Mining Digest 394 – Jun 7, 2019: African Inventions, Alice Guy-Blache, Broadband Access Bills, CIA and Reporters, Climate Change Battle, Computer History, Ebola Virus, Emergency Doctor, Farming Future, Government Evolution, Gun Control, HIV-Aids, Hookworm, Housing in Utah, Infection Control, Intelligence Committees, Jeanne Baret, Lie Detection, Malaria Discussion, Medicare in Utah, Melanoma Update, Neurosurgeon, Nuclear War, Nuclear Waste, Parasitism Discussion, Poverty Avoidance, Press Freedom, Propaganda Rag by Carlson, Public Health Doctor, Rabies, Rheumatology, Scurvy, Self Driving Cars, Technology Giants, Tim Cook, Tuskegee Airmen, Vaccines, Video Games Future, War on Drugs, Waste Elimination, Zika Virus

Exercise your ears: the 64 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 700 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,200) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Elections 37 mins – “Demographic, technological, and geostrategic developments are disrupting the electoral landscape in sub-Saharan Africa. How do these shifts affect the political climate for democracy and participation across Africa? What have recent elections in Nigeria illustrated about these? And what about the clash between China and the United States in Africa? To explore these questions, David Priess spoke with Judd Devermont, director of the Africa program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, host of the Into Africa podcast, and former national intelligence officer for Africa from 2015 to 2018.” At the link find the title,“African Elections and U.S. Interests,” and select “Direct download: Episode_401.mp3from the pop-up menu.

African Inventions 9 mins – “What good is a sophisticated piece of medical equipment to people in Africa if it can’t handle the climate there? Biomedical engineer Tania Douglas shares stories of how we’re often blinded to real needs in our pursuit of technology — and how a deeper understanding of the context where it’s used can lead us to better solutions.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alice Guy-Blaché 50 mins – “…we continue our series on documentary film with the story of Alice Guy-Blaché, the first female filmmaker.  She wrote, produced, or directed a thousand films, and yet today, even in Hollywood, she remains unknown. Friday, we continue our series on documentary film with the story of Alice Guy-Blaché, the first female filmmaker. Guy-Blaché was working as a secretary in Paris at the very moment that moving pictures emerged as a new technology. She was mesmerized and inspired. Over the course of her career she wrote, produced, or directed a thousand films, and yet today, even in Hollywood, she remains unknown. Director Pamela Green joins us to talk about Guy-Blaché, the woman who saw the future through a camera.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Access Bills 30 mins – “Interest in community broadband and broadband service from cooperatives has grown significantly within the past few years. This legislative session, lawmakers in states such as Vermont, North Carolina, and Arkansas, have decided that they’d like to start contributing to new ways to bring better Internet access to their constituents. This week, Christopher and Jess Del Fiacco, our Communications Specialist, sit down to review some of the most recent state bills that we find promising. Jess and Christopher talk about H 513 making it’s way through Vermont’s legislature. The bill contains policy changes and financial support designed to invigorate local broadband projects. H 513 was developed after state leaders examined the success of ECFiber, the regional network that brings gigabit connectivity to more than 20 communities in the central part of the state.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband FCC Support 39 mins – “Over the past few years, Partner Jonathan Chambers of Conexon has become our “go-to guy” for FCC conversations. This week, he joins us to talk about a recent issue that revolves around the Connect America Fund Phase II auction and one of the grant recipients, Viasat. With former experience working at the FCC in the Office of Strategic Planning and Policy Analysis, Jonathan has insight we try to tap into every time a thorny issue arises. Satellite Internet access provider Viasat was one of the top winners of federal funding, winning more than $122 million. Questions remain, however, if they will be able to deliver services that meet the requirements and deliver what they promised. Apparently, Viasat is unsure if their chosen satellite technology will be able to meet the testing thresholds and have asked the FCC to retroactively adjust the requirements to ensure their services pass muster. The FCC has yet to decline this request, which raises direct and indirect issue with the CAF II program, the FCC’s administration of the program, and Viasat. In this interview, Jonathan and Christopher discuss the issue in more detail and use the matter as a springboard to more thoroughly talk about the role of federal, state, and local government in developing rural broadband. Jonathan and Christopher ponder ways for local residents to have more of a voice in how broadband is funded and deployed in their communities and how ways to improve the process.” At the link right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA and Reporters 50 mins – “Back in February, we hosted Bill Harlow and Marie Harf, two former public affairs officers at the Central Intelligence Agency, to discuss how the CIA interacts with reporters on sensitive national security topics. For this episode, we thought it only fair to turn that around and also talk about how it’s seen on the other side. Mary