Mining Digest 411 – Oct 4, 2019: 5G Rollout, Agricultural Trends, American Association of Individual Investors, Bitcoin in Latin America, Broadband in Arkansas, Brown Fat, Burning Man, Childhood Mortality, Code for America, Cutting Edge Technologies, Democracy and Capitalism at Risk, Detention Centers, Economic Middleman, Financial Future Discussion, Food Technology, Health Care Technology, Homeless Story, Hong Kong History, Impeachment Concerns, James Clapper, James Earl Ray, Jeffrey Epstein, Jumpstarting Creativity, Kenya Special, Left Behind Children, Libraries in Colleges, Mind-body Problem, Nerve Transfer Surgery, News Fatigue, Nudging People, Oil Trade Impact, Perverse Laws, Pipeline Rejection, Scams Against Lawyers, Self-Improvement, Social Signaling, Solzhenitsyn P1, Trump As the Joker, VR Impact

Exercise your ears: the 62 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 779 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (28,505) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Rollout 30 mins – “Jonathan Adelstein, president of the Wireless Infrastructure Association (WIA), talked about 5G and small-cell technology. WIA builds the cell towers and other technologies needed for the next generation of mobile communications.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Agricultural Trends 61 mins – “Thousands of bears in New Jersey. Humpback whales near New York City. Acres devoted to farming stable or declining even as food production soars. Jesse Ausubel of the Rockefeller University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the return of nature. Ausubel shows how technology has reduced many of the dimensions of the human footprint even as population rises and why this trend is likely to continue into the future. The conversation concludes with Ausubel’s cautious optimism about the impact of climate change.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Airline CEO 73 mins – “How did the CEO of a real estate development company become chairman of an airline? How can a competent manager learn to trust his subordinates? Joel Peterson, Chairman of the Board at JetBlue Airways and author of The 10 Laws of Trust, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career at Trammell Crow and JetBlue and how the concept of trust, outlined in his book, has helped his career. He closes the conversation with a discussion of how he overcame his personal weaknesses that would have handicapped his career–or as he puts it, how he “rewrote his operating system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

American Association of Individual Investors 28 mins – “The AAII (American Association of Individual Investors) Conference was a treasure trove of investment history and advice for amateur investors.  In fact, Paul felt a lot of the information should be meaningful to professionals as well.  Paul was impressed with the presentations from Meb Faber, Larry Swedroe, Dr. Craig Israelsen and Mark Hulbert.  The one thing that all four experts agree on is  that investors’ emotions are their biggest enemies.  After listening to all these experts Paul is now  convinced what he believes is the biggest decision investors make—and most aren’t making it!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Antitrust Discussion 16 mins – “This week, the US House Antitrust subcommittee announced a probe into the mainly-unchecked power of tech giants like Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon. The investigation could include public hearings and subpoenas toward antitrust intervention into the businesses of Silicon Valley leviathans. The news came on the same day that The Wall Street Journal reported that the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department are expanding their oversight into Facebook and Google’s anti-competitive practices. Last November, Brooke spoke with Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, about Amazon’s domination over industry after industry and where we stand in the arc of antitrust regulation. In 2018, Mitchell wrote an article for The Nation called “Amazon Doesn’t Just Want to Dominate the Market — It Wants to Become the Market.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Atheism Types 96 mins – Philosopher and author John Gray talks about his latest book, Seven Types of Atheism, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gray argues that progress is an illusion and that most atheisms inherit, unknowingly, a religious belief in progress that is not justified. While Gray concedes that technological know-how and scientific knowledge improve over time, he argues that morality and political systems are cyclical and that there is no reason to be optimistic about the future.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin in Latin America 60 mins – “Writer, reporter, and film producer Jim Epstein talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about mining Bitcoins in Venezuela as a way to import food. Venezuela is a tragicomic example of how policy can lead to strange and presumably unexpected outcomes. Epstein also discusses how Bitcoin is being used elsewhere in Latin America and the potential for the blockchain technology to lower the costs of owning and transferring property.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband Association 28 mins – “Jonathan Spalter talked about broadband availability, 5G, net neutrality and internet security.