Mining Digest 408 – Sep 13, 2019: African Chickens, Broadband in Colorado, Cannabinoid Sensitivity, Chinese Surveillance App, Climate Crisis, Climate Pioneers, Cryogenic Preservation, Cuba Visit, Dark Matter Impact, Data Storage, Decision Making, Digital Minimalism, Ethical Perils for Lawyers, European Economic Trends, Food Banks, Great Recession, Homeless in San Francisco, Hospitalists Use, Internet Privacy, Jim Acosta and Trump, Ku Klux Klan Investigator, Liberty in America, Middlemen, Monopolies, Music and Emotions, Northwest Territory Pioneers, Obesity Research, Red Scare of the 40’s, Right to Repair Movement, Russian Political Interference, Stanford Archives, Sweatshops, Trade Trends, Tree Top Canopy, Trump and Putin

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 501 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Chickens 63 mins – “Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about whether it’s better to give poor Africans cash or chickens and the role of experiments in helping us figure out the answer. Along the way he discusses the importance of growth vs. smaller interventions and the state of development economics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Banking Crisis 58 mins – “It’s quite a feat to write the “standard work” about an historical moment while that moment is still occurring, but that’s what the jury of the 2019 Lionel Gelber Prize believe Adam Tooze did with his book, Crashed: How a Decade of Financial Crises Changed the World. Adam Tooze is an Anglo-German historian based in New York. That confluence of expertise and geography gives him particular insight into the 2008 financial crash. He argues against the prevailing “national American narrative” of excessive “pride and hubris” around the U.S. subprime mortgage crisis, and the idea that the U.S. crisis slammed into connected economies.  Instead of a broken relationship between the economies of nations, Tooze says that it was a precarious financing situation between banks worldwide, particularly those in America and North Atlantic Europe, that led to the meltdown. The effects of the crisis were felt everywhere: from the loss of peoples’ homes and savings in places like Ireland and the southern U.S., to years of political fallout in Ukraine and Eastern Europe. The fragilities of our financial system aren’t the result of any glitch, Adam Tooze maintains. They’re baked into global capitalism. Some international regulators, such as Indian economist Raghuram Rajan, tried to sound the alarm before 2008 — but to no avail. Even as things appear to stabilize, and economies grow, the 2008 crisis has led to profound changes around the world. Adam Tooze points to the 30 per cent unemployment rate for young people in Spain as an example of the crash’s impact on entire generations.  In the end, these enmeshed global structures seem outside of individual control. But that does not mean people are powerless.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is in this blog archive.

Broadband in Colorado 28 mins – “This week, we’re bringing another podcast interview that Christopher conducted while at Mountain Connect in Colorado. David Young, former Fiber Infrastructure and Right-of-Way Manager for the city of Lincoln, Nebraska, sat down to reminisce about the city’s network that began as conduit and has evolved into citywide Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH). David has moved on to Kansas City in Kansas, but he was deeply involved in the advancement of Lincoln’s network that has done so much for competition and better connectivity in Lincoln. In addition to all the direct benefits that the city is enjoying from a gigabit fiber network, there’s a long list of indirect benefits that David and Christopher discuss that affect sectors such as education, economic development, and public safety. Along with sharing the many ways the fiber infrastructure has helped the city and it’s people, David shares words of wisdom for other communities who may be considering similar investments. He offers some technical advice on deployment, important factors for communities working in a state with restrictions, and thoughts on their decision to choose a public-private partnership model.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cannabinoid Sensitivity 18 mins – “Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is a relatively newly recognised condition – but, according to one study, can account for up to 6% of patients presenting to emergency departments. The causal mechanism is as yet unclear – but currently the only known way to prevent the syndrome is for the patient to stop their cannabis use. Yaniv Chocron, chief resident at Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland talks us through spotting the condition, and what we think might be the mechanism of action.