Mining Digest 420 – Dec 6, 2019: African Electrification, AI Arms Race, AI in Law, Artificial Meat, Autistic Security Analyst, Billionaires Bite Back, Biohacking Techniques, Bitcoin Politics, CIA Hacking Tools, Computer Security, Crazy Ideas, Cyber Security Summit, Data and Goliath News, Democracy Future, DNA Evidence Reliability, DNA Meets AI, Equifax Data Breech, Foods and Climate Change, Fungi Impact, Immigrants in the US, Internet Health Report, IoT Testimony, Iraq Shuts Down Internet, Lies in 2017, Low Energy Electronics, Martian Chronicles, Metabolites, NSA and CIA Secrets, Parkinson’s Discussion, Poland, Presidential Purchase Question, Productive Conflict, Propaganda Affects, Rabies Control, Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology, Sexual Harassment, Simple Rules, STEM Cells in Teeth, Web Evidence Authentication, Workplace Jerks

Exercise your ears: the 49 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 600 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Electrification 13 mins – “Energy poverty, or the lack of access to electricity and other basic energy services, affects nearly two-thirds of Sub-Saharan Africa. As the region’s population continues to increase, so will the need to build a new energy system to grow with it, says Rose M. Mutiso. In a bold talk, she discusses how a balanced mix of solutions like solar, wind farms, geothermal power and modern grids could create a high-energy future for Africa — providing reliable electricity, creating jobs and raising incomes….As the Research Director of the Energy for Growth Hub, Rose M. Mutiso works with a global network of experts finding solutions for energy deficits across Africa and Asia. She is also cofounder of the Mawazo Institute, helping African women to become scholars and thought leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

African Smartphone Company 40 mins – “Africa’s first smartphone factory has officially opened in Rwanda. Also a new super fast robotic tuna; technology help for people with dementia, and Ushahidi visits Hacktoberfest.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Arms Race 21 mins – “In this issue: Data, Surveillance, and the AI Arms Race, and Fake News and Pandemics” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-2019-07.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Defenses 8 mins – “In this issue: Artificial Intelligence and the Attack/Defense Balance, Can Consumers’ Online Data Be Protected?” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI in Law 44 mins – “Lawyers are excited by the potential of new tech tools using AI, but how can they be sure they’re legal and ethical? This lack of clarity has led the ABA to call for a deeper look at these tools and their use in the profession. In this Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Ed Walters to discuss the recently passed resolution urging the study of issues surrounding artificial intelligence. They discuss the importance of moving forward with technology in the profession while still ensuring that new tech is held accountable through audits and product transparency. They also review some of the positive and negative things going on in the AI space and give their take on its future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Artificial Meat 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austistic Security Analyst 39 mins- Interview with a security analyst who has Asperger’s Syndrome and works with a new startup company dealing with security and operations (Secops) – “...strengthen your secops team by leveraging neurodiversityAt the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Billionaires Bite Back 21 mins – “Are we in a “billionaire moment”? Three are running for president — if you can count Trump. Two progressive candidates are running on ambitious policies that would require hefty taxes on billionaires. And with the threat of those taxes hanging in the balance, several billionaires have recently begun lobbying the American people through the media. Speaking with Bob, former Labor Secretary Robert Reich argues that we’re well into a second gilded age. Much like the economy in the late 1800’s, a small group of monopolists, old money heirs, and Wall Street executives have amassed more money than the bottom 50% of Americans. In lieu of paying more taxes, our richest citizens have rebuffed populist anger by donating to charities and do-good foundations. But, is that a fair trade off? In his new book, Goliath: The 100-Year War Between Monopoly Power and Democracy, Matt Stoller argues that “philanthropy capitalism” and lax antitrust enforcement are doing fatal damage to our society. He and Bob dig into the forgotten history of Microsoft’s antitrust trial, to demonstrate how many of today’s most generous philanthropists have often bullied and manipulated their way to wield power.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biohacking Techniques (87m)- episode 114 outtakes on the road to hacker summer camp At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biotech Companies 49 mins- “Pam Marrone, founder of AgraQuest, relates the challenges and rewards she experienced in building a successful biotechnology company that specializes in ecologically friendly agricultural products.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Politics 56 mins – “I’m delighted to post another 2017 show, # 261, my May 31, 2017 interview with Prof. David Golumbia of Virginia Commonwealth University, author of The Politics of Bitcoin: Software as Right-Wing Extremism In his book, David examines the connections between cryptocurrencies and the United States’ far right. Specifically, David identifies the underlying theories that animate both cryptocurrency enthusiasm and far right thinking today. While our wider US political context plays an important role in understanding David’s critique, cryptocurrency structure and stated goals stand at the center of David’s focus. I enjoyed discussing this challenging and timely topic with David, and fully expect that his scholarship will help us understand where we are headed as commerce becomes increasingly decentralized.