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Broadband in Arkansas 21 mins – “It’s mid-May and while some states’ legislatures are still in session, other’s have already debated new legislation, voted, and adopted new laws. This week, we talk with one Senator from Arkansas who, along with her colleagues, are interested in bringing better broadband to rural areas of her state, Breanne Davis. During the 2019 session, she introduced SB 150, which was ultimately adopted. The bill makes slight changes in Arkansas law that prevent local communities from developing infrastructure to be used for broadband. She and Christopher discuss why she and her colleagues decided it was time to ask lawmakers for the change after years of depending on large ISPs who weren’t living up to promises to expand broadband in rural areas. Christopher and Senator Davis discuss some of the details of the bill and address the amendments that changed a broad piece of legislation to a targeted law that allows local communities to apply for federal grant funding. She explains some of the reasons for the amendments and how those changes fit into the vision she and her colleagues in the legislature have for the future of Arkansas.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Broadband in Colorado 32 mins – “Summer is the time for the Mountain Connect Broadband Development Conference, one of the events that Christopher is sure to attend every year. This year, it was held in Dillon, Colorado, and while he was enjoying the scenery, he collected a series of interviews. This week we hear from Brian Worthen, CEO of Mammoth Networks. With its home base in Wyoming, Mammoth serves locations in eleven western states. They primarily provide wholesale middle mile service, but the company also offers last mile connectivity in select locations. Brian describes how, over time, Mammoth has developed a system of adopting combinations of technology to get the job done. They provide service in areas that are often sparsely populated, in areas where the geology varies, and Mammoth adjusts to the needs of their diverse customers. The company received an award at Mountain Connect for their work on Colorado’s Project THOR. In this interview, Brian describes their involvement with the project and with several other local projects in the state. Christopher and his guest talk about cooperatives and their expanding role in delivering high-quality Internet access. They consider which levels of government are best suited to offer financial assistance to broadband initiatives, especially in rural communities, and discuss the potential for Low Earth Orbit Satellites to contribute to universal broadband access.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brown Fat 27 mins – “Although the best exercises in the world haven’t changed in decades that doesn’t mean you can’t stay on the cutting edge of fat-burning… And, if you’ve never heard of BAT (brown adipose tissue) before you will absolutely want to check out the big benefits of increasing this form of fat… Yes, believe it or not, there is a beneficial form of body fat that actually helps you rev up your metabolism and keeps you lean! Tune into today’s #CabralConcept 1329 to find out 3 ways to stimulate brown fat to burn more calories – Enjoy the show! At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Burning Man 72 minsMarian Goodell, CEO of the Burning Man Project, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Burning Man, the 8-day art and music festival in the Nevada Desert. Goodell explains how Burning Man has evolved over the years, the principles and rules that govern the experience today, and plans for expanding the Burning Man experience around the world.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Catholic Activists 58 mins – “Filmmakers Joe Tropea and Skizz Cyzyk talked about their documentary, Hit & Stay: A History of Faith and Resistance, on the actions of the Catonsville 9 and other Catholic activists who protested the Vietnam War.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Childhood Mortality 63 mins – “Historian and author Janet Golden talks about her book, Babies Made Us Modern, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Golden chronicles the transformation of parenting in first half of the 20th century. It’s a fascinating story of how our knowledge of infant health and behavior grew dramatically but remains imperfect. At the same time, government, business, and private organizations responded to that imperfect knowledge.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Code for America 60 mins – “Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the organization she started. Code for America works with private sector tech people to bring technology to the provision of government services. Pahlka discusses some of the success Code for America has had with improving government and the challenges of citizenship and technology in the 21st century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporate Control 75 mins Bloomberg Opinion columnist and economist Noah Smith talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about corporate control, wages, and monopoly power. Smith discusses the costs and benefits of co-determination–the idea of putting workers on corporate boards. The conversation then moves to a lively discussion of wages and monopoly power and how the American worker has been doing in recent years.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cutting Edge Technologies 70 mins – “Ecologist Kelly Weinersmith and cartoonist Zach Weinersmith–creator of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal–talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their new book, Soonish–a look at cutting-edge and not-quite cutting edge technologies. The Weinersmiths speculate about everything from asteroid mining to robotic house construction to the nasal cycle and how the human body and medicine might be transformed in the future. They discuss the likelihood of some really crazy stuff coming along and changing our lives as well as the possible downsides of innovation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy and Capitalism at Risk 60 mins – “Syndicated columnist Jonah Goldberg argues that tribalism, populism, and nationalism are threatening American democracy. He’s interviewed by John Podhoretz, editor of [Commentary] magazine.” At the link find and right-click “(April 26, 2018) Jonah Goldberg, “Suicide of the West” then select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu to get the podcast.

