Mining Digest 432: Alzheimers, Antibiotic Misuse, Anti-racism, Astronomy vs Catholic Church, Bayard Rustin and Segregation, Being Certain, Body Parts Farm, Brain Covering Tear, Carbon Offsets, College Behind Bars, Con Artists, Debtors’ Prison, Education Waste, Flying Cars, Foreign Policy, Gender Equality, Harvey Milk, Healthcare Fix, Homeless Myths, Homlessness Prevention, Infections, Journalism and Intelligence, License Bottleneckers, Meatless Meat, Medicare View by Conservatives, Meeting Improvements, National Archive Disruption, Secondhand Stuff, Surgery History, Trump and Racism, Uber Overview, Vagina Bible, Video Games Impact

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 720 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,030 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

African Safaris 22 mins – “This is an interview with my friend Jody Cole, founder of Wild African Rainbow Safaris. We explore how she built her business from the ground up based on her love of Sub-Saharan Africa. I think you will find her story inspiring.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimers 78 mins – “Everyone knows someone who’s survived cancer. But no one knows anyone who’s survived Alzheimer’s—until now. Alzheimer’s disease is a global pandemic and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Of the 326 million Americans currently living, approximately 45 million will develop Alzheimer’s disease during their lifetimes unless effective prevention programs are instituted. The 99 percent failure rate of Alzheimer’s drug trials underscores both the area of greatest biomedical failure and the need for a more complete understanding of the drivers (i.e., the root causes) of the disease. Despite these alarming statistics, it has now been demonstrated that early stage Alzheimer’s and its precursors, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), can be prevented and in some cases reversed.  Join Dale Bredesen as he presents a novel programmatic approach that identifies and targets the multiple contributors to cognitive decline. Based on his findings from over 30 years of research into the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases, this approach led to the first published reports of the reversal of cognitive decline. Currently, over 3,000 patients use the protocol described in these initial reports, with success that has not been described previously.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Anti-Racism 69 mins -”The struggle for racial justice is far from over. Inequality is built on many aspects ingrained in our society—history, law and culture. How do we confront this inequality embedded in American life? How can we play an active role in building an anti-racist society? National Book Award winner Ibram X. Kendi returns to INFORUM to deliver an honest critique of modern America and our own role in perpetuating inequality. In his new book, How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi holds up both a magnifying glass and a mirror to examine how to uproot racism from society—starting with ourselves.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Antibiotic Misuse 51 mins – “We can’t say we weren’t warned.  More than 75 years ago, bacteriologist Rene Dubos cautioned that misuse of antibiotics could breed drug-resistant bacteria – and he has been proved prescient.  In this episode: the rise of superbugs, why we ignored the warnings about them, how some are enlisting an old therapy to fight back, and whether we’ll heed history’s lessons in the face of a future pandemic.  Plus, a weird unforeseen effect of antibiotics being investigated at the Body Farm.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. 