Louise Kelly is a voice familiar to many as an anchor of All Things Considered on NPR. She previously spent a decade as national security and intelligence correspondent for NPR News after working for CNN and the BBC. Shane Harris, in addition to co-hosting the Rational Security podcast, now covers intelligence and national security for The Washington Post, after writing about the same for outlets like The Wall Street Journal, Daily Beast, and National Journal. David Priess recently sat down with Mary Louise and Shane to discuss the challenges of covering national security, to address myths about the intelligence beat, and, unsuccessfully, to uncover their sources.” At the link find the title, “2 April 2019, Mary Louise Kelly and Shane Harris on Covering the CIA ,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_405.mp3and select “save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Agreement Politics 85 mins – “From 1989 to early 2017, Sue Biniaz was the lead climate lawyer and a climate negotiator at the State Department. She was also a key architect of the Paris Agreement on Climate Change, a UN-negotiated agreement designed to mitigate global warming, which went into effect in November 2016. In June 2017, President Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the agreement. Sue sat down with Lawfare’s Jack Goldsmith to talk about the early days of U.S. and international climate action, how the Paris Agreement came into force and the predecessor agreements that gave rise to it, how it was supposed to operate, and what impacts Trump’s actions have had on international climate policy.” At the link find the title, “27 March 2019, Sue Biniaz on the Trump Administration and International Climate Policy,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_403.mp3and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Battle 29 mins – “Environmentalists have been talking for a long time about the threat to the planet. Now, a prominent voice is directing our attention to a related threat: he says our very humanity is in peril. This week on Sea Change Radio, we welcome back author and environmental leader Bill McKibben. The founder of 350.org, McKibben most notably spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement. His new book is Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out? While his thesis may seem grim, the book includes a call to action and engagement. In our conversation we discuss the new book, how climate change activism is disrupting right wing plans, and what people can and must do to advance and support a sustainable future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer History 90 mins– “Mark Richards is a photojournalist and photographer of “Core Memory: A Visual Survey of Vintage Computers.” He talks with Leo Laporte about his career including photographing combat in Afghanistan, chronicling his cancer treatment and preserving computer history.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Virus 61 mins – “Let’s face it. This is the episode you’ve been waiting for. Are you ready for one of the most publicized epidemics of the century? Because we’re ready to tell you about it. Ebola has been in the scientific consciousness since 1976, but why did it take an outbreak of epic proportions for you, dear listeners, to hear about it? Well, listen closely for the answer. Special guests this episode include badass scientists Lauren Cowley, Nell Bond, and Sarah Paige, who will share their first-hand experiences with the 2014 Ebola epidemic.” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Emergency Doctor 46 mins – “Dr Belinda Hibble is an emergency medicine physician currently working in Geelong. Her self-admitted short attention span and desire to experience a variety of encounters in a single day makes her perfectly suitable for her position. Based in a rural setting, one simply “makes it work” in an emergency department. We debate the advantages and disadvantages of not having subspecialties at hand to “siphon off” broad or complex patients, and how this has helped her learn to manage patients in a more pragmatic manner. Dr Hibble describes high burnout rates amongst ED physicians. To combat this, she suggests doctors involve themselves in other aspects of medicine, including administration, research and teaching, while working in multiple public and private hospitals and considering subspecialising. Work-life balance seems to be an aspect ED physicians struggle with. We discuss the importance of “learning how to say no”, and the seemingly impossible task of truly “switching off” with smartphones at hand 24/7….Belinda’s time with MUMUS has served her well not only in her career but in other aspects of her life. She has used her experience with policy to work with the ED college in changing their curriculum. This leadership has also translated over into her clinical work, as well as looking impressive on her CV. At the end of the day, Belinda encourages us to get out there, experience as much as we can and make an educated decision about a path we want to pursue.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Farming Future 45 mins – “As the human population continues to grow can ag-tech developments create a more sustainable and efficient way of farming that will increase yields to cope with demand for food? Click looks at what farms of the future could look like; from fitbits for cows and robotic milking and growing crops without a human setting foot in a field. Are we looking at a digital agricultural revolution with highly technically skilled farm labourers needed to manage some of these automated systems?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in the blog archive.

