Mining Digest 396 – Jun 21, 2019: Affordable Care Act Fight, Anti-Vaxx Agenda, Bitcoin Wallet Attack, Blockchain Discussion, Cashless Economy, China’s Digital Currency Experiment, Cyber Breaking and Entering, Disturbing Books, Electronic Discovery, Fake News and Facebook, Farm Bureau Activities, Female Rage, Fertility Research, Fighting Hate Speech, Frederick Douglass, Future of Work, Harm Reduction to Treat Addiction, Internet Poor Quality in U.S., Internet Threat to Children, Investment Decisions, Library Fire, Measles Comeback, Meritocracy Myths, Mobile Device Forensics, Obesity Paradox, Opioid Crisis, Placebo Effect Research, Powerful Woman, Programmer Gender Imbalance, RISC Creation, Self Driving Car Research, Single Payer Health Care, Spouse Death, Test Tube Babies, U.S. Imperialism, Universal Basic Income, Waste Water Treatment, White Power Movement

Exercise your ears: the 58 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 614 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (25,442) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Affordable Care Act Fight 48 mins – “The Trump administration moves to strike down the entire Affordable Care Act. We look at the implications of a full repeal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Canada 22 mins – “What would you do with $125 million dollars and a mandate to advance artificial intelligence research and policy in Canada? If you’re Dr.Elissa Strome, the answer is A LOT. This episode of the Ask AI podcast features an interview with Dr. Elissa Strome, the head of CIFAR’s Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Anti-Vaxx Agenda 6 mins – “…lawmakers in Washington heard from an 18-year-old who, against all odds got his shots. Ethan Lindenberger, who fought with his own mother to get vaccinated, told senators, “for my mother, her love, affection, and care as a parent was used to push an agenda to create a false distress.” That “anti-vaxx” agenda, the dangerous legacy of a thoroughly debunked 1998 study in the British medical journal Lancet, was dealt yet another devastating — though not mortal — blow this week, courtesy of epidemiologists from Denmark’s Staten Serum Institute. Their new study, which included more than 650,000 children, found that the MMR vaccine did not raise the risk of developing autism. And yet, even in the face of study after study, and even as websites like Pinterest have moved to stamp out the spread of anti-vaxx materials on their websites, the debunked vaccine-autism link and its impact on public health live on. In this 2012 interview, Brooke spoke with Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science and Fear, about why these myths persist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Betsy Ross 46 mins – “Betsy Ross is an American icon to many, the seamstress who sewed the first U.S. flag because of a personal commission from George Washington. But is it true? Sort of. Learn all about this fascinating story today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Bitcoin Wallet Attack 6 mins – “In this issue: New Attack Against Electrum Bitcoin Wallets; Machine Learning to Detect Software Vulnerabilities; Using a Fake Hand to Defeat Hand-Vein Biometrics.” At the link find the title, “Crypto-Gram January 15, 2019,” right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bits and Bytes 4 mins – “...If you’ve purchased a laptop lately, you’ve likely been deluged with an array of technical details, like “number of bits.” Thirty-two is passé. Sixty-four is all the rage. Why should we care?…” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2863” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Discussion 34 mins – “In this issue: Evaluating the GCHQ Exceptional Access Proposal; Public-Interest Tech at the RSA Conference; Blockchain and Trust” AT the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-02.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cashless Economy 16 mins – “Can digital payments make physical currency a thing of the past? Cryptpocurrency pioneer Charlie Shrem, founder of Crypto.IQ, says it’s only a matter of time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

China’s Digital Currency Experiment 14 mins – “Join the team from WSJ’s Heard on the Street for a look at China’s futuristic adoption of digital payments and cashless transactions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Chinese Internet Growth 13 mins – “The Chinese internet has grown at a staggering pace — it now has more users than the combined populations of the US, UK, Russia, Germany, France and Canada. Even with its imperfections, the lives of once-forgotten populations have been irrevocably elevated because of it, says South China Morning Post CEO Gary Liu. In a fascinating talk, Liu details how the tech industry in China has developed — from the innovative, like AI-optimized train travel, to the dystopian, like a social credit rating that both rewards and restricts citizens.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cowboys 50 mins – we’re talking about the Wright family of ranchers and rodeo cowboys in central Utah. They’re the subject of a new book that explores the challenges of keeping a foot in the West’s past while trying to navigate its new realities.