Democracy and Capitalism at Risk 87 mins – “Jonah Goldberg of National Review talks about his latest book, Suicide of the West, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Goldberg argues that both capitalism and democracy are at risk in the current contentious political environment. He argues that we take for granted what he calls “the miracle”–the transformation of the standard of living in the democracies with market economies. Goldberg argues that unless we actively work to preserve our political and economic systems, the forces of populism, nationalism, and tribalism will work steadily to destroy them.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Detention Centers 49 mins – “Broken bathrooms. Expired food. Severe overcrowding. We look at conditions at U.S. detention centers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Econometrics 64 mins – “Nobel Laureate James Heckman of the University of Chicago talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of econometrics and the challenges of measurement in assessing economic theories and public policy. Heckman gives us his take on natural experiments, selection bias, randomized control trials and the reliability of sophisticated statistical analysis. The conversation closes with Heckman reminiscing about his intellectual influences throughout his career.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 63 mins – “How are those in favor of bigger government and those who want smaller government like a couple stuck in a bad marriage? Economist John Cochrane of Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how to take a different approach to the standard policy arguments. Cochrane wants to get away from the stale big government/small government arguments which he likens to a couple who have gotten stuck in a rut making the same ineffective arguments over and over. Cochrane argues for a fresh approach to economic policy including applications to growth, taxes and financial regulation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Middleman 63 mins – Why would anyone want to hire a middleman, like a wedding planner, especially if you have time to take care of the planning yourself? Marina Krakovsky, author of The Middleman Economy talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about middlemen in the modern economy. Despite predictions that the internet would destroy the need for middlemen, Krakovsky argues they’re more valuable than ever though their roles have changed. Krakovsky looks at the different roles middlemen play today and how their value added can justify their existence.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Redefined 62 mins – “Maeve Cohen, Co-director of Rethinking Economics, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her organization and its efforts to change economics education. Cohen, who co-founded the Post-Crash Economics Society, argues for a more human-centered approach to economics that would be less confident in its policy prescriptions and more honest about the significance of its underlying assumptions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Financial Future Discussion 45 mins– “In this lively interview with Ken Roberts, of Ken’s Bulls and Bears, Paul and Ken discuss a range of important investor topics for every stage of life, including Millennials on “FIRE”,  Best-in-Class ETFs, maximizing returns while minimizing risk, and retirement distributions.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Technology 67 mins – “How bad is pink slime? Are free-range chickens happier? Can robots cook? Jayson Lusk of Oklahoma State University and the author of Unnaturally Delicious talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more from his new book. Lusk explores the wide-ranging application of technology to farming, cooking, protein production, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Trends 63 mins – “Futurist, author, and visionary Kevin Kelly talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, The Inevitable, Kelly’s look at what the future might be like and the role of the human experience in a world increasingly filled with information, artificial intelligence, virtual reality, and the connecting of the planet’s population.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government and Innovation 68 mins- “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology. At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Health Care Technology 63 mins – “Technology and innovation usually mean higher quality and lower prices. Is health care different? Jonathan Skinner of Dartmouth College talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how technology and innovation affect the cost and efficacy of health care. The conversation concludes with a discussion of the rise in mortality among middle-age white males–a surprising reversal of trend–that has been linked to use of opioid painkillers.