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Surveillance App 41 mins – “Travellers to China through Kyrgyzstan are being forced to install a surveillance app on their phones. Professor Thorsten Holt is on the programme to explain, with the help of investigative journalists, how he has hacked into and analysed this surveillance app. He says the app compiles a report on your phone contacts, text messages and even your social media accounts, as well as searching for over 73,000 specific files.; Robotic Endoscopy – Endoscopies are medical procedures that involve threading a camera through the body to see inside. Anyone who has had one will know how uncomfortable they can be. But, they are also challenging for the doctor – taking on average 100 to 250 procedures to be able to perform well. Reporter Madeleine Finlay met Dr Joe Norton, who is part of an international team developing an intelligent robotic system that could make it a lot less painful for both the patient and clinician.; Game Designing: Mentoring the Next Generation – Mathew Applegate works with over 300 young people in Suffolk on game design, and has just won the BAFTA Young Game Designers Mentor Award. Having been a hacker and spent time working for the government, Mathew then set up his Creative Computing Club in 2012, which delivers courses on game design, robotics, AI, VR and much more. He spoke to us on why he believes game design is so beneficial for the young people of Suffolk.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change and Trump 41 mins – “The Trump administration has ordered federal agencies to stop publishing worst-case scenario projections of climate change. This week, On the Media examines the administration’s pattern of attacks on climate science. Plus, a look at the dark money behind environmental deregulation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Issues 36 mins – “We revisit the archive as Ian Sample looks at why some people continue to deny anthropogenic global heating, despite the scientific evidence. Could better communication be the key? And what tips can scientists and journalists take from political campaigns?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Crisis 48 mins – “There’s no greater threat to humanity than climate change. What can we do to stop the worst consequences? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can save our planet and whether we can do it in time.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Listen to full show” but not download; however, a copy is includeed in this blog archive.

Climate Pioneers 28 mins– “Since 1973, the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement has been bestowed upon people who have made a significant impact in the fight for a sustainable planet. Last week on Sea Change Radio, we spoke with noted activist climate scientist Michael Mann, who was one of two recipients of this year’s Tyler Prize. This week, we are honored to speak with the other Tyler Prize Laureate, Warren Washington, to learn about the beginnings of his groundbreaking career as an atmospheric scientist. Dr. Washington was the second African American to receive a PhD in meteorology. He’s a former chair of the National Science Board, and currently a senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. After our conversation with Dr. Washington, we chat with this year’s Tyler Prize panel moderator Kelly Sims-Gallagher, a professor at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, about the evolving intersection of global affairs and climate science.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryogenic Preservation 30 mins – “Last year, around 3,500 organs were transplanted into patients in the UK alone. That said, a large number of organs were also discarded because the moment a donor dies, doctors have only eight or so hours to find a patient on the organ register who is a match and can be almost immediately ready for surgery. One recent estimate suggested that as many as 60% of the hearts and lungs donated for transplantation are discarded each year. But a new technology could be about to change this: whole-organ cryopreservation. This week, Hannah Devlin looks at the past, present, and future of these technologies with University College London’s Professor Barry Fuller. We also hear from Newcastle University bioethicist Dr Simon Woods about some of the ethical issues that arise with any biotechnology, including cryopreservation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cuba Visit 62 mins – “Casey Mulligan of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about life in Cuba. Mulligan, who recently returned from a trip to Cuba, discusses the economy, the standard of living and some of the peculiarities of communist control.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Matter Impact 31 mins – “Of all the scientific advances of the last century, few are more impressive than the discovery that the matter familiar to us on Earth is quite different from the stuff that makes up most of the universe. A whacking 85% of the universe is made of something astronomers called “dark matter”. Its existence was first proposed only in the 1930s: as Lady Bracknell might have said, to have been unaware of a little of the matter in the universe would be unfortunate, to be ignorant of 85% of it looks like sheer carelessness. Dark matter has proved to be a headache for scientists. Even after decades of careful study, there is still plenty of room for theoretical speculation about how the matter behaves, as Lisa Randall demonstrates. In her book, she sets out a new idea about its behaviour and then uses it to offer an explanation as to why the dinosaurs were wiped out 65m years ago. This might sound outlandish, but Randall’s impressive record as an imaginative scientist entitles her to a fair hearing. She is a theoretical physicist at Harvard University, and has conceived several radical ideas that have become mainstream thinking. Most famously, she co-authored a theory that implies the possible existence of dimensions in addition to the three we are all familiar with, and that these extra dimensions may be observable by means of the Large Hadron Collider at the Cern laboratory. If they were to be detected, she would be a shoo-in for a Nobel prize.