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Hacking Tools 28 mins – “In this issue: WikiLeaks Releases CIA Hacking Tools; Botnets; Defense Against Doxing; Buzzword Watch: Prosilience; The CIA’s “Development Tradecraft DOs and DON’Ts” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-03.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Infections 12 mins – “In this issue: Spectre and Meltdown Attacks Against Microprocessors, Susan Landau’s New Book: “Listening In”, New Book Coming in September: “Click Here to Kill Everybody”, Daniel Miessler on My Writings about IoT Security” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Computer Security 10 mins – “In this issue: Security in a World of Physically Capable Computers” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-10.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Crazy Ideas 27 mins – “What if you removed failure from your vocabulary? Patricia Ryan Madson, Improv pioneer and retired Stanford University lecturer, sees improvisation – and the art of “yes, and” – as a route to innovation. In this episode of Stanford Innovation Lab, Tina Seelig meets with Patricia to discuss re-framing experiences as experiments and practicing attentiveness.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cyber Security Summit 27 mins – “In this issue: Admiral Rogers Speaking at the Joint Service Academy Cyber Security Summit; The Further Democratization of QUANTUM; The Further Democratization of Stingray; Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest Semifinalists; Hacking Airplanes; Counting the US Intelligence Community Leakers; “Hinky” in Action” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data and Goliath News 16 mins – “In this issue: More “Data and Goliath” News; The Eighth Movie-Plot Threat Contest; Metal Detectors at Sports Stadiums; Cisco Shipping Equipment to Fake Addresses to Foil NSA Interception; New Zealand’s XKEYSCORE Use ; Australia Outlaws Warrant Canaries” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-15-04.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Democracy Future 56 mins – “I’m pleased to post Show # 262, May 31, 2017, my interview with Prof. Al Roberts, Director of the School of Public Policy at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and author of Four Crises of American Democracy: Representation, Mastery, Discipline, Anticipation. Al is one of the nation’s leading scholars on government secrecy, and his recent work has focused on the broad functional challenges faced by governmental institutions today. In our wide ranging discussion, we examined the state of government today, its capacity to withstand the pressures exerted on it by outside forces, and what we can reasonably expect government to do and not do in response. Obviously pressing and critical issues, I always enjoy my discussions with Al, and hope that you do as well!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Evidence Reliability 18 mins – “How reliable is DNA evidence in 2019? What about DNA that was collected 20 or more years ago? Is it possible for you to leave DNA in a place you’ve never been? We ask those questions as the case against alleged Claremont serial killer Bradley Robert Edwards is before the court, police and the victim’s families hoping to finally get closure on the deaths of Sarah Spiers, Jane Rimmer and Ciara Glennon.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNA Meets AI 51 mins – “Midway through a M.D./Ph.D program at UCLA, Alice Zhang made a discovery that she felt could reverberate far beyond the halls of academia. So she shifted directions, leaving her Ph.D program to found Verge Genomics, a biomedical firm that aims to unite genetic research and artificial intelligence in service of drug discovery. She describes how AI can revolutionize the drug discovery process, and reframes risk-taking as a simple series of optimistic next steps. Workplace Jerks.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

DNC Hacks 26 mins – “In this issue: Attributing the DNC Hacks to Russia , Are We Becoming More Moral Faster Than We’re Becoming More Dangerous? Security Risks of TSA PreCheck, Law Enforcement Access to IoT Data, Class Breaks, A Comment on the Trump Dossier” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-01.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Equifax Data Breach 7 mins – “In this issue: On the Equifax Data Breach, iPhone Changes to Frustrate the Police” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-09.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Foods and Climate Change 60 mins – “Make beef out of plants instead of cows and you can begin to save the planet. That’s what inspired award-winning scientist Patrick Brown to leave his professorship at Stanford University and found Impossible Foods. In conversation with Stanford Professor of the Practice Tina Seelig, Brown describes how his singular passion for impact prompted him to leave academia and become a food-tech entrepreneur.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fungi Impact 16 mins – “Resource inequality is one of our greatest challenges, but it’s not unique to humans. Like us, mycorrhizal fungi that live in plant and tree roots strategically trade, steal and withhold resources, displaying remarkable parallels to humans in their capacity to be opportunistic (and sometimes ruthless) — all in the absence of cognition. In a mind-blowing talk, evolutionary biologist Toby Kiers shares what fungi networks and relationships reveal about human economies, and what they can tell us about inequality.