Mining Digest 426 – Jan 17, 2020: Cambridge Analytica, China and US, Curt’s Cafe, Darwinian Revolution, Deep Brain Stimulation, Emergency Communications, Exercise Value, Falling Man, Federal Reserve Banks, Fourth Industrial Revolution, Graphene, Gregg Jarrett Interview, Guns in America, Hereditary Science, Impeached President Prospects, Impeachment Rules, Impossible Lab, Life Extension, Limbs International, Meat Replacement, Negotiation Expert Interview, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Not a Scientist, Oculus Quest and Rift, Older Women, Ousted Ambassador’s Story, Prejudice Discussion, Public Debate and Social Change, Science of Recovery, Silicon Valley, Smoking Cessation, Social Darwinism, Sports Gambling, Susan Rice, Technology Advance, Ten Year Old Boys, Tipping

Exercise your ears: the 53 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 564 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of (26,850 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Apple 2014 iPad Event 57 mins – “Dan Benjamin is joined by Victor Agreda Jr. of TUAW and Adam Christianson of Maccast to talk about the Apple 2014 iPad Event.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Cambridge Analytica 55 mins – “I don’t even know where to begin with this one. You’ve probably heard of Cambridge Analytica. Maybe you know they’re a company that did some nefarious things involving facebook and the 2016 US presidential elections. If you’re anything like me, you don’t know the half of it. If you get through this episode without wanting to move to a remote hut in the Arctic circle, I will personally refund this hour of your life. My guest today is Christopher Wylie, author of MindF*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America. in high school, he found himself on the outside of lots of social circles. Computers and hacker culture gave him community. Identity. From there, it’s a long strange trip through progressive politics in Canada to military Psy ops in London to helping Steve Bannon and the Billionaire Robert Mercer build the most powerful psychological weapon of mass destruction in existence—one that very likely won the presidency for Donald Trump and the Brexit vote. Chris was 24 at the time. When the scale and consequences of Cambridge Analytica got too big to ignore, he turned whistleblower—and none of our lives, his included, will ever be the same.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

China and the US 32 mins – “This week we look at the history of on U.S.-China relations from President Nixon’s historic visit in 1972 through today. We get the perspective of Ambassador Gary Locke, who served as the United States’ envoy to China from 2011 to 2014. President Trump visits the country this week as part of a five-nation Asian tour.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Curt’s Cafe 33 mins – “Most juvenile offenders end up back in prison — but not at Curt’s Cafe, a coffee shop offers a path to a better life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Darwinian Revolution 55 mins -“We talk to influential evolutionary biologist David Sloan Wilson about his new book This View of Life: Completing the Darwinian Revolution.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deep Brain Stimulation 52 mins – “We talk to science writer and neurobiologist Lone Frank about her latest book The Pleasure Shock: The Rise of Deep Brain Stimulation and Its Forgotten Inventor.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Emergency Communications 27 mins – “A team of “computer nerds” spot a huge hole in emergency services. Their solution may save 10,000 lives a year (or more!).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Exercise Value 22 mins – “There is strong evidence that exercise is wildly beneficial. There is even stronger evidence that most people hate to exercise. So if a pill could mimic the effects of working out, why wouldn’t we want to take it?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Falling Man 23 mins – “Do you remember this photograph? In the United States, people have taken pains to banish it from the record of September 11, 2001. The story behind it, though, and the search for the man pictured in it, are our most intimate connection to the horror of that day. Thus begins Tom Junod’s “The Falling Man,” which over the past fourteen years has become one of the magazine’s most-read stories of all time. It’s a story that is as enthralling and complicated today as when it was first published in 2003. Inspired by the infamous photograph of one of the people forced to jump from the World Trade Center, captured by Richard Drew on 9/11, Junod reveals why he felt it was his responsibility to bring the photo—and the anonymous falling man pictured—to light.” At the link find the title, “The Falling Man, by Tom Junod, right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Federal Reserve Banks 44 mins – “Mary Daly rose from high-school dropout to president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. She thinks the central bank needs an upgrade too. It starts with recognizing that the economy is made up of actual humans.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Female Nobel Prize Winner – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the work and ideas of Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin (1910-1994), awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1964 for revealing the structures of vitamin B12 and penicillin and who later determined the structure of insulin. She was one of the pioneers of X-ray crystallography and described by a colleague as ‘a crystallographers’ crystallographer’. She remains the only British woman to have won a Nobel in science, yet rejected the idea that she was a role model for other women, or that her career was held back because she was a woman. She was also the first woman since Florence Nightingale to receive the Order of Merit, and was given the Lenin Peace Prize in recognition of her efforts to bring together scientists from the East and West in pursuit of nuclear disarmament.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Forth Industrial Revolution 12 mins – “We stand on the brink of a technological revolution that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work, and relate to one another. In its scale, scope, and complexity, the transformation will be unlike anything humankind has experienced before. We do not yet know just how it will unfold, but one thing is clear: the response to it must be integrated and comprehensive, involving all stakeholders of the global polity, from the public and private sectors to academia and civil society….” At the link you can watch the interesting associated video. The sound track is also included in this blog archive.

