Mining Digest 427 – Jan 24, 2020: Alzheimer’s Treatment, Antibiotics and Diarrhea, Astronaut Interview, Autism and Vaccines, Client Data Protection, Dinosaurs, Dog Rescues, Eating Clay, Exercise and Brain, Fentanyl Exposure, Flu Vaccines, Greenwald Cybercrimes, HIV Battle and US Health Care Therapy, Hurtling Toward Catastrophe, Immunizations, Indebted Students, Language and Brains, Learning How to Learn, Mindfulness Meditation, Neuroscience Ideas, Opioid Events, Peaceful Parenting with Laura Markam, Perpetual Progress with Atul Gawande, Predictably Irrational, PTSD Guidelines, Raising Kids, Reading Research, Santorini Wine with Panayiota Kalogeropoulou, Saving Democracy, Scott Adams of Dilbert, Sickle Cell Anemia Assessment, Student Debt, Terry Jones Dies, Thinking in Algorithms, Wine Lessons with Veronique Rivest, Work Environment Improvement, Writing Profession

Exercise your ears: the 48 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 441 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alzheimer Treatment 21 mins – “Books and Ideas 36 is an interview with Daniel George, co-author of “The Myth of Alzheimer’s: What You Aren’t Being Told About Today’s Most Dreaded Diagnosis.” This interview is a follow-up to the one I did with Dr. Peter Whitehouse earlier this month for Brain Science Podcast 68.
Detailed show notes and episode transcripts are available http://booksandideas.com.
” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Antibiotics and Diarrhea 33 mins – “In this episode, we discuss the efficacy and safety of probiotics for the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Astronaut Interview 43 mins – “’I had dreamt about becoming an astronaut from the time I watched Alan Shepard launch on the first American sub-orbital flight on May 5, 1961. Eleven days before my seventh birthday, I committed to a new goal: one day, I would fly in outer space.’ We talk to Dave Williams, a Canadian astronaut, neuroscientist, physician, and author of the new book Defying Limits: Lessons from the Edge of the Universe.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Autism and Vaccines 58 mins – “Episode 25 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Dr. Paul A. Offit, author of “Autism’s False Prophets: Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure.” The scientific evidence shows no connection between vaccines and autism yet opponents of vaccination continue to encourage parents to refuse to vaccinate their children against potentially life threatening diseases. In this episode we consider the evidence for vaccine safety and examine the factors that fuel the on-going controversy. Children are already dying from preventable diseases like measles and hemophilis infuenza (Hib) meningitis, so it is vital that parents be informed about the unnecessary risks faced by unvaccinated children. For detailed show notes and episode transcripts go to http://booksandideas.com.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Biological Mind 59 mins – “In his new book The Biological Mind: How Brain, Body, and Environment Collaborate to Make Us Who We Are, Dr Alan Jasanoff from MIT argues against what he calls the cerebral mystique, which is the tendency to view the human brain as much more autonomous and mysterious than it really is. Our conversation (BS 146) brings together several key ideas that have been discussed on past episodes of Brain Science, but our emphasis is on the fact the Mind is not just the Brain because the Mind is created by the interaction of the Brain with both the Body and its environment. Failure to appreciate the biological nature of our Minds has consequences in many aspects of our lives, including how we approach both mental health and issues of social justice.” At the link right-click “audio mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Client Data Protection 24 mins – “All lawyers have an ethical obligation to employ security measures when sharing information and data with their clients. Whether that means encrypting all important emails or properly researching cloud based file-sharing services like Dropbox, it is incumbent on lawyers to understand the levels of security available. LexisNexis recently did a survey on what tools lawyers and legal professionals are using to protect their clients’ privileged information. 77% of the lawyers surveyed did not have adequate security for their confidential client data. How important is encryption and what can lawyers do to change the way they share data?