Astronomy Cast 49 mins – “This episode of Books and Ideas features the return of Podcasting Hall of Famer, Dr. Pamela Gay. Dr. Gay is co-host of the long running show Astronomy Cast. As a professional astronomer she has dedicated her career to public outreach and she is very involved with the citizen science project Cosmos Quest. Her passion for science is contagious.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Astronomy vs Catholic Church 53 mins – “400 years ago, some ideas about the cosmos were too scandalous to mention. When the Dominican friar Giordano Bruno suggested that planets existed outside our Solar System, the Catholic Inquisition had him arrested, jailed, and burned at the stake for heresy. Today, we have evidence of thousands of planets orbiting other stars.  Our discovery of extrasolar planets has dramatically changed ideas about the possibility for life elsewhere in the universe.  Modern theories about the existence of the ghostly particles called neutrinos or of collapsed stars with unfathomable gravity (black holes), while similarly incendiary, didn’t prompt arrest, of course.  Neutrinos and black holes were arresting ideas because they came decades before we had the means to prove their existence. Hear about scientific ideas that came before their time and why extrasolar planets, neutrinos, and black holes are now found on the frontiers of astronomical research.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Audio Books Increase 32 mins – “As the audio revolution has unfolded, audiobooks and podcasts have existed largely in worlds adjacent, with the simplicity of a major retailer for audiobooks and a major source for podcasts. But change is upon us. The recent acquisition of multiple podcast networks is creating rivals in the world of podcasts. Meanwhile, audiobook publishers are evolving beyond their signature format with the development of original works that exist in a middle ground between audiobooks (longer) and podcasts (shorter). This coming collision of audiobooks and podcasts means more choice for consumers along with more confusion – and more opportunity – for publishers, authors, and other content producers. What’s driving the change is consumer listening behavior, as Michele Cobb of the Audio Publishers Association (APA) told CCC’s Chris Kenneally in October at the Frankfurt Book Fair.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Bayard Rustin and Segregation 53 mins – “August 28th, 1963 will forever be tied to Martin Luther King Jr.’s hallowed “I Have a Dream Speech.” This historic moment would probably have never come to fruition if it weren’t for a man standing in King’s shadow, Mr. Bayard Rustin.   Bayard Rustin was a man with a number of seemingly incompatible labels: black, gay, Quaker . . . identifications that served to earn him as many detractors as admirers. Although he had numerous passions and pursuits, his most transformative act, one that certainly changed the course of American history, was to counsel MLK on the use of non-violent resistance. Rustin also helped to engineer the March on Washington and frame the Montgomery bus boycott.  With such lofty achievements, why isn’t Rustin considered an icon of both Civil Rights and humanity?   Why is Rustin not synonymous with Civil Rights? How could a person who changed the course of American history not be a household name? Was he purposely kept out of the history books? On State of the Re:Union, host Al Letson normally sets out to take listeners to a specific place, but for this special, the program takes the audience to a specific time in history that shapes the way we live now. More than just a Black History Month special, we found his complex story one for all seasons.” At the linkk you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Being Certain 80 mins – “Neurologist and author Robert Burton talks about his book, On Being Certain, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Burton explores our need for certainty and the challenge of being skeptical about what our brain tells us must be true. Where does what Burton calls “the feeling of knowing” come from? Why can memory lead us astray? Burton claims that our reaction to events emerges from competition among different parts of the brain operating below our level of awareness. The conversation includes a discussion of the experience of transcendence and the different ways humans come to that experience.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link as” from the pop-up menu.

Ben Franklin’s World 39 mins – “This is an interview with historian Liz Covart about her highly respected podcast “Ben Franklin’s World.” We explore what it means to be an historian in the 21st Century and the challenges of sharing early American history via podcasting.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Body Parts Farm 50 mins – “We could choose not to pay income tax and suffer the consequences. But we can’t avoid death. The biological functions of all organisms eventually cease. But why should this be? Find out why animals die and meet one creature that is biologically immortal. Plus, a trip to the Body Farm where decaying bodies help science…how we might cheat the Big Sleep with drugs… why Mexican cemeteries look like villages… and a doctor’s fight against one of the world’s deadliest diseases.” At the link right-click “Download episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Covering Tear 44 minsAndrea Buchanan lost her mind while crossing the street one blustery March morning. The cold winter air triggered a coughing fit, and she began to choke. When the coughing finally stopped, she thought it was over. She could not have been more wrong. When she coughed that morning, a small tear ripped through her dura mater, the membrane covering the brain and spinal cord. But she didn’t know that yet. Instead, Andrea went on with her day, unaware that her cerebrospinal fluid was already beginning to leak out of that tiny opening. We talk to author Andrea J. Buchanan about her experience with a brain injury and how she used playing the piano to recover. Buchanan’s new book is The Beginning of Everything: The Year I Lost My Mind and Found Myself.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Carbon Offsets 49 mins – “Carbon offsets: They’ve been called everything from a band-aid solution to “the best thing a consumer can do right now.” A new service even offers customers a monthly subscription to offset their carbon footprint. Meanwhile, offset providers are scrutinized for transparency, and purchasers are criticized for using them as a get-out-of-jail-free card. In the race to bring carbon emissions to zero, are offsets a legitimate tool—or a scam to allow heavy emitters a way out of taking real action? What impact does purchasing offsets have on poorer communities?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

College Behind Bars 67 mins – “For 30 years, Lynn Novick has been directing and producing landmark documentary films about American culture, history, politics, sports, art and music. With co-director Ken Burns, she has created more than 80 hours of acclaimed programming for PBS, including The Vietnam WarBaseballJazzFrank Lloyd WrightThe War and Prohibition. This duPont–Columbia and Peabody-Award winning filmmaker’s new documentary series, College Behind Bars, reveals the transformative power of higher education through the experiences of men and women trying to earn college degrees while incarcerated. Executive produced by Ken Burns and produced by Sarah Botstein, College Behind Bars is Novