Mining Digest 414 – Oct 25, 2019: AI in Law, Brain Bleed Stroke Treatment, Broadband in California, Cory Booker, Critical Zone, Double Jeopardy Discussion, Drug Wars, Dying Process, Environmental Justice, European Technology, Knowledge Limits, Liposome Research, Machine Learning, MIT President Interview, Philanthropy, Pitanga Fruit Value, Powerful Companies, Recession Recovery, Recreational Drugs, Robots on the Road, Sleep Needs, Solar Cells and Fusion, Tribalism, TV Ratings, Venture Capitalist, White Coat Uprising in Sudan

Exercise your ears: the 37 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 659 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,300) podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

3D Printing Overview 8 mins – “3D printing has grown in sophistication since the late 1970s; TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits is shaping the next development, which he calls 4D printing, where the fourth dimension is time. This emerging technology will allow us to print objects that then reshape themselves or self-assemble over time. Think: a printed cube that folds before your eyes, or a printed pipe able to sense the need to expand or contract.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Download Audio” or “Download Video” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Law 19 mins – “In the latest episode of Crazy/Genius, produced by Patricia Yacob and Jesse Brenneman, we take a long look at the use of AI in the legal system. Algorithms pervade our lives. They determine the news we see and the products we buy. The presence of these tools is relatively obvious: Most people using Netflix or Amazon understand that their experience is mediated by technology. But algorithms also play a quiet and often devastating role in almost every element of the criminal-justice system—from policing and bail to sentencing and parole. By turning to computers, many states and cities are putting Americans’ fates in the hands of algorithms that may be nothing more than mathematical expressions of underlying bias. Perhaps no journalist has done more to uncover this shadowy world of criminal-justice AI than Julia Angwin, a longtime investigative reporter. In 2016, Angwin and a team at ProPublica published a detailed report on COMPAS, a risk-assessment tool created by the company Equivant, then called Northpointe. (After corresponding over several emails, Equivant declined to comment for our story.)” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Batteries 17 mins – “The electric car is making headway, some 100 years after Henry Ford popularized the automobile and some 40 or so since the lithium ion breakthrough. But to better power these growing industries, it’s crucial to create a battery without a risk of explosion (something several device providers know a thing or two about). The major breakthrough could come from the polymer industry. If we’re able to replace an unstable liquid electrolyte with an indestructible piece of plastic, we can make the battery cheaper, safer, lighter and better suited for the auto industry. Better still: replacing lithium with cheaper and more stable magnesium, or using renewables like solar or wind, could increase wide-scale adoption on and off the road. And that could be the most powerful disruption of all.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blind Ironers 13 mins – “Should blind people bother with the ironing? Blind mum Emma Williams and blind dad Allan Tweddle explain why and when you should bother and give our presenter Lee Kumatat a lesson and tips for getting it right. While some visually impaired people need a first aid certificate to move forward with education or work, some have found it hard to gain the necessary accreditation. Johny Cassidy meets Alan North, a partially sighted trainer who’s helping them to qualify.