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cognitive Dissonance 58 mins – “The theory of cognitive dissonance is not new but Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me): Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts by Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson makes cognitive dissonance accessible to everyone, and, more importantly, Tavris and Aronson make it clear why we should care. As Dr. Tavris explained in a recent interview (Books and Ideas #43), “cognitive dissonance is a theory of blind spots.” Appreciating how our brains automatically strive to decrease the discomfort we feel when faced with conflicting beliefs, can help us become aware of how these blind spots effect our behavior and attitudes.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode 43” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dinosaurs 44 mins – “We talk to paleontologist, professor, expeditioner, and science communicator Ken Lacovara about his recent book Why Dinosaurs Matter.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dog Rescues 55 mins – “Episode 33 of Books and Ideas an interview with Kyla Duffy, the founder of Happy Tails Books where she publishes stories about dog rescue. Her goal is to raise awareness of the plight of puppy mill dogs and to raise funds for a wide variety of canine rescue organizations. I discovered her work through my contact with German Shepherd Rescue of Central Alabama. This episode is more personal than most because I share some of the story of my rescued German Shepherd Jake, and of course, Kyla talks about rescuing a Boston Terrier named Bill (pictured above) led her to start a publishing company.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode 33” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Eating Clay 19 mins – “New research shows a 6-month treatment for breast cancer is nearly as successful as the previously-standard 12-month course; the surprising effects that clay can have on your body; and a look into new studies that give new reasons why dark chocolate is good for you.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Emotions 42 mins– “BS 151 is a discussion of The Neuroscience of Emotion: A New Synthesis by Ralph Adolphs and David J. Anderson. We talk about key ideas from the book and relate them to several previous episodes about emotion including interviews with Jaak PankseppLisa Feldman Barrett and Luis Pessoa.” At the link right-click “audio mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Exercise and Brain 59 mins – “Back in 2008 I interviewed Dr. John Ratey twice: first about his then new book Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (BSP 33) and then later about his work with ADHD (BSP 45). Dr. Ratey was one of my favorite guests so I was eager to interview him about his new book Go Wild: Free Your Body and Mind. This latest book explores the science behind the current movement to embrace a more healthy lifestyle based on lessons learned from our hunter gatherer ancestors. Since the topic doesn’t quite fit on the Brain Science Podcast I recorded Dr. Ratey’s latest interview for my other show Books and Ideas, but I am including the mp3 as a free download in the BSP feed.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode 55 of Books and Ideas” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Fentanyl Exposure 15 mins – “Today’s episode of the podcast is a myth busting on all the media reports about first responders overdosing by being exposed to fentanyl in the field by incidental contact. This is physically impossible and the misinformation out there has scared a lot of people, cost us lots of money in the form of hazmat responses and shutting down hospitals, and prevented overdose patients from getting the timely care they need in an emergency. This episode will systematically go through every argument why fentanyl is NOT harmful via incidental exposure and debunk these myths to give first responders one less thing to worry about while they do their frequently dangerous yet vital work.” At the link right-click “Podcast Link” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Flu Vaccines 21 mins – “In this episode, we discuss two controversial topics in the world of immunizations with Dr. Angelo — the “high-dose” influenza vaccine and the expanded use of PCV13 (Prevnar-13).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Genetic Code Cracking 63 minsEpisode 60 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Matthew Cobb, author of Life’s Greatest Secret: The Race to Crack the Genetic Code. We focus on some of the unsung scientists who made essential discoveries. Matthew Cobb was the first person I ever interviewed back in Episode 7, so it was special to have him on to help me celebrate the 9th Anniversary of Books and Ideas.