Mining Digest 410 – Sep 27, 2019: Black Womanhood, CBD and THC, Central Park Five, Danger and Risk, Democracy Revival, Doctors Fight Bullies, Evictions, Fake News Industry, Foot and Mouth Disease, Girls Who Code, Hate Speech Online, Honor Killings, IGNITE talks, Impact Investing, Intolerance In Europe, Investing for Life, Investing in Target-Date Funds, Jobs and Technology, JUNO Jupiter Probe, Law and Technology, Lead Poisoning, Legal Chatbots, Presidential Stories, Racism Deconstructed, San Francisco Mayor, Senate Failure, Serial Killers, Trump Wealth, Undercover Stories, Vaccinations in China

Exercise your ears: the 51 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 660 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group for the next four months here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,028) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aloha Shirts 32 mins – “There are a few ways to tell if you’re looking at an authentic, high-quality aloha shirt. If the pockets match the pattern, that’s a good sign, but it’s not everything. Much of understanding an aloha shirt is about paying attention to what is on the shirt itself. It’s about looking at the pattern to see the story it tells.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheists Movement 54 mins – Perhaps the three best known atheists of the past couple of decades are Sam Harris, Richard Dawkins, and the late Christopher Hitchens. They’ve presented powerful arguments against religious belief, and urgent calls for an end to religion in public life.  But among contemporary atheist scholars and activists, the focus has shifted from criticism of religion toward the possibilities of an atheist ethics — goodness without God.  Christian Smith is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Notre Dame, and is the author of Atheist Overreach: What Atheism Can’t Deliver.  In the book, Smith addresses three main claims made by atheists: that science can determine whether God exists; that human beings are not naturally religious; and — the focus of this IDEAS episode —that human beings can be good without God. Not just good as individuals, but capable of a collective morality that can redress inequality and suffering, and lead to the betterment of all humanity.

Black Womanhood 47 mins – “Beauty. Politics. Inequality. Gender. Money. Familiar themes endlessly discussed. But are we hearing every essential voice? Rhetorical question, because the answer is obviously no. For example, not enough of us have heard the searing analysis from sociology professor and black feminist thinker Tressie McMillan Cottom. In her new collection of essays, Cottom says her work is animated by what’s still seen as a “radical idea … black women are rational and human.” From that assumption, she works her way analytically through politics, economics, history, sociology and culture.

Books in India 19 mins – “With thousands of publishers working in dozens of languages, India is the seventh-largest book publishing nation on Earth. The English-language book market alone is the world’s second-largest, after the US. In addition, the Indian smartphone market is the fastest-growing on the planet, with 300 million users. While Indian-language news and entertainment available on those devices may be leading a generation away from traditional print media, including books, the Association of Publishers in India (API) considers books to be essential to India’s future – as resources for educational ambitions and as outlets for creative expression.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Illinois 24 mins – “As part of our series of interviews conducted during the 2019 Broadband Communities Summit in Austin, Texas, earlier in April, we’re sharing Christopher’s interview with Angela Imming. Angela is the Director of Technology and Innovation for the city of Highland, Illinois, home to Highland Communication Services (HCS).” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CBD and THC 33 mins – “What has convinced some researchers that the risks of heavy cannabis use now warrant public health campaigns to warn people of potential harm? How real is the risk of psychosis among vulnerable users of the drug? And why has the number of young people receiving treatment for cannabis-related problems seemingly been on the rise in the UK? Ian Sample is joined by Sir Robin Murray, professor of psychiatric research at King’s College London, Suzi Gage, senior research associate in the MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at Bristol University and Ian Hamilton, a mental health lecturer at the University of York.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Central Park Five 38 mins – “Millions of rent-burdened Americans face eviction filings and proceedings every year. On this week’s On the Media, what we think we know, and what we definitely don’t know, about America’s eviction crisis. Plus, how local journalists failed the Central Park Five.