Mining Digest 422 – Dec 20, 2019: 5G Network, African Economic Trends, AI Competition, Bitcoin Explained, Blockchain Background, Colored Student Challenges, Cryptocurrency Scam, Cyberattacks and AI, Dark Web Discussion, Face Based Surveillance, Future of Work, Geothermal Energy in California, Health Care Challenges, Heart Disease, Impeachment History, Kids Need Champions, Leave No One Behind, Libra Cryptocurrency, McDonald’s in Marseilles, Migration Into Venezuela, Phil Rosenthal, Policing in America, Quantum Mechanics, Retirement Issues, Six Day War Effects, Slavery Start in America, Smartphone Upgrades, TikTok Social Media, Treat Williams, Vietnam War Music

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 719 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

5G Network 21 mins – “The 5G network of the future will manage super-complex tasks quickly, and both China and the United States want to control it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

African Economic Trends 315 mins – “With the goal of improving the management of oil, gas, and mineral revenues, curbing corruption, and fighting inequality, African countries—like Ghana, Kenya, Guinea, and Liberia—are stepping up their efforts to support good governance in resource-dependent countries. Long-fought-for gains in transparency—including from initiatives like the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)—have helped civil society and other accountability actors assess how individual oil, gas, and mining revenues are delivered or lost, and how revenues spending decisions are made. Yet the transparency revolution remains far from complete. Ongoing dependence on extractive industry revenues in many countries continues to limit the policy space for economic diversification and overall growth. At the same time, the use of national and subnational revenue distribution by elites to maintain their control over the democratic process continues to erode trust in government, constraining the political space for human rights and other accountability activists to monitor duty bearers and speak out against violations. Confidence in the quality and reliability of public data further creates challenges. In the end, greater transparency and accountability will make domestic resource mobilization more effective, leading to better economic and social outcomes for all.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Competition 16 mins- “Artificial intelligence is the most important tech frontier, and both the United States and China want to dominate it. We look at how the two countries compare now—and where the race is headed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alibaba Trends 18 mins – “The top exec at Alibaba explains “Singles Day,” describes his relationship with Jack Ma, and talks about why cloud computing will be the “main business” for the e-commerce giant in the future.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bioethics 54 mins – “Professor Bartha Knoppers is the 2019 recipient of the Henry G. Friesen International Prize for excellence in health research. Once a scholar of surrealist poetry, she has now become a world-renowned voice and a prolific researcher in the field of medical ethics. Her Friesen lecture is called: “Scientific Breakthroughs: The Prohibition Reflex.” At the link find the title, “‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovation,” right-click “Download ‘Shouldn’t there be a law against that?’: Facing our fear of genetic innovationand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Background 30 mins – “’Shifting from a perspective of ‘only humans control money’ to ‘machines and software control money’ is really radical and it changes a lot of things,” says the popular blockchain and Bitcoin author and speaker Andreas Antonopoulos. Antonopoulos discusses why the real magic of blockchain is decentralization, why criticisms that Bitcoin is a waste of energy are wrong, and why he now charges a 20% premium to be paid by wire transfer instead of bitcoin. And if you’re amazed by the idea of a self-driving car, wait until you hear his description of how the taxis of the future might operate.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Bitcoin Explained 112 mins – “Ever wonder what cryptocurrencies are? Do you want to understand how they work? CNBC’s Arjun Kharpal and Saheli Roy Choudhury explain bitcoin, digital currencies and blockchain technology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Challenges P1 12 mins – “Your Biggest Challenge with Blockchain (part ¼) – I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P2 16 mins “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. Beyond the Valley explores Facebook’s “Libra” and other global efforts to make cryptocurrencies a part of daily life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P3 16 mins – “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. Here are the final 3 challenges my subscribers submitted. (From the top 10. See previous episodes for the other 7).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Blockchain Challenges P4 7 mins – “I sent a survey to about 1,500 people and asked them what their biggest challenges were, when it comes to learning about blockchain and cryptocurrency. We created Blockchain Innovation Academy to address those challenges. This is a short tour of the Academy. Watch the video – https://blockchain.global/academy/ Join the Academy – https://memorypool.ca/home/At the link you can listen, but not download; however, the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Colored Student Challenges 88 mins – “Narratives of race and poverty often interact in a toxic way for young people of color in the United States. Stereotyped as lazy or dangerous, young people of color frequently encounter economic, social, educational, and personal security challenges that diminish their opportunities and are barriers to their success. On October 23, the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative at Brookings hosted a discussion with two 2019 Teachers of the Year on how they have been working to upend the pernicious impact of these toxic narratives and empower their students to thrive.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrency Scam 15 mins – “Eager investors put money into an initial coin offering, or ICO, led by a figure by the name of Marco Fike. Everything seemed to check out at first. But then they discovered that Marco Fike wasn’t real.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cyberattacks and AI 21 mins – “Cyberattacks are on the rise. And more and more, artificial intelligence is helping both the attackers and the people combating them.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dam Hazards 18 mins – “People have been building dams for centuries to impound water for drinking and recreation, to support navigation, to manage floods, and as a source of hydroelectric power. But dams can also present dangers. Low-head dams, in particular, can pose invisible and deadly hazards to swimmers and boaters. To learn more about these dams, the risks they present, and what we can do about them we talk with Roger Adams, President of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials, and Paul Schweiger, a member of the Association and Vice President and Dams and Hydraulics Section Manager with Gannett Fleming.” At the link find the title, “Dam Dangers – The Risks of Low-Head Dams,” right-click Listen to this episode nowand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dark Web Discussion 28 mins – “The “dark web” is huge and mysterious, but most people have never been there. Beyond the Valley explores it first-hand.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