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Greenwald Cybercrimes 9 mins – “The Brazilian federal government on Tuesday revealed charges of cybercrimes against Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Glenn Greenwald, for his alleged role in the leaking of explosive messages written by high-ranking law enforcement officials. Press freedom advocates immediately decried the charges as a dangerous blow to basic press freedoms; Greenwald himself told Washington Post cybersecurity reporter Joseph Marks, “Governments [are] figuring out how they can criminalize journalism based on large-scale leaks.” In this podcast extra, Marks breaks down the charges and draws comparisons (and contrasts) with the American government’s prosecution of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Therapy 9 mins – “In this episode, we review HIV therapy with Dr. Cottreau with a particular focus on Truvada, Atripla, Complera, Stribild, and Triumeq.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

HIV Treatment and US Health Care 34 mins – “Episode 54 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Dr. Michael Saag, one of the pioneers in the battle against HIV-AIDS and author of the provocative new book Positive: One Doctor’s Personal Encounters with Death, Life, and the US Healthcare System. When I asked him why he wrote his book he said bluntly “Because I am angry!” Saag shares the frustration of most American physicians who struggle with the current chaos that we call a healthcare “system.” As he notes on page 2 of Positive,  “over three decades of unparalleled advances in science and healing, so much about practicing medicine seems to have gotten worse. Medical professionals’ time with patients has decreased while the workload had increased. The cost of patient care has risen by every measure, while insurers appear to profit more and help less.” In Positive Dr. Saag blends the inside story of how HIV-AIDS was transformed from a death sentence to a manageable chronic medical condition with a candid discussion of our sytems failings. He recognizes that those of us who want to see real change face an uphill battle against powerful, (and rich) entrenched interests who are profiting from the current chaos, but it is his hope that Positive will motivate physicians and patients to use the actvisim that helped spur success against AIDS as an inspiration to fight together for change.” At the link right-click “Listen to Episode 54 of Books and Ideas,” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Hurtling Towards Catastrophe 52 mins – “After the US military assassinated an Iranian military general, war propaganda kicked into overdrive. On this week’s On the Media, how news consumers can cut through the misleading claims and dangerous frames. Plus, how Generation Z is interpreting the geopolitical crisis through memes. And, how apocalyptic thinking is a near-constant through history.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Indebted Students 25 mins – “In an unusual study on student debt, New York University anthropologist Caitlin Zaloom interviewed more than 160 people—students and parents—and got them to open up their financial books and talk about the toll of paying for college. The result is an often riveting book called “Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost.” For this week’s podcast, we talked with Zaloom about what surprised her most from her research, what she thinks should be done and how she has changed her thinking about saving for college for her own young children. And because the best parts of Zaloom’s book are the voices of the students she spoke with, we wanted to bring a student perspective to this episode as well. So we talked with a recent NYU graduate who took on six-figure debt for college and asked him what it feels like to select a college—and now start a career—under such financial stress.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language and Brains 53 mins – “Angela Friederici’s new book Language in Our Brain: The Origins of a Uniquely Human Capacity captures decades of research. Although the book is quite technical, our recent conversation (BS 144) provides an excellent overview to listeners of all backgrounds. Our earliest knowledge was acquired from patients with brain lesions, but newer tools allow researchers to correlate concepts from Linguistics, such as phonology, syntax and semantics, with the neuroscientific tools such as EEG and imaging.At the link “(click to stream, right click to download)” to get the podcast.