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dalai Lama Interview 27 mins – “In a wide ranging interview the Dalai Lama talks to the BBC’s Rajini Vaidyanathan about President Trump and his America First agenda, Brexit, the EU, and China’s relationship with the world. The interview also challenges some of the Buddhist spiritual leader’s more controversial statements and explores his views on the institution of the Dalai Lama. Coming just months after a recent health scare – the Dalai Lama shares his thoughts on the state of the world today. The interview also asks the Buddhist spiritual leader what did he mean when he said “Europe was for Europeans”, and why does a female successor have to be attractive?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Danger and Risk 66 mins – “When does the pursuit of safety lead us into danger? Greg Ip of the Wall Street Journal and author of Foolproof talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in his book–the way we publicly and privately try to cope with risk and danger and how those choices can create unintended consequences. While much of the conversation focuses on the financial crisis of 2008, there are also discussions of football injuries, damage from natural disasters such as hurricanes, car accidents, and Herbert Hoover. Along the way, Herman Melville’s insights into the mesmerizing nature of water make an appearance.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Revival 15 mins – “Civic evangelist Eric Liu shares a powerful way to rekindle the spirit of citizenship and the belief that democracy still works. Join him for a trip to “Civic Saturday” and learn more about how making civic engagement a weekly habit can help build communities based on shared values and a path to belonging.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Doctors Fight Bullies 27 minsHalifax cardiologist Dr. Gabrielle Horne spent 14 years fighting to restore her reputation after she was bullied and bad-mouthed by supervisors when she was an up-and-coming researcher. She was eventually awarded the largest settlement in Canada for loss of reputation. While her story is extraordinary, it’s not isolated. Recent Canadian surveys reveal 60% of medical students and 75% of residents report being harassed, intimidated or personally mistreated by someone in authority. This week White Coat, Black Art explores why doctors bully and what it will take to change the culture that allows it to happen, with insights from both Dr. Horne and lawyer Valerie Wise, who represents both doctors and their employers in disputes” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Evictions P1 35 mins – “We hear the story of Jeffrey, a security guard whose hours were inconsistent, whose rent burden was beyond severe, and whose family now lives in a two-bed hotel room in Richmond, Virginia. And we meet our partner in this project, Matt Desmond — Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City, and founder of the Eviction Lab at Princeton University. Brooke and Matt hash out what we know and what we only think we know about the forces that drive eviction.” At the link you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Fake News Industry 24 mins – “Instagram influencers might be the most mocked professionals on the internet. But look closer, and they’re not just a crucial part of online retail. They’re a symbol of the future of work—independent, passionate, and economically vulnerable. In the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, we speak to several influencers and consult two people who study them most closely— the Atlantic reporter Taylor Lorenz and the Cornell University professor Brooke Erin Duffy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foot and Mouth Disease 27 mins – “When we think about the U.S.-Mexico border, it’s hard not to think about the current immigration conflict and the contentious idea to build a wall. But the concept of a border wall isn’t new: proposals for walls have been made for more than 100 years. Our story starts in 1947, when a group of Texas ranchers demanded a fence along their state’s border with Mexico. Their motivation, though, was to stop an outbreak of a disease that struck farm animals. The response to the crisis was complicated and often messy. But in the end two countries came together to solve a complex predicament—instead of building a wall.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Genetic Operations 33 mins – “How much of our genome is actually doing useful stuff? And what do our genes actually tell our cells to do? We guide you through the basics of genetics…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Will Interview 47 mins – “Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist George F. Will, on his new mediation on the state of American conservatism.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girls Who Code 46 mins – “Girls Who Code CEO Reshma Saujani talks with Recode’s Kara Swisher about the challenges facing women in the tech industry and what everyone can do to make progress happen faster. In this episode: The 60 Minutes problem; what Girls Who Code does; how it compares to other diversity-in-coding groups; how much progress have we made so far?; the link between perfectionism and “fitting in”; the lousy excuses for homogeneous hiring; how Google and Microsoft could become the new Goldman Sachs; sexual harassment and the impact of #MeToo; bringing new investors into the ecosystem; what parents should tell their daughters; and where are the role models?” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Grace Kennan Warnecke 58 mins – :Grace Kennan Warnecke, daughter of American diplomat George Kennan, talked about her memoir, Daughter of the Cold War.” At the link you can listen and pay to download the podcast; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ham Radios After Cyclones 27 mins – “Ham Radio operators have been drafted in to keep communications open after Cyclone Fani devastated parts of India. HF and VHF will be used to communicate with the main disaster control room in Delhi. Operators have been deployed to areas where all other forms of communication have failed. Soft Robotics – Recent advances in 3D printing have led to significant progress in the field of soft robotics. Katia Bertoldi, professor of applied mechanics at Harvard, describes her work with soft robots – compliant robots, made from soft materials, usually rubber, which are suitable to interact with humans in a non-intrusive way. As these robots need to move in a complex way new materials are being developed to allow them to do that. Fighting Back Against Online Trolls in Colombia – In Colombia, an organisation called Fundacion Karisma is helping victims of online abuse fight back against misogynistic internet trolls by educating them on data security. The organisation recently won an award from the Index on Censorship, for their digital activism and work for freedom of expression on the internet. Our reporter Tom Stephens speaks to the head of the organisation about their work.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hate Speech Online 27 mins – “…The latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, analyzes the recent wave of internet-inspired violence—from Charlottesville to Christchurch—and asks why the web became such a fecund landscape for extremism. Hate is an ancient offline phenomenon. But something about the design of our social-media platforms—and perhaps something inherent to the internet itself—has amplified the worst angels of our nature. (Subscribe here.) The psychological roots of online hatred have three levels. At the bottom, there is group polarization and the natural tendency of moderate people to become extremist versions of themselves when they interact with like-minded peers. At the next level, there is what you might call Viral Screaming Syndrome—the natural tendency of web content to veer toward high-arousal emotions, such as outrage and paranoia, to attract attention and promote social sharing. “Video is really expensive to make, and reported video is really, really expensive to make,” says the Atlantic staff writer Alexis Madrigal. “You know what’s not expensive to make? A bunch of random, paranoid opinions to cut through the noise.” Finally, the largest social-media networks have built algorithms that exacerbate both group polarization and the Viral Screaming Effect. For example, YouTube executives knew that extreme and misleading videos were racking up tens of millions of views, but the company’s executives declined to intervene, because they were “focused on increasing viewing time and other measures of engagement,” according to a Bloomberg report in April….” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Insurance 48 mins – “High deductibles and medical bills are feeding resentment and political alienation of the middle class, reports the Los Angeles Times. We unpack. Noam Levey and Elana Schor join Meghna Chakrabarti.” At the link left-click the circle with three dots, right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Henry David Thoreau 53 mins – “This week, we have a lecture by Laura Walls, Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame.  Professor Wall’s lecture is titled “Henry David Thoreau’s Legacy of Resistance and Hope,” and is presented by the Boston University College of Arts and Sciences.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honor Killings 13 mins – “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Documentarian and TED Fellow Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy uses it to fight violence against women, turning her camera on the tradition of honor killings in Pakistan. In a stirring talk, she shares how she took her Oscar-winning film on the road in a mobile cinema, visiting small towns and villages across Pakistan — and shifting the dynamics between women, men and society, one screening at a time.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IBM’s Watson 46 mins – “In this episode, Jason Velez explains how he is using IBM’s Watson to empower 1Law, the small firm and affiliation of US lawyers he founded. He also explains how he went about building 1Law’s technology solutions, which prompts Sam and Aaron to address the question whether lawyers should learn to code.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the this blog archive.