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Breaking and Entering 27 mins – “What are the distinctions between penetration testing and vulnerability assessments? In this 100th episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Sherri Davidoff about her career as a penetration tester and what she has developed with the companies in the area of cybersecurity. They discuss why law firms should consider pen testing in order to illustrate areas of weakness in security and become better protectors of their information. They also get a sneak peek of Sherri’s upcoming sessions at ABA TECHSHOW 2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Disturbing Books 42 mins – “On this week’s show, thriller fan Alison Flood speaks to Alice Clark-Platts about her terrifying novel The Flower Girls, after finding herself struggling with its most shocking moment. Then Claire, Richard, Sian and Alison share the books they have found unsettling or disturbing, even to the point of being unable to finish them.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Discovery 28 mins – “The processes of eDiscovery and its regulation are constantly changing. The challenges that come with this continuous evolution require lawyers to be educated on best practices. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Doug Austin about the most prominent trends in eDiscovery. They talk about the new developments in data privacy laws from 2018 and discuss the most significant criminal and civil eDiscovery cases.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Facebook Privacy 12 mins – “Judging Facebook’s Privacy Shift” At the link find the title, “Crypto-Gram March 15, 2019,” right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Fake News and Facebook 45 mins – “What’s real? What’s fake? With more than 1 billion people using Facebook, the company’s artificial intelligence algorithms can’t answer these questions, so it hired outside firms to moderate content. These human “content moderators” decide what’s fake, real, satire, inappropriate and illegal. No surprise: It’s not working. In this Komando on Demand podcast, you’ll hear from Brooke Binkwoski, former Facebook fact-checker, about the real story. Find out how Facebook’s content moderators watch the seedy side of life all day, so you don’t have to.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Farm Management 36 mins – “Dick Wittman is the Founder of Wittman Consulting, a company dedicated to training consultants who can help family farm businesses in transitional processes and agricultural finance. Dick is a former manager and the current board chair for a 20,000-acre family farm located in Idaho. He has an extensive farming and ranching background in crops, cattle, and timber. He holds a degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Idaho and a Master’s degree from the University of Utah. Currently, he focuses on public speaking and running Train-the-Trainer workshops, expanding the international resource base of agricultural consultants for family-owned businesses. Dick joins me today to share why it’s important for family farm owners to adopt the “Farm CEO” mindset. He explains why family farm managers need to operate more like executives and how they can change their mindset to function at an executive level. He also shares the skills that are required today to better manage family farm businesses and the importance of being able to adapt your organization to market changes in order to to ensure future success.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar, then selec “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Female Freedom 15 mins – “Kakenya Ntaiya made a deal with her father: She would undergo a traditional Maasai rite of passage, female circumcision, if he would let her go to high school. Ntaiya tells the fearless story of continuing on to college, and of working with her village elders to build a school for girls in her community, changing the destiny of 125 young women.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Poets 54 mins – “Mary Oliver, the beloved American poet who died last month at the age of 83, was described by The New York Times as “far and away this country’s best-selling poet. It does not seem strange at all now that the most prominent of poets should be women, but until relatively recently, poetry was considered, however chauvinistically, as a robustly male preserve. The vast majority of towering figures in English-language poetry were men until around the middle of the 20th Century. But just as Mary Oliver has inspired countless women – and men – with her poetry, her predecessors from decades or a century and a half ago deeply influenced Oliver’s generation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Female Rage 12 mins – “Anger is a powerful emotion — it warns us of threat, insult, indignity and harm. But across the world, girls and women are taught that their anger is better left unvoiced, says author Soraya Chemaly. Why is that, and what might we lose in this silence? In a provocative, thoughtful talk, Chemaly explores the dangerous lie that anger isn’t feminine, showing how women’s rage is justified, healthy and a potential catalyst for change.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fertility Research [3rd item] 32 mins – “Helen Macdonald and Carl Heneghan are back again talking about what’s happened in the world of evidence this month. They start by talking about how difficult a task it is to find evidence that’s definitely practice changing, what GPs can learn from Malawian children with nonsevere fast-breathing pneumonia, how radiation dosage varies substantially – and consultant radiologist Amy Davies what that means for patients. They also rail against add-on tests for fertility, and the lack of evidence underpinning their use – will the traffic light system suggested help patients make treatment choices. Carl’s rant this week is based on a new study by Steve Woloshin and Lisa Schwartz which documented 20 years of medical marketing in the USA.