Mining Digest 423 – Dec 27, 2019: AI Acceleration, Antiracism, Australia and New Zealand, Australian Economy, Bayocean Fell Into the Sea, Bias Quashing, Bridging the Racial Divide, Cochlear Implants, Consciousness, Corporations and Faith Based Organization, Deep Medicine, Impeachment Primer, Innovation Reform, Intelligence Committee, Leadership for Christians, Mexico Is Mad, Moth Cell Phone Stories, Moth Navajo Story, Music Education, NASA, Organized Crime in Australia, Piracy, Rural American Myths, Shipwreck Kelly, Supreme Court Activities, Windows 10 to Linux

Exercise your ears: the 40 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 551 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,460 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 160GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

AI Acceleration 39 mins – “Today’s guest stands at the forefront of artificial intelligence advancement. Steve Guggenheimer has been with Microsoft for 26 years and has been heavily involved in the company’s AI ventures. This week on Killer Innovations, Steve Guggenheimer joins us to discuss the progress of AI, the transition into “the cloud,” and what he and his team at Microsoft are doing to advance technology.” At the left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Antiracism 46 mins – “Countering racism is essential to the formation of a just and equitable society — so how can we fight it? Ibram X. Kendi says to be able to recognize racism we need to define it and then understand it’s opposite: antiracism. In his new best-selling book, “How to Be an Antiracist,” Kendi explains that racism is powerful and can change the way we see and value others and ourselves. How can we recognize racism and work to oppose it? In his conversation with Jemele Hill, staff writer for The Atlantic, Kendi talks about his own battle with racism, why it’s so difficult to talk productively about racism, and why an understanding of history is essential to combating racism. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Arbiters of Truth 37 mins – “Facebook has had a bad few weeks. Testifying before the House of Representatives on Oct. 23, CEO Mark Zuckerberg was grilled by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on whether the company’s decision to exempt politicians from the platform’s typical rules prohibiting false advertisements would allow Ocasio-Cortez to distribute ads claiming Republicans had voted for the Green New Deal. Days later, the platform faced another backlash when it took down false ads run by a candidate for the California governorship, who cheerfully admitted that he had registered for the race only to test the boundaries of Facebook’s policy. And on Oct. 30, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey made things even more difficult for Zuckerberg by announcing that the rival platform would ban political ads altogether—a decision that garnered Twitter good press, but will likely prove to be just as much of a minefield for Dorsey once he and his team start struggling to define what constitutes a political ad in the first place.  This dustup is just the latest example of the problems faced by social media platforms as they grapple with how to responsibly govern online spaces. As Zuckerberg wrote after the 2016 election, “We do not want to be arbiters of truth ourselves.”  Today, Lawfare is launching a podcast series on disinformation and misinformation in the runup to the 2020 election. And, with thanks to Zuckerberg for the inspiration, we’re calling it Arbiters of Truth. My colleagues Evelyn Douek, Kate Klonick, Alina Polyakova and I will be sitting down with experts to discuss thorny issues of content moderation, online speech and the erosion of discourse around the world. We’ll talk to writers, academics, government officials, members of civil society and employees of the big social media companies themselves. There are no easy answers to these problems, but our hope is that we can at least make clear what questions should be asked. And there is no more important time to be asking them, with content moderation under the telescope of regulators everywhere, social media still transforming our world and voters heading to the ballot box. This week, we’re introducing the series with a roundtable discussion between Douek, Klonick, Polyakova and myself on the key issues: Just what are disinformation and misinformation, anyway? How much of a problem is fake news? And is effective content moderation even possible?” At the link left-click the – arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Artificial Intelligence 46 mins – “Artificial intelligence isn’t something we’ll see in the future. Thinking machines are already here, and nine powerful companies in the US and China control their development. The spam filter in your email inbox is AI. So are programs like Google Translate. The next level for thinking machines is when they begin learning the way humans learn. As artificial intelligence gets refined, who’s keeping track of whether these machines share our motivations, desires, and hopes for the future of humanity? Amy Webb, author of “The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity,” speaks with Alexis Madrigal, a staff writer for The Atlantic who covers Silicon Valley. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Australia and New Zealand 45 mins – “Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand & Minister for Foreign Affairs Winston Peters addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘Australia and New Zealand Working Together In A Changing World’.