Graphene 48 mins – “We talk to chemist Joseph Meany about his book Graphene: The Superstrong, Superthin, and Superversatile Material That Will Revolutionize the World.” At the link find the title, “The Material That Will Revolutionize the World,” where you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Gregg Jarrett Interview 56 mins – “Fox News legal and political analyst Gregg Jarrett talked about his book, Witch Hunt: The Story of the Greatest Mass Delusion in American Political History, in which offered his thoughts on the Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. He was interviewed by Matt Schlapp, chair of the American Conservative Union.” At the link you can listen, but must pay for a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Groupon’s Founder 33 minsThe Story: Alex is back in the host’s chair to introduce a new show from Gimlet – his own! It’s an interview show called Without Fail where Alex talks to people who have made a big bet and either won or lost. When Andrew Mason started Groupon 10 years ago he was in his mid-20s, fresh out of grad school, and running a company for the first time ever. Within 2 years Groupon was called the fastest growing company in history. And then just as rapidly. And just as dramatically. Its fortunes changed. This dream rise, the nightmare fall, all in this incredibly short time span – it’s like a startup fable. But it actually happened. To a real guy! In part one of this two-part conversation, Andrew talks with Alex about Groupon’s rise. How it started as a website designed for something completely different, what it felt like when it finally caught on and started to grow, and Andrew’s own conflicted feelings about being a CEO.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Guns in America 28 mins – “This week we look at the history of guns in America with Author William Doyle. He’s the written a number of books including, “American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms,” which he co-wrote with the late Chris Kyle of “American Sniper” fame.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Hereditary Science 37 mins – “Carl Zimmer is a New York Times columnist and author of 13 books about science. We talked to him about his latest book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity, which was recently named The Guardian’s Best Science Book of 2018.” At the link find the title, “She Has Her Mother’s Laugh,” where you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Policy 56 mins – “Journalist Michelle Malkin offers her thoughts on U.S. immigration policy. She’s interviewed by Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX).” At the link find the title, “Michelle Malkin, “Open Borders Inc.” where you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeached President Prospects 16 mins – “What actually happens to a president who’s impeached? What penalties against removed presidents are written into law? Law professor Jessica Levinson offers insight into how the law comes down on reelecting a president faced with an impeachment inquiry.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Probe 21 mins – “Pending a House vote on the Democrats’ resolution, the stage will be set for the next phase of the impeachment probe. Congress reporter Mike DeBonis explains what the new procedures and rules mean for the events on Capitol Hill in the weeks ahead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Trial 28 mins – “Senate impeachment trials are rare in American history, but there are some rules and precedent for how it all works. Reporter Paul Kane answers questions like: Can the rules change by Senate vote? Who collects evidence? And does public opinion matter?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impossible Labs 36 mins – “Mick Ebeling and Daniel Belquer are helping the deaf hear music. Not Impossible Labs built limbs for amputees in warzones. That’s just the beginning…Not Impossible is a podcast that asks the question “What if nothing in life is impossible?” It explores inspiring stories about people solving the hardest, most mind-boggling problems in some of the most creative and unimaginable ways. Mick Ebeling, founder of Not Impossible Labs, guides us through uplifting stories of people who’ve created technology for the sake of humanity. ” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LBJ Tapes 32 mins – “This week: The LBJ tapes- President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the audio recordings made during his presidency. We spoke with presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss. He’s the author of two books examining the recordings, “Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes, 1963-1964” and “Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson’s Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Life Extension 15 mins – “This week: A new study attempts to extend the life of worms and what it might mean for us; and a detailed look into the recent failed Soyuz rocket launch.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is inclouded in this blog archive.

