Mining Digest 415 – Nov 1, 2019: Baseball Salaries, Bataan Survivor, Chiobani CEO Talk, Constitution Convention, D-Day Story, Dementia Story, Educating Black Students, Food Production, Gorilla in Room, Immigration Crisis, Inactivity, IT Stories, Jad Abumrad, Legal Education Technology, Meat or Not, Mobile Connectivity in Africa, National Health Service and Technology, Native American Economics, Noise in Cities, , Rape Investigation, Solzhenitsyn, South Africa at 25 Years, Stephen Hawking, TB Testing, Technology in Law, Trumpnomics

Exercise your ears: the 35 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 665 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Baseball Salaries 21 mins – “Baseball is a winner-take-all career. There is a very small chance of making massive amounts of money. But more importantly, there is a very big chance of making almost no money. Some minor leaguers earn $8,000 dollars per year. To have more chances at winning the baseball lottery, some players are deciding to get together and face the odds as a group. They are joining “income pools,” which could change the way baseball players, and lots of professionals, think about how we get paid.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bataan Survivor 52 mins – “In 1942 the Japanese army forced 70,000 prisoners to march across the Bataan Peninsula. Gene Jacobsen was among them, and he tells his story of three and a half years as a prisoner of war. This episode picked by Doug Fabrizio.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chiobani CEO Talk 17 mins – “Profit, money, shareholders: these are the priorities of most companies today. But at what cost? In an appeal to corporate leaders worldwide, Chobani founder Hamdi Ulukaya calls for an end to the business playbook of the past — and shares his vision for a new, “anti-CEO playbook” that prioritizes people over profits. “This is the difference between profit and true wealth,” he says.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Constitution Convention 62 mins – “Are there many Americans today who wish the President of the United States had more power relative to the other branches of Congress? Terry Moe is one of them. In this week’s EconTalk episode, Moe–a professor of political science at Stanford University and a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution–talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book (co-authored with William Howell), Relic. Moe wants to give the President the power to propose legislation that Congress would have to approve or reject free of amendments. Moe argues this would improve legislation and reduce the cronyism and special interest influence on Congress.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crowdfunding Music 14 mins – “Don’t make people pay for music, says Amanda Palmer: Let them. In a passionate talk that begins in her days as a street performer (drop a dollar in the hat for the Eight-Foot Bride!), she examines the new relationship between artist and fan.” At the link left-click “Share” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

D-Day Story 15 mins – “In honor of the 75th anniversary of D-Day, “Unknown History” podcast, author and historian Giles Milton takes listeners through the perilous 24 hours of D-Day, sharing the tales of the men and women who risked their lives by land, sea, and air. For more from “Unknown History” visit https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/unknown-history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Dementia Interview 50 mins – “In 2010, Gerda Saunders learned that she has dementia. So she started writing what she calls field notes on the progress of her condition. The result is her memoir, Memory’s Last Breath. This episode was picked by KUER’s newsroom managing editor Elaine Clark” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Story 53 mins – “In 2010, Gerda Saunders learned that she has dementia. She was 61 years old at the time, and soon had to leave her post teaching at the University of Utah. So Gerda started writing what she calls her field notes on dementia. The result is a new memoir due out this week. We’ve been following Gerda over the last year with a series of short films documenting her journey, and Monday, Doug sits down to talk to her about her book. It’s called Memory’s Last Breath. Saunders served as Associate Director for the University of Utah’s Gender Studies Program. She’s the author of a collection of short stories called Blessings on the Sheep Dog…and her new memoir is called Memory’s Last Breath: Field Notes on my Dementia…” At the link right-click the Play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educating Black Students 44 mins – “New York Times best-selling author Tara Westover discusses her memoir, “Educated.” Tara describes what it was like growing up in the remote Idaho mountains as the daughter of survivalist Mormons. She explains her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when Tara’s older brother became violent. Tara did not attend school or see doctors, and had minimal interaction with the outside world for 17 years. Despite this unorthodox upbringing, Tara taught herself enough mathematics and grammar to earn acceptance into Brigham Young University. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her to Cambridge University, where she earned her Ph.D. in history. This coming-of-age story of courage serves as an inspiring reminder to anyone looking to find their own, unique voice. This conversation was recorded in front of an audience aboard the O Magazine Holland America Girls Getaway Cruise.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive and can be downloaded there.