Government Evolution 92 mins – “Denise Howell is joined by Tom W. Bell, who is a professor at Chapman University, Fowler School of Law, and author of Your Next Government?: From the Nation State to Stateless Nations. They discuss off-the-shelf government and open-source legal systems like Ulex, big tech stepping into roles traditionally occupied by government, seasteading, the future of cryptocurrency, and more.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P1 29 mins – “Almost nothing is more controversial than gun control in the United States. Yet while passions flare and legislators posture but do little, deaths from gun violence are all too common. Almost every proposal put forward to address gun violence eventually fails. Seemingly, the Second Amendment stops any attempt to control guns. Despite this, there have been commonsense approaches to reducing gun violence that have been very effective in some communities. How gun violence has been managed in these communities is reviewed in this podcast with JAMA author April M. Zeoli, PhD, MPH, from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, Lansing.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P2 26 mins – “Almost nothing is more controversial than gun control in the United States. Yet while passions flare and legislators posture but do little, deaths from gun violence are all too common. Almost every proposal put forward to address gun violence eventually fails. Seemingly, the Second Amendment stops any attempt to control guns. Despite this, there have been commonsense approaches to reducing gun violence that have been very effective in some communities. How gun violence has been managed in these communities is reviewed in this podcast with JAMA author April M. Zeoli, PhD, MPH, from the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University, Lansing. Part 2 of 3.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gun Control Success P3 25 mins – “Congressman Mike Thompson chairs the US House Gun Violence Prevention Taskforce. He spoke with us about what the House has done to address gun violence and what you can do to help them see necessary legislation make it into law. We also talk with Joshua Sharfstein, MD, about strategies that can be undertaken by the physician community to reduce gun violence.” At the link right-click “Download MP3”and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV-Aids 90 mins – “This week we’re talking about HIV/AIDS, one of the biggest pandemics of modern times. We were fortunate enough to speak with three individuals who have had vastly different experiences with HIV/AIDS. Frank Iamelli, who took care of many of his friends throughout the epidemic, Hillel Wasserman, who has been living with HIV since 1987, and Brryan Jackson who was diagnosed with AIDS when he was only 5 years old. In this episode, you’ll get a glimpse into their stories and then we’ll fill you in on all of the biology, history, and present state of HIV in the world. Don’t forget to tune in next week for our special bonus episode where you will get to hear more of Frank, Hillel, and Brryan’s stories in depth. In the meantime, here are a couple of links to Brryan’s website and Being Alive LA which you’ll hear more about next week!” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hookworms 76 mins – “Today we’re taking a bite out of hookworm, our first macroparasite. We start, as all hookworm journeys must, from the dewy grass, where larvae burrow into your exposed flesh and make their long and winding way to your guts, where the eggs of a fortunate few will be immortalized in fossilized poop. It’s a tale of human migration, of failed eradication, and of overburdened populations. So pull up a chair, take off your shoes, and rest your feet in the cool dew-soaked grass. But watch out for the ground itch…Find more from Meramec Valley Girl at https://meramecvalleygirl.com/ and on instagram @meramecvalleygirl” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Housing in Utah 51 mins – “…we’re exploring the problem of housing affordability in Utah. With the state’s high birthrate and an influx of new workers moving to the state, it’s becoming harder and more expensive to find a place to live. So, people are moving in with roommates. The elderly are retrofitting their homes and “aging in place.” And as gentrification is transforming communities downtown, plans for dense-housing projects have riled up the suburbs. It’s a tough situation, and a panel of guests will join us to talk about it.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ice Age Civilization 51 mins – “The writer Craig Childs’ latest book is a strange kind of travelogue. It’s about his journeys across the country and back in time to the Ice Age to explore what life was like for North America’s first people. When humans arrived here more than 20,000 years ago, they found the place teeming with massive mammals that they hunted and were hunted by. In many ways, those people were no different from us today. But what they did have is a connection to the natural world we can hardly imagine.” At the link left-click the “Play” button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Infection Control 12 mins – “Bacteria “talk” to each other, sending chemical information to coordinate attacks. What if we could listen to what they were saying? Nanophysicist Fatima AlZahra’a Alatraktchi invented a tool to spy on bacterial chatter and translate their secret communication into human language. Her work could pave the way for early diagnosis of disease — before we even get sick.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Committees 49 mins – “In this third episode of the special Culper Partners Rule of Law series, David Kris and Nate Jones speak with former Senator Saxby Chambliss, who served as a senator from Georgia from 2003–2015, and in the House of Representatives from 1995–2003. During his tenure in the Senate, he was a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, as well as the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, where he served as Vice Chairman from 2011–2014. His previous role as Chairman of the House Intelligence Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security made him one of the leading congressional experts on those issues. They talked about the history of the congressional intelligence committees, the significance of election interference, and the proper penalties for lying to Congress. Chambliss also described what it was like to serve on the Senate Intelligence Committee, even describing a particular situation that is apparently still classified and undisclosed, as well as revealing whom he considers to be the best legislator he ever knew.” At the link find the title, “22 March 2019, Culper Partners Rule of Law Series: Sen. Saxby Chamblissright-click “Direct download: Episode_402.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interpol Abuses 49 mins – “Bill Browder, human rights campaigner and foe of Vladimir Putin, seems to get arrested whenever he travels abroad as a result of red notices and diffusion orders issued by Putin through the Interpol police organization. These incidents have highlighted the abuse of Interpol by authoritarian governments, and they raise a really important question: Should we be participating in an international police organization with governments that use that organization to harass and arrest their enemies? On this episode of The Lawfare Podcast, Benjamin Wittes speaks with two people with somewhat different points of view, although a lot of common ground: Bill Browder himself, along with Jago Russell, the head of Fair Trials, which has worked to reform Interpol and make it less susceptible to abuse. Bill argues for kicking the bums out and having police cooperation only between countries that observe civilized norms of law enforcement. Jago makes the case for mending, not ending, an inclusive international police organization.” At the link find the title, “Bill Browder and Jago Russell Debate Interpol and Authoritarian Governments,” right-click “Direct download: Episode_400.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeanne Baret 16 mins – “In 1767, a young French servant boarded a ship and sailed around the world, collecting plants previously unknown to Western science. The ship’s crew knew the servant as “Jean,” the scrappy aide to the expedition’s botanist. But “Jean” had a secret. She was actually Jeanne Baret, a woman disguised as a man—and she was about to make botanical history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Lie Detection 56 mins – “…Freedom of the press is supposedly a defining feature of western societies, and journalists are generally under the impression that their job is to give us the facts about what’s happening in the world. There’s a lot of lip service to this ideal, but in an era of fake news, post-truth and a 24-hour news cycle, what are journalists to hang onto? Where might you find the truth anyway, and who might tell it to you? And does your editor, your paper, your producer, have your back? And if these are the problems for journalists: what about the problems for you, the reader, listener, viewer? This episode features a discussion with journalists Susan Ormiston and Desmond Cole, and writer Linda McQuaig.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Malaria Discussion 92 mins – “The Tremendous Trio solve the case of the Woman With Steatorrhea, and reveal breakdown of the glycocalyx associated with severe and fatal malaria.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #167 “ and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medicare in Utah 52 mins – “You’ve probably been hearing a lot about “Medicare for All” recently. Monday, we’ll talk about how much it would cost and what it would mean to end private insurers and build a single-payer health care system. Monday, we continue our series exploring the best way to get health care to the most people in America. You’ve probably been hearing a lot about “Medicare for All” recently. Earlier this month, Democratic presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders introduced a proposal for a national health insurance program. We’ll talk about Sanders’ Medicare for All and how it compares to other Democratic plans. Will also ask how much it would cost and what it would mean to end private insurers.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Melanoma Update 50 mins – “Dr. Omid Hamid, who is at the forefront of this research, shares the latest news of how he and scientists are making incredible advancements in the treatment melanoma with a variety of groundbreaking therapies. This episode is sponsored by Hydralyte and Alliant University CSP.” At the link right-click, “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report Release 46 mins – “The Mueller report is out. Redacted by the Justice Department, shipped up to Congress and released to the public. We break it down in a special live evening broadcast.” At the link right-click the down-pointed arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurosurgeon 34 mins – “Dr Heidi McAlpine is a neurosurgery registrar at the Alfred Hospital in Melbourne. Today, she gives us fantastic insight into what it’s like being the only female registrar currently on the program! While occasionally being mistaken for another, more junior member of the team on ward rounds, Heidi thoroughly enjoys her work. She initially wanted to be a neurologist but loved surgery, eventually finding a field that combined her two passions…..From Dr McAlpine’s perspective, neurosurgery constitutes a significant time commitment, but not one that should get in the way of pursuing one’s own life outside of medicine, including starting a family. She encourages all female medical students (including you guys!) to enter the program to show that it’s doable, as doctors will change the system by “pushing those boundaries” and “highlighting and addressing” issues within the program. To everyone else, she urges us to “experience everything that we can”, especially “hands on” activities, “look after each other”, and do what we enjoy.