Limbs International 33 mins – “Of the 30 Million amputees worldwide, only 5 percent have access to prosthetics. A professor in Texas sets out to change that, one step at a time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Machine Bias 56 mins – “Now that algorithms are everywhere, helping us to both run and make sense of the world, a strange question has emerged among artificial intelligence researchers: When is it ok to predict the future based on the past? When is it ok to be biased? “I want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what tumors looked like in the past, and I want it to become biased toward selecting those kind of tumors in the future,” explains philosopher Shannon Vallor at Santa Clara University.  “But I don’t want a machine-learning algorithm to learn what successful engineers and doctors looked like in the past and then become biased toward selecting those kinds of people when sorting and ranking resumes.” At the link at the sound bar right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meat Replacement 56 mins – “This week’s episode, “The Future of Meat,” was first published in February, and quickly became one of our most downloaded episodes ever. Why? Is it because so many of you love to eat meat? Maybe. Or is it because so many of you don’t love to eat meat? Also maybe. Let me explain. There’s a movement happening right now, a really large movement, around meatless meat — that is, meat-like food that doesn’t come from living animals. The California company Beyond Meat had one of the hottest I.P.O.’s in recent memory, and it’s barely slowed down: their market cap now is over $9 billion. Impossible Foods, the company you’ll hear about in today’s episode, also appears to be headed for an I.P.O. and perhaps a similar success. Is it possible that 50 years from now, or even 20 or even 10 years, most of the “meat” we eat won’t come from animals? I don’t know — let’s check in then. But for now, here’s our best attempt at describing the future of meat.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Negotiation Expert Interview 107 mins – “In this episode, we sit down with negotiation expert Misha Glouberman who explains how to talk to people about things — that is, how to avoid the pitfalls associated with debate when two or more people attempt to come to an agreement that will be mutually beneficial.” At the link at the sound bar right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurodegenerative Diseases 44 mins – “We talk to Katja Brose, neuroscientist and Science Program Officer at the Chan Zuckerberg Science Initiative about the latest, best prospects in neurodegenerative disease treatment.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Neurogenesis 32 mins – “A careful look into research on whether or not we can generate new neurons as adults; new research into using machine learning to predict premature death; and a new technique to reshape cartilage by heating it.” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

New History of Life 45 mins – “We talk to science writer David Quammen about his new book The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life.” At the link find the title, “A Radical New History of Life,” where you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog

Nobel Prize Winner – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the work, ideas and life of the woman who won the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for her work on the structures of vitamin B12 and penicillin.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu

Not a Scientist 44 mins – “In this episode, science journalist Dave Levitan talks about his new book: Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent, and Utterly Mangle Science. In the book, Levitan takes us through 12 repeating patterns that politicians fall into when they talk about scientific research. Some are nefarious and intentional, some are based on ignorance, and some are just part of the normal business of politicians managing their public image or trying to appeal to their base. Not only do they often get the science wrong, they sometimes fail to communicate the nature of scientific inquiry and the goals of the scientific process itself.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Oculus Quest and Rift 33 mins – “Google Pixel 3a! Cheap Phone Alert!!! Or maybe midrange w/ a badass camera alert: Google’s new Pixel 3a takes us back to the glorious Nexus days, but with a flagship camera, a headphone jack, and at least one problem! Watch the video to find out more! Lenovo IdeaPad S940 Lenovo’s IdeaPad S940 got a ton of press back at CES 2019, we’ve got a full review of the gorgeous 13.9 Core i7 ultraportable in the video. Is it a worthy alternative to Dell’s XPS 13???BATTLESTATION!!! Dennis emailed, “This is my dual game/ space sim/ video editing setup with LaserDisc/ SVHS/ and HD Cable sources. Two PCs: the Primary is an overclocked 2700x Air Cooled rig with 11 fans on a modified Lian-Li Dynamic 011 case and an older Intel I-3 Torrent/ PLEX Server tied together with KVM Multiplicity software.” Here’s his PCPartPicker List, and a link to Multiplicity! Oculus Quest vs. Rift-S Review Norman Chan and the crew at Tested have been on the leading edge of VR since the Oculus Kickstarter, Norm’s got the word on the Quest and Rift-S, and which one you should buy, if you should be buying a VR headset at all! RODE Mic Wireless GO Compact Pack Can a $200 wireless mic system, “the world’s smallest, most versatile wireless microphone system” be any good? RODE’s Wireless Go is tiny!!! Watch the video to find out how it compares to professional gear! DO SOMETHING ANALOG Like Ken, who sent us the most excellent story of how he got drone footage of the cooling towers at the Brayton Point Power Plant in Somerset, MA being imploded. The video is amazing!” At the link right-click “Download TekThing 228” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Older Women 52 mins – “In 1972, the year I was born, there was apparently a famous TV ad for Geritol. My guest today describes it thus: “…a husband spoke to the camera while his wife draped herself over his shoulder, smiling like something between a model and the brainwashed resident of a creepy commune…”My wife’s incredible. She took care of the baby all day, cooked a great dinner and even went to a school meeting—and look at her!” Her potion of eternal youth, of course, is Geritol. It’s got all the vitamins and iron she needs. This perfect woman grins silently at the camera as her husband concludes: “My wife: I think I’ll keep her.”  Though what constitutes “getting old” for women in America has been a moving target throughout US history, it has rarely been a picnic. But our history’s also full of women who have raised hell and pushed back in a hundred different ways against the cultural and literal corsets America keeps trying to stuff them into. My guest today is New York Times columnist and celebrated author Gail Collins. Her new book is No Stopping Us Now: the Adventures of Older Women in American History. It’s a bumpy, often exhilarating ride through the lives of older women in America from colonial times up to the present day. And Gail’s good company as our wise, wisecracking stagecoach driver. We’re headed West, and there’s hope on the horizon.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Ousted Ambassador’s Story 24 mins – “Marie Yovanovitch faced lawmakers for hours of testimony Friday. National security reporter Matt Zapotosky breaks down the key moments from the inquiry’s second public hearing. Plus, other impeachment news developments you may have missed this week.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Prejudice Discussion 40 mins – “We talk to David Amodia, a social neuroscientist and psychology professor at NYU and the University of Amsterdam, about the science of prejudice.At the link find the title, “The Neuroscience of Prejudice,” where you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Public Debate and Social Change 55 mins – “…“I wish I could tell you exactly why that’s when everything exploded,” said Wiseman. “I can’t. We could probably spend the next couple of hours analyzing all the different reasons, but that was the point that I would say communication in the public square about LGBT issues began in earnest.” In this episode, you’ll hear that debate unfold as we spend time in Starkville exploring the value of argumentation and conversation in the process of change, progress, and understanding our basic humanity.” At the link at the sound bar right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rand Paul Interview 45 mins – “Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) discusses the history of socialism and argues that there is a new threat of socialist ideology on the rise in America. He’s interviewed by Congressman Matt Gaetz (R-FL).” At the link find the title, “Sen. Rand Paul, “The Case Against Socialism” right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Republican Protest 21 mins – “Reporter Toluse Olorunnipa explains what GOP lawmakers were trying to achieve Wednesday when they protested in the basement of the Capitol. What role do House Republicans play in defending the president and how much is White House guidance informing them?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Saudi Arabia 22 mins – “This week we take a look at the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with Bruce Riedel. He is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution. He’s also the author of “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and the United States Since FDR.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Science of Recovery 21 mins – “We talk to Christie Aschwanden about her new book Good To Go: What the athlete in all of us can learn from the strange science of recovery….In recent years recovery has become a sports and fitness buzzword. Anyone who works out or competes at any level is bombarded with the latest recovery products and services: from drinks and shakes to compression sleeves, foam rollers, electrical muscle stimulators, and sleep trackers. At the link yo can listen but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Silicon Valley 27 mins – “We talk to New York Times writer and journalist Matt Richtel about his new novel, written under the pen name A. B. Jewell, called The Man Who Wouldn’t Die.” At the link find the title, “Silicon Valley: A Satire,” where you can listen, but not download the podcast; however, a copy of it is included in this blog archive.