Exercise Less 44 mins – “Biomechanist Katy Bowman and her family don’t own couches or recliners or even chairs at the kitchen table. That’s so they have every possible opportunity for physical movement, which is a central idea of Bowman’s fitness philosophy. This episode picked by producer Benjamin Bombard.” At the link right-click the Play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Food Production 62 mins – “Tamar Haspel, who writes “Unearthed,” a column on food and agriculture at the Washington Post, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a wide variety of issues related to the cost of food and how it’s produced. Topics discussed include why technology helps make some foods inexpensive, how animals are treated, the health of the honey bee, and whether eggs from your backyard taste any better than eggs at the grocery.

Gorilla in Room 65 mins – “Teppo Felin of the University of Oxford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about perception, cognition, and rationality. Felin argues that some of the standard experimental critiques of human rationality assume an omniscience that misleads us in thinking about social science and human capability. The conversation includes a discussion of the implications of different understandings of rationality for economics, entrepreneurship, and innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Crisis 66 mins- “Michelle Malkin is a nationally recognized syndicated columnist who made her name through sharp humor to become an unapologetic conservative voice in America’s political discourse. A popular Fox News Channel contributor, Malkin has more than 2 million Twitter followers. Adding to her collection of four no. 1 best sellers, Malkin’s new book, Open Borders, Inc., is her exposé about what happens at America’s borders. Beginning with a thorough reexamination of the southern border’s history of immigration to its current state of crisis, Malkin argues that powerful special interest groups are working behind the scenes to keep America’s borders open for an influx of cheap labor in order to enrich the nation’s elite and create new generations of Democratic voters. Unafraid to challenge the status quo, Malkin offers her insight and confrontational approach on a variety of issues, from identity politics to social matters. Join us for an engaging conversation with one of the most outspoken voices of the American Right, and be sure to bring your questions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Inactivity 50 mins – “Chances are good you’re sitting down as you read these words. After hearing what Dr. James Levine has to say about the dangers of inactivity, you might find yourself standing a lot more.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Basics 52 mins – “Paul discusses the annual update of Callan’s colorful “Periodic Table of Investment Returns 1999-2017” and suggests you view the table while listening.  Paul also addresses the changes to his 401k recommendations from 50/50 U.S/international equities to 70/30 U.S./international, and small cap value from Guggenheim SmallCap 600 Pure Value (RZV) to SPDR Small Cap Value (SLYV); and he compares the return and risk of his buy-and-hold and market-timing accounts.” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Basics 58 mins – “Paul Merriman answers questions about a wide variety of investor concerns: profitable focus funds, using a pension as a substitute for bonds, moving DFA funds to Vanguard, the impact of higher taxes on the market, performance of major asset classes besides the S&P 500, defensive investment strategies for a bear market, popular sector funds, the impact of saving an extra percentage or more a year, the Ultimate Buy and Hold, and an inter-generational conversation about sound investing:” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IT Stories 81 mins – “Technology Veterans weekly podcast with Carey Holzman and Mike Smith” At the link right-click “Download” under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Jad Abumrad 41 mins – “Radiolab co-host Jad Abumrad is a genius. Back in 2011, he was certified when the MacArthur Foundation awarded him a “genius grant.” Jad thinks public radio should be more chaotic, more joyous and more lifelike. This episode was picked by Doug.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Education Technology 20 mins – “Introducing technology to legal education could be the key to inspiring innovation in the legal industry. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Darin Fox about how he sees technology functioning in legal education. They discuss the program Darin oversees at the University of Oklahoma, how the recession affected the use of legal technology, and potential future uses of courtroom technology. Darin Fox is an associate dean at the University of Oklahoma College of Law. He oversees the law library, information technology, and the school’s law practice technology training program, called the Digital Initiative Project.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Leonardo Da Vinci 30 mins – “On the eve of a major new Science Museum exhibition, we look at Leonardo’s designs, and consider his influence on modern robotics and aeronautics Leonardo Da Vinci was an incredible polymath: one of the most diversely talented people ever known. The Science Museum’s new exhibition takes the machines that Leonardo drew and exquisitely reinterprets them in three-dimensional form, alongside games and multimedia installations. Nicola Davis is joined by Claudio Giorgione, curator at the Leonardo Da Vinci National Science and Technology museum in Milan, and by Professor Jim Bennett, Keeper Emeritus for the Science Museum.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat or Not 19 mins – “To meat or not to meat? That is the question. Recent innovations in lab-grown meats seem to be making non-meat burgers and tacos a tastier option than they have ever been. But are these products too good to be true? And are non-meat alternatives always more ecologically responsible than actual meat? This week’s guests on Sea Change Radio have some thoughts on the matter. We speak with the co-founders of Soil4Climate, Seth Itzkan and Karl Thidemann, about the mission of their organization. They lay out the benefits of regenerative farming and grazing practices, as well as a lifestyle that includes eating plenty of meat. They also explain why they hope companies like Impossible Foods ultimately fulfill the promise in their name, and cease to be possible.” At thelinkr ight-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mobile Connectivity in Africa 28 mins – “By the end of this year, 386 million Africans will hold mobile technology in their hands. Clár Ní Chonghaile discusses what this could mean for development, and the problems investors face – from the difficulties over power supplies to the lack of educational opportunities in computing. Viola Llewellyn is a co-founder of Ovamba, which offers financing to small- and medium-sized businesses through a web-based platform with a mobile app. She says there needs to be a shift from traditional learning to education in technological subjects, which will be vital to the continent’s development. Tomi Davies, a Nigerian angel investor, explains the difficulties of trying to put money into tech startups in Africa, as there are no clear policies on taxation or local investing. For Stephen Haggard, the cost of data is one of the biggest issues. He chairs Nairobi-based technology company Eneza Education, and says the cost of airtime is one of the biggest barriers for people wanting to learn. He also discusses the frustration of relying on SMS text messaging, as only 23% of mobile subscribers in Africa have smartphones.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