Homeless Story 56 mins– “In 2005, Paul Kennedy made a documentary about Ken Lyotier, a man living on the margins in Vancouver who has spent 30 years helping his community. Paul meets up with Ken again to tour the Downtown Eastside together.” “I first encountered Ken, not on the street, but in an internet chatroom, where we initially had a political disagreement. We gradually switched to e-mail conversation. Then eventually we arranged to meet in person, at a bicycle shop on Hastings Street, in Vancouver’s struggling Downtown Eastside.  In fact, that’s exactly where Ken is standing in the photograph on this page. We rented bikes there, and then rode all the way around the Stanley Park seawall, talking about recycling, and discovering that we agreed on much more than we first thought.Ken was not your typical expert. So I was more excited than usual when a show we made together — The IDEAS of Ken Lyotier — first aired on January 31, 2005. No reaction was forthcoming, and I wasn’t certain that anybody had actually listened. Or maybe my interviewing was at fault? In any case, I definitely never forgot Ken himself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong History 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Concerns 29 mins – “We have our hands full at Sea Change Radio just trying to cover important stories relating to the environment and social justice. But we also recognize that what’s happening in the broader political landscape has a profound ripple effect on environmental and social policies. So today on Sea Change Radio we are focusing on the presidency and the rule of law. Now that the Mueller report has been submitted to the Department of Justice, calls for impeachment of President Donald Trump have begun to reach a fever pitch. Our guest today is John Stoehr of the New Haven Register and The Editorial Board. We discuss the question of whether Democrats in Congress should be moving ahead with articles of impeachment. And for those who are eager to impeach, we ponder whether it is because it’s smart politics or because it’s the right thing to do?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

James Clapper 58 mins – “Former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper talked about his book, Facts and Fears, and Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. He also talked about the summit in Singapore between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un on June” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

James Earl Ray 57 mins – “James Swanson retraced events leading up to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. He is interviewed by Jesse Holland, author and race and ethnicity writer for the Associated Press.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Jason Zweig 64 mins – “Jason Zweig of the Wall Street Journal and author of The Devil’s Financial Dictionary talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about finance, financial journalism and Zweig’s new book. Zweig discusses rationality and the investor’s challenge of self-restraint, the repetitive nature of financial journalism, and the financial crisis of 2008.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jeffrey Epstein 27 mins – “How is it that a multimillionaire got a sweetheart deal for sex crimes? New charges are bringing up old questions about Jeffrey Epstein.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jim Acosta 59 mins – “Jim Acosta, CNN’s chief White House correspondent, talked about his book, The Enemy of the People: A Dangerous Time to Tell the Truth in America, in which he offered his first-hand account of, covering the Trump administration. He was interviewed by Jay Rosen, founder of PressThink and a New York University journalism professor.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Jumpstarting Creativity 53 mins – “Our greatest breakthroughs and triumphs have one thing in common: creativity. But how do you ignite it? And how do you rekindle it? This hour, TED speakers explore ideas on jumpstarting creativity. Guests include economist Tim Harford, producer Helen Marriage, artificial intelligence researcher Steve Engels, and behavioral scientist Marily Oppezzo.” At the link find the title, “Jumpstarting Creativity,” right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kenya Special 47 mins – “Digital Planet re-visits the technology scene in Kenya, 10 years after the submarine broadband cable was connected. Presenter Gareth Mitchell and regular studio commentator Bill Thompson are in Nairobi to find out what has changed in the last decade and what can be expected in the future. High-speed broadband 10 years on; Tonny Tugee from SEACOM discusses the impact of the submarine communications cable, which was switched on in July 2009. Investment in African tech talent; Amrote Abdella from Microsoft 4 Afrika explains why Microsoft has launched its first Africa Development Centres in Kenya and Nigeria, investing in African tech talent to ensure global relevance. Nekewa Were, Managing Director of iHub is also on the programme. The techspace has helped more than 350 startups and raised $40m in investment since it opened in 2010. Future-proofing Kenya in the technological revolution; technologist Juliana Rotich explains why Kenya must learn from past mistakes in other countries when adopting emerging technologies and is working to ensure that data can benefit all elements of society.