Learning How to Learn 93 mins – “In this interview, Barbara Oakley (@barbaraoakley), 8-time author and creator of Learning to Learn, an online course with over a million enrolled students, shares the science and strategies to learn more quickly, overcome procrastination and get better at practically anything. Just when I start to think I”m using my time well and getting a lot done in my life, I meet someone like Marbara Oakley. Barbara is a true polymath. She was a captain the U.S. Army, a Russian translator on Soviet trawlers, a radio operator in the..”. At the link right-click “Download as MP3 by right-clicking here” and Select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Mindfulness Meditation 45 mins – “In this episode Dr. Dean and I share our experiences with mindfulness meditation and Dr. Dean explains why she finds it helpful for a wide range of problems, including the stress we all face from time to time.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neuroscience Ideas 46 mins – “Episode 42 of Books and Ideas is an edited version of the talk that Dr. Campbell gave in May 2011 in London at Skeptics in the Pub. “Why Neuroscience Matters” is a brief introduction to some of the recent discoveries in neuroscience that are changing the way we see ourselves and each other. Special Thanks to the PodDelusion podcast for sharing the original recording.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Neuroscience Ideas 46 mins – “Episode 42 of the Brain Science Podcast is a discussion of On Being Certain: Believing You Are Right Even When You’re Not, by Robert Burton, MD.  This Part 1 of a two-part discussion of the unconscious origins of what Dr. Burton calls “the feeling of knowing.”  In Episode 43 I will interview Dr. Burton. Today’s episode provides an overview of Dr. Burton’s key ideas. In past episodes I have discussed the role of unconscious decision-making.  On Being Certain: Believing You Are Right Even When You’re Not ,by Robert Burton, MD, takes this topic to a new level.  First, Dr. Burton discusses the evidence that the “feeling of knowing” arises from parts of our brain that we can neither access or control.  Then he discusses the implications of this finding, including the fact that it challenges long-held assumptions about the possibility of purely rational thought.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is include in this blog archive.

New Medical Interns Advice 9 mins – “Just a few days after the new EM interns start, today’s episode will talk about my advice to new EM interns.  Think of this as the “big picture advice” or a 30,000 foot view of how to approach EM residency.  I’ll talk about 4 major big picture points to keep in mind as you start your residency.  This will go way beyond “arrive early, stay late, and always keep learning” and expand on some big picture ideas of how to function well as a new intern.At the link right-click “Big Picture Advice to New Interns Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Events 33 mins – “In this episode, we discuss risk factors for opioid-related adverse events, naloxone (Narcan, Evzio), and a number of non-narcotic agents for neuropathic pain.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Peaceful Parenting with Dr. Laura Markham 59 mins – “Parenting expert and multiple best-selling author Dr. Laura Markham breaks down the three keys to successful parenting, how to properly model emotions and conflict resolution, and the coveted recipe for raising happy, resilient kids.” At the link right-click “Download as MP3 by right-clicking here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Perpetual Progress with Atul Gawande 78 mins – “World-renowned surgeon, writer, and researcher Atul Gawande (@Atul_Gawande) shares powerful lessons about creating a culture of safe learning, the critical difference between a coach and a mentor, and how to ensure constant improvement in key areas of your personal and professional life.” At the link right-click “Download as MP3 by right-clicking here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Politics and Power 12 mins – “In 2018, Tufts University political science professor Eitan Hersh asked a random sample of 1,000 Americans how much time they spend on political activities. “A third of Americans say they spend two hours or more each day on politics,” he wrote. “Of these people, four out of five say that not one minute of that time is spent on any kind of real political work. It is all TV news and podcasts and radio shows and social media and cheering and booing and complaining to friends and family.” In short, they are political hobbyiststreating politics like entertainmentIn a new book, Politics Is For Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change, Hersh explores what it takes to get engaged and examines who is responsible for broken politics. He and Brooke talk about the lessons he’s learned from organizers around the country, and what civic engagement really mean.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Predictably Irrational 45 mins – “Dan Ariely is a professor of behavioral economics at MIT and author of the bestseller, Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions.  He was my guest for Episode 19 of Books and Ideas. During the interview, he explains how his came to study human behavior.  He uses examples from his book to explore the question, “What makes a good experiment?”  He also discusses how he hope that his findings can help strengthen our society, despite our human tendency to make “irrational” choices.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