IGNITE Talks 73 mins – “Berkman Klein community members share their research, passions, and musings in five minute Ignite Talks. Topics include the data economy in the European Union, maternal health around the world, youth and privacy online in Latin American, Ubuntu as an ethical framework for AI, collecting secrets, and more!” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impact Investing 47 mins – “Foundations and pension funds are under pressure to do more “impact investing,” focusing not just on the bottom line, but also on doing good for people and the planet. But is it effective? If so, why isn’t impact investing catching on more?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intolerance in Europe 34 mins – “Johny Pitts and Roger Robinson talk about Windrush, the rise of rightwing populism – and why they both feel still hope.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing for Life 70 mins – “We have a special guest on the podcast today, Paul Merriman. He emailed me out of the blue introducing himself. It is like Jack Bogle or Bill Bernstein calling you up and trying to tell you who they are. I replied back to him, “Paul I know very well who you are and it would be an honor to get you on the show.”  He is best known for his work educating the individual investor and here are the questions he answered for the WCI [WhiteCoatInvestor] community…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investing in Bear Markets 60 mins – “In this conversation with Rob Berger of Doughroller.net, Paul discusses how to handle a bear market. How can we stick to our investment plan when our portfolios drop by 20% or more, and how should you be investing now? Among topics covered: My recent meeting with Vanguard founder John Bogle; Should one diversify beyond the S&P 500? What role does luck play in a person’s success? Should investors wait to invest until the market comes down?  What does it means to be a long-term investor? Paul‘s retirement portfolio; How to defend against a bear market; How to invest a large sum of money; The role PE ratios play in valuing the market; How to stick to your investment plan when the market drops; How to invest 5 years before retirement”

Investing in Target-Date Funds 74 mins – “Chris Pedersen joins Paul to talk about their latest research on getting better returns from Target-Date portfolios. The discussion includes the pros and cons of Target-Date Funds (TDFs), how to make the best use of TDFs, recommendations for D-I-Y investors at Vanguard, and the easy solutions they created at Motif for those following Paul’s work. To enable investors interested in exploring and/or implementing this approach, The Merriman Target Date Portfolios are available at Motif Investing. You can read Chris’ related article, Achieving Success with Target Date Funds”.  You can also dive deeper into Chris’ research and analysis at the Merriman Target Date Portfolio Glide Path Asset Allocations. For more about Motif and other portfolios recommended by Paul Merriman, click hereAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Is It Too Late 54 mins – “In Paul Kennedy’s final week at IDEAS, he looks back at his four decades with the program. We begin the series with an episode inspired by the Muskoka Summit on the Environment, an event Paul has moderated since 2010. For this episode, Paul invited three guests to join him onstage at the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto to answer two basic questions about our collective future: are we doomed? And what inspires hope?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Jobs and Technology 64 mins– “Are workers being left behind when the economy grows? Is technology making the human workforce obsolete? James Bessen, author of Learning by Doing, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of learning on the job in the past and in the present. Bessen argues that during times of technological innovation, it often takes years before workers see higher wages from productivity increases. Bessen stresses the importance of the standardization of education on the job as workers adapt to new technology.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

JUNO Jupiter Probe 20 mins – “Following the news this week that the spacecraft successfully dropped into Jupiter’s orbit, Ian Sample is joined by planetary scientists professor Fran Bagenal – a co-investigator on the mission – and Dr Adam Masters to discuss the probe.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Law and Technology 27 mins – “Over the past 100 years technology has made enormous leaps toward improving the ease of everyday living for the average citizen. This progress has also been reflected in the legal profession as tech becomes more integrated into the working lives of lawyers. However, in what ways has technology improved the profession and how can technological advancements aid us in the future? In this special centennial episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway sit down with ABA President-Elect Linda Klein to reflect on how technology has improved the practice of law throughout their careers. The hosts open by taking some time to reflect on the last 100 episodes of the podcast and Linda shares her memory of having the Digital Edge be the very first podcast she ever listened to. She then muses over being introduced to technology early in her career and how tech started to influence and improve the way she practiced law. Within these reflections, Linda provides some insight into why she thinks it is important for lawyers to give back to their communities and tips on how tech can help fit everything into one’s busy life. The group then focuses on ABA initiatives centered around positively influencing the rapid change happening in the legal profession spurred by globalization and technology. Linda then looks toward the future and discusses goals that she has for her presidency relating specifically to technology and the practice of law.