy has leveraged his role to champion economic and social issues locally and nationally, including American manufacturing, workforce development, a livable minimum wage, affordable health care, mental health and addiction care, civil rights, immigration, and energy costs, with a focus on bipartisan efforts. He is a member of the influential House Energy and Commerce Committee and chairs Congress’ Transgender Equality Task Force. Locally, Kennedy remains closely in touch with his constituents by committing to his ongoing Tour 34, an initiative where he holds constituent office hours in all 34 Fourth District municipalities. Join us for a wide-ranging conversation with a rising star of the Democratic Party about the future of a new generation of politicians and the key challenges facing the American people today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

San Francisco Federal Reserve 65 mins – “Ten years into a historic economic expansion, inflation remains surprisingly subdued. Is this a problem or a benefit? San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President Mary Daly will talk about navigating this debate and finding clarity as a policymaker. Daly became president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on October 1, 2018. In this role, she participates on the Federal Open Market Committee, bringing the 12th district’s perspective to monetary policy discussions in Washington, D.C. Daly is a widely respected expert on labor markets with an unusual breadth of personal experience. She dropped out of high school at the age of 15, working in a doughnut shop and at Target before a friend persuaded her to earn a general education diploma. She worked her way through college at the University of Missouri–Kansas City, then earned a doctorate from Syracuse University before joining the Fed in 1996. Prior to her appointment to president, Daly served as the bank’s executive vice president and director of research. Daly has become a strong voice for increasing diversity among the leadership ranks of the Federal Reserve System by building the pipeline of women and minorities entering the economics profession. Come hear a unique perspective from an official responsible for supporting a safe, sound and stable American financial system.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Silicon Valley Problems 69 mins – ““In Italian, there’s a beautiful word, basta, which is basically like your way of saying, ‘Enough!’” the Social Capital CEO said on the latest episode of Recode Decode. “And so I woke up one day and I was like, ‘Basta!’ Enough.” And over the next year, Palihapitiya’s declaration that he had had “enough” would ricochet around Silicon Valley, as his well-regarded, traditional venture capital firm lost several of its most prominent partners, angered its investors, and scaled back several of its most ambitious plans. Now, Palihapitiya is offering his explanation for how exactly Social Capital fell into such dramatic disarray: It was an “identity crisis” motivated by deep, personal failings that had to be dealt with. On this emotionally charged episode of Recode Decode, Palihapitiya told Recode’s Kara Swisher and Teddy Schleifer that he had the right to be happy and had discovered — despite being part of Silicon Valley’s rich and famous — that he wasn’t. So “basta” it was.” At the link right-click “Share” at the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the op-up menu.

Susan Crawford on Fiberoptics 33 mins – “Harvard Professor, author, and broadband champion Susan Crawford has been incredibly busy ever since she released her latest book Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution — And Why America Might Miss It. Fortunately for us and our listeners, she hasn’t been too busy to take some time for Community Broadband Bits listeners. She’s here this week to talk about the book, her experiences researching it, and discussing policy recommendations aimed at bringing better connectivity to rural and urban areas. The conversation between Christopher and Susan is one of our best podcasts. They touch on technology, competition, and how we’ve come to the point when local communities are leading the charge to bring high-quality Internet access to their residents and businesses. Susan shares some of the stories she encountered — both favorable and not so favorable — of places where local leaders are either working to hard to put broadband infrastructure in place or barely moving the dial on getting their communities better connected.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sustainable Farming 60 mins – “One of the best-kept secrets in combating the climate crisis and the loss of biodiversity and agricultural productivity is a return to an agriculture model that sustained people and the planet prior to the age of industrial agriculture. The answer to the future of farming is to look to the past. Beginning from the modern sustainable agricultural and slow food movement, California’s early pioneers in organic farming have redefined the meaning of sustainability. The new models for an earth-friendly, food-healthy system have drawn from the teachings of Rudolf Steiner—noted scientist, philosopher and founder of the Waldorf School. Interestingly, he was instrumental in helping European farmers combat the rapid decline in seed fertility, crop vitality and animal health on their farms. Join fourth-generation winemaker Paul Dolan, former chairman of the Wine Institute and former president of Fetzer Vineyards, who led a transformation that put the company at the forefront of organic viticulture and sustainable business. Today, besides growing and making biodynamic wines, Dolan is a leader in redefining the farming system, with a focus on regenerative agriculture and biodynamic farming. Joining Dolan is Roots of Change (ROC) president Michael Dimock, an organizer and thought leader on food and farming systems. ROC develops and campaigns for smart, incentive-based food and farm policies that position agriculture and food enterprises as solutions to critical challenges of the 21st century. He is the host of the new podcast “Flipping the Table,” featuring honest conversations about food, farms and the future. Dimock serves on the boards of the UCLA Law School’s Resnick food law and policy program, Farm to Pantry, the Wild Farm Alliance and Sonoma Academy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Trump Investigation 76 mins – “Trump lashes out as investigators close in, Democrats introduce a Green New Deal, and former Mayor Mitch Landrieu joins Jon, Jon, Tommy, Dan, and Brittany Packnett live on stage in New Orleans.” At the link find the title, ““Who dat obstructing justice?” (LIVE in New Orleans), 10 Feb 2019” right-click “MEDIA ENCLOSURE: https://traffic.megaphone.fm/DGT9442139477.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