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kids’ Clothing 27 mins – “Clothes are records of the bodies we’ve lived in. Think of the old sweater that you used to have that’s just not your style anymore, or the jeans that just aren’t your size anymore. We are like snakes who shed our skins and grow new ones as we age. And it all starts in the kids’ department….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Left Behind Children 53 mins – “This is the flipside of migration. Migrants make headlines all the time, but what about those they leave behind? The so-called ‘motherless villages’ of Indonesia; rural Senegal where not enough men are left to work the fields and the Guatemalan parents who risk their children’s lives, sending them on the perilous journey to the US. Stories of deserted families and communities, revealing the bigger picture of the country that has been abandoned.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Libraries in Colleges 60 mins – “Libraries have long been central to college campuses. In fact, one way colleges have measured their greatness has been to boast about the size of their library collections. (Harvard wins on that metric, with 18.9 million volumes.Yale is close behind at 15.2 million.) But now that so many materials are digital, is a book count the best way to measure a library’s impact? And how have libraries become central to new efforts to remake the college campus for the information age? These were some of the questions discussed this week during the latest installment of EdSurge Live, our series of online discussions about big topics in higher education. Our guests were: Steven Bell, associate university librarian for research and instructional services at Temple University, which recently opened a glitzy new $175-million library on its campus. Emily Drabinski, critical pedagogy librarian at the Mina Rees Library at the Graduate Center, CUNY Listen to the conversation below, or read a transcript of highlights, lightly edited for clarity.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” from the pop-up menu.

Library Funding 19 mins – “American libraries came out ahead in 2018, though it took work to get there, reports Andrew AlbanesePublishers Weekly senior writer. In a PW review of the year’s top stories from the library community, he found public support for libraries made the difference in holding back attempts to cut federal funding “In February of 2018, for the second year in a row, the Trump Administration called to permanently eliminate all federal library and arts funding. At the time ALA president Jim Neal blasted the proposal as ‘out of touch with the real needs of Americans,’ and he vowed that library supporters would make their voices heard. And that’s exactly what happened,” Albanese explains. >Indeed, lawmakers on Capitol Hill defied the White House and recommended reauthorizing – or in some cases increasing – the funding levels for many library-related programs, including a $2 million bump for the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In a separate “minibus” that passed in September, the Library of Congress also received a $26 million increase to its budget. “ALA officials are urging library supporters to stay engaged with their local lawmakers. As of this writing, a final FY2019 budget has not yet been passed,” Albanese tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “One of things that helps libraries is that the money spent on library programs is some of the best, most effective money spent by the government—it directly helps people in their communities.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind-Body Problem 76 mins – “Science journalist and author John Horgan talks about his book, Mind-Body Problems, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Horgan interviewed an array of scientists, philosophers, and others who have worked on consciousness, free-will, and what it means to be human. Horgan argues that no single solution to the problems in these areas is likely to be established by science and that our perspective on these questions is inevitably colored by our personal experiences rather than by scientific evidence. Horgan concludes by making the case for personal and intellectual freedom and the need to embrace subjective interpretations of mind-body issues in ways that bring meaning to our lives.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Nerve Transfer Surgery 15 mins – “The Lancet’s Senior Editor Jonathan Pimm talks with author Natasha van Zyl about the pioneering surgical procedure of transplanting nerves to restore function in the upper limbs.” At the link right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Fatigue 49 mins – “Even some news junkies have had enough. More and more Americans are turning off their screens and unplugging their headphones because the news is too much. Nieman Lab‘s Joshua Benton, and former Chief Political Reporter at CNN, Candy Crowley,  and co-founder of the Solutions Journalism Network Tina Rosenberg, join us to discuss news avoidance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