Smoking Cessation 21 mins – In this episode, we discuss smoking cessation, including nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion (Zyban), and varenicline (Chantix).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Social Darwinism53 mins – “It is widely understood that Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution completely revolutionized the study of biology. Yet, according to David Sloan Wilson, the Darwinian revolution won’t be truly complete until it is applied more broadly—to everything associated with the words “human,” “culture,” and “policy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sports Gambling 56 mins – “What happens when tens of millions of fantasy-sports players are suddenly able to bet real money on real games? We’re about to find out. A recent Supreme Court decision has cleared the way to bring an estimated $300 billion in black-market sports betting into the light. We sort out the winners and losers.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Spotify Acquistion Talks P1 32 mins – “Just days before Thanksgiving, Alex and Matt board a red-eye to Stockholm for a conversation that could change everything.

Spotify Acquistion Talks P2 33 mins – As acquisition talks with Spotify continue, Alex and Matt face their hopes and fears about what might lie ahead.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Styron’s Depression 26 mins – “When journalist Philip Caputo set out to profile William Styron in 1985, it was something of a dream assignment: Styron, then at work on the novel The Way of the Warrior, was one of the towering figures in American letters. The two men’s shared experience as Marines—Styron himself praised Caputo’s 1977 Vietnam memoir, A Rumor of War—formed a connection far stronger than their common bond as writers. But when Styron fell into a clinical depression during the reporting of the story, the nature of Caputo’s profile changed radically. Styron never completed the novel, although his 1990 meditation on depression, Darkness Visible, remains one of the most lucid and illuminating accounts of the illness. Caputo joins host David Brancaccio to discuss Styron’s greatness as a writer and how his struggle against depression—and his ability to articulate it in print—stands, in some regards, as his ultimate literary achievement.” At the link find the title, “Styron’s Choices, by Philip Caputo,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Susan Rice 60 mins – “Susan Rice, Obama administration national security adviser and ambassador to the United Nations, discussed her life and career in American diplomacy and foreign policy. She was interviewed by Robin Wright, author and New Yorker columnist.” At the link you can listen, but must pay for a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Technology Advances 17 mins – “Dan and his 6 year old son Cash discuss antenna breaks in the upcoming iPhone 6 housing, iPad as a gaming platform, the technology of podcasting and live streaming, the limits of Magneto’s powers, Adventure Time, deadly amoebas, visiting Four Corners, Bigfoot, rodeos, a crystal tooth, and more.” At the link right-click “MP3Audio” and select “Save Link As from the pop-up menu.

Ten Year Old Boys 27 mins – “In 1992, writer Susan Orlean was sick of celebrity profiles. Instead, she wanted to do something bigger and much harder: She wanted to profile the inner life of an average American boy. After convincing her editor, Orlean spent more than a week going to fifth grade and hanging out with Colin Duffy, a ten-year-old from Glen Ridge, New Jersey. The resulting article—“The American Man at Age Ten”—stands as one of the most surprising and engaging portraits of what it’s like to be a boy in America. Orlean joins host David Brancaccio to discuss how the story came about, what it was like to shadow Colin, and how the piece continues to reverberate almost twenty-five years after it was first published.” At the link find the title, “The American Male at Age Ten, by Susan Orlean,” right-click “Play Now” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tipping 48 mins – “Today on Freakonomics Radio: we wade back into the tipping wars. We discuss the lessons learned when one gigantic company that didn’t used to have tipping changed its mind.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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