Mining Digest 416 – Nov 8, 2019: Aging Study, Animal Emotions, Arctic Sea Ice Crisis, Artificial Human Construction, Biology of Extremes, Blindness Stories, China-Foe or Ally, Chronic Pain Control, Climate Change Fight, Death Camp, Democracy Under Threat, Dissident Doctor, Dyatlov Pass Mystery, Economic Growth, Enlightenment Period, Evicted, Fake Videos, Fifty Key Inventions, Future Trends, Gates Interview, Gene Research, Girlhood Stories, HIV Fight, Human Embryos Lab Grown, Illiberal Reformers, Immigrant Crossings, Innovation in the NHS, Intelligence Discussion, Investment Mutual Funds, Investment Questions, Language Learning, Leadership Crisis, Legal Profession Future, Luddite Lawyers, Meat Alternatives, Monica Lewinsky, Mueller Report, Multilingual Societies, Open Access Books, O’Reilly and Technology, Parkinson’s Research, Plastic Eating Bugs, Psychology of Money, Radiation Facts, Theranos Story, Trump Tariffs, Tylenol Murders, Undercover Migrant, Urban-Rural Political Divide, Weavers

Exercise your ears: the 74 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 801 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Aaron Copland 26 mins – “There are many Americas. Nowadays they barely speak to each other. But during the most perilous years of the last century, one young composer went in search of a sound that melded many of the nation’s strains into something singular and new. He was a man of the left, though of no political party: gay, but neither closeted nor out; Jewish, but agnostic, unless you count music as a religion. His name was Aaron Copland. On this July 4th weekend, WNYC’s Sara Fishko tells his story.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Aging Study 33 mins – “As the first batch of the best studied humans on the planet turn 70, we speak to Helen Pearson, whose book The Life Project explores this huge birth-cohort study. Seventy years ago, in 1946, the world’s longest running major study of human development began in Britain. The analysis of the lives of thousands of people was so successful that researchers repeated the exercise, following thousands more babies born in 1958, 1970, the early 1990s, and at the turn of the millennium. Six generations of children were followed: over 70,000 people. The studies have become the envy of scientists around the world, but beyond the research team, remarkably few people know they even exist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alexander von Humboldt 42 mins – “On this week’s show, we’re talking about two books that encourage us to look anew at nature. Claire sits down in Cartegena with Andrea Wulf, who won the Royal Society prize in 2016 for The Invention of Nature, her biography of Alexander von Humboldt. They discuss her latest take on the polymath explorer’s life: graphic novel The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt. We also discover how you can find food growing wild – even in the city – as Richard tries to collect his dinner with professional forager John Wright, the author of The Forager’s Calendar.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Animal Emotions 33 mins – “In 2016, a video of an aging chimp named Mama went viral. In the scene, Mama, on her deathbed, greets a biologist, Jan van Hooff, who she had known for decades. Her emotion is clear. The video is heartbreaking – and also so human, which helps explains why millions of people watched it. For primatologist and psychologist Frans de Waal, the encounter perfectly illustrates the idea that animals have emotions – and that they often closely resemble our own. He explores this idea in his new book, “Mama’s Last Hug: Animal Emotions and What They Tell Us About Ourselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Arctic Sea Ice Crisis 32 mins – “In his latest book A Farewell to Ice, Peter Wadhams, professor of ocean physics at Cambridge University, explores the current crisis faced by Arctic sea ice, and in doing so makes some alarming predictions. But how accurate are these? And do they even matter, when the potential ramifications of the total disappearance of Arctic sea ice are considered? Joining Ian Sample in the studio this week alongside Professor Wadhams, are Dr David Schroeder, at the Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling at Reading University, Jonathan Bamber, professor of physical geography at the University of Bristol, and the Guardian’s own environment site editor, Adam Vaughan.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Human Construction 26 mins – “As tech giants embrace voice-enabled AI assistants to power purchases, play songs and deliver the weather report, hear the latest on Mica, Magic Leap’s AI-powered virtual human, who wants to help you do more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Astrophysics 12 mins – “Humans have been studying the stars for thousands of years, but astrophysicist Juna Kollmeier is on a special mission: creating the most detailed 3-D maps of the universe ever made. Journey across the cosmos as she shares her team’s work on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, imaging millions of stars, black holes and galaxies in unprecedented detail. If we maintain our pace, she says, we can map every large galaxy in the observable universe by 2060. “We’ve gone from arranging clamshells to general relativity in a few thousand years,” she says. “If we hang on 40 more, we can map all the galaxies.