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear War 49 mins – “End-of-times narratives themselves are nothing new; only the means have changed. While once a few horsemen and a river of blood were enough to signal the dusk of man, apocalypse now requires the imaginations of entire atomic laboratories — or roving squads of special effects crews. This week we look through a few recent highlights from the genre: from a 1980’s made-for-TV spectacle, to a new piece of speculative fiction documenting a hypothetical nuclear conflict with North Korea. 1. Jeffrey Lewis [@ArmsControlWonk], author of “The 2020 Commission Report,” on what we might say to ourselves after a devastating war with North Korea. Listen. 2. Marsha Gordon [@MarshaGGordon], film studies professor at North Carolina State University, on the 1983 film “The Day After,” which imagines a massive nuclear strike in the Midwestern U.S. Listen. 3. Anne Washburn, playwright, on “Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play,” in which she imagines American cultural life after a devastating nuclear event. Listen. 4. Andrew Fitzgerald [@magicandrew], chief digital content officer at Hearst TV, on what journalists, seven years ago, thought about the prospect of covering the end of the world.” At the link find the title, “Fallout, Aug 2019,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nuclear Waste 31 mins – “There’s no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent — when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift — the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don’t have to purchase anything new — as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow, then “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oncologist 44 mins – “Dr Ranjana Srivastava is a well-decorated oncologist that also holds numerous accolades, including the Westpac Women of Influence Award, recipient of the Medal of the Order of Australia for her service to medicine in the field of doctor-patient communication, and award-winning author for The Guardian. As a medical student, she enjoyed most fields, but ruled out obstetrics when she “almost dropped a baby”, and surgery when she fainted in theatre! It was a rural rotation in oncology where she saw the calming influence her consultants had on patients that she decided to pursue this field….Her typical week involves a mixture between clinical work and authoring. Listen in to discover how she deals with the emotional burden of discussing prognoses, terminal illnesses and chemotherapy on a daily basis to patients and families. While she finds it incredibly rewarding to help patients, managing their expectations and breaking harsh truths to them can be tough. Moreover, the specialty is “bounding along at an unprecendented pace”. This makes keeping up to date inrcredibly difficult, especially with patients consulting the internet for novel regiment. In future, she sees treatments being targeted to patients. There is no “magic solution” to maintaining a work-life balance, but Ranjana gives us some aspects we should prioritise. Increasingly, clinicians can choose their own hours and draw boundaries from an early age. She encourages students to spend extended periods of time following consultants to learn what each specialty is like. The initial “glitter and glamour” can fade away unless one truly enjoys what they are doing. At the end of the day, Ranjana stresses the importance of being “present” in each consultation, since we “may never see that patient again”.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis 17 mins – “This installment examines the drug companies’ role in the current opioids crisis. Led by the billionaire Sackler Family, Purdue Pharma used marketing, advertising and questionable tactics to encourage physicians to prescribe OxyContin whenever possible. The push to “eliminate pain completely” resulted in iatrogenic addiction. Beautiful Boy author, David Sheff, Dreamland author, Sam Quinones and Addiction Treatment Specialist, Shelley Sprague are this week’s contributors.At the link right-click, “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oppression Impact 56 mins – “Oppression takes many forms: it can be physical, the one-on-one power play of an abusive relationship. It can also be political and cultural, the oppression of one group by another in a society. All of these things have their long-lasting effects: the psychological trauma of individuals and of groups. Then there’s the legacy of inherited oppression: you yourself may not have been oppressed, but those in your group before you — parents, ancestors — suffered, and now here you are, carrying the weight of that inheritance. Oppression shapes us, who we are, both individually and as a group — and often not in any way we might wish. That impact’s one of the nasty lessons life offers…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive

Parasitism Discussion 75 mins – “Vincent and Dickson answer listener emails about Leishmania, dual infection of vectors, tapeworms, liver flukes, toxoplasmosis, and much more.” At the link right-click “Download TWiP #42” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pathologist 39 mins – “Dr Tarini Fernando is a senior pathology registrar currently completing her advanced training.  