UC Berkeley Chancellor 74 mins – “It is not news that UC Berkeley is under continual financial pressure due to a challenging mix of increased enrollment, insufficient state funding and a tuition freeze. But by July 2019 Berkeley is expected to return to a balanced budget and financial health, and Chancellor Carol Christ is already looking to the future. Hear her discuss a new vision for undergraduate education that goes beyond the completion of assignments to immersion in the discovery and the creation of knowledge.  Christ’s signature Initiatives include: translating UCB’s research into inventions, governmental policies and services that advance the greater good; emphasizing research initiatives like Chan Zuckerberg Biohub, which span the old dividing lines between disciplines, departments and even institutions; supporting the exploding interest in data science across the full range of academic disciplines; implementing a new free speech policy that sustains a commitment to the First Amendment while supporting the campus community’s values and protecting Berkeley’s actual operations from unnecessary disruption; and promoting diversity as an essential element for a campus that seeks to embody and represent California and that needs to prepare students to succeed in a multicultural world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Uganda Orphanage Closure 27 mins – “Uganda is a country that has seen massive growth in the number of ‘orphanages’ providing homes to children, despite the number of orphans there decreasing. It is believed 80% of children now living in orphanages have at least one living parent. The majority of the hundreds of orphanages operating in Uganda are illegal, unregistered and now are in a fight with the government trying to shut them down. Dozens on the government’s list for closure are funded by overseas charities and church groups, many of which are based in the UK. With widespread concerns about abuse, trafficking and exploitation of children growing up in orphanages, are funders doing enough to make sure their donations are not doing more harm than good?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is also included in the blog archive.

Walls Discussion 66 mins – “Even with just a two-word title, John Lanchester’s newest novel, The Wall, evokes the political divisiveness our time. In this dystopian future, current political issues are taken to their logical extremes: issues of mass immigration (and populist reactions against it) are cast as symptoms of the ultimate problem of climate change. Lanchester’s ability to merge reality with metaphor make the novel a poignant wake-up call in the context of global politics, which are often too shortsighted. Join us with moderator Michael Lewis, best-selling author of Moneyball and The Big Short, for a witty back-and-forth between two authors who both have a knack for understanding some of the largest political issues of our time—and, more important, know how to communicate them in an effective and engaging way.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Water In California 60 mins – “For most Americans, water will be the primary delivery system through which they personally experience the effects of climate changes: drought, floods, storm water and wastewater discharges. Horror stories abound about the massive infrastructure costs needed to address these potential catastrophic issues. But the reality is that we have solutions that are both environmentally sustainable and affordable. Our speaker will explore new options to finance and scale investments for localized consumer and neighborhood created strategies that ensure a resilient future for water flow. These options should be capable of providing safe, clean reliable water for everyone.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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