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Asylum Seekers 12 mins – “Refugee and immigrants rights attorney Melanie Nezer shares an urgently needed historical perspective on the crisis at the southern US border, showing how citizens can hold their governments accountable for protecting the vulnerable. “A country shows strength through compassion and pragmatism, not through force and through fear,” she says.” At the link right-click “Share” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology of Extremes 51 mins – “…Utah writer Matthew LaPlante joins us to talk about the biggest, fastest, tiniest and deadliest creatures in the world. There’s a lot scientists are learning by studying extreme evolution. They’re finding out new things about immunity, cellular regeneration and the biology of the planet to name a few. LaPlante says the take-away for him though was a sense of awe about the world and he hopes that readers come away seeing things differently than they had before. His book is called Superlative.” At the link left-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blindness Stories 19 mins – “Dave Steele was diagnosed with the hereditary condition retinitis pigmentosa five years ago. He found translating his grief and loss into poetry was cathartic for him, and quickly discovered that it helped others who were also coming to terms with visual impairment. The Colorado Center for the Blind in the United States, run by the National Federation for the Blind, offers a nine month course to people who want to learn skills for living life as a visually impaired person. At the end of the course, they must pass a final assessment. It’s called ‘The Drop’ and involves being driven to an unknown location, handed a phone on which they can only make emergency calls and told to find their way back to the Centre. Danielle Montour completed ‘The Drop’ back in September. She tells us how it helped her to become more comfortable with her blindness. And Chris Fisher went from being fully sighted and studying for his pilot’s licence to, four weeks later, being totally blind. Chris, always good with maintenance and building things, turned back to what he knew before losing his sight, and has built a commercially viable business as a wood turner. Chris shows Tom Walker around his workshop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Book Production 50 mins – “This week the books podcast takes a physical turn, shifting away from the intangible business of writing to consider the hunks of wood we haul around for our reading pleasure. With sales of printed books on the rise, there’s little sign the reading experience will go entirely digital any time soon. So how does a novel make the jump from manuscript to bookshop, and what happens next? We start our story at Hodder & Stoughton, where director of production Joanna Seaton gives us a whistlestop tour of the editorial process. Next we head to Suffolk, where Chris Impey takes us from printing plate to bound copy at one of the UK’s biggest printers, Clays. Waterstones fiction buyer Chris White tells us how they decide which titles make it on to the shelves, while Book Industry Communication’s Karina Luke and Book Aid International’s Simon Mercer explain what happens to the books that never get sold.

Brexit Fate 47 mins – “The make-or-break vote on the Brexit deal with Britain’s future hanging in the balance. We’ll turn to London for reaction and what’s next.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China, Foe or Ally 54 mins – “Two prominent names in U.S. foreign policy argue that China is now a foe to the liberal international order. They say Beijing’s vision of the world just doesn’t work with the values of a country such as Canada. The disagreements on rule-of-law, press freedom, and open debate are wide—and now getting wider. On the flip side, a one-time president of the UN Security Council joins the head of a major Chinese think-tank to paint Beijing as an ally to liberal internationalism, especially as the U.S. tacks toward an isolationist stance to the world. Be it resolved, China is a threat to the liberal international order. So goes the most recent edition of the Munk Debates, featuring H.R. McMaster and Michael Pillsbury competing for audience votes against Kishore Mahbubani and Huiyao Wang at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chronic Pain Control 31 mins – “Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Prevention 30 mins – “What do we know about the way we experience pain? What purpose does it serve, and could we be close to dealing with the kind of chronic pain not yet treatable with medicine? Scientists at University College London have made a discovery which makes mice pain-free, and have reversed painlessness in a woman with a rare condition. Nicola Davis is joined by Dr Natasha Curran, Consultant in Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine at University College London Hospitals, and by Professor John Wood, lead author of the study and a neuroscientist at UCL.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Climate Change Fight 29 mins – “Whether or not we use the name Green New Deal to describe a set of aggressive long-term policies that will help humanity in the fight against climate change, most rational people agree that the status quo is completely unacceptable. The potential of a Green New Deal is that it could pave the way for some great minds to devise concrete proposals for reducing greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with one of those great minds, Ramez Naam, a futurist and technologist who’s crafted his own sort of Green New Deal. We delve into the nuts and bolts of Naam’s proposal and the problems it’s trying to solve, as he makes the case for why we may actually see bipartisan support for such a proposal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cloud Computing Ethics 30 mins – “No lawyer should assume their firm’s technology is secure. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Lucian Pera about the ethics of lawyers using the cloud and how they can use it with confidence. They break down the different cloud providers, the dangers that can potentially crop up when using the cloud, and the importance of having a technology mentor that lawyers can turn to with questions whenever they need it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Coffee History 54 mins – “An ordinary cup of Joe just won’t do anymore. It’s now gourmet, fair trade and organic. Whether the method is pour over, French press, or vacuum pumps, coffee is now described with terms like “mouthfeel”, just as fine wines are. Contributing producer Marilyn Powell brings us her documentary, The Coffee Chronicles about the cultural history behind the world’s most popular drink.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Complacent Americans 66 mins – “In his latest book, Tyler Cowen documents trends of increased risk aversion, resistance to change, and reluctance to interact with people outside of our familiar groups. He speculates on many plausible causes of these trends, but he does not focus on any single factor. Indeed, in the passage quoted above, “They” refers not to any group or institution, but instead to “people making decisions,” meaning everyone.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Contradictions or Not 19 mins – “Hannah Gadsby’s groundbreaking special “Nanette” broke comedy. In a talk about truth and purpose, she shares three ideas and three contradictions. Or not.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data-Driven Ethics Initiative 29 mins – “The Data-Driven Ethics Initiative is a research project that aims to use legal services data to modernize legal rules for professional conduct. In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway talk to Erin Gerstenzang about the initiative and the current landscape of ethics reform including lawyer regulations. Additionally, Erin delves into the challenges of ethics reform and how design-thinking can help.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Death Camp 54 mins – “In 2015, a strange discovery was made near the site of the former Stutthof concentration camp in Poland. Poet-musician Grzegorz Kwiatkowski and a friend walked into a pine forest and found “a lot of shoes.” “Not a lot like a hundred, but a lot like thousands of hundreds, hundreds of thousands,”  Kwiatkowski said. The two kept digging up more and more shoes from the ground. Children’s shoes. Women’s shoes. Shoes likely surrendered by Jews when they arrived at the death camp. The Stutthof concentration camp operated from September 1939 to May 1945. It housed 110,000 prisoners from 25 countries and 27 nationalities — 65,000 of them perished there. The camp supplied slave labour to the Nazi war machine, and was also the laboratory for making soap from the fat of thousands of victims.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Democracy Under Threat 54 mins – “In this episode, Harvard historian James Kloppenberg traces the long and tortuous tradition of American liberal democracy. He argues that the United States has arrived at such a precarious place in its political evolution, that the very conditions that make democracy possible are under threat. Professor Kloppenberg says unless Americans are willing to move away from widespread destructive tendencies like self-righteousness and dogmatism, then democracy itself may never recover.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Digestion 15 mins – “Ever wonder how we poop? Learn about the gut — the system where digestion (and a whole lot more) happens — as doctor and author Giulia Enders takes us inside the complex, fascinating science behind it, including its connection to mental health. It turns out, looking closer at something we might shy away from can leave us feeling more fearless and appreciative of ourselves.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dissent Doctor 27 mins – “You may not know Dr. Michael Klein’s name, but if you’ve had a child in the past 30 years, he may have played a key role in how that baby came into the world. Klein was a pioneer in pushing the medical system to put the needs of mothers and babies first — including exposing the fact that the episiotomy, a once-routine procedure performed on mothers giving birth was doing more harm than good. Brian speaks to him about his new memoir: Dissident Doctor: Catching Babies and Challenging the Medical Status Quo, and finds out how Klein’s past as a Vietnam draft deserter whose father was blacklisted in the McCarthy era, led him to a revolutionary career in medicine. (Perhaps you’ve heard of his daughter…Naomi?)” At the link find the title, “The dissident doctor who put women and children first,” right-click “Download The dissident doctor who put women and children firstand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dyatlov Pass Mystery 50 mins – “In 1959, a group of nine Russian students met a mysterious death in the Ural mountains. Experienced cross-country skiers, their bodies were found scattered around a campsite, their tent cut from the inside, as they seemingly panicked to escape from someone – or something. Sixty years on, Lucy Ash traces their footsteps to try to find out what happened.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Growth 62 mins– “Tyler Cowen of George Mason University and the co-host of the blog Marginal Revolution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Stubborn Attachments, his book-length treatment of how to think about public policy. Cowen argues that economic growth–properly defined–is the moral key to maintaining civilization and promoting human well-being. Along the way, the conversation also deals with inequality, environmental issues, and education.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment Period P1 54 mins – “French philosopher Denis Diderot was one of a small group of 18th-century thinkers who began to explore a radical new way of thinking about all knowledge. Fear of prison kept Diderot from publishing much in his own lifetime, apart from his magisterial Encyclopédie, which proposed a new way of organizing everything we know and experience. Part one of a two-part series: producer Philip Coulter goes on a walk around Diderot’s Paris with philosophy professor and historian, Sophie Audidière.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Enlightenment Period P2 54 mins – “French philosopher Denis Diderot was one of a small group of 18th-century thinkers who began to explore a radical new way of thinking about the totality of human knowledge. In his magisterial Encyclopédie, he proposed a new way of organizing everything we know and experience. In part 2 of his series, producer Philip Coulter takes a walk around Diderot’s Paris.