E-commerce Issues 22 mins – “E-commerce has opened the whole world to sellers in Asia and Europe. But if they want to be big merchants, they have to contend with big tech.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Education Technology Failure 11 mins – “Is too much technology in our classrooms detrimental to learning? Lifelong educator Mary Jo Madda cautions that tech tools should support the relationship between teachers and students, not replace it. Featured in Forbes “30 Under 30,” Mary Jo is a born educator, from her start as a charter middle school teacher during her years with Teach for America to her current work as a lead at Google on the Code Next team, where she’s working to develop computer science education programs for students of color. Aside from her time served teaching, Mary Jo was also a Director at EdSurge (an edtech news organization), a member of the ScratchED team at the MIT Media Lab, and one of four founding Education Entrepreneurship Fellows at the Harvard University Innovation Lab. She has spoken at SXSWedu, Stanford University, the University of Virginia, and now will grace our stage at TEDxChicago.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Face-based Technology 19 mins – “Technology is being perfected in China that uses cameras, software and artificial intelligence to identify individuals as they go about their daily lives. And now other countries are trying it out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Federal Trade Commission 64 mins – “The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) plays an increasingly central role in regulating existing and emerging technologies—including privacy and security, competition, and combating unfair and deceptive consumer practices. As the debate over federal privacy legislation heats up on Capitol Hill, the FTC’s scope of authority and enforcement capability are emerging as key issues. On October 28, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted FTC Commissioners Rebecca Kelly Slaughter and Christine S. Wilson for a conversation about the agency’s current and future priorities, perspectives on a national data privacy law, and challenges it may face in performing oversight of emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence systems, platforms, and social media. On October 28, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted FTC Commissioners Rebecca Kelly Slaughter and Christine S. Wilson for a conversation about the agency’s current and future priorities, perspectives on a national data privacy law, and challenges it may face in performing oversight of emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence systems, platforms, and social media. After the discussion, speakers answered questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Future of Work 92 mins – “Around the world, and especially in Africa, rapid digitization and the spread of new technologies are ushering in a new era of economic disruption. This has ignited a global debate about the implications for labor markets and the future of work. So far, the future of work discussion has focused mainly on advanced economies and on industrial jobs, which raises questions about its relevance for low-income countries in general and Africa in particular. A new World Bank report, “The Future of Work in Africa: Harnessing the Potential of Digital Technologies for All” examines this issue in the African context. By examining how adopting digital technologies may transform work in sub-Saharan Africa, the authors conclude that economies in the region may be able to turn the promise of a digital revolution into reality. To do so, they will need to prioritize three “Es”: enabling entrepreneurship; enhancing the productivity of the informal sector; and extending social protection coverage. Such an approach requires a competitive business environment that can guarantee the availability of affordable digital infrastructure services as well as incentives that spur the adoption of digital and related technologies across all farms and firms. On Thursday, October 17, the Global Economy and Development Program’s Africa Growth Initiative hosted a discussion on how African policymakers can harness these new technologies to create jobs and grow their economies.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Geothermal Energy in California 18 mins – “Geothermal energy brings steam created with the heat of magma deep in the earth to generate electric power. California is endowed with numerous sites where magma is close enough to the surface to make geothermal energy practical. The Geysers, a geothermal field in northern California, is the world’s largest source of geothermal electric energy, where six different companies use steam from 350 wells to provide enough electric power to support nearly half-a-million homes. To learn more about the Geysers, and to explore the functionality and sustainability of geothermal power, we talk with California Energy Commissioner Karen Douglas, an attorney and one of five members of the commission.” At the link find the title, “The Geysers Geothermal Field in California – the World’s Largest Geothermal Energy Producer, right-click “Listen to this episode now,” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu

Health Care Challenges 18 mins – “Health care poses global challenges. Can artificial intelligence and cloud computing help overcome them?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Heart Disease 45 mins – “We talk to cardiologist, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his new book State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Huawei 21 mins – “Beyond the Valley looks at how Huawei has navigated a trade war, a tech blacklist, and other global turbulence — and where it may be headed next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment History 22 mins – “Before the House makes history by voting on Trump’s impeachment, let’s go back in history to discuss how the framers of the Constitution thought about impeachment. Yale History Prof. Joanne Freeman guides us through the journey.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kids Need Champions 7 mins – “Rita Pierson, a teacher for 40 years, once heard a colleague say, “They don’t pay me to like the kids.” Her response: “Kids don’t learn from people they don’t like.'” A rousing call to educators to believe in their students and actually connect with them on a real, human, personal level.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Leave No One Behind 88 mins – “A central theme of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) is a pledge “that no one will be left behind.” Since the establishment of the SDGs in 2015, the importance of this commitment has only grown in political resonance throughout all parts of the globe. Yet, to drive meaningful results, the mantra needs to be matched with action. In that spirit, a newly edited book, “Leave No One Behind: Time for Specifics on the Sustainable Development Goals,” aims to translate that ambitious commitment into an action-oriented mindset, focused on supporting specific people in specific places who are facing specific problems. The volume covers everything from tackling the obstacles faced by women, migrants, refugees and the ultra-poor to closing gaps in access to healthcare and quality education. On October 18, the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, together with the UN Foundation and the JICA Research Institute co-hosted an event to highlight outcomes from the September SDG summit in New York and to explore how key actors move from incremental action and approaches to transformative change, especially with respect to fulfilling the leave no one behind commitment. Book co-editor and co-author John McArthur, who is also a senior adviser at the UN Foundation, opened the event with a presentation on the volume’s central themes. A moderated panel of experts followed. Following the discussion, the panel answered questions from the audience.” At the link right-click “Audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leonardo da Vinci 54 mins – “Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween. The renaissance artist and engineer was also a monster buff. Writer and historian Ross King unveils da Vinci’s sketches and stories of monsters, beasts, giants and dragons, and explains how the artist’s views on fantasy were in contrast to an increasingly rational age.” At the link find the title, Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween” right-click “Download Monster buff Leonardo da Vinci would have loved Halloween,” and select “Save link As” from the pop-up menu.