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Storage 27 mins – “If data is the new oil, are data centres the new oil rigs? Far into the north of Europe, under half a year of darkness, where the landscape has inspired folklore and legend, are some of the biggest data centres in the world. The frozen mountains and deep fjords under the aurora hide the “dark fibre“ for the modern internet to function in the way we all want it to – instantly and reliably. Ninety percent of the world’s data has been created in the last few years, and as a more internet enabled future, with AI and the internet of things, becomes reality – data more than ever needs a physical home. This requires energy, and by 2020 some estimate around 20% of the world’s energy supply will be used to process data. This can be hugely costly, and damaging for the environment. Norway – which became so rich from oil and gas thinks data mines might be part of a new economic future away from fossil fuels. Abundant renewable energy means it’s cheap to cool the hot whirring servers – the cold landscape itself also lends itself to housing data. We visit a huge data mine in a former mineral mine, next to a deep fjord, and hear how the data is pinged back and forth across the globe. But it’s not as simple as that, as the Sami, the traditional people of the region have found traditional lands in some parts spoiled by huge hydroelectric dams. Modernity and tradition go hand in hand in the far north of Europe, where legends of trolls in mountain caves sit alongside some of the most high tech companies in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Decision Making 83 mins – “Psychologist Charlan Nemeth of the University of California, Berkeley and author of In Defense of Troublemakers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in the book–the power of groupthink, the power of conviction, and the opportunity for an authentic, persistent dissenter to have an impact on a group’s decision. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the challenges of doing careful research in modern times.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Threat 67 mins – “Author and legal scholar Cass Sunstein of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, #Republic. Sunstein argues that the internet has encouraged people to frequent informational echo chambers where their views are reinforced and rarely challenged. In addition, there is a loss of public space where people might have to encounter dissonant ideas or causes they might wish to champion. Sunstein considers this a threat to democracy and discusses a variety of ways the situation might improve.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digital Minimalism 30 mins – “Georgetown University’s Cal Newport discusses his book, “Digital Minimalism,” in which he questions the value of being digitally connected all the time.” At the link find the title, “Cal Newport, “Digital Minimalism” in the Communicators section, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Perils for Lawyers 24 mins – “Of the 46% of judges using social media, 80% are on Facebook and over 30% are on LinkedIn, but activity on social media presents a number of ethical dilemmas for judges, attorneys, jurors, and litigants. In a recent case in Georgia, a judge stepped down after being scrutinized for sending a friend request to a litigant on his upcoming trial calendar and later releasing her on a personal recognizance bond. Similar activities from other judges and attorneys have resulted in violations of both the Code of Professional Conduct and the Code of Judicial Conduct, from unauthorized practice of law across state lines and breaching attorney-client privilege to posting inappropriate comments and sending friend requests to litigants and related attorneys. These ethical perils extend to jurors, who must be reminded of their own limitations in social media use with regard to pending trials. On this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview Judge Herbert B. Dixon, Jr., discussing stories of collateral damage associated with inappropriate social media use and ways legal professionals can avoid ethical missteps. Stay tuned at the end for Judge Dixon’s 4 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Posting on Social Media.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