Brain Bleed Stroke Treatment 27 mins – “The results of a medical trial called RESTART may be a game changer when it comes to the treatment of patients after a brain haemorrhage. More than a third of these patients take regular blood thinning medication such as aspirin after having had a heart attack or stroke in the past. And after a brain haemorrhage this leaves doctors with a dilemma. Should the antiplatelet medicines be restarted to prevent future heart attacks or could that increase the chances of another brain haemorrhage? Often doctors are reluctant to take the risk. Researchers led by a team at the University of Edinburgh have conducted a randomised controlled trial comparing patients who were restarted on their medication after a brain haemorrhage with those that were not. The surprising results have just been published in the journal Lancet, and lead author professor Rustam al-Shahi Salman tells Claudia what they found. About 12 to 15% of the world’s gold comes from artisanal mining where people work with whatever tools they have to hand. In some countries, such as Kenya, mercury is used to separate the gold from the rock; workers burn the amalgam, sluice it by hand or even put it between their teeth to squeeze out the gold. But touching, inhaling or ingesting mercury has long been known to cause serious health issues such as neurological problems, cancers, miscarriage or damage to a pregnant women’s foetus. Hannah McNeish visited Migori County in Kenya to look at attempts to prevent poisoning from becoming a major public health problem. Every day more than 7,000 people are bitten by snakes, and even though anti-venoms are effective, approximately 300 of those die. As well as people dying, many others are left with serious disabilities, which can leave whole families destitute. This week the World Health Organisation, or WHO, launched a new road map to try to tackle the problem once and for all. And the Wellcome Trust has also just announced that they are investing more than 100 million dollars in scientific research looking at anti-venoms. Dr Bernadette Abela-Ridder is team leader for neglected zoonotic diseases in the Department for the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases of the WHO.” At the link you cannot listen; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Broadband in California 25 mins – “This spring, SiFi Networks and Fullerton, California, announced that they will be working together to deploy an open access Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH) network across the city of 140,000 people. SiFi will fund and build the network and has already signed up two providers to offer Internet access service to the public. This week, Christopher speaks with Ban Bawtree-Johnson, CEO of SiFi Networks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cory Booker 32 mins – “Presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker joins to discuss the first round of debates and why he should be the Democratic nominee. He speaks with Jane Clayson. Plus, we look at the growing threat of ransomware attacks with Frances Robles and Tyler Moore.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Critical Zone 27 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down the Dr. Sue Brantley, distinguished Professor of Geosciences at Penn State. She is particularly interested in the critical zone – the zone from the top of vegetation canopy to groundwater.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Donner Party 27 mins – “Did they or didn’t they? There is plenty of written evidence that the ill-fated Donner Party resorted to cannibalism – except there are no bones. Learn the details of one of the worst disasters of the early West in this classic episode of Stuff You Should Know.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Double Jeopardy Rule 33 mins – “The Supreme Court upholds the double jeopardy rule that allows states and the federal government to prosecute for the same crime. The ruling could blunt President Trump’s pardon powers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Drug Wars 44 mins – “Robin Feldman of the University of California Hastings College of Law and author of Drug Wars talks about her book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Feldman explores the various ways that pharmaceutical companies try to reduce competition from generic drugs. The conversation includes a discussion of the Hatch-Waxman Act and the sometimes crazy world of patent protection.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dying Process 45 mins – “Chuck and Josh have covered just about every aspect of death except dying itself. Here, they fulfill the death suite of podcasts with an in-depth look at just how people die, what happens to the body during the dying process and how people accept death — and what they regret not having done while they lived.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economic Development Regulation 75 mins – “Simeon Djankov, creator of the World Bank’s Doing Business Report, and Matt Warner, Chief Operating Officer of Atlas Network talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role regulation plays in economic development and the challenges of measuring regulatory barriers to new business creation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Justice 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes Dr. Robert Figueroa of Oregon State University co -author of Science and other cultures for a compelling talk on Environmental justice, DDT, the philosophy of science and many other topics. …Over the past decade, Rob has edited the special issue of the Journal of Environmental Philosophy on Ecotourism and Environmental Justice (fall 2010).  He has published widely on environmental justice studies working to extend both the applications of environmental justice in multiple disciplines and to rethink justice theory through grassroots experiences. One example of this has involved cultural geographer Gordon Waitt from the University of Wollongong, Australia.  Rob and Gordon have been studying ecotourism and environmental justice at Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia since 2005.  Their Uluru Project has produced several publications combining philosophy and geography in an affective, qualitative methodology that has shaped thought in tourism studies, environmental justice, critical geography, and restorative justice for indigenous peoples.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

European Technology 28 mins – “Syed Kamall, a member of the European Parliament, talked about European Union (EU) technology policy issues. Topics included the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) privacy regulations of concern to some U.S.-based companies, and the impact of the U.K.’s exit from the EU (also known as “Brexit” on technology developments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Financial Guidance 48 mins – “My recent opportunities to educate investors have been extremely satisfying, including a presentation to teenagers and their parents on Bainbridge Island, mostly-retired investors at the AAII chapter in Portland, OR and to 200 students at Western Washington University. The following are questions that came rolling in from the groups, as well as emails from our readers and listeners….” At the link right-click “Download’ an dselect “Save Link as from the pop-up menu.

Forensic Trends 19 mins – “Although fingerprint identification has been in use for centuries, it wasn’t until the 19th Century that criminal investigators used it as protocol for prosecution or exoneration. The dawn of the fingerprint era occurred in Argentina, as fingerprints left by a mother at the scene of the crime freed authorities’ prime suspect and convicted the mother. From there, forensic disciplines would later proliferate to include footprints, tire tracks, hair samples and – the gold standard – DNA.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Geologist 19 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. Bin Chen an Assistant Researcher in Mineral Physics and Experimental Petrology at Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii at Manoa. The focus of my research is to understand the physics and chemistry of Earth and planetary interiors through direct examination of material properties under high pressure-temperature conditions using a wide spectrum of techniques available in synchrotron and neutron facilities and in-house laboratories.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Knowledge Limits 25 mins – “Why do ideas discarded for centuries, like electric cars, return to the cutting edge of science and technology?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Liposome Research 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. Keelung Hong, Ph.D., who founded Taiwan Liposome Company, Ltd. (TLC) in 1997 and serves as its Chairman and Chief Executive Officer.Dr.Hong has a very distinctive connection with UTEP.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Machine Learning 41 mins – “Can machine learning improve the use of data and evidence for understanding economics and public policy? Susan Athey of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about how machine learning can be used in conjunction with traditional econometric techniques to measure the impact of say, the minimum wage or the effectiveness of a new drug. The last part of the conversation looks at the experimental techniques being used by firms like Google and Amazon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