Libra Cryptocurrency 16 mins – “A unlikely regulatory body sits firmly on the front line of data protection and privacy, and it wields a very “big stick” over Silicon Valley and beyond.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Libra Cryptocurrency 23 mins – “Beyond the Valley explores Facebook’s “Libra” and other global efforts to make cryptocurrencies a part of daily life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

McDonald’s in Marseille 46 mins – “Residents of an immigrant neighborhood in northern Marseille gather outside of a McDonald’s they are fighting to keep open.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Migration Impacts 76 mins – “Marking the launch of New York Times reporter Jason DeParle’s book tracing the arc of migration and its impacts through the life of an extended family of Filipino migrants over a three-decade period, from Manila and through Dubai to the Houston area, this conversation with MPI’s Andrew Selee and the World Bank’s Dilip Ratha explores migration at both a global and very personal level.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migration Into Venezuela 73 mins – “Felipe Muñoz, Advisor to the President of Colombia for the Colombian-Venezuelan Border, discusses how Colombia is coping with the influx of Venezuelan migrants, plans for future policy decisions surrounding this migration, and developments in regional and international cooperation. The political and economic unraveling of Venezuela has sparked the flight of more than 4 million people in what now stands as the largest exodus of migrants in the western hemisphere—a number that could exceed 5 million by year’s end. More than 1.4 million Venezuelans have settled in Colombia, which has generously opened its doors.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Migration Pathways for Immigrants to Europe 130 mins – “This event hosted by MPI Europe and the Research Unit of the Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration featured a discussion on research into legal migration pathways for work and training for low- and middle-skilled migrants.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