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Fighting Hate Speech 52 mins – “Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. She’s former ACLU president, and she argues that censorship just doesn’t work. The way to resist hate speech, she says, is with more free speech. Nadine Strossen says we should protect hate speech. Strossen is a constitutional law professor and the former president of the ACLU, and she gets why people react so viscerally to racist, sexist, and other hateful language. She says she’s been a target of anti-Semitic and misogynist speech herself. The problem though, she argues in her latest book, is that censorship simply doesn’t work. Strossen joins us to explain why the best way to resist hate speech is with more free speech.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

First Research Lab 4 mins – “…Baron Justus von Liebig was born in Darmstadt in 1803. He took up chemistry when he was seventeen. When he was twenty, he went to Paris for a year to study with the famous French chemist Gay-Lussac. Gay-Lussac opened his eyes to the new idea that we’d need accurate experiments to make sense of chemistry. Liebig came back to a post at the University of Giessen in Germany. There he turned his young man’s enthusiasm on Gay-Lussac’s ideas. He worked single-mindedly to set up a chemical research laboratory. He had to spend his own salary on equipment. By 1827, Liebig had a twenty-man operation, the likes of which the world had never seen. Liebig is honored for his work in organic, pharmacological, and agricultural chemistry. But this laboratory was his greatest contribution. Other chemists had to copy it to keep up with him. It was the first systematic research laboratory, and it changed our thinking. Before Liebig, research was an amateur’s game. Now it was being put into the hands of a new breed of professionals….”At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1652.and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fred Rogers 36 mins – “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood aired its final episode in 2001. Fred Rogers passed away two years later. But the legacy of Mister Rogers is stronger than ever. Last year’s film about Rogers, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor,” became the highest-grossing biographical documentary of all time. And, now, a recently published book tells Fred Rogers’ story from childhood to his status as American icon. It is called “The Good Neighbor: The Life and Work of Fred Rogers.” Diane talks to the book’s author, Maxwell King, about why both children, and adults, continue to turn to Mister Rogers for comfort and guidance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Frederick Douglass 52 mins – “…we’re talking about Fredrick Douglass, escaped slave, educator, and orator. Historian David Blight says that words were his only weapon, and he used his voice to explain the human condition.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future of Work 54 mins – “Boston University professor Ellen Shell talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about her new book, The Job: Work and Its Future in a Time of Radical Change. In this episode: Shell’s background in science and culture journalism; her earlier books, “The Hungry Gene” and “Cheap”; how writing about 1800s department store sales in “Cheap” led to writing “The Job”; what jobs will be automated and how we should prepare; how this transition compares to the Industrial Revolution; the ripple effects of one job being automated; the recent government shutdown; what does it even mean to be employed in the gig economy?; the “skills gap” myth and the opportunities of growing up rich; what should young people in the workforce do now?; will robots ever take all the jobs?” At the link left-click the box with three dots, then right-click “Download file” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Harm Reduction to Treat Addiction 14 mins – “Why do we still think that drug use is a law-enforcement issue? Making drugs illegal does nothing to stop people from using them, says public health expert Mark Tyndall. So, what might work? Tyndall shares community-based research that shows how harm-reduction strategies, like safe-injection sites, are working to address the drug overdose crisis.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Needs 28 mins – “3D printed steaks, One cheap pill to treat most of aging by Ian Woolf, Nathan Waters examines Human Needs, now and into the future – part 1” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Poor Quality in U.S. 32 mins – “The United States prides itself on being a country of innovation. But in the land that built the internet, our ability to get access to high speed quality service is not on par with other countries in Europe and Asia. Harvard law professor Susan Crawford says as the country slips further behind, we jeopardize our place as a leader in the tech revolution. Susan Crawford’s new book is called “Fiber: The Coming Tech Revolution―And Why America Might Miss It.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Internet Threat to Children 17 mins – “Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From “surprise egg” reveals and the “Finger Family Song” to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. “We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them,” Bridle says.