News Literacy 25 mins – “Today on the podcast we’re talking about news literacy, and the challenge of teaching students to navigate the relentless flow of information they get through social media and websites and YouTube and … podcasts. What are the stakes of making sure the next generation can sort fact from propaganda or spin? Here’s how a 10th grader in Southern California puts it: “If misinformation gets spread and if enough people believe it, it could cause problems and a lot of people will be confused about what’s true and what’s not true—it’s really important to know what facts are real.” That’s Valeria Luquin, a 15-year-old who has recently gone through a journalism course that went over the basics of news literacy. The course used materials created by a nonprofit called the News Literacy Project, which provides a set of online materials and offers professional development for teachers. Our guest today, Peter Adams, has years of experience working with students like Luquin, first as a classroom teacher, then as a college instructor, and currently as senior vice president for education at the News Literacy Project.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link” from the pop-up menu.

Nudging People 36 mins – “Every day, each one of us is “nudged” by external factors and actors to change how we behave. Whether it’s the weather forecast, an advert on the train, or advice from a friend, we are all influenced by nudges. But what is a nudge? What is the human psychology behind their effectiveness? And when does a nudge become something more sinister – such as coercion or manipulation? To explore this and more, Ian Sample speaks to the Harvard Law School’s Professor Cass Sunstein about the psychology and history of nudging, as well as some of the ethical quandaries explored in his new book The Ethics of Influence: Government in the the Age of Behavioural Science. We also hear from head of the UK’s ‘nudge unit’ (aka the behavioural insights team), Dr David Halpern, about how nudges are helping governments with tax repayments, more effective approaches to job seeking and reducing further education dropout rates.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oil Trade Impact 64 mins – “Should the United States allow its citizens to buy oil from countries run by bad men? Is this a case where morality trumps the usual case for free trade? Leif Wenar, professor of philosophy at King’s College, London and author of Blood Oil, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the morality of buying resources from countries that use the resulting revenue to oppress their citizens. Based on the ideas in his book, Wenar argues that in many cases, importing oil is equivalent to buying stolen goods where the low prices cannot justify the purchase. The conversation discusses the possible outcomes from banning foreign oil from tyrannical regimes along with the resource curse and the case for fair trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perverse Laws 75 mins – “Leo Katz, professor of law at the University of Pennsylvania, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Why the Law Is So Perverse. Katz argues that certain seemingly inexplicable features of the law are the result of conflicts between multiple objectives that the law or the courts must trade off against each other. Katz also argues that structure of the law and how it is enforced are analogous to certain inevitable ambiguities of collective choice and voting theory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pipeline Rejection 53 mins – “Paul Kennedy says goodbye as IDEAS host, returning to where he first began. In July 1977, Paul traveled to Fort Providence, Northwest Territories, where he put his canoe in the water, and started paddling 1,600 km all the way to the Arctic Ocean. He was making his very first documentary for IDEAS, the program he’d later host for 20 years. It was also the year that the Berger Inquiry report came out — on whether to construct an oil pipeline down the Mackenzie Valley.[Berger Inquiry] That trip and that inquiry taught both the nation and Paul himself the real value of listening. “I had no ‘idea’ that during that trip I’d discover what a river really is, and how much a river means, on this watery planet we insist on calling Earth,” Paul says. Paul’s first contribution to IDEAS was called The Fur Trade Revisited. In spring 2019, he returned to the region to talk to some of the people he met there, and to “take the temperature of the country” — and perhaps the world. Because what happens in Canada’s North captures what happens elsewhere, from climate change to politics.