She decided quite early on to pursue this pathway after enjoying her elective rotation in forensic pathology in her final year of university. We discussed with her what sort of students might enjoy the “culture shock” that is pathology and how best to prepare oneself for the interviews. This includes the importance of research and experience in other wards in the hospital. Tarini provides us with an insight into the scope of fields and and range of tissues pathologists deal with within the lab, as well as the teams she interacts with outside it. She highlights the difference between public and private work, comparing the financial reward, time commitment and workload demands of both. Our discussion also touches on the level of knowledge required for both day-to-day tasks and the final exams, as well as how to balance the demands of simultaneously learning and teaching with personal pursuits, family and friends. Her advice also extends to the traits doctors should have to pursue a career in pathology and to deal with the challenges of failing exams and working extra hours.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Popaganda Rag by Carlson 28 mins – “To suggest that Tucker Carlson has a tendency to hint at deeply discriminatory tropes would be cliché — but also dead-on. Just this week, thanks to newly unearthed audio released by Media Matters, the Fox News darling ditches his signature dog whistle in exchange for unmistakable and unapologetic hate speech. Who is Tucker Carlson, really? In this week’s pod extra, Bob delves into the origins of the now-notorious commentator with Lyz Lenz, a writer for Columbia Journalism Review who profiled Carlson in September.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Avoidance 56 mins – “…Poverty has always been a defining issue in the quest to build a better world. Most political systems lay claim to the idea that they alone can create a better world. It’s a kind of litmus test: if our political systems can’t raise almost everyone out of relative poverty, then what exactly have we achieved? Why poverty exists at all in otherwise wealthy, prosperous democratic countries is a very incisive question, and it’s not enough to just shrug and say our system is still better than any other alternative. And those alternatives? Dictatorships take us into the abyss. Right-wing libertarianism has little to offer as solutions to poverty. Soviet-style Communism didn’t exactly work either, which leaves some version of western liberal democracy, either what we have now, or some variation that is still to emerge. So once we’ve got past that, and accepted that we’ve failed on the poverty file, how do we go about making things more equitable right now, making sure that wealth is distributed to those in need, and creating opportunity for the weak to become stronger?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Press Freedom 54 mins – “What do you have a right to say? Is it ever ok to say whatever you want? In some places, like the United States, freedom of speech basically means you have the right to say nearly anything, and the idea is that the bright light of debate will push untruths aside.  It’s a nice idea, but easier said than done. In most societies, there are restrictions on what it’s alright to say: criticising the president is ok in some places; in others, doing so can land you in prison, or hasten your execution. And of course in the wild and lawless  lands of the internet, anyone appears to be able to say anything — although you might find it safest to say nothing at all.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Public Health Doctor 32 mins – “Dr Alessandro Demaio is a doctor in the field of public health that works for the World Health Organisation. He has pioneered several global public health movements, including NCD free, the UN decade of action on nutrition, and Festival 21. Alessandro’s work has taken him all around the world, from assisting aid workers in Sri Lanka after the tsunami, Copenhagen – where he completed his PhD in public health – Harvard University, where he pursued a post doctorate fellowship, Geneva, for his work with the WHO, and even Mongolia!…A typical day lasts 11 hours and involves practically nothing of what we expect of your average doctor! Alessandro spends his time liaising with experts from around the world and working on large-scale projects. For those of us wanting to do our part, Alessandro encourages us to become involved in the WHO, medical school organisations, or other non-medical organisations. Indeed, he sees his best investment as the “time and risk” he put in to leaving the “safe” path of medicine, with a clear goal and the comfort of equifinality in mind (yep, we had to google that one too). He believes life “comes in stages”, and he is happy to sacrifice his work-life balance for the moment to make an impact on the world.At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies 67 mins – “After a long hiatus we are back with a much anticipated look at one of the most feared diseases of all time: rabies. We cover everything from its evolutionary history to its massive case fatality rate, from why it makes you slobber so much to how Pliny the Elder thought you should treat it (spoiler: don’t try it at home, folks).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rheumatology 38 mins – “Dr Michael Gingold is a rheumatology consultant working in Melbourne. Today, we unpack this oft forgotten specialty, in which Michael has an abundance of experience. His training has taken him all over the world, and he is yet to meet a rheumatology consultant that isn’t “happy”. He personally puts this down to the enduring relationships he forms with his long-term patients. The work Michael performs on a daily basis seems intriguing. As with most doctors, he splits his time between public and private practice, with most of this comprising outpatient work, as well as teaching and supervising the trainee program. However, a good chunk of his day is also dedicated towards answering questions from GPs, specialists and patients. Rheumatologists seem to be an accessible, easy-going bunch! He also gives his two cents on why the current “workforce review” might result in a large changeover of staff in the near future, and encourages all of us that are clinically inclined to be a part of this. Many novel and newly-generic medications will continue to change the pharmacological landscape in this time as well…At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. .