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Decisions 44 mins – “Are you missing out on millions of dollars for your retirement? After deciding to save and invest, the most important investment decision of your life, in Paul’s opinion, is what this podcast addresses. Of the Millennials investing in 401k plans, nearly 25% are refusing to take the risk of investing in stocks (equities) and are choosing only to invest in bonds (fixed income), which they see as “secure”. Secure as bonds may be, Paul is concerned that young investors are missing out on what could be millions of dollars difference in their retirement savings. He makes a strong case that the worst of equity returns are better than the best of fixed-income returns. In comparing the returns of four major U.S. equity asset classes with three fixed-income asset classes, it is clear that those — especially in their early years — who do not “take the risk” of investing in equities — will lose out on significant increases to their long-term retirement plan, based on historical evidence. The point is, if you’re going to bother saving and investing for your future, why not maximize your returns with little additional risk, especially when you have time on your side?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Len Deighton Novels 54 mins – “The great era of the spy novel was the 1970’s and ’80s, and the three masters of the genre were all British: John le Carré, Ian Fleming and Len Deighton. Fleming arguably was in a genre all by himself, writing tongue-in-cheek romance thrillers, wearing just the tuxedo jacket of the spy novel. But the other two were up to something different — the spy novel for them was a vehicle to explore ideas of class, of ideology and disillusionments in life.Where were the gains that the post-war era had promised? In the Cold War with the Soviets, it didn’t seem like we were winning much of anything…” At the link you can listen, bu tnot download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Library Fire 51 mins – “…we’re talking about libraries and their place in today’s digital world. Our guide is the writer Susan Orlean, whose latest book tells the story of a devastating fire that swallowed the Los Angeles Central Library in 1986.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Linux Creation 4 mins – “….My computer-wise friends have all been at me to do a program about the computer operating system Linux. That might strike you as odd, but Linux has almost religious implications among computer people. It has become an emblem of the altruism to which so much of the computer underworld aspires. Linux is an operating system, like those used to run Windows or Macintosh machines. Linux, however, is available to anyone, free of charge….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 1669.” and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Measles Comeback 27 mins – “Dr. Brian Goldman looks at the global spread of measles, what it means to Canadians, and how we went from believing the disease was cornered to a crisis point in less than 2 years. Brian speaks to Jayda Kelsall, an Ottawa cancer patient with up-to-date vaccines, who contracted the disease on a trip to the UK, and New York Times “plagues and pestilences” reporter, Donald G. McNeil Jr., who has traced the origins of the current outbreak in New York, and the resurgence of measles around the world.” At the link find the title, The measles comeback,” right-click ”Download The measles comeback” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meritocracy Myths 50 mins – “A college admissions scandal has highlighted what people refer to as “the myth of meritocracy.” But actually, meritocracy itself is a myth. This week, On the Media looks at the satirical origins of the word and what they tell us about why the US embraces it. Plus, the messaging for and against Medicare for All, as well as a historical look at why we don’t have universal healthcare. And economic historian and Tucker Carlson antagonist Rutger Bregman.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Device Forensics 31 mins – “In our increasingly mobile world, lawyers face many new challenges in digital forensics for their practice. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Brett Burney about what lawyers need to know about digital forensics on mobile devices. They discuss Brett’s mobile data collection spectrum, which outlines methods of data collection and preservation for lawyers and their clients. Brett gives tips on what lawyers should consider in these processes to ensure the best results, including the importance of hiring digital forensics technologists when lawyers are uncomfortable with technology. Brett Burney is Principal of Burney Consultants LLC, and focuses the bulk of his time on bridging the chasm between the legal and technology frontiers of electronic discovery. He is also the author of the free download eDiscovery Buyers Guide at http://www.ediscoverybuyersguide.com.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mountaintop Dynamo 4 mins – “Today, we install a dynamo on a mountaintop. The University of Houston’s College of Engineering presents this series about the machines that make our civilization run, and the people whose ingenuity created them….” At the link right-clickClick here for audio of Episode 1656.and select “Save Link As’ from the pop-up menu.