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Lead Poisoning 30 mins – “In this, our first episode, we tell the story of how the lead industry fooled the public into thinking its products were safe. Thankfully, as you’ll hear, a number of activists, researchers and pediatricians developed the scientific evidence needed to prove the lead industry wrong. Our interaction and graphic designer, Clarisa Diaz, made this fantastic flowchart that shows how those battles were won:…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Tech Trends 26 mins – “The legal industry is transforming—what does this mean for lawyers in the future? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway welcome Stacey Caywood and Dean Sonderegger to discuss the Wolters Kluwer 2019 Future Ready Lawyer Survey. They discuss the trends and findings of the survey, highlighting the things leading organizations were doing that boosted their future-readiness. The survey found that law firms that lead in leveraging technology outperformed others across all categories and were also more profitable. They talk about how trailing organizations in the survey can catch up, offering strategies and encouraging them to invest in technology to better prepare their firms for the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Netflix Impact 27 minsThe numbers are staggering: thousands of films and TV shows available to 160 million subscribers in 190 countries. Netflix has changed the entertainment business; that much is obvious. But how has it changed the meaning of video entertainment in our culture—and the way movies and television shows are made? In this episode of Crazy/Genius, the final installment of the third season, the host Derek Thompson talks with Matt Zoller Seitz, a television critic for New York magazine, about the downsides of too much technological convenience. Then he speaks with Franklin Leonard, the founder of the Black List, about data, diversity, and the Netflix effect for storytellers. This episode was produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Stories 54 mins – “Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes (54 min. 22 sec. – May 3, 2019) Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes talk about C-SPAN’s latest book, [The Presidents: Noted Historians Rank America’s Best – and Worst – Chief Executives].” At the link find the title, “Harold Holzer and Amity Shlaes,” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism Deconstructed 18 mins – “Baratunde Thurston explores the phenomenon of white Americans calling the police on black Americans who have committed the crimes of … eating, walking or generally “living while black.” In this profound, thought-provoking and often hilarious talk, he reveals the power of language to change stories of trauma into stories of healing — while challenging us all to level up.” At the link left-click “Share,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

San Francisco Mayor 78 mins – “Breed’s shortlist of worries includes a homelessness epidemic, mental health care reform, public drug use, streets so dirty she had to convene a “poop patrol,” a shortage of affordable housing for middle-class workers, and policymakers who would be happy to see more housing built so long as it doesn’t cast a shadow on a public park. But as she approaches the end of her first year in her office, Breed also has a valuable card to play: San Francisco is a city with a low unemployment rate and many skilled workers, so Breed can pressure their prospective Big Tech employers to be part of the solution. “It wasn’t necessarily a tech company, but I had a company in my office who wanted to expand, and usually most mayors would be really excited about that,” she said. “But I said, ‘So where’s your workforce? Where are your additional 400 employees going to come from? Where are they going to live?’” “It’s not to say people aren’t invited, but it’s to say if you’re going to expand, there has to be some accountability,” Breed added. “How are you going to invest more in San Francisco?” On the new podcast, she also talked about a new initiative called Opportunities For All, which aims to place all San Francisco high school students in paid internships. She singled out Airbnb for its support of the initiative, indicating that despite some past “challenges,” the company is “rolling up their sleeves to be better community partners.” “I want them to invite internships in their businesses and not where the kids are kind of pushed to the side, I want these to be meaningful internships so that they learn about this industry, about what’s possible in engineering, HR, or anything,” Breed said. “I want them to be committed to really investing in our future in San Francisco.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Senate Failure 61 mins – “Former U.S. trade negotiator and senior Senate staffer Ira Shapiro argued that the U.S. Senate has lost its political center. He is interviewed by former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle.” At the link you can purchase a download, or listen; however, a copy is also included in this blog archive.