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Australian Economy 52 mins – “Australian Film Television and Radio School (AFTR) chair and star of ABC’s Gruen Russel Howcroft addresses the National Press Club on the topic ‘The Creative Economy Deficit’. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bayocean Fell into the Sea 11 mins – “There’s a pretty comprehensive book on Bayocean by Bert and Margie Webber called Bayocean: the Oregon Town That Fell Into the Sea There’s also a terrific website that appears to be regularly updating that’s filled with all sorts of stories and resources about Bayocean. ” At the link left-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bias Quashing 56 mins – “Bias is natural — it’s one way we make sense of the world. It becomes problematic when our biases become stereotypes and prejudices. So how do we manage bias, particularly in the classroom and workplace? Jennifer Eberhardt, author of “Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do,” sits down with Adam Grant, host of the WorkLife podcast to go over the science behind bias. How effective are workplace diversity trainings and how can we get at bias early before it becomes ingrained? John Dickerson, correspondent for “60 Minutes,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Bridging the Racial Divide  58 mins  “At a time that many think that our nation has submerged itself in such racially polarizing indulgences that there is no way out, there is yet a smoldering spark of fresh hope. This interview gives all of us marching orders toward a more unified existence without ignoring the difficulties that must be reversed! It’s a very thoughtful discussion for the betterment of #humanity! The conversation deserves our attention! #thethirdoption Learn more about your ad choices. Visit…” At the link find the title, “Bridging the racial divide with Miles McPherson” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cochlear Implants 14 mins -”The parents of a deaf boy in India are advised to get him a cochlear implant so he can live a “normal” life. When they can’t afford to maintain the device, he’s left with little ability to communicate. How can the concept of “multiple normals” improve clinical practice? Interview with Dr. Michele Friedner on how the concept of normality affects health care decisions.” At the link right-click Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

College Teaching and Learning 30 mins – “Somewhere in a university lab, a research subject is being slid into a brain-scanning device to try to better understand how humans learn and retain information. It may seem a bit like science fiction, but research like this is taking off around the world. And in recent years more of the findings are making their way onto campus, in the form of new teaching practices. That has Matthew Rascoff, associate vice provost for digital education and innovation at Duke University, excited about the possibility to make wide-scale improvements in how colleges teach. “From a teaching and learning perspective, this is a golden age,” he says. “We know more about how people learn than we ever have in the past.” EdSurge sat down with Rascoff last month at a meeting of a group called Harvesting Academic Innovation for Learners, or HAIL, held at Southern New Hampshire University. He painted a picture of where he sees campus innovation going, and talked about how his new digital tools can navigate issues around protecting student privacy and avoiding algorithmic bias.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P1 56 mins – “Every parent knows that each child is born with an unique personality. In his new book Innate: How the Wiring of Our Brains Shapes Who We Are. Dr. Kevin Mitchell writes “We are different from each other in large part because of the way our brains get wired before we are born.” (page 7) A key idea is that much of much of our behavior is innate but this is only partly due to genetics. Events during brain development are equally important.” At the link right-click “Kevin Mitchel (click to play interview)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P2 88 mins – “In this month’s episode of Brain Science (BS 160) we take a deep dive into the neuroscience of consciousness. Until recently, consciousness was considered outside the realm of science, but now it is a growing field of interest. I review several recent books with a cross-section of viewpoints, but there are several concepts that they all share: Consciousness requires a brain; Consciousness is a product of evolution; Consciousness is embodied” At the link right-click “Ginger Campbell, MD (Click to Listen)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P3 64 mins – “How does the brain generate subjective experience? This is what philosophers of mind have called Qualia and neuroscientist Michael Graziano proposes a fascinating answer In his new book Rethinking Consciousness: A Scientific Theory of Subjective Experience. In BS 162 explains how his Attention Schema Theory compliments several current theories of Consciousness by answering this critical question. His theory had two critical components: one is that whatever circuitry the brain uses to attribute consciousness to others, is also used to attribute consciousness to ourselves. Second, a critical feature of this circuitry is that it provides an incomplete picture of what the brain is actually doing. Since awareness of what the brain is actually doing provides no survival advantage, we have the sense that our Mind is non-physical. This may seem strange, but it is consistent with how we know our other