European Economic Trends 63 mins – “What is the future of the European economy? What are the challenges facing Europe? What are the implications of Brexit for the United Kingdom and the rest of the Europe? Nicholas Crafts of the University of Warwick, Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics, and Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more in front of a live audience at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evernote Value 27 mins – “Many people, including lawyers, are using an organizational tool called Evernote and are singing its praises. They are enthusiastic about its capacity to capture all types of information in many formats, to organize information into useful notebooks, and to enable access to that information across multiple platforms. In a time when almost everything is done online, Evernote is a user-friendly web service that can help lawyers stay organized, freeing up time for marketing and taking on new clients.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Audio As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Banks 63 mins – “If you have 250 million tons of food to give away every year to local food banks how should you do it? Canice Prendergast of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how he and a team of economists created an artificial currency and a daily auction for the national food bank Feeding America so that local food banks could bid on the types of food that were the most valuable to them. Prendergast explains the results of the new system and the cultural and practical challenges of bringing prices, even artificial ones, to a world accustomed to giving things away.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Great Recession 66 mins – “Was the Financial Crisis of 2008 caused by a crisis in the housing market? Or did the Federal Reserve turn a garden-variety recession into the Great Recession? David Beckworth of Western Kentucky University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Fed’s response to the recession that began in December of 2007 and worsened in 2008. Beckworth argues that the Fed failed to respond adequately to the drop in nominal GDP by keeping interest rates too high for too long. Beckworth describes what he thinks the Fed should have done and the lessons we should learn going forward to reduce the severity of future downturns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare in U.S. 66 mins – “Historian Christy Ford Chapin of University of Maryland Baltimore County and Johns Hopkins and author of Ensuring America’s Health talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book–a history of how America’s health care system came to be dominated by insurance companies or government agencies paying doctors per procedure. Chapin explains how this system emerged from efforts by the American Medical Association to stop various reform efforts over the decades. Chapin argues that different models might have emerged that would lead to a more effective health care system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Historical Perspectives 63 mins – “Chuck Klosterman, author of But What If We’re Wrong, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the possibility that things we hold to be undeniably true may turn out to be totally false in the future. This wide-ranging conversation covers music and literary reputations, fundamentals of science, and issues of self-deception and illusion.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless in San Francisco 58 mins – “Podcaster and writer Erica Sandberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about homelessness in San Francisco. Sandberg talks about what the city can do about homelessness and her experience with Downtown Streets Team, which gives homeless people in the Bay Area the chance to work in exchange for gift cards that let them buy food and other basics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hospitalists Use 69 mins – “Physician David Meltzer of the University of Chicago talks about the power of the doctor-patient relationship with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Meltzer, who also has a Ph.D. in economics, discusses a controlled experiment he has been running to measure the importance of maintaining the continuity of doctor-patient relationships. Meltzer argues that the increasing use of hospitalists–specialists who take over a patient from the patient’s regular doctor once the patient is hospitalized–has raised costs and hurt patients. The initial results from his study show that patients who stay with their doctors have fewer subsequent hospitalizations and have better mental health. The conversation closes with a discussion of the challenges facing the current medical system to adopt cost-saving or life-improving technology or techniques.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Information Growth 63 mins – “Cesar Hidalgo of MIT and the author of Why Information Grows talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the growth of knowledge and know-how in the modern economy. Hidalgo emphasizes the importance of networks among innovators and creators and the role of trust in sustaining those networks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Internet Privacy 27 mins – “C-SPAN conducts interviews with digital activists and thinkers at the State of Net Conference. This week’s guests, Daniel Weitzner of MIT, and Mary Stone Ross, co-author of the California Privacy Act, discuss digital privacy.” At the link in the Communications section, find the title, “Daniel Weitzner & Mary Stone Ross on privacy” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Growth versus Value 33 mins – ““When I see a title that addresses the value vs. growth issue, you’ve got my attention,” says Paul. “A new article by Dr. Craig L. Israelsen titled, This piece of evidence could derail the growth vs. value debate, opened my eyes to the huge differences similar indices earn over similar periods of time. From his findings, it is easy to see how two investors – theoretically in the same index fund – could have substantially different returns.” For those interested in other research from Dr. Israelsen, check out his website. To review the SPIVA tables and report, click here.