Obesity Paradox [first item] 27 mins- “It is well known that being overweight or obese puts a person at a higher risk of stroke, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and many other conditions. But new research suggests that if a person does have a stroke, they are more likely to survive it if they are overweight. This adds evidence to what is known as the obesity paradox; namely that obesity puts you at risk, but might protect you in certain circumstances. Claudia speaks to the study author Dr Zuolu Liu, Vascular Neurology Fellow at the University of California Los Angeles Medical Center. Algae, cacti and the horseradish tree – they may sound like parts of nature you would observe on a hike but, according to a new report, these are among the 50 so-called foods of the future we should all be eating. The report, compiled by the food manufacturers Knorr, WWF-UK and the Center of Public Health Nutrition at the University of Washington, is hoping to help find solutions to how we can reduce the impact our food has on the environment. And give us some health benefits as well. The BBC’s Katie Silver went along to taste some of the ingredients in Paris and New York. Have you ever been in such terrible pain that you cannot even find the words to describe it? Or cannot convince your doctor quite how bad it is? New research says this can often happen to women with endometriosis, who wait seven years on average to get a diagnosis. Dr Stella Bullo, a Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at Manchester Metropolitan University, and an endometriosis patient herself, studied the experiences of 150 women with endometriosis. She found that many of them found it hard to communicate the extent of their pain, and some resorted to metaphors to try and describe it. Her research has just been published in the journal Health: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Crisis 24 mins – “Purdue Pharma has settled a lawsuit with the state of Oklahoma for $270 million, a larger figure than two other cases the company has settled with other states. In doing so, the company also avoided a televised trial in May at a time when there’s been growing public pressure on Purdue and its owners, the Sackler family, amid allegations that they misled the public about the dangers of OxyContin. Back in 2017, Bob spoke with Barry Meier about how public discourse about chronic pain and treatment have been shaped by companies like Purdue with help from physicians, consultants, and the media. Meier is a former reporter for The New York Times and author of Pain Killer: A “Wonder” Drug’s Trail of Addiction and Death. Bob also interviewed journalist Anna Clark about her reporting for the Columbia Journalism Review on opioid-related death notices. Sites like Legacy.com, she explained, have often chronicled the crisis’ individual human toll.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Periodic Table Anniversary 54 mins – “The world, the universe, is a mess of molecules and muck. Within the chaos, though, a cosmic harmony plays the secret song of nature, and the music of matter. You just have to be able to read the music. Contributor Ian Wilkinson unravels the universal chords as the world honours the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev’s creation of the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Placebo Effect Research 62 mins – “Author and psychotherapist Gary Greenberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the placebo effect. Is it real? How does the placebo effect influence drug testing? If it’s real, what is the underlying mechanism of why it works and how might it be harnessed to improve health care? The conversation concludes with a discussion of how knowledge of the placebo effect has influenced Greenberg’s psychotherapy practice.” At the link right-click Download: and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powerful Woman 13 mins – “Everyone’s heard of Martin Luther King Jr. But do you know the woman Dr. King called “the architect of the civil rights movement,” Septima Clark? The teacher of some of the generation’s most legendary activists — like Rosa Parks, Diane Nash, Fannie Lou Hamer and thousands more — Clark laid out a blueprint for change-making that has stood the test of time. Now T. Morgan Dixon and Vanessa Garrison, the cofounders of GirlTrek, are taking a page from Clark’s playbook to launch a health revolution in the US — and get one million women walking for justice. (This ambitious idea is part of the Audacious Project, TED’s initiative to inspire and fund global change.)” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Programmer Gender Imbalance 48 mins – “Algorithms influence everything we do now. Who’s creating them? Understanding coders and why how they think is changing how we live. Clive Thompson and Vaidehi Joshi join Meghna Chakrabarti. Also, the Jussie Smollett case. Miles Bryan joins.” At the link right-click the circle with three dots, then left-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Rape Kits 53 mins – “Rape kits are simple forensic evidence collection kits used when someone is sexually assaulted. But the story is deeper than this. Learn all about rape kits, the sad backlog problem, and what you can do to help, in today’s episode.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