senses work. For instance, we know the world we experience visually is highly processed, rather than an accurate depiction of the world around us. (Note: the is part 3 of a 4 part series, but episodes can be enjoyed in any order.)” At the link right-click “(click to play, Right click to download audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Consciousness P4 92 mins – “Christof Koch returns to Brain Science for the 3rd time and in BS 163 he shares his new book The Feeling of Life Itself: Why Consciousness Is Widespread but Can’t Be Computed. He tells us why he doesn’t think the Neural Correlates of Consciousness (NCC) are enough to explain subjective experience and he gives us a brief overview of the Integrated Information Theory (IIT) of Consciousness.” At the link right-click “(click to play interview, right click to download MP3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Corporations and Faith Based Organizations 41 mins – “I was recently asked to sit down and have a wide ranging conversation with ATT CEO Randall Stephenson to talk about how corporations like his can tap into Faith based organizations like The Potter’s House Church. It was a joy to have this opportunity to discuss some cutting edge ideas about how corporations and churches can work together to change lives and make people and our society stronger and better. What a tremendous privilege it was to welcome Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, the president of Liberia, to MegaFest. President Sirleaf is the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. Her rise to power against incredible odds, and the lasting impact she has made on her country and the African continent is a powerful story that I’m thrilled to share here in the Village.” At the link find the title, “PRESIDENTIAL VISION & FAITH: President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of Liberia,” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deep Medicine 52 mins – “In modern-day medicine, doctors have little time to spend with patients because rote tasks, like taking notes and performing medical scans, use up their precious time. Eric Topol, a prominent cardiologist, says there has been a steady degradation of the human side of health care – ever since medicine became big business. “We have de-humanized health care. We have gutted the care of health care. This is our only shot to get it back.” He believes artificial intelligence can help free time for doctors so they can listen more closely to patients about their medical concerns. He speaks with David Brooks, op-ed columnist for The New York Times, about Topol’s latest book, “Deep Medicine.” Topol is executive vice president of Scripps Research. Brooks is executive director of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Facebook Moderators 33 mins – “…On May 3, 2017, Mark Zuckerberg announced the expansion of Facebook’s “community operations” team. The new employees, who would be added to 4,500 existing moderators, would be responsible for reviewing every piece of content reported for violating the company’s community standards. By the end of 2018, in response to criticism of the prevalence of violent and exploitative content on the social network, Facebook had more than 30,000 employees working on safety and security — about half of whom were content moderators. The moderators include some full-time employees, but Facebook relies heavily on contract labor to do the job. Ellen Silver, Facebook’s vice president of operations, said in a blog post last year that the use of contract labor allowed Facebook to “scale globally” — to have content moderators working around the clock, evaluating posts in more than 50 languages, at more than 20 sites around the world. The use of contract labor also has a practical benefit for Facebook: it is radically cheaper. The median Facebook employee earns $240,000 annually in salary, bonuses, and stock options. A content moderator working for Cognizant in Arizona, on the other hand, will earn just $28,800 per year. The arrangement helps Facebook maintain a high profit margin. In its most recent quarter, the company earned $6.9 billion in profits, on $16.9 billion in revenue. And while Zuckerberg had warned investors that Facebook’s investment in security would reduce the company’s profitability, profits were up 61 percent over the previous year…” At the link left-click “Share” at the sound bar, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Global Economy 50 mins – “As the US and China continue their trade war, economic instability is rising in countries around the world. Gita Gopinath, chief economist at the International Monetary Fund says, the number one risk to the global economy is the trade war. The IMF is seeing weakening in industrial production, manufacturing, and investment. “All of this is very closely tied to trade, trade uncertainty, and policies related to that,” she says. In a wide-ranging conversation with Gillian Tett, editor at large for the Financial Times, Gopinath talks about whether a recession is looming for the US or elsewhere, why the IMF is redefining global growth, and how more women economic leaders can rise up. Gopinath is the IMF’s first female chief economist. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Discussion 61 mins – “The Conservative Legal Resistance – Stuart Gerson on the case for impeachment from the right. Plus, Cyrus Habib on listening.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Primer 67 mins – “Answering all the questions you’ve had about the constitutional crisis but were afraid to ask.