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Acosta and Trump 39 mins – “Few journalists have been as visible during the Trump administration as CNN’s Jim Acosta. Over the last few years he has become known for his aggressive questioning of the president. While some applaud Acosta’s tenacity, he has also received accusations of grandstanding, and the president, himself, has lashed out, calling Acosta “the enemy of the people.” It is a term President Trump has used to describe the media, in general, at least 30 times on Twitter since taking office. And, now, it is also the title of Jim Acosta’s new book, “Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ku Klux Klan Investigator 58 mins – “Daryl Davis talked about his efforts over the past 30 years to befriend members of the Ku Klux Klan to try to understand their hatred and to convince them that they are wrong. He also spoke at length about his love of and the influence on his life of rock and roll pioneer Chuck Berry, describing the time he played piano with Mr. Berry on the “Late Show with David Letterman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Liberty in America 64 mins – “What is the state of liberty in America? Is liberty increasing or decreasing? Should we be optimistic or pessimistic about the future? This week EconTalk features David Boaz, P. J. O’Rourke, and George Will discussing these questions and more with EconTalk host Russ Roberts in front of a live audience at the Cato Institute.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Library Day 52 mins – “As National Libraries Day approaches, we salute these temples of learning with the writers Ali Smith, Jackie Kay and Tom Holland, and head across the Channel to find out what’s on the shelves of the library in Calais’ Jungle More than just a stack of books, libraries are cultural powerhouses that fuel intellectual life. We hear about the central part they play in the life of the writer Ali Smith, and how a decommissioned library was the spark for her latest collection of short stories. Next we head for Calais, where Susannah Tresilian found how a volunteer-run library is offering hope to those in the most desperate straits. Back in the studio, Tom Holland explains the intricacies of the Public Lending Right, and we finish with Jackie Kay, who reads from her poem Dear Library.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Memory Formats 45 mins – “How can we construct a sense of self from the fragments of life we can recall? We dissect how science and fiction shed light on the mysteries of memoryScience and the humanities are too often poles apart, so two of the UK’s most distinguished institutions decided to do something about it. At a special event hosted at the Royal Society in London, and co-presented by the Royal Society of Literature, travel writer and novelist Colin Thubron took to the stage with neuroscientist Jon Aggleton. They discussed issues of memory, emotion and brain structure raised by Thubron’s latest book, a tale of six tenants and a landlord whose innermost thoughts and values are illuminated by a conflagration in the house where they all live.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Middlemen 72 mins – “Mike Munger of Duke University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the often-vilified middleman–someone who buys cheap, sells dear and does nothing to improve the product. Munger explains the economic function of arbitrage using a classic article about how prices emerged in a POW camp during World War II. Munger then applies the analysis to the financial crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopolies 28 mins – “Carl Szabo of NetChoice and Gene Kimmelman, president and CEO of Public Knowledge, debated the pros and cons of breaking up big tech firms like Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Music and Emotions 30 mins – “In the fourth instalment of Brain waves, Dr Kevin Fong and Nathalie Nahai explore the power that music has to trigger our emotions, and ask if there’s an evolutionary function behind it all. Plus, why do sad songs say so much?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neil deGrasse Tyson 33 mins – “Visiting the Hayden Planetarium as a young boy, Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson immediately fell in love with the world of astronomy. Fast forward a couple of decades, and Neil continues to inspire people from all generations. Through his role as the director at the very planetarium that first sparked his interest, and as an author, presenter, and communicator, Neil’s enthusiasm for the subject he loves is truly unrivalled. This week, he sat down with Nicola Davis to discuss his own journey, the importance of his role models, and the benefits of sceptical thought, both in science and further afield. He also discusses chapters from his new book Welcome to the Universe, including his thoughts on why Pluto is not a planet, and whether intelligent civilisations might exist elsewhere.