Serial Killers 47 mins – “Ted Bundy is one of the country’s most notorious serial killers. His savage acts of murder — targeting young women across the country during the 1970s — belied the outward appearance of a clean-cut, charismatic and intelligent young man. Bundy is depicted in a new feature film on Netflix starring Zac Efron, “Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile.” It’s told through the eyes of his then-girlfriend Liz, who he charmed even as he went on trial for murder. We speak with director Joe Berlinger.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Small Presses 10 mins – “Dozens of independent standalone publishers continue to dot the literary landscape in the United States. They survive against all odds, building catalogs of works that range from experimental to controversial. Among the titles are occasional bestsellers, but that is hardly the point. Author JoeAnn Hart argues that these small presses make our bookshelves more diverse and our cultural existence more interesting. Stamford ’76 is her latest book, a mix of a memoir and a murder mystery, that was published in April by the University of Iowa Press. As an author and a reader, Hart champions the small presses for taking big risks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Successful Companies 63 mins – “In October 2001, Amazon was in trouble. The first dot-com bubble had popped a year earlier, and Amazon’s stock price was languishing in the single digits, less than half of where it was trading a year before. That’s when founder and CEO Jeff Bezos called Jim Collins, a former Stanford business professor who had written the widely-admired book Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap…and Others Don’t. Collins visited Amazon’s campus to talk about some ideas from the book, including a concept he called “turning the flywheel” — in essence, figuring out how to push your business so that it starts to gain momentum, growing faster and faster. “Now the wonderful thing about great students — and Jeff Bezos and company are really thoughtful, smart people — is they take an idea and then they took it even further,” Collins said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher. “So they took the flywheel and they said, ‘We’re going to make the flywheel ours.’…” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the popup menu.

Systemic Racism 47 mins – “Milwaukee County declares racism a public health crisis and wants to push the plan nationwide.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Travel Tech Guide 12 mins – “The ASUS ZenScreen gives you a second monitor while on the go, IOGEAR has the perfect portable USB-C docking station for Windows, Mac, and Linux laptops, and Kingston has all the storage that a mobile geek needs. Fr. Robert Ballecer returns for part 2 of his Travel Tech Guide: Storage and Connectivity!” At the link right-click “Download options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Wealth 54 mins – “As we all learned this week, President Trump “lost more money than nearly other individual American taxpayer” between 1985 and 1994. It was during that decade of losses that Trump published The Art of the Deal and became a fixture on the Forbes 400 list of wealthiest Americans. But if his business failures and his debts were so immense, how did he get on the list to begin with? Jonathan Greenberg, now an investigative journalist, was then the Forbes reporter whose unenviable task it was to evaluate Trump’s fabulous claims. Bob spoke with him this week about the origin myth upon which a 37-year-long con was built.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Trumponomics 60 mins – “Famed economist and President Trump economic advisor, Stephen Moore, explains Trump’s economic philosophy. President Trump has embraced both traditional conservative ideas of tax cuts and deregulation, but has also adopted unorthodox positions of protectionism and tariffs. Moore discusses this and more in our interview about his new book, Trumponomics: Inside the America First Plan to Revive Our Economy.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Undercover Stories 54 mins – “Are deception and secrecy categorically wrong? Or can they be a necessary means to an end? This hour, TED speakers share stories of going undercover to explore unknown territory, and find the truth.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vaccinations in China 27 mins – “Chinese vaccination rates are claimed to be a great success, but is that the whole picture? Every country has its own challenges to deal and China’s include the vast size of the country, mass migration into cities and the birth of 15 million children a year. Their goal is 90% vaccination coverage. Have they achieved it? Reporter Madeleine Finlay has just been to a symposium in London on vaccination programmes in China, and she reports back for Health Check. Thanks to a vigorous vaccination campaign that started in the 1960s, Taiwan has, like all but three countries in the world, succeeded in eradicating polio. There has been no polio infection there since 1983, but there are still survivors of polio who contracted the virus before that time. Some of them belong to the Chinese Taipei City Wheelchair Dance Sport Association and often get together to take part in wheelchair ballroom dancing. BBC’s Cindy Sui went to visit wheelchair dancers Vincent Kuo and Ivy Huang, who told her how dancing even helped them find love. What advice would you give your younger self? Psychologists at Clemson University in the US surveyed nearly 200 over 30 year olds asking this very question. Their answers fell into three main categories; things they wish they had done differently about the way they thought of themselves, choices concerning education and choices about relationships. Professor of Psychology Robin Kowalski was lead author of the study, which has just been published in the Journal of Social Psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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