PTSD Guidelines 36 mins – “In this episode, we will review the surprising results of the VA/DoD’s 2017 Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of PTSD, particularly as it relates to the use of one particular agent, prazosin.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Raising Kids 122 mins – “Parenting expert and best selling author Barbara Coloroso (@BarbaraColoroso) shares her three foundational principles of child-rearing, how to get kids to be accountable for their actions, and what we can do as parents to raise confident, happy children.” At the link right-click “Download as MP3 by right-clicking here…” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reading Research 59 mins – “In her recent book Tales of Literacy for the 21st Century, Dr. Maryanne Wolf revisits some of the key ideas of her wonderful first book Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain. Since Dr. Wolf was one of my earliest guests back in BSP 29, I was eager to talk with her again. In BS 145 we touch on several key ideas. First, she emphasized again that reading is very different from language. All normal humans learn their first language, almost automatically as long as they are exposed to language during the critical period early in life, but reading is actually a cultural invention and must be taught. We explore the  implications of this distinction. Another important issue is that since our brain is plastic, how we learn to read makes a huge difference. Dr. Wolf is very concerned about the implications of the shift to digital media, not just for young readers, but for readers of all ages. But in Tales of Literacy she also explores how digital technology might be used to bring reading to children who might otherwise remain illiterate. ” At the link right-click “audio mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Reading Science 76 mins – “The latest episode of Brain Science (BS 136) is  discussion of Language at the Speed of Sight: How We Read, Why So Many Can’t, and What Can Be Done About It by Mark Seidenberg . Unfortunately I was unable to reach  the author, so this is a return the show’s early days when it was not dominated by interviews.  This book contains information that is important to anyone who cares about how children learn to read. One key theme is that there is a large gap between current reading science and educational practice. In this podcast we explore the relationship between spoken and written language, including a very important difference: spoken language evolved but writing is an invention: the original information technology. We revisit several of the topics that we originally explored back in BSP 24, but we also explore some new topics such as how written languages reflect the unique properties of their particular spoken languages.” At the link right-click “Click to listen to podcastand select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Santorini Wine with Panayiota Kalogeropoulou 18 mins – “The island of Santorini has not only has breathtaking views but also a fascinating history. Traces of its first inhabitants have been linked back to 4500 BC. In 1613 BC the most powerful volcanic event in the last 10,000 years took place – completely destroying all the islands within a 60 km radius. It has been estimated that 90 billion tons of molten rock was injected into the air, the sea swallowed the volcano, and a massive tsunami swept across the Aegean Sea. Along with the obvious devastation of nature, it is believed that the eruption also sealed the deal for the most civilized nation on the island at the time, the Minoans. Thanks to the thick layer of ash cause by the event, the Bronze Age settlement of Akrotiri was so well preserved that we are able to see how prosperous the area had once been with an elaborate drainage systems, multi-storied buildings, incredible wall paintings, furniture and vessels. The site has as much of a significant importance as does Pompeii. The island’s main volcanic rock, its mineral rich soil, and the amazing climate, has produced some incredibly unique wines. Santorini is known for some of the oldest vineyards in the world. And we know that wine is one of my favourite topics. On today’s podcast I speak with Panayiota Kalogeropoulou about Santorini’s wines. Panayiota is the Director at the Domaine Sigalas vineyard. Paris Sigalas, a mathematician with a goal to make his Santorini vineyard a world heritage site, focuses on grapes that thrive in Santorini (these include the Aidani, Athiri, Plantana – and the prime Greek grape Assyrtiko).” At the link right-click “Download this Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up me nu.