Rheumatology 48 min – “Prof Michelle Leech is a rheumatology consultant and deputy dean at Monash University’s Faculty of Medicine. It is hard to believe that she was once a self-described “shy” medical student that dreaded answering questions given her success as a doctor! Today, we walk to Prof Leech about how she evolved from timid medical student to academic pioneer and respected clinician….We talk at length about the “training bottleneck” troubling many specialties, its impact on rheumatology, and where the future of specialty training may lie (literally – and it’s not in hospitals!). Other ideas, such as dual training and flexible working hours, are explained to us by our wonderful mentor. Michelle also gives us fantastic insight into her pathway to being an academic professor and researcher, and how this has helped her clinical work.. Michelle’s advice to use students is to simply “have a rest!”. We debate the origin and future of the hypercompetitive state of medical school which she believes is up to us as a group to “dial up and down”. Her opinion is that work and life exist on a “continuum”, not as separate entities, and that we should pursue that which keeps us “energises, and causes [us] to energise others” rather than to fill out our CVs. Wise words! Work and life is a “continuum”. She also implored young doctors to admit their vulnerability and ignorance, to lean on those around them for support, and share our stories with colleagues, to foster a supportive community that will stay with us through our junior years (and beyond).At the link right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scurvy 62 mins – “Arr, mateys, climb aboard for a swash-buckling tale of when the high seas were full of disease! Today we’re covering a non-infectious but no less terrifying scourge that has wrecked millions of lives and sent even the bravest of sailors quivering in their boots: Scurvy. From the open ocean to the California gold rush to modern times, scurvy has been causing collagen breakdown throughout human history, and we can blame it all on…evolution?” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Driving Cars 19 mins – “Driverless vehicles are being tested at the moment but at the Blind Veterans UK Centre in Ovingdean, Brighton, a six month trial for the use of visually impaired people has just got underway. Reporter Lucy Edwards went to find out what some of the blind veterans think of them. Roy Symons is turning 100 on Friday. His secret to a long life? Keep organised, keep your independence and have a tot of something strong each day. Peter White visits him in his home in Harrow to toast him on his birthday.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

SF Writer Anders 63 mins – “Charlie Jane Anders is the author of The City in the Middle of the Night. She talks with Megan Morrone about starting the sci-fi blog iO9, the difference between futurism and science fiction, and writing believable characters who screw up.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Speech Freedom 56 mins – “What do you have a right to say? Is it ever ok to say whatever you want? In some places, like the United States, freedom of speech basically means you have the right to say nearly anything, and the idea is that the bright light of debate will push untruths aside.  It’s a nice idea, but easier said than done. In most societies, there are restrictions on what it’s alright to say: criticising the president is ok in some places; in others, doing so can land you in prison, or hasten your execution. And of course in the wild and lawless  lands of the internet, anyone appears to be able to say anything — although you might find it safest to say nothing at all….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive 

Technology Giants 66 mins – “Can we live without big tech? Is it even possible to avoid any influence when they dominate the internet today? Megan Morrone speaks with Gizmodo’s investigative reporter Kashmir Hill about her six weeks blocking Google, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft, and Apple from monetizing her in any way whether through surveillance capitalism or using any of their products.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology Titans 62mins – “Amy Webb is the Author of The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans & Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity. She talks with Leo Laporte about the coming age of artificial intelligence and the nine companies that will control it.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tim Cook 57 mins – “Megan Morrone speaks with Leander Kahney, the editor and publisher of CultofMac.com and author of Inside Steve’s BrainJony Ive: The Genius Behind Apple’s Greatest Products, and Cult of Mac, about his latest book, Tim Cook: The Genius Who Took Apple to the Next Level. They discuss Tim’s background and how he started at Apple, how Cook fixed Apple’s supply chain with just-in-time manufacturing, and the clash between Apple and the FBI over iPhone encryption, and more.