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Reform 39 mins – “Does innovation need reforming? Can something as nebulous as innovation be changed? The reason that this issue bothers me is due to the misuse of innovation, done in a whole variety of ways. Innovation tends to have minimized support financially. What is the proper role that innovation plays in our daily lives? We tend to view innovation as the new shiny gadget from Apple, Dell, or HP. The reality is that innovation plays a much more significant part of our daily lives. It’s the continuous role of innovation solving issues such as healthcare, education, politics, etc. It allows us to share ideas globally uniting us rather than dividing us. Back to my fundamental question. Does innovation need reforming? If so, what approach should minimize? Should more regulation or other incentives be applied? Or is there another completely different approach?…” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, then right-click “Save File,” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Intelligence Committee 36 mins – “House Intelligence Committee member Rep. Jim Himes on the intersection of the law and national security.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

CIA Interrogations – “Philip Mudd is currently a counterterrorism and national security analyst with CNN, but before that, Mudd spent 25 years working at the Central Intelligence Agency, on the NSC staff, and eventually at the FBI. His third book is “Black Site: The CIA in the Post-9/11 World.” David Priess sat down with Phil to talk about his career at CIA, the book, his research into the advanced interrogations and the interrogation program at CIA after 9/11, and the ethics of it all.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Episode_465.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Leadership for Christians 28 mins – “This conversation between these two was originally recorded at Dr. Hybel’s 2016 Global Leadership Summit, an annual training event that aims to transform Christian leaders around the world with an injection of vision, skill development, and inspiration. Together, they hit a range of topics and address Bishop’s philosophy on Leadership. Bishop also leans in on some of the hard truths of leadership; how he balances his life and reconciles the dropping of balls; and lastly, he speaks openly…” At the link find the title, “[replay] The HARD truth about Leadership: Dr. Bill Hybels” which can be heard but not downloaded; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Mexico Is Mad 50 mins – “Is the relationship between the United States and Mexico on shaky ground? This year, President Trump threatened to impose tariffs on Mexican imports if the country didn’t stop the flow of migrants from Central America. And, just this week, Mexican officials called a fatal shooting at an El Paso department store that killed eight Mexican nationals an “act of terrorism.” Will the issues at the border lead to more tension between the two countries, or can they find compromise? Jorge Guajardo, former Mexican ambassador to China, joins Julián Aguilar, a reporter who covers border affairs for The Texas Tribune, and Jeh Johnson, former US secretary of homeland security for a discussion about what’s at stake. Mary Louise Kelly, co-host of NPR’s “All Things Considered,” moderates the conversation. The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Moth Cell Phone Stories 48 mins – “In this hour, stories of ringtones, rekindled connections, and revolution. Revealing phone calls, missed messages, and finding one’s calling. This hour is hosted by The Moth’s Executive Producer, Sarah Austin Jenness. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media. Susan Fee gets a surprise when she calls her daughter. A series of missed calls gets scientist Moran Cerf in hot water. Nancy Mahl gets a call from her mom on 9/11. Cheech Marin finds his calling after dodging the draft.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Moth Navajo Story 48 mins – “In this episode we travel to Chicago, the Navajo Nation in Arizona, and then end the hour on the sidelines of the Tour de France. A man struggles with his unruly neighbors, an artists shares memories of growing up on the Navajo Nation and a journalist exposes one of the greatest sports scandals of our time. The Moth Radio Hour is produced by The Moth and Jay Allison of Atlantic Public Media.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog’s archive.

Music Education 18 mins- “If you were fortunate enough to have music education in school, what were those classes like? Did you pick up an instrument—say, a recorder or violin, and learn how to play the scale and simple melodies? Did you listen to the classics and learn about the history of music? Musicians and music educators alike say that learning music is so much more than just playing an instrument, or learning about your favorite artists. It’s a window into other disciplines—and life skills—and teaches you how to learn and get along. That’s what Lorrie Murray, executive director of the Bay Area Music Project, told EdSurge earlier this fall. And it’s a sentiment echoed by a rock legend, Steven van Zandt, who most people have heard (as a member of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band) or watched (as the mobster Silvio Dante in “The Sopranos”). Murray and van Zandt are our guests on this week’s EdSurge podcast, and they share their different approaches to music education. Both say that although music may not be a lifestyle and profession for everyone, it can teach everybody lifelong lessons.

NASA 58 mins – “NASA turns 60 this week. We’re joined by Former NASA chief technologist Mason Peck joins us to discuss the agency’s history of spaceflight milestones, which include landing humans on the Moon (six times!), putting rovers on Mars, sending probes to interstellar space, and partnering on the International Space Station. Beyond these physical exploration achievements, NASA has also revolutionized the human view of Earth, the solar system, the Milky Way, and the deep swaths of space and time beyond our local group of galaxies.  We also discuss NASA’s future, including its partnerships with the commercial space sector, megaprojects like the Space Launch System and the James Webb Space Telescope, and human exploration of the Moon and Mars.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Organized Crime in Australia 62 mins – “Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton addresses the National Press Club in Canberra on the topic of organised crime.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Piracy 43 mins – “One of the most lawless places on earth is the high seas – remote waters, often hundreds of miles from shore. These largely ungoverned waters play host to criminal acts like sea slavery, gun running, human trafficking, and abuse of stowaways. “The lack of protections for the people who work above the water line and the creatures below, I think, is a huge problem,” says New York Times investigative reporter Ian Urbina. Urbina spent five perilous years jumping aboard fishing vessels and talking with the victims of these inhumanities. His book “Outlaw Ocean: Journeys Across the Last Untamed Frontier,” chronicles their stories and what can be done to protect workers and the wild places they frequent. M. Sanjayan, CEO of Conservation International, interviews Urbina.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

President Roosevelt Wartime Meeting 13 mins – President’s ship almost torpedoed…” At the link left-share, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rural America 50 mins – “Writers Tara Westover and Sarah Smarsh grew up in rural parts of the mid-section of America and chronicled the stories of their childhoods in best-selling books. While the books vary in emphasis, structure, and theme, both writers agree that people in the Heartland are easily stereotyped by the national media and politicians. “There’s a real gulf between the story we tell ourselves about a country and those conflict- and ratings-driven conversations in New York City studios, and what happens on-the-ground in local communities,” says Smarsh. They tell James Fallows, author of “Our Towns,” about what needs to change to eliminate these damaging stereotypes. Smarsh and Westover also describe how they’re using their platforms to address some of the most complex challenges that rural communities face today. Smarsh is the author of “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Riches Country on Earth.” Westover wrote the book, “Educated.” The views and opinions of the podcast guests are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Rural American Myths 58 mins – “Rural America has come to the nation’s attention. But much discussion in the media and coffee shops, at conferences and dinner tables, relies on incorrect or no data, largely idyllic or dystopic tropes and images, and opinion uninformed by rural experience. The full picture of rural America is quite different. It has gained population in the last two years. Agriculture employs less than 4 percent of the rural workforce. Rural leaders are generating productive economic and social innovations just as in urban America. Immigrants are helping revive rural economies and culture. Placemaking is rampant. Impact investing is on the rise. The voting map is red and blue and purple. Start the day with a frank and revealing exchange with rural doers, knowers, and advocates. Bring all those questions about rural America you have always wanted to ask. Help foster a truer narrative about America’s rural people, places, culture, and economy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Shipwreck Kelly 21 mins – “There’s a lot written about Kelly and his times, none more enjoyable than Bill Bryson’s in One Summer: America, 1927. The best academic book that touches on Kelly and his times is Dance Marathons: Performing American Culture in the 1920s and 30s, by Carol Martin.” At the link left-click “Download Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court Activities 46 mins – “Get Ready for the Most Significant Supreme Court Term in a Decade – The justices are tackling abortion, guns, DACA, and LGBTQ rights.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Supreme Court and the Law 60 mins – “Dahlia Lithwick is joined by Stuart Gerson of the conservative legal group Checks and Balances to talk about developments in the border wall case he helped bring in El Paso, Texas; the view of impeachment from concerned conservatives; and the latest escalation in the Department of Justice’s investigation into the origins of the Russia investigation. Then, Cyrus Habib, lieutenant governor of Washington state (and owner of the most impressive résumé of any guest ever on the show) shares a refreshingly optimistic take on the law and politics.” At the link left-share, then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows 10 to Linux P1 46 mins- “In today’s show we start a series on how to switch from Windows and upgrade to Linux. We break the process down into easy steps.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Windows10 to Linux P2 24 mins – “In our second episode dedicated to upgrading from Windows to Linux we describe how to create installation media from Windows, macOS, and Linux, booting from a USB device, making the right setup selections, and getting updates.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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