Saving Democracy 33 mins Bob Garfield, co-host of WNYC’s On the Media and the author of American Manifesto: Saving Democracy from Villains, Vandals, and Ourselves (Counterpoint, 2020), offers his analysis of the state of American democracy (not good) and six steps toward saving it.” At the link right-click the circle with three dots, then right-click “Download this audio” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Science Communication 48 mins – “The midterms are closer than we think – which is another opportunity to see where candidates stand on key science issues, from energy to funding basic research. We talk to Sheril Kirshenbaum, executive director of Science Debate (sciencedebate.org), a nonpartisan organization that asks candidates, elected officials, the public and the media to focus more on science policy issues of vital importance to modern life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Adams of Dilbert 56 minsToday on the Knowledge Project, I speak with Scott Adams (@ScottAdamsSays), creator of the Dilbert cartoon and author of multiple best-selling books, including his most recent Loserthink: How Untrained Brains are Ruining America. After a stalled career in the telecommunications and banking industry left Scott unfulfilled and uncertain of his future, he decided to try his hand at his childhood dream of becoming a cartoonist. As you’ll hear in this interview, Scott combined his unique talents with some hard work, persistence, some kind encouragement from a stranger, and a little luck, to transform his little cartoon into a syndicated powerhouse that’s recognized all over the world. Dilbert now appears in over 2,000 newspapers in 65 countries and is translated into 25 languages.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell Anemia Assessment 29 mins – “Today’s episode is on the evaluation and management of sickle cell anemia in the Emergency Department. Dr Jared Walker, a third year EM resident at the University of Florida Jacksonville, has written and recorded this excellent review of sickle cell disease. This episode will discuss how to properly assess patients with sickle cell, how to order the right labs and imaging, what red flags to look out for, how to control sickle cell pain, how to catch the various complications of sickle cell, and proper patient disposition.” At the link right-click “Sickle Cell Anemia Podcast” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Student Debt 25 mins – “In an unusual study on student debt, New York University anthropologist Caitlin Zaloom interviewed more than 160 people—students and parents—and got them to open up their financial books and talk about the toll of paying for college. The result is an often riveting book called “Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost.” For this week’s podcast, we talked with Zaloom about what surprised her most from her research, what she thinks should be done and how she has changed her thinking about saving for college for her own young children….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Synapses 62 minsDr. Seth Grant, director of the Genes To Cognition project in the UK, has been studying the molecular biology of the synapse for decades. This month marks his fourth appearance on Brain Science (BS 150). In his latest interview we discuss the findings of his latest paper in Neuron, and he also provides an overview of how this paper fits into his larger body of work. Longtime listeners will appreciate this update, but the material is also accessible to new listeners of all backgrounds. In earlier work Grant and his team discovered that vertebrate synapses are much more complex than those of invertebrates. Significantly, mammals appear to have the most complex synapses. These findings challenge the long-held assumption that the synapse is a simple, unchanging structure.” At the link right-click “audio mp3and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Terry Jones Dies 12 mins – “Jones, who died Jan. 21, co-founded the British comedy troupe in 1969, and went on to direct and co-star in the 1979 Python film Life of Brian. Originally broadcast in 1987.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thinking in Algorithms 19 mins – “My guess for this short episode of The Knowledge Project is a man who wears many hats. Ali Almosssari is a San Francisco based author of books on critical thinking and computer science education, and the creator of An Illustrated Book of Bad Arguments… …We talk about our most common logical fallacies, learning new skills, and making better decisions without deceiving ourselves.”At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Wine Lessons with Véronique Rivest 49 mins – “Véronique Rivest (@veroniquerivest) and I explore the fascinating world of wine, including an on-air tasting, tips and tricks for serving wine that will impress your friends and so much more.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Work Environment Improvement 59 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas is an interview with Rhodes Perry, author of Belonging At Work: Everyday Actions You Can Take to Cultivate an Inclusive Organization. Human beings are wired to be social, which means feeling like we belong is actually essential to our physical and emotional health. In this interview we discuss some of the obstacles to “Belonging at Work” and practical steps toward improvement. Rhodes also shares the Platinum Rule: Treating others like THEY want to be treated, which I think should be applied in all aspects of our life.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Writing Profession 43 mins – “Welcome back to Books and Ideas. I’m your host, Dr. Ginger Campbell, and this is Episode 61. It has been over a year since I released an episode of Books and Ideas, so I wanted to celebrate by having a very special guest, podcasting Hall of Famer, Mur Lafferty. We’re going to talk a little bit about her new book, Six Wakes, but we’ll also talk about Mur’s long-running podcast, I Should Be Writing, and I also asked her to share some of the highs and lows of her career so far. If you are an aspiring writer, this is an episode you won’t want to miss. I always enjoy talking with Mur, and even though this interview is fairly short, I think it’s one everyone will enjoy. At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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