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tuskegee Airman 50 mins – “The Tuskegee Airmen braved racism and brutally tough training in order to secure their spot in American history as the first African-American military pilots. Listen in today to the story of their determination and heroism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Ulysses S. Grant 60 mins – “John Marszalek, editor of an annotated edition of Ulysses S. Grant’s memoirs, discussed Grant’s process for writing, his relationship with Abraham Lincoln and why he focused on the Civil War and excluded his presidency. This program is from the annual Lincoln Forum symposium.” At the link you can listen, but must purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Vaccines P1 128 mins– “The wait is finally over: this week we are very excited to bring you the episode we’ve been teasing for weeks: vaccines! This week and next (you don’t have to wait a full two weeks for the next episode!), we are presenting a two-part series on vaccines. In today’s episode, we dive deep into the biology of vaccines, from how they stimulate your (amazing) immune system to protect you, to how they make you into an almost-superhero, shielding the innocents around you from deadly infections. We take you back hundreds, nay, thousands of years to when something akin to vaccination first began, and then we walk along the long road of vaccine development to see just how massive an impact vaccines have had on the modern world. The best part? We are joined by not one, but two experts from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Gail Rodgers and Dr. Padmini Srikantiah explain the process of vaccine development, highlight the challenges of vaccine deployment, and shine a hopeful light on the future of vaccines. And be sure to tune in next week for part 2 where we’ll focus on vaccine hesitancy and address common misconceptions surrounding vaccines in even more depth. For more information on the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation initiatives, visit: https://www.gatesfoundation.org/At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccines P2 140 mins – “Were you stoked about the history and biology of vaccines we covered in part 1, but left with even more questions? Were you really hoping to hear us talk about anti-vaccine sentiment and address misconceptions about vaccines in detail? Did you want even more expert guest insight?! Well then do we have the episode for you! Today, we delve into the history of the “anti-vaccine movement” which, spoiler alert, is nothing new. With the help of Dr. Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and Co-director of the Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development we address some of the most common concerns and questions that arise about vaccines, their safety, and their efficacy. And finally, we hear from Bill Nye The Science Guy about dealing with the challenges of science communication in the modern world when diseases spread as fast as fake news headlines. Y’all. This is the episode you’ve been waiting for. You can follow Dr. Peter Hotez on twitter @PeterHotez and check out his book “Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Video Games Future 67 mins – “Jason Howell speaks with returning guest Blake Harris, author of the bestseller Console Wars, about his latest book, The History of the Future: Oculus, Facebook, and the Revolution That Swept Virtual Reality. They discuss Harris’ three-plus years chronicling the meteoric rise of Oculus, the VR company founded by Palmer Luckey in 2012 that was acquired for over $2 billion dollars only two years later; and how he, after being systematically lied to by Facebook executives, uncovered the true story that led to the controversial firing of Luckey.” At the link click “Download options.” then right-click “audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P1 46 mins – “It was the perfect political prop: drugs seized by government agents right across the street from the White House, just in time for a big presidential address. The reality was more complicated.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P2 33 mins – “One day, early in the semester, Keith Jackson didn’t show up to class. He’d been arrested for selling crack, but for his classmates, that wasn’t the surprising part.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P3 49 mins – “The drug bust and the trial were a “farce,” but the full force of the law still came down on Keith Jackson — and thousands of people like him. That didn’t end the crack epidemic, so what did? At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P4 37 mins – “It’s the deadliest drug epidemic our country has ever faced. We go to ground zero, where “nothing changes except for the drug.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P5 44 mins – “It’s not easy being an undercover cop in a county of just 40,000 people. But drugs were making it hard for Bucky Culbertson to run his business, so he made it his business to get rid of drugs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

War on Drugs P6 50 mins – “Many people in Wise County agree that they can’t jail their way out of a drug epidemic, but there’s a lot less agreement on what to do instead. And we find out what happened to Joey Ballard.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Waste Elimination 11 mins – “There’s no such thing as throwing something away, says Andrew Dent — when you toss a used food container, broken toy or old pair of socks into the trash, those things inevitably end up in ever-growing landfills. But we can get smarter about the way we make, and remake, our products. Dent shares exciting examples of thrift — the idea of using and reusing what you need so you don’t have to purchase anything new — as well as advances in material science, like electronics made of nanocellulose and enzymes that can help make plastic infinitely recyclable.” At the link left-click “Share”, right-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Zika Virus 68 mins – “Zika virus may not have as long and storied a history as many diseases we’ve covered, but in a short time it has managed to make a big impression. Today we’ll talk about how Zika wriggled its way out of obscurity and cover its journey from a mosquito’s mouth straight to our newspaper headlines. From the first discovery of the virus in a Ugandan jungle, to the heartbreaking effects only recently discovered, to the future of Zika research and vaccine development, we’ll fill you in on everything you want to know and then some.” At the link right-click “MP2” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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