MIT President Interview 38 mins – “If an asteroid were spotted hurtling toward Earth, we wouldn’t be arguing over whether asteroids exist. But that’s basically what the politicization of science has done to the public discussion about climate change, says former MIT president Susan Hockfield. “I understand that people might debate the fine points of climate change, but the fact is that the best science indicates that we’re in trouble,” Hockfield said on the latest episode of Recode Decode with Kara Swisher, adding, “It’s simply folly to my mind not to step up and invent the technologies that are going to prevent us from the ravages of climate change that we’re inflicting on the planet, or frankly whether it’s us or anyone or some other natural operation.” …Hockfield’s latest book, which she discusses at length in the new podcast with Swisher, is The Age of Living Machines: How Biology Will Build the Next Technology Revolution.” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Moon and Saturn 47 mins – “3,2,1 … liftoff. We celebrate the moon mission at 50 and look at the future of space exploration.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nanoparticles and Twitter 32 mins – “Nanoparticles and twitter peer review” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Philanthropy 45 mins – “’We live in extremely unequal and frankly inequitable times,’ says Rockefeller Foundation president Raj Shah. But Shah, who previously worked with US Aid and Bill and Melinda Gates, says he’s optimistic about the long-term future. “I am an optimist today because I believe most people in Washington and around this country want to live in a more fair and more just world, are willing to work together to get there, and they need leaders who will honor that and bring out those tendencies as opposed to the tendencies that tend to tear us apart,” he said on the latest episode of Recode Decode. Speaking with Recode’s Teddy Schleifer at the 2019 Code Conference, Shah said that to do the most good, private philanthropies like Rockefeller should be working hand-in-hand with politicians who are “conscientious, more informed, and more evidence- and data-based” than today’s trendy right-wing populists. “We believe in public-private partnerships,” Shah said. “The greatest hits of the Rockefeller Foundation, and frankly of all of philanthropy, have been efforts to create human progress with the public sector and with the private sector, not trying to replace it.”” At the link left-click “Share” on the sound bar, right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Pitanga Fruit Value 45 mins – “Pitanga extends life in worms, Smart dust has shrunk by Ian Woolf, David Hinwood designs robots to recycle old clothing.” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Pope Francis Encyclical 39 mins – “Is capitalism part of the poverty problem facing the world or part of the solution? Are human beings doing a good job preserving the earth for future generations? To improve the world, should we improve capitalism or ourselves? Robert Whaples of Wake Forest University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about “Laudato Si’,” Pope Francis’s encyclical on capitalism, poverty, and environmental issues.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Powerful Companies 41 mins – “New York University Professor Scott Galloway talks about his book The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google. He discussed what he calls the four most powerful companies in the world and their impact on our lives.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Public Health Service 28 mins – “Dr. Keith Panell sits down with Brett P. Giroir (born November 4, 1960 in Marrero, Louisiana) is an American physician-scientist who is the current Assistant Secretary for Health[1] and a four-star admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps. He concurrently serves as the Senior Advisor for Mental Health and Opioid Policy.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Recovery 46 mins – “Economist Robert Hall of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the current state of the U.S. economy and what we know and don’t know about the recovery from the Great Recession. Much of the conversation focuses on the choices facing the Federal Reserve and the policy instruments the Fed has available. The conversation includes a discussion of Hall’s experience as chair of the National Bureau of Economic Research Committee on Business Cycle Dating.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recreational Drugs 47 mins – “How did heroin spread beyond big cities in America? What’s the connection between heroin and America’s opioid problem? Sam Quinones, author of Dreamland, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the explosion in heroin use and how one small Mexican town changed how heroin was produced and sold in America. That in turn became entangled with the growth in the use of pain-killers as recreational drugs. Drawing on the investigative reporting that culminated in his book, Quinones lays out the recent history and economics of the growth in heroin and pain-killer usage and the lost lives along the way.” At the link right-click “Download” and select”Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Robots 35 mins – “At SXSW, we brought together leading experts in the field of AI for a special live panel discussion on the future of robots – in our homes, at work, and anywhere else they can go. We gathered all the highlights here for you in this episode. Meet Kuri: Your new adorable robot friend who takes pictures, videos and can make you feel a little less lonely inside. What else might homeward-bound bots be able to accomplish someday? And how did we get all the way here? We’ve come quite a way from Leonardo da Vinci’s early animatronic designs, and Ada Lovelace’s algorithmic acrobatics. By the 1950s, we forged the first robot arm, and soon after, the earliest of artificial intelligence – foreshadowing the army of roombas entertaining your cat (and cleaning your floors) at home today.