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigrants in the US 32 mins – “America has long sold itself as “the nation of immigrants.” But when you look at our history — even the halcyon Ellis Island days — that branding has always come with an asterisk. Give us your tired, your poor, your huddled masses… especially if they’ll work for cheap. Our guests on this episode are Hiroshi Motomura of the University of California and Andre Perry of the Brookings Institution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Internet Cleanliness 15 mins – “Millions of images and videos are uploaded to the internet each day, yet we rarely see shocking and disturbing content in our social media feeds. Who’s keeping the internet “clean” for us? In this eye-opening talk, documentarians Hans Block and Moritz Riesewieck take us inside the shadowy world of online content moderators — the people contracted by major platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Google to rid the internet of toxic material. Learn more about the psychological impact of this kind of work — and how “digital cleaning” influences what all of us see and think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Internet Report 39 mins – “Mozilla launches new approach to the Health of the Internet; multipurpose drones in Malawi; Nam June Paik The Future is Now exhibition at Tate Modern Art Gallery.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IoT Testimony 33 mins – “It’s been estimated that about 8 billion “things” are connected to the Internet, and that the number of connected “things” could exceed 20 billion by the end of 2020. Sharon Nelson and John Simek are joined by Gail Gottehrer to explore the scope of the Internet of Things. It is critical to understand what data these devices collect, the privacy and security issues associated with them, and how IoT data can be, and has been, used as evidence in court. They also discuss recent legislative efforts to regulate the IoT at the state and federal level and the litigation that may result from them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Iraq Shuts Down Internet 43 mins – “Iraq’s internet is shut down; technologists and designers challenged to be more inclusive; an environmental protest song linked to 800,000 years of CO2 data; a solar-powered car.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lies in 2017 26 mins – “Our friends at PolitiFact have sorted through a year of lies, fibs, exaggerations, fabrications and outright falsehoods to find the worst of the worst. PolitiFact’s Editor Angie Drobnic Holan joins us to reveal the 2017 lie of the year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Low Energy Electronics 29 mins – “The 2019 Nobel Prizes for Chemistry and Physics by Ian Woolf, Samuel Bladwell explains Future Low Energy Electronic Technologies…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Martian Chronicles P1 and 2 150 mins total – “Martian Chronicles – by Cory Doctorow: They say you can’t smell anything through a launch-hood, but I still smelled the pove in the next seat as the space-attendants strapped us into our acceleration couches and shone lights in our eyes and triple-checked the medical readouts on our wristlets to make sure our hearts wouldn’t explode when the rocket boosted us into orbit for transfer to the Eagle and the long, long trip to Mars. He was skinny, but not normal-skinny, the kind of skinny you get from playing a lot of sports and taking the metabolism pills your parents got for you so you wouldn’t get teased at school. He was kind of pot-bellied with scrawny arms and sunken cheeks and he was brown-brown, like the brown Mom used to slather on after a day at the beach covered in factor-500 sunblock. Only he was the kind of all-over-even brown that you only got by being born brown. He gave me a holy-crap-I’m-going-to-MARS smile and a brave thumbs-up and I couldn’t bring myself to snub him because he looked so damned happy about it. So I gave him the same thumbs up, rotating my wrist in the strap that held it onto the arm-rest so that I didn’t accidentally break my nose with my own hand when we “clawed our way out of the gravity well” (this was a phrase from the briefing seminars that they liked to repeat a lot. It had a lot of macho going for it)….” At the link right-click “Download” to get P1; do the same here for P2.

Metabolites 5 mins – “Many diseases are driven by metabolites — small molecules in your body like fat, glucose and cholesterol — but we don’t know exactly what they are or how they work. Biotech entrepreneur and TED Fellow Leila Pirhaji shares her plan to build an AI-based network to characterize metabolite patterns, better understand how disease develops — and discover more effective treatments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

NSA and CIA Secrets 24 mins – “In this issue: Who is Publishing NSA and CIA Secrets, and Why? The Quick vs. the Strong: Commentary on Cory Doctorow’s “Walkaway”; Securing Elections; Surveillance and our Insecure Infrastructure” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-17-05.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Parkinson’s Discussion P1 27 mins – “BBC newsreader Jane Hill knows all about Parkinson’s. Her father was diagnosed in t1980s and lived with the condition for ten years — her uncle had it, too. She’s spoken about the dreadful experience of watching helplessly as the two men were engulfed by the degenerative disease, losing their independence and the ability to do the things that they once enjoyed. “I remember feeling how cruel Parkinson’s is. The number of people living with Parkinson’s disease is set to double over the next few decades as we all live longer; it is the only long-term neurological condition that is increasing globally. In this series Jane Hill looks at what it means to be given a diagnosis of Parkinson’s and the reality of living with the condition. She and her cousin Steve remember how their fathers adopted a British stiff upper lip at a time when there was little awareness. In contrast she meets highly successful comedy writer Paul Mayhew Archer, whose reaction to his diagnosis was to create a one-man show exploring the lighter side of living with Parkinson’s. Actors Michael J Fox and Alan Alda both discuss the early symptoms of the disease and their diagnosis. Most people are diagnosed in their sixties but Dutch blogger Mariette Robijn talks about accepting a life changing diagnosis in her forties.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poland 54 mins – “With the US deep in questions of impeachment, what lessons can we learn from divided societies abroad? This week, On the Media travels to Poland, where conspiracy, xenophobia and the rise of illiberalism have the country in an existential fight for its future. On the Media producer Leah Feder reports.