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Evicted P1 37 mins – “We have a problem as a country, a problem made up of small inadequacies and inequalities that compound and intersect. There is and always has been an eviction crisis. American renters endure nearly a million evictions a year and they defend themselves from roughly three times as many eviction filings. The problem, broadly and historically speaking, is putting people in homes and ensuring that they can stay put. It’s a problem we’ve had for a very long time — long enough to have solved it, long enough to at least comprehend it. But we haven’t, and we don’t. Not yet.  Within the past several months On the Media has traveled to Richmond, Chicago, Indianapolis, Camden and Atlanta in search of the symptoms, and perhaps a cure, to this particular plague. We did so with the help of Matthew Desmond, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City and founder of The Eviction Lab. He’s our partner in this project, and so we start the series with a conversation between him and Brooke. We also hear the story of Jeffrey, a security guard in Richmond, Virginia whose ongoing housing troubles teach us a lot about our eviction crisis.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P2 37 mins – “Home is in your heart and in your head, but mostly home is on land — acreage parceled out, clawed at, stolen, denied for decades and decades. First, there was Field Order No. 15, the Union Army’s plan to distribute 40-acre plots to the newly emancipated. That was a promise broken almost immediately. Later, there was the Great Migration, in which millions of African Americans fled north, where governments, lenders, and white neighbors would never let them own their land and build their own wealth. And now a system, purpose-built, extracts what it can, turning black and brown renters into debtors and evictees. In this second episode of our series The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis, we catalog the thefts and the schemes — most of which were perfectly legal — and we ask how long this debt will fester forever.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P3 37 mins – “This is episode three in our series, “The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis.” It’s the dollars-and-cents episode, in which we account for what we know and don’t know about those who own and those who rent. We digest some new data — compiled and analyzed, in part, by our collaborator, Matthew Desmond — that demonstrate the extent to which landlords often profit in impoverished communities. We speak with the founder of a massive online eviction platform, who defends his company’s “standardized process.” In Camden, New Jersey we hear the story of Destiny, a social worker whose corporate landlord showed no reluctance to bring her to housing court, month after month. In Indianapolis we meet a mom-and-pop landlord who doesn’t deny her profits in the low-income market — she’s a businesswoman, after all — but who also has often given delinquent tenants the chance to get caught up. And in Richmond, Virginia we learn the hard truth about landlords’ comfortable place in the American legal system — even in spite of unmistakable neglect.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evicted P4 37 mins – “We have an eviction crisis, which is really just one part of a broader housing affordability crisis. Incomes are too low for rents. Rents are too high for incomes. The barriers to home-buying are growing, especially for younger Americans. The wealth gap between black and white Americans is spreading, driven largely by inequalities in housing. The shockwaves from the foreclosure crisis continue. And in some cities, gentrification drives up costs and drives away low-income families. Luckily enough, there are solutions — quite a few of them, in fact. In this fourth and final episode of The Scarlet E: Unmasking America’s Eviction Crisis, we evaluate the proposals, which range from subtle to significant. First, a look back on a solution that worked in some places and was allowed to fail in many others. We visit Atlanta, home to the nation’s first public housing projects. We learn how the city has since destroyed or converted all of its public housing. And with the help of Lawrence Vale, author of Purging the Poorest: Public Housing and the Design Politics of Twice-Cleared Communities, we look at one public housing project, in Boston, that continues to thrive. And then we look at solutions, both proposed and in-play. Again in Atlanta, we meet landlord Marjy Stagmeier, whose unique model improves nearby schools’ performance — and still turns a profit. We speak with sociologist Matt Desmond about the need to fully fund our Section 8 housing voucher program, and to encourage, or compel, landlords to accept voucher-holders. And we touch on the housing proposals from several Democratic candidates for president. Matt wonders whether our federal housing policies — for instance, the mortgage interest deduction — are subsidizing those most in need. We also ask New York City Councilmember Mark Levine and South Carolina legislator Marvin Pendarvis about possible reforms in our housing courts. We hear from Marty Wegbreit, director of litigation for the Central Virginia Legal Aid Society, about how Richmond turned its shame over its high eviction rates into policy. And we consider ways that some cities might increase their affordable housing supply by doing away with restrictive, exclusionary zoning policies.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Fake Videos 46 mins – “Those doctored videos of Nancy Pelosi and Mark Zuckerberg highlight the growing threat of deepfake technology. It’s getting harder to know what’s real and what isn’t. How can they be stopped?”” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fifty Key Inventions 69 mins – “Financial Times columnist and author Tim Harford talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about Harford’s latest book, Fifty Inventions That Shaped the Modern Economy. Highlights include how elevators are an important form of mass transit, why washing machines didn’t save quite as much time as you’d think, and the glorious illuminating aspects of light throughout history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future Trends 63 mins – “Author Tim O’Reilly, founder of O’Reilly Media and long-time observer and commenter on the internet and technology, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his new book, WTF? What’s the Future and Why It’s Up to Us. O’Reilly surveys the evolution of the internet, the key companies that have prospered from it, and how the products of those companies have changed our lives. He then turns to the future and explains why he is an optimist and what can be done to make that optimism accurate.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gates Interview 66 mins – “Microsoft founder Bill Gates takes us deep into his remarkable history and propels us into the future of technology and philanthropy.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gene Research 31 mins – “How does our genetic makeup help or hinder our chances in life? And as our ability to unravel DNA becomes more powerful, what are the implications? Scientists are finding ways to alter the genetic makeup of children with harmful mutations such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy. Will we soon see more complex disorders such as cancers and heart disease being tackled in this way, by altering or replacing entire groups of genes? To tackle these questions and more, Ian Sample is joined in the studio by Siddharta Mukherjee, whose new book spans the history of genetics, from Gregor Mendl’s 19th century experiments to modern gene-editing techniques.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Girlhood Stories 52 mins – “In this hour, moxie, grit, and growing up. Stories of the strength, both physical and mental, of young women. Hosted by The Moth’s Executive Producer Sarah Austin Jenness. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Sandra Kimokoti feels conflicted over her physical strength. Wanjiru Kibera goes off the path in the Kenyan wilderness. Gabrielle Shelton tries to find work as a welder. Catherine Smyka and her male friend have the same taste in women. Christal Brown finds a connection to her father through dance” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gutenberg Bible 51 mins – “Only 49 of original editions of the Gutenberg Bible are known to survive. Margaret Leslie Davis joins Wednesday to tell the 500-year odyssey of obsession and tragedy of one extremely rare and beautiful copy of a book that sparked a revolution.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Fight 26 mins – “Earlier this year, the UK government announced it wanted to end new HIV transmissions in England by 2030. Hannah Devlin looks at the history of the epidemic, including its impact on the gay community, recent promising drug trials and whether Britain can meet its target…”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Human Embryos Lab Grown 36 mins – “Researchers in the US and UK recently broke the record for culturing human embryos in the lab, keeping them alive for up to 13 days – that’s beyond the point at which they would normally implant in a mother’s womb. This has prompted some to ask whether we should allow scientists to grow human embryos for longer? Or is the 14 day rule a line in the sand that should not be moved? Ian Sample is joined by embryologist Sue Avery, James Lawford Davies, a solicitor specialising in assisted reproduction, embryo and stem cell research and bioethicist and philosopher John Harris.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Illiberal Reformers 69 mins – “Were the first professional economists racists? Thomas Leonard of Princeton University and author of Illiberal Reformers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a portrait of the progressive movement and its early advocates at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th. The economists of that time were eager to champion the power of the state and its ability to regulate capitalism successfully. Leonard exposes the racist origins of these ideas and the role eugenics played in the early days of professional economics. Woodrow Wilson takes a beating as well.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigrant Crossings 27 mins – “It is over two years since the authorities in France closed down the Jungle, the large migrant camp in Calais on the French coast. At its height more than 9,000 people from around the world lived in the camp while attempting to make it across to the UK, often hiding in the back of lorries or packed into small boats. It was hoped the camp’s closure would stem the number of people risking their lives to try to get to Britain. But has it worked? In December, Britain’s Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, declared the number of migrants attempting to cross the English Channel in boats a ‘major incident’ and since then more than 100 people have been picked up in 2019. For Assignment, Paul Kenyon investigates the British gangs making big money and risking migrants’ lives smuggling them across the Channel and reports on the attempts to break up their networks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Crisis 26 mins – “Just like in 2016, President Trump is making immigration a key part of his re-election campaign. Starting this weekend, he has directed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to conduct a mass roundup of families that have received deportation orders. This means Trump’s Democratic opponent, whoever he or she ends up being, will have to talk about immigration as well. But regardless of Trump’s rhetoric and actions on immigration, we do indeed have a crisis at the border: thousands of Central American families are coming across the southern border each day seeking asylum. Millions of people are living in the U.S. without authorization. So what should be done? Diane speaks with Angela Kelley of Open Society Foundations to talk about the immigration challenges we’re facing and solutions she hopes Democratic candidates and leaders will offer.