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Robots on the Road 18 mins – “The world’s biggest car makers and technology companies are investing billions of dollars in autonomous vehicles. They believe it’s just a few years before computers with high-tech sensors do the driving for us, filling our roads with robot cars ferrying human passengers from A to B. But is a driverless future really just around the corner? The BBC’s technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones travels to Arizona in the US – a hotbed for autonomous vehicle testing – to try out the robot taxi service developed by Google that’s already ferrying paying passengers around the suburbs of Phoenix, and discovers that robots still have a lot of learning to do when it comes to the tough driving conditions on busy American freeways. He also hears how Arizona locals have responded to sharing their roads with robots, and visits the Phoenix suburb that saw the first fatal accident involving a driverless car to ask if autonomous technology will ever be safe enough to gain public acceptance. Despite those challenges, we hear from car-maker Ford about its plans for a driverless car service in the next two years as car makers race to keep up with tech firms like Google and Uber in the autonomous driving space, and critics of the technology discuss how robot cars might change the dynamic between cars, pedestrians and other road users forever.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sleep Needs 19 mins – “Sleep is your life-support system and Mother Nature’s best effort yet at immortality, says sleep scientist Matt Walker. In this deep dive into the science of slumber, Walker shares the wonderfully good things that happen when you get sleep — and the alarmingly bad things that happen when you don’t, for both your brain and body. Learn more about sleep’s impact on your learning, memory, immune system and even your genetic code — as well as some helpful tips for getting some shut-eye.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Cells and Fusion 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell sits down with Dr. David Strubbe of the University of California at Merced for a compelling dicussion on solar cells & nuclear fusion. His interests  vary from theoretical condensed-matter physics to thermoelectrics. [The list of UC Merced’s research strengths is long and includes climate change and ecology; solar and renewable energy; water quality and resources; artificial intelligence; cognitive science; stem-cell, diabetes and cancer research; air quality; big-data analysis; computer science; mechanical, environmental and materials engineering; political science; and much, much more.]” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supermarket Trends 32 mins – “For 100 years, the supermarket has been the place to go to purchase groceries –but that’s rapidly changing and will almost certainly not be the case in the coming decade. Here, we look back on its reign at the top, and look ahead to its very precarious future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tectonic Science 28 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes Professor Frances Cooper from the University of Bristol in England. Her research is focused on understanding the mechanics of large-scale continental deformation and the evolution of orogenic systems.At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribalism 62 mins – “EconTalk host Russ Roberts does a monologue on how political discourse seems to have deteriorated in recent years and the growth in outrage, tribalism, and intolerance for those with different views from one’s own. Roberts suggests that part of the problem is the revolution of the market for information caused by the internet that allows people to customize what they see to fit their own political narratives and worldview. In short, the market for news works to make us feel good rather than to help us to discover the truth. The monologue closes with some suggestions for how we might improve the way we consume information and interact with those we disagree with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tribalism 76 mins – “Journalist and author Sebastian Junger talks about his book Tribe with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Junger explores the human need to be needed and the challenges facing many individuals in modern society who struggle to connect with others. His studies of communal connection include soldiers in a small combat unit and American Indian society in the nineteenth century.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TV Ratings 30 mins – “Ever wonder why some great shows go off the air after a season or less? Blame it on the Nielsen company, which has for more than 60 years been the almost exclusive decider of what goes and what stays on TV.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Venture Capitalist 30 mins – “Scott Kupor, managing partner at the venture capital firm Andreesen Horowitz, talks about the role that venture capitalists play in silicon valley and the process that start-ups go through to acquire funding.” At the link find the title, “Scott Kupor,” in the C-Span Communicators, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vertical Farming 30 mins- “How are we going to feed everybody on Earth? It’s not just a common question – it’s one that’s been asked for centuries. As the population keeps growing exponentially (10 billion by 2050), leading thinkers, farmers, inventors and governments keep coming back to this question. The agricultural revolution that introduced high-yield crops like wheat and barley won’t be the same one that powers us into the future. We’ll need ever-more fresh fruits and vegetables – well beyond the scope of what John Deere’s famed steel plow and Cyrus McCormick’s mechanical reaper can handle.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

White Coat Uprising in Sudan 27 mins – “When ongoing street protests finally pushed Sudan’s repressive president from power last month, it was the country’s doctors many thanked. Ever since Omar al-Bashir’s successful coup in 1989 they had defied him. Staging strikes, organising demonstrations, and campaigning for human rights, the country’s white-coated men and women opposed all he stood for. In the last few months alone scores of them were jailed, beaten, tortured and some deliberately gunned down. Through the eyes of a murdered medic’s family, Mike Thomson looks at the extraordinary role these unlikely revolutionaries have played in Sudan’s uprising.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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