RISC Definition 4 mins – “…In the early 1980s academic research challenged the notion that more was better. Instead of introducing ever more complicated instructions, researchers advocated the opposite. If an instruction set had simpler instructions, but worked very efficiently with a processor, computers would get faster. The name given to this approach went by the acronym RISC, for Reduced Instruction Set Computing….” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2865” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Self Driving Car Research 67 mins – “Five years ago at the Code Conference, self-driving cars seemed as though they were just around the corner: Google unveiled the project that would later become Waymo, and Uber’s then-CEO Travis Kalanick stirred controversy when he talked about the benefits of replacing human drivers. But in 2019, autonomous vehicle prototypes are a rarity in most cities outside of San Francisco, and humans are still vital to companies like Uber and its first-to-IPO rival Lyft. That’s because self-driving is a really, really hard technological problem, Ford CTO Ken Washington said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher. But, very slowly, beginning in 2021, you’re going to start seeing cars with no one in the driver’s seat….” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Shipping Containers 4 mins – “Shipping containers didn’t exist in 1950. Today, roughly seventeen million travel the world on ships, trains, and trucks. Laid end to end, they’d stretch around the globe almost four-and-a-half times. Managing their movement is an engineering feat in its own right. It’s work enough transporting a full container to its destination. But then comes another question — what to do with the empty?..” At the link right-click “Click here for audio of Episode 2879” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Singe Payer Health Care 52 mins – “we’re beginning a series of conversations about health care in the country and the best way to get it to the most people. There are a lot of ideas, but we’re going to begin with the single-payer model. Joseph Jarvis is a doctor and a public health consultant who’s written a book about his experiences in the system. He’s also a self-described conservative, which is why he says single-payer makes sense. It’s fiscally responsible, it can be state-based, and health care is a moral issue. Dr. Joseph Jarvis is a physician and a consultant in public health and environmental medicine. His book is called The Purple World: Healing the Harm in American Health Care.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Socialism History 47 mins – “President Trump says the U.S. will never be a socialist country. Some Democrats embrace the “democratic socialist” label. But what does socialism really mean? What’s its history?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spiritual Partnerships 32 mins – “Spiritual pioneer, teacher and New York Times best-selling author Gary Zukav and his wife Linda Francis discuss spiritual partnerships. Gary and Linda share what they’ve identified as “phases of a deeply connected relationship.” The couple describes the unusual way they met, their perspective on lasting love and how spiritual partnerships can help you find greater joy and happiness in life. Gary and Linda are co-founders of The Seat of the Soul Institute. Gary also talks about the inspirations for his book “Spiritual Partnership: The Journey to Authentic Power.” More than six million copies of Gary’s books are in print and translations have been published in 32 languages.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Spouse Death 14 mins – “In her brutally honest, ironically funny and widely read meditation on death, “You May Want to Marry My Husband,” the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness. A year after her death, Jason offers candid insights on the often excruciating process of moving through and with loss — as well as some quiet wisdom for anyone else experiencing life-changing grief.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Test Tube Babies 16 mins – “The world’s first test-tube baby turns 40 this year, but human reproduction is still one of medical science’s great mysteries. From artificial sperm to AI-powered analysis of embryos, a look at how science is changing the way we make babies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

U.S. Imperialism 53 mins – “Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States. This is Part 2 of our series, “On American Expansion. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Universal Basic Income 15 mins – “There’s a record wealth gap in the U.S. today. Entrepreneur and Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes says it’s time to talk about providing at least $500 a month to every American worker making less than $50,000 a year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Wastewater Treatment 4 mins – “…So what exactly do wastewater treatment plants do with the wastewater? The solid and liquid components are separated. The solids are sent to a digester, so-called because special bacteria are introduced to digest the sludge — that’s the technical term. The process kills potentially harmful bacteria and creates biogas as a byproduct. The gas can in turn be used to power the plant. What’s left of the solids is used for fertilizer or sent to a sanitary landfill. The vast majority of the waste that arrives at a wastewater treatment plant is liquid; and not just any liquid, but water — with trace amounts of other compounds. Small amounts of chlorine are used to kill whatever bacteria become suspended in the water, after which it’s discharged into rivers or oceans. So in the end, wastewater treatment is less about back lot dealings with the unmentionable than it is about simply reclaiming water….” At the link right-click Click here for audio of Episode 2894and select ‘save Link As from the pop-up menu.

White Power Movement 51 mins – “…we’re talking about the roots of the resurgent white power movement. In a new book, historian Kathleen Belew traces the movement’s consolidation back to the 1970s, when some soldiers returned from Vietnam feeling betrayed by their government.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

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About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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