National Health Service and Technology – “The NHS is about caring for people, free at the point of care, creating a safety net which catches the most vulnerable. Tech has been defined by the facebook maxim “move fast, break things” – looking to disrupt a sector, get investment and move on. We want to be able to harness the potential utility of digital tech in the NHS – but how can those two cultures be reconciled, and what salutary lessons should we learn from other industries (pharmaceuticals, devices) before we embark on these new ventures. In this podcast we hear from; Neil Sebire, Chief Research Information Officer and Director, Great Ormond Street Hospital Digital Research, Informatics and Virtual Environments (DRIVE) Unit Dr Ramani Moonesinghe, Professor and Head of Centre for Perioperative Medicine, University College London Indra Joshi, Digital Health and Artificial Intelligence Clinical Lead…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the archive of this blog.

Noise in Cities – “Is our blaring modern soundscape harming our health? Cities are noisy places and while people are pretty good at tuning it out on a day-to-day basis our sonic environments have serious, long-term impacts on our mental and physical health. This is part one in a two-part series supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation about how sound can be designed to reduce harm and even improve wellbeing. Many of the sounds we hear are created with very little thought for how they interact with each other. Some of these are byproducts of modern technologies, like engine sounds or the hums of computers. Others are made intentionally, like alarms or cellphone rings. There are the sounds of overhead planes, air conditioning units, stores pumping out music, sirens and then people talking loudly to be heard over the rest of the noise. Then there are cars, which may be the biggest culprit.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Noise in Hospitals – “Sounds can have serious impacts on our wellbeing, even (or especially) in places focused on health like hospitals. This is the second episode in a two-part series supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation about how sound can be designed to reduce harm and even improve wellbeing. “Hospitals are horrible places to get better,” believes Joel Beckerman, sound designer and composer at Man Made Music, who has serious concerns about noise in hospital settings. Joe Schlesinger, a musician and anesthesiologist at Vanderbilt Medical Center, has experiened some of this caucophy firsthand while at work. “As I walk in, there’s the hubbub of people talking,” says Schlesinger. There are clinicians and families talking, and big metal carts rolling down the halls. In the middle of all of this, he also hears alarms coming from various patient rooms. Worse, he says, these “are difficult to localize, so I’m not sure which rooms they’re coming from.” Joel Beckerman has experienced the same thing in hospitals he has worked in. “There is a heart monitor,” he explains, which “makes 86 different alarms … there’s no way that that can be meaningful to anybody.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rape Investigations 48 mins – “A major investigation by The Atlantic finds that the police are still skeptical of women who report a rape. The reporter says a “subterranean river of chauvinism” is to blame.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the this blog archive.