North Africa Economic Development 45 mins – “Fragile states in Africa, like Somalia, are grappling with tensions and tradeoffs between development imperatives and stabilization objectives, the need for economic stimulus and debt sustainability, and global financial stewardship and transparency. At the same time such countries need to focus on strengthening local public and private sector capacity. Indeed, the two countries are confronting extraordinary development challenges, including with respect to development finance. For more than a decade, the international community has stepped up efforts to engage more effectively with fragile states whose economic performance is impaired by limited administrative capacity, persistent social tensions, ongoing conflict, and political instability. The International Monetary Fund and World Bank are engaged in some form in almost all fragile states to improve economic management and performance, reduce poverty, and improve governance. Development assistance is inherently risky in these environments, where weak policies and institutions correlate with a lower probability of successful outcomes. Despite the risks, there is a strong rationale for engagement as the impact of well-designed and supervised aid-financed programs can potentially be very high. On October 17, the Brookings Africa Growth Initiative and the Brookings Doha Center hosted Finance Minister Abdirahman Duale Beileh of Somalia for a conversation on these and related issues.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Phil Rosenthal 96 mins – “Emmy-winning comedy writer, food lover and raconteur Phil Rosenthal returns to the podcast for an in-depth conversation about New York-style pizza, celebrity PSAs, “non-ethnic” character actors, the cinema of Stanley Kubrick and the emotional resonance of “The Honeymooners.” Also, Will Ferrell works the men’s room, Peter Boyle turns down “The French Connection,” Brad Garrett salutes The Merchant of Venom and Phil breaks bread with Steve Martin and Carl Reiner. PLUS: Nick Apollo Forte! “Ratatouille”! The timelessness of “Tootsie”! Appreciating Walter Matthau! Gilbert hangs at Larry David’s place! And “Broadway Danny Rose” inspires the Amazing Colossal Podcast!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Policing in America 88 mins – “Policing in America has been criticized greatly over the past several years by the general public, politicians, and the media. Most of these criticisms have centered on the increase in officer-involved shootings, particularly involving Black Americans. Policy solutions to improve police-civilian relations, increase trust in policing, and reduce officer-involved shootings have centered on implicit bias trainings, virtual reality technology to improve decision-making, the advent of data science, extra equipment such as body-worn cameras, more transparency, and harsher police sanctions. With increased scrutiny, however, there has been little direct attention on the experience of police officers as policy changes are being implemented. On October 25, Governance Studies, the Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative, and the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings hosted an event that focused more acutely on police officers and their daily experiences. Expert panelists addressed the strengths and weaknesses of data science and technological enhancements for the policing profession, the mental health of police officers, and policies to advance community policing, improve officer well-being, and reduce officer-involved shootings.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics in 2016 45 mins – “Update With The Washington Post’s Aaron Blake.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Quantum Mechanics 37 mins – “We talk to theoretical physicist Sean Carroll about his new book Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Issues 119 mins – Many households approach retirement age with inadequate financial resources, but substantial equity in their residence along with a preference to remain in their homes. For these households, retirement planning presents the challenge of deciding between staying in their home or having sufficient income. In theory, reverse mortgages offer a solution whereby older homeowners can “age in place,” while also consuming their housing equity. Yet, despite their theoretical appeal, few Americans take out reverse mortgages—in part due to historical concerns about high fees and high foreclosure rates. Additionally, the program suffers from ongoing challenges over the cost, with several rounds of reforms implemented in the wake of the housing crisis. On Monday, October 28, in conjunction with the Kellogg School of Management, Brookings featured a wide-ranging discussion on the pros and cons of reverse mortgages and proposals to improve the workings of this market. Debra Whitman of AARP delivered the keynote address, followed by paper presentations by Stephanie Moulton and Donald Haurin of Ohio State University and Thomas Davidoff of the University of British Columbia. After their presentations, Chris Mayer of Columbia and Laurie Goodman of the Urban Institute joined the authors for a panel discussion to explore how policies can contribute to retirement security. Martin Baily of Brookings and Ben Harris of the Kellogg School of Management released a framing paper on the topic and moderated the event.” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secretary of the Navy 85 mins – “America’s maritime forces are undergoing significant changes to address the realities of great power competition. Evolving technology, ongoing uncertainty about the budgetary and fiscal climate, and accelerating innovation by America’s competitors have forced the Navy and Marine Corps to adapt quickly and comprehensively to fulfill the vision laid out for them in the National Defense Strategy. Much work, though, remains to be done. On October 23, the Brookings Institution hosted Richard Spencer, the 76th secretary of the Navy, to discuss naval modernization, the budgetary environment, and the challenges posed by America’s great power rivals to America’s maritime forces.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Silicon Valley: A Satire 27 mins – “We talk to New York Times writer and journalist Matt Richtel about his new novel, written under the pen name A. B. Jewell, called The Man Who Wouldn’t Die.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Six Day War Effects 36 mins – “When Eric Carlson retired, he dove headfirst into an old hobby… philately. Philately is the study of postage stamps, and it’s a tragically underappreciated field of study. A stamp can give you a perfect snapshot of the past on a single square inch of paper. Carlson finds his stamps where every person with an obscure hobby does: eBay. One day he found this really odd looking stamp. “it’s a very cumbersome looking red bird in the middle […] with a yellow background,” describes Carlson….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery Starts in America 46 mins – “Four hundred years ago, inbAugust 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the English colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 25- years of slavery that followed. “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hanna-Jones, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present episode1: ‘The Fight for a True Democracy.’ This episode includes scenes of graphic violence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Smartphone Upgrades 14 mins – “Smartphone makers have a problem. A lot of people see no reason to upgrade. Manufacturers are trying hard to give them one.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

TikTok Social Media Platform 12 mins – “Chinese-owned app TikTok has become one of the biggest social media platforms in the world. But now it’s facing scrutiny from U.S. lawmakers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Treat Williams 94 mins – “Actor, writer and cinephile Treat Williams stops by the studio to talk about his 45 years in film, his admiration for Frank Capra and William Wyler, his love of old movie theaters and his memories of working with legendary directors Milos Forman, Sergio Leone and Steven Spielberg. Also, Vincent Price disses Alan Thicke, John Belushi auditions for “Hair,” Gilbert hangs with Katharine Hepburn and Treat cameos in “The Empire Strikes Back”! PLUS: “The Phantom”! Praising Bob Balaban! The mastery of Sidney Lumet! Gene Hackman cuts to the check! And Treat remembers James Cagney, Martin Landau and Orson Welles!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Music 63 mins – “Inside Media gives Newseum visitors the story behind the story through interviews with journalists and newsmakers. The program format offers the audience an opportunity to ask questions or make comments.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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