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Individual Liberty 66 mins – “Author and historian Thomas Ricks talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, Churchill and Orwell. Ricks makes the case that the odd couple of Winston Churchill and George Orwell played and play an important role in preserving individual liberty. Ricks reviews the contributions of these two giants whose lives overlapped and whose legacy remains vibrant.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation in the National Health Service 36 mins – “We look at the innovations that are changing the NHS today and asks what science on the horizon will transform the health service in the next decade It employs 1.6 million people, spends more than £4,000 a second, and performed 10m operations last year in England alone. Millions more visit emergency units, have outpatient care, and receive help for mental health problems. This week we’re focusing on the NHS and how science and technology underpin the care doctors can give to patients. Ian Sample talks to Professor Sir Bruce Keogh, NHS England’s Medical Director and professional lead for NHS doctors. Bruce is responsible for promoting clinical leadership, quality and innovation, having previously been a surgeon and physician who specialised in cardiac surgery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Intelligence Discussion 30 mins – “In his latest book, Are we smart enough to know how smart animals are?, legendary ethologist Professor Frans de Waal questions the boundaries that have historically existed between the minds of humans and other animals. Here Waal joins Hannah Devlin in the studio – alongside psychologist Professor Wendy Johnson – and they discuss the nature of intelligence and intelligence in nature, throwing light on an age-old debate that challenges just how special we humans are.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Mutual Funds 54 mins – “This podcast is the audio-only version of the video, Target Date Funds: America’s #1 Retirement Investment, in which Paul illuminates why Target Date Funds are America’s best retirement investment, and how to maximize that investment with his 2-Funds-For-Life Strategy. While this strategy is ideal for young and first-time investors, it can be effectively used by investors at any stage who want to both simplify and get the most from their investments. Since the introduction of the modern mutual fund in 1924, no other investment product has been as important to investors as the target date fund (TDF).  Paul explains how TDFs work, 10 reasons TDFs are likely to make investors more money, 6 reasons many TDFs make investors less than they should and how to select the best-performing TDFs.  For investors willing to add a second fund, to work along side their TDF, Paul shows how to substantially increase the expected lifetime return with a “2 Funds For Life” strategy. Theoretically, the TDF only requires an investor to make two major investment decisions. Investors in their working and saving years only need select the year they expect to retire, and the TDF takes care of all investment decisions.  The second decision, which likely happens at retirement, is a bit more complex, as the investor needs to decide how to invest during retirement, while providing regular income to meet their cost of living.  Paul discusses four possible investment strategies that can be used by investors through the end of their life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Investment Questions 42 mins – “Paul addresses the 4 most common questions he receives from readers and listeners: Will indexing work as well in the future as in the past? Will small cap and value asset classes produce higher than S&P 500 returns in the future? How often should I rebalance? How do I best put my money into the market at these historically high prices? He also discusses an important lesson learned from a meeting with Dr. Hendrick Bessembinder.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Learning 27 mins – “Simon Calder asks how to go about acquiring a new tongue. He gets tips from those who know – innovative teachers and polyglots. The answers are surprising. At school, it is repetitive drills, shouted out loud by the whole class, that seem to lodge the grammar and pronunciation in the pupils’ brains. But if you are an adult learning by yourself, then, on the contrary, don’t stress about grammar and pronunciation, there are better, and more fun things to focus on. Simon has a go at learning Slovenian, can he order coffee and cake after just one lesson?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Leadership Crisis 14 mins – “What should modern leadership look like? Entrepreneur and former Icelandic presidential candidate Halla Tómasdóttir thinks global leaders need to change their ways — or risk becoming irrelevant. In a conversation with curator Bryn Freedman, she shows how anybody can step up and make a difference, even if you don’t yet have power. “There’s a leader inside every single one of us,” she says, “and our most important work in life is to release that leader.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Legal Profession Future 40 mins – “After years of writing and thinking about the future of the legal profession, Richard Susskind began to run into legal professionals whose careers are being affected by technology. In addition to lawyers, those in the medical, architecture, financial, and other fields have begun to notice a shift in the provision of professional services. Richard got together with his son, Daniel Susskind, at the time working in justice policy, education policy, and health policy for the British Prime Minister, to examine how technology is increasingly playing a fundamental role in how all service-based professions work. They recently published a book on the subject called “The Future of the Professions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Luddite Lawyers 24 mins – “Luddite: a person opposed to increased industrialization or new technology. As we’ve heard time and time again, many lawyers are averse to becoming knowledgeable about modern technology. Older attorneys often do not want to learn a computer-based management tool and feel as though they can hire someone to manage the security and encryption of their sensitive information. Often, even having a young lawyer in the firm can seem like a solution since they will most likely have grown up with a certain level of technology knowledge. But none of these are valid excuses to a proper level of technological education. The luddite lawyers need to face the ethical implications of their ignorance.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Meat Alternatives 6 mins – “Conventional meat production causes harm to our environment and presents risks to global health, but people aren’t going to eat less meat unless we give them alternatives that cost the same (or less) and that taste the same (or better). In an eye-opening talk, food innovator and TED Fellow Bruce Friedrich shows the plant- and cell-based products that could soon transform the global meat industry — and your dinner plate.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monica Lewinsky 22 mins – “In 1998, says Monica Lewinsky, “I was Patient Zero of losing a personal reputation on a global scale almost instantaneously.” Today, the kind of online public shaming she went through has become a constant. In a brave talk, she takes a look at our “culture of humiliation,” in which online shame equals dollar signs — and demands a different way.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mueller Report 47 mins – “Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the Mueller report says there was no conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia to affect the outcome of the 2016 election. We dig in.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Multilingual Societies 27 mins – “What is it like to live in a place where you have to speak several languages to get by? Simon Calder travels to India, where a top university only teaches in English, the one language that the students from all over the country have in common. And he meets people who use four different languages with their friends and family, depending on whom they are talking to. In Luxembourg, it is not so much family, but other situations that require four languages, such as going shopping, watching TV, or school lessons. Simon hears that in secondary school, maths is taught in French, history in German, casual chat in Luxembourgish, and English is compulsory too, so that no one leaves school without being multilingual.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

O’Reilly and Technology 63 mins – “Tim O’Reilly of O’Reilly Media talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career in technology and media and the challenges facing low-wage workers as technology advances. Topics include the early days of the Internet, the efficacy of regulation to protect workers, and the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Open Access Books 19 mins – “Open access is transforming scholarly journal publishing, yet the looming size of the journal ecosystem has thrown into deep shadow an equally remarkable transformation in scholarly books. In recent years, e-book acquisition rates and usage have soared. E-books offer multiple advantages, from acquisition models to accessibility and researcher engagement metrics. In parallel with research coming out of the UK, an ongoing study by the US-based Book Industry Study Group is identifying the challenges in understanding the usage of OA e-books. This research will provide much needed documentation on e-book impact levels, especially for funders of open access publishing programs. At the recent 2018 Frankfurt Book Fair, CCC’s Carl Robinson moderated a panel discussion on the viability of business models and the unique needs of OA books compared to OA journals. Guests were Brian O’Leary, executive director of the New York City-based Book Industry Study Group (BISG),and David Worlock, a longtime independent publishing analyst and co-chair of Outsell’s leadership programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Research 10 mins- “Arjan Kortholt is Associate Professor at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. Arjan’s original work was studying chemotaxis; the movement of cells up or down substance concentration gradients, for example when white blood cells are chasing pathogens. However, whilst studying the proteins involved in chemotaxis, he found they are related to Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s has traditionally been studied by medical doctors, but now Arjan is studying the disease from a new, microbiological angle; using techniques and tools from microbiology to help find a cure.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Plastic Eating Bugs 10 mins – “Humans produce 300 million tons of new plastic each year — yet, despite our best efforts, less than 10 percent of it ends up being recycled. Is there a better way to deal with all this waste? Morgan Vague describes her research with microbiologist Jay Mellies on bacteria that have evolved the unexpected ability to eat plastic — and how they could help us solve our growing pollution problem.” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Psychology of Money 32 mins – “How does money change our thinking, feelings and behaviour? Claudia Hammond joins the podcast team to teach us how to take control of our cash…”” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radiation Facts 30 mins – “Timothy Jorgensen, associate professor of radiation medicine at Georgetown University, Washington DC and author of Strange Glow, joins Nicola Davis to discuss the story of radiation, exploring the varied ways it exists, and dispelling some of the myths surrounding it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reconstruction 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is given by Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor Emeritus of History at Columbia University, and is titled “The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Forged a Constitutional Revolution.”  The event was presented by the Boston University Alumni Association.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theory of Everything 32 mins – “In the race for a unifying ‘theory of everything’ two frontrunners are miles ahead. But what will win? String theory? Loop quantum gravity? Or something else entirely?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Story 48 mins – “Academy Award-winning director Alex Gibney on his HBO documentary “The Inventor” — a tale about Silicon Valley, Elizabeth Holmes and the collapse of her blood-testing company Theranos.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump Tariffs 32 mins – “President Trump has said he views tariffs as an important tool in his efforts to reshape the landscape of global trade. And has used them repeatedly in America’s escalating trade war with China. This week, however, the president threatened to use tariffs in a way that caught most people off guard — as a bargaining chip to pressure the Mexican government to crack down on migrants heading to the U.S. Whether or not the 5 percent tariff actually goes into effect on Monday, Trump’s threats have spooked markets, rattled the business community and sparked a backlash from Republican lawmakers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Tylenol Murders P1 48 mins – “On one terrible day in Chicago in 1982, seven people died suddenly and mysteriously. In just a matter of hours, it becomes clear, someone has poisoned bottles of Extra-Strength Tylenol, one of the most trusted and widely-used products in America.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tylenol Murders P2 48 mins – “The panic that began in Chicago spreads and begins to change the world. The investigation into the murders turns up leads and suspects, but still no one has ever been charged with the murders. It remains unsolved to this day.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Undercover Migrant 27 mins – “The extraordinary story of an undercover migrant and his ‘secret spectacles’. When Azeteng, a young man from rural Ghana, heard stories on the radio of West African migrants dying on their way to Europe, he felt compelled to act. He took what little savings he had and bought glasses with a hidden camera – his ‘secret spectacles.’ Then he put himself in the hands of people smugglers and travelled 3,000 miles on the desert migrant trail north, aiming to document the crimes of the traffickers. Along the way he saw extortion, slavery, and death in the vast stretches of the Sahara. For Assignment, reporter Joel Gunter tells the story of his journey – a journey that thousands of young Africans like him attempt each year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Union Pacific Railroad Movie 51 mins – “We’re marking the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad by showing Cecil B. DeMille’s epic Western Union Pacific. Film historian James D’Arc joins us to talk about the film and how the railroads united a divided country. Here’s how we’re observing the 150th anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad: By showing a movie! Cecil B. DeMille’s 1939 epic Western Union Pacific is the only modern feature film to dramatize the building of the railroads and the driving of the golden spike. Most of it was shot here in Utah. The film historian James D’Arc says it’s one of DeMille’s very best films, and he made a lot of movies. D’Arc joins us to talk about the film and how the railroads united a divided country.” At the link right-click the play button and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Urban-Rural Political Divide 31 mins – “The political divide between urban and rural America: why it is bad news for cities … and Democrats.” At the link left-click the circle with dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Wearable Technology for Lawyers 26 mins – “In this episode of The Digital EdgeSharon Nelson and Jim Calloway interview legal technology expert Richard Georges about wearable technology, how smartwatches enhances his ability to be productive, and what lawyers need to consider when adopting this new technology. Having a smartwatch, Georges explains, actually decreases court disruptions and car distractions while making him accessible to clients at all times. Most of the issues concerning data security are due to human error rather than technology. As long as lawyers learn how to properly embrace wearable technology, he says, it can improve any practice from big law to a solo firm. The risks are not greater, they are simply different. Judges may already discourage smart phones in court and many clients worry about a decrease in information security. But if used properly, a smartwatch can actually increase the productivity, availability, and even safety of any lawyer’s practice with fewer disruptions. What are the best practices for using wearable technology to benefit your practice?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Weavers 15 mins – “Our society is in the midst of a social crisis, says op-ed columnist and author David Brooks: we’re trapped in a valley of isolation and fragmentation. How do we find our way out? Based on his travels across the United States — and his meetings with a range of exceptional people known as “weavers” — Brooks lays out his vision for a cultural revolution that empowers us all to lead lives of greater meaning, purpose and joy.”” At the link right-click “Share,” then left-click the download arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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