Solzhenitsyn 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

South Africa at 25 Years 27 mins – “There is a generation in South Africa who are known as the Born Frees. They were born in 1994, the year of the elections in which black citizens were allowed to vote for the first time. The Born Frees are 25 years old now – graduating from universities, getting established in their careers, or still living in enduring poverty, which has reduced since 1994 but is still profound. The government estimates that 13 million South Africans still live in what they call ‘extreme poverty.’ This is a major disappointment to many who queued for hours to vote in the 1994 election which brought Nelson Mandela to power. Despite spending 27 years in an Apartheid jail, Mandela was dedicated to creating a ‘rainbow nation’, with dignity and opportunity for everyone, regardless of race. BBC correspondent Hugh Sykes has visited South Africa regularly since 1994, and in this programme he tells us about the politics of the country, education, corruption and poverty. He finds some young South Africans who have never heard the word ‘Apartheid’ and don’t know what it means. Hugh also examines the unresolved issue of the ownership of South Africa’s farms – which are still mostly in the hands of the small white minority. More than 2000 white farmers have been murdered since 1994. Is this land-grab politics, or random violent crime?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Stephen Hawkin 36 mins – “On 8 January 1942, Frank and Isobel Hawking celebrated the birth of their son, Stephen. 75 years later and Professor Stephen Hawking is one of the most prominent scientists of all time. In a career spanning half a century, the cosmologist has notched up more than 150 scientific papers, a dozen or so books, and a string of TV and film appearances. It’s an achievement made all the more remarkable given his diagnosis with motor neurone disease at the age of 21. In this special edition of Science Weekly, we ask a handful of physicists about his contributions to science and the wider world. Speaking to Ian Sample this week are long-time friend and collaborator Professor Sir Roger Penrose, former student Professor Marika Taylor, Professor Sabine Hossenfelder, and Professor Max Tegmark.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

TB Testing – “A TB infection can take two forms, active and latent. Active disease is transmissible, and causes the damage to the lungs which makes TB one of the biggest killers in the world. In the latent form, the bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis is quiescent and can stay that way for years until it becomes active and causes those clinical signs.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology in Law 21 mins – “Ten years ago, dictation and speech recognition were clunky, inefficient, and inaccurate softwares. As the technology emerged, lawyers tried programs like Dragon Dictation, but most decided that speech solutions were not practical or worth using. Today, these softwares are much more accurate and useful for many lawyers, but maintain a similar reputation. How have dictation and speech recognition changed from the past and who can benefit most from them now? Will they work with the programs lawyers are already using in their law firms?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Technology Pros and Cons – “According to the Marist Poll, 49 percent of Americans think technology makes people dumber, while 46 percent say it makes people smarter. So we’re about an even split on this topic. We have immediate access to knowledge and to each other, making us more productive now than ever before. But are we getting any smarter as a result? Experts disagree, and so do the intelligence test results. While non-verbal IQ tests results are rising, Verbal IQ, the Flynn Effect and others are decreasing. There are varying opinions as to why this is happening. Some believe that humans have reached their genetic potential and are now on the decline. Others believe it’s because we let technology do the “thinking” for us. Still, others say it’s just plain laziness. To further complicate the issue, consider the many types of intelligence. There’s social intelligence, emotional intelligence, problem-solving, spatial relations, language, musical, kinesthetic, existential, mathematical, logical … and all of them contain both learned and unlearned aspects.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then select the “Save File” option from the pop-up menu.

Trumpnomics 60 mins – “Economist Stephen Moore discusses the economic policies of the Trump administration. He’s interviewed by Veronique de Rugy, senior research fellow at George Mason University Mercatus Center.”At the link you can listen and purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Winnipeg Strike of 1919 54 mins – “It was the biggest labour action in Canadian history: on May 15, 1919, over 35,000 workers took to the streets of Winnipeg for six weeks. It began peacefully and passionately and ended in lethal violence and disagreement over what it  meant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in the blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.