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Northwest Territory Pioneers 58 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough recounted the pioneers who settled the Northwest Territory. He spoke at the 19th annual National Book Festival in Washington, DC.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Obesity Research 26 mins – “Why do some of us pile on the pounds, while others seem to get away with it? Hannah Devlin speaks to Dr Giles Yeo about some of the latest findings from the field of obesity research – from the role of our genes and how heritable our weight is, to how, as a society, we’ve become overweight and what we can do about it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Primatologist 28 mins – ‘What can we learn from chimps when it comes to politics and power? Ian Sample meets the leading primatologist Prof Frans de Waal of Emory University to discuss good leadership and what we can learn from our closest living relatives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Red Scare of the 40’s 59 mins – “Journalist and author David Maraniss discussed his book A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Right to Repair Movement 47 mins – “The companies that build our smartphones, our cars and our appliances don’t want you or your repairman to be able to fix them. And the “right-to-repair” movement is fighting back.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Russian Political Interference 47 mins -”With or without collusion, Russia’s threat to American elections is real and ongoing. We explore vulnerabilities and fixes with top cybersecurity experts.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Stanford Archives 64 mins – “What does an x-ray of Hitler’s skull have in common with a jar of Ronald Reagan’s jelly beans? They are both part of the Hoover Institution archives. Eric Wakin, Director of the Library and Archives of the Hoover Institution at Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about what it’s like to be an archivist and the importance of archival materials for research, culture, and memory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sweatshops 76 mins – “If you were a poor person in a poor country, would you prefer steady work in a factory or to be your own boss, buying and selling in the local market? Economist Chris Blattman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about experimental evidence on how poor people choose in the labor market and the consequences for their income, health, and satisfaction.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trade Trends 74 mins – “David Autor of MIT talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the fundamentals of trade and his research on the impact on workers and communities from trade with China. Autor’s research finds large and persistent effects on manufacturing jobs and communities where those jobs once were. Autor and Roberts discuss whether these results capture the full impact of increased trade with China and what the policy response might be that could help workers hurt by trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tree Top Canopy 54 mins – “Trees and forests may just be key to the survival of life on our planet. As a pioneering scientist and explorer of the world’s “eighth continent” — its tree canopy — Dr. Meg Lowman knows that trees can be a lifesaver — both professionally, and personally. As a painfully shy girl in upstate New York, tree houses were Meg’s refuge from hostile primary school classmates, envious of her good marks. Her studies in forest science led to a career as “the Einstein of Trees.” To help others learn, she’s created a system of canopy walkways that draw visitors, and preserve forests, around the world.  Dr. Meg Lowman is the Director of Global Initiatives, Lindsay Chair of Botany and Senior Scientist in Plant Conservation California Academy of Sciences. Paul Kennedy visited this self-described “arbournaut” in Florida’s Myakka River State Park.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trump and Putin 50 mins – “Journalists Michael Isikoff and David Corn discuss Russia’s long simmering plan to undermine American democracy, and how the U.S. Intelligence Community failed to see the warning signs in 2016.  They delve into a rogue’s gallery of Russia enablers from Paul Manafort to Carter Paige and analyze why the Trump campaign and Russian cyberattackers seemed to be so suspiciously in sync.  They talk about President Donald Trump’s strange infatuation with Vladimir Putin, why President Obama didn’t do more to stop Russian interference before it was too late, and what was Donald Trump up to in that infamous Moscow hotel room in 2013.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Trumpocracy 47 mins – “We’re talking with The Atlantic’s David Frum about his new book about President Trump, called “Trumpocracy: The Corruption of The American Republic.” Frum’s argument: Trump is undermining American institutions.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.