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Election Hacking 12 mins – “In this issue: My Priorities for the Next Four Years, Hacking and the 2016 Presidential Election, Dumb Security Survey Questions” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-16-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Presidential Purchase Question 16 mins – “Michael Bloomberg is one of the world’s richest men, and he’s taking a wildly long shot at becoming the next US President. The problem is, he’s very late to the race, and a long way back in the polls. On the other hand, he’s expected to spend more money on his campaign than the other Democratic candidates combined. Today, who exactly is Michael Bloomberg, and is it possible to buy the presidency?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Productive Conflict 7 mins – “Got an idea to make your workplace better? Labor organizer and TED Fellow Jess Kutch can show you how to put it into action. In this quick talk, she explains how “productive conflict” — when people organize to challenge and change their work lives for the better — can be beneficial for employees and employers alike.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Propaganda Affects 31 mins – “In this issue: Information Attacks against Democracies, How Surveillance Inhibits Freedom of Expression. Propaganda and the Weakening of Trust in Government” At the link right-click “Direct download: crypto-gram-18-12.mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rabies Control 16 mins – “Could we anticipate the next big disease outbreak, stopping a virus like Ebola before it ever strikes? In this talk about frontline scientific research, ecologist Daniel Streicker takes us to the Amazon rainforest in Peru where he tracks the movement of vampire bats in order to forecast and prevent rabies outbreaks. By studying these disease patterns, Streicker shows how we could learn to cut off the next pandemic at its source.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Religious Freedom and Discrimination 43 mins – “The clash of two American values — religious freedom and freedom from discrimination –- didn’t seem so huge when a broad coalition of religious and civil rights representatives got together in a room in 1993. While starting from different ends of the political spectrum, this group came together to push for a new law, The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, meant to protect the religious practice of all faiths, no matter how small. RFRA became the law of the land.  But just a few years and a huge cultural shift later, the law was found to be only applicable at the federal level, and the coalition could not find a way to balance religious freedom with the civil rights of LGBT persons and women. That rift continues today as we continue to ask what does it mean to be free to exercise one’s religion? We hear from the people who were in that room in 1993 – and now are living with the consequences of their efforts.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Resveratrol and Synthetic Biology 29 mins – “Nano-capsules for lower weight and longer life by Ian Woolf, Claudia Vickers talks about synthetic biology and the CSIRO future science platform…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sexual Harassment 30 mins – “Congress is considering changes to the way it handles sexual harassment complaints after its current rules have been called onerous by critics. We take stock of what might change with Patrick Terpstra of the Scripps Washington Bureau, and we speak with the lawmaker who helped shape the system, retired Rep. Chris Shays, who says it’s imperfect but is a vast improvement over what came before.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Simple Rules 23 mins – “Rules get an unfairly bad rap. In this episode, Stanford Engineering Professor Kathleen Eisenhardt, author of Simple Rules: How to Thrive in a Complex World, and Stanford Professor Bob Sutton discuss the virtues of structure and guidelines. As long as your rules are clear and customized to your organization, Eisenhardt says, they won’t get in your way. In fact, the right set of rules—everything from Michael Pollan’s “eat food, not too much, mostly plants” to “no emails on the weekend”—can keep teams focused, productive, and harmonious.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

STEM Cells in Teeth 29 mins – “Baby teeth worth more by Chris Stewart, Baby teeth update by Ian Woolf, Amanda Hamilton spoke with Professor Malcom Simons about his patent of the “junk” DNA that makes up ninety-five percent of our genetic inheritence, The impact of extreme weather on human history by Tim Baynes, Aphasia by Ian Woolf…” At the link right-click “MP3 download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Web Evidence Authentication 30 mins – “The collection of critical web-based evidence could make or break a case, but many lawyers aren’t quite sure how to go about it. Digital DetectivesSharon Nelson and John Simek get expert advice from Brett Burney on best practices for collection and authentication of online evidence. They discuss several real-world examples of major collection mistakes lawyers have made and offer suggestions for tools that can preserve and produce evidence properly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Workplace Jerks 57 mins – “Even as adults, we still have to deal with bullies, at work and otherwise. Stanford Professor Bob Sutton has devoted his career to studying organizational behavior and dysfunction, and of late, figuring out how we all can avoid or deal with people who demean, disrespect and drain their peers. The professor of management science and engineering draws on academic research and anecdotal evidence included in his new book, “The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal with People Who Treat You Like Dirt.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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