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Political Polarization 70 mins – “Political scientist Lilliana Mason of the University Maryland and author of Uncivil Agreement talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mason argues that political partisanship has become stronger in America in recent years because it aligns with other forms of community and identity. People are associating primarily with people who share their political views in their other social activities outside of politics. As a result, they encounter fewer people from the other side. The intensity of partisanship can even overcome ideology as partisans change their policy positions in their eagerness to be on the winning side. The conversation closes with a discussion of what might be done to improve political discourse in America.” At the link right-click download and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Propaganda 28 mins – “Has this ever happened to you: You are talking with a friend or family member, and as the topic moves to politics, things start to get a little heated. You make what you think are excellent points, based on data, logic, and what you fervently believe to be the absolute truth. Yet, when the debate concludes, somehow neither of you has budged an inch, and no one leaves any wiser. Perhaps this is why we are instructed to “never discuss politics in polite company.” This week on Sea Change Radio, we are talking about bridging the divide, with James Hoggan, an author and the co-founder of Desmog Blog. Hopefully, the next time the subject of impeachment or the Democratic nominee of your choice arises, the debate can be spirited, productive, and maybe even polite.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Mechanics 39 mins – “Ian Sample speaks to the theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his mission to demystify quantum mechanics. It won’t be easy, though, as Carroll’s favoured interpretation of this fundamental theory – the ‘many worlds’ interpretation – results in a possibly infinite number of parallel universes…” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scams Against Lawyers 26 mins – “In this edition of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway discuss check fraud with expert Dan Pinnington. Together, they reveal how lawyers are repeatedly falling into the trap of check fraudsters and what can be done to avoid it. Tune in for tips on how to spot a check fraudster in your practice or law firm. Pinnington is the Vice President of Claims Prevention and Stakeholder Relations at Lawyers’ Professional Indemnity Company (LAWPRO). He is a prolific writer, speaker, and blogger on topics including practice management, risk management, and legal technology. He is also a contributor to AvoidAClaim.com which is blog by LAWPRO that, among many things, helps attorneys prevent malpractice claims.” A 16 slide presentation is also at the link. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog.

Self-Improvement 76 mins – “Jordan Peterson, author of 12 Rules for Life, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topics covered include parenting, conversation, the role of literature in everyday life, and the relationship between sacrificial rites and trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Social Signaling 69 mins – “Judith Donath, author of The Social Machine, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the ideas in her book–an examination of signaling, online identity, and online community. Donath argues that design elements in technology play a key role in our interactions with one another. The conversation closes with a discussion of data collection by corporations and the government.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solzhenitsyn P1 79 mins – “Russian Literature Professor Kevin McKenna of the University of Vermont talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the life and times of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. This is the opening episode of the EconTalk Book Club for Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece In the First Circle: The First Uncensored Edition. A subsequent episode to air in the next few weeks discusses the book itself.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solzhenitsyn P2 78 mins – “Russian Literature Professor Kevin McKenna of the University of Vermont talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the characters, plot, and themes of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s masterpiece, In the First Circle. This is the second episode of the EconTalk book club discussing the book. The first episode–a discussion of Solzhenitsyn’s life and times–is available on EconTalk at Kevin McKenna on Solzhenitsyn, the Soviet Union, and In the First Circle.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Statistical Studies 64 mins – “John Ioannidis of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on the reliability of published research findings. They discuss Ioannidis’s recent study on bias in economics research, meta-analysis, the challenge of small sample analysis, and the reliability of statistical significance as a measure of success in empirical research.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Trump As the Joker 59 mins – “MSNBC’s Joy-Ann Reid talked about The Man Who Sold America: Trump and the Unravelling of the American Story, author and journalist Sophia Nelson. In her book, Ms. Reid argued that President Trump was damaging American democracy.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

VR Impact 30 mins – “Jeremy Bailenson, a Stanford University professor who runs the institution’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, talked about virtual reality and its potential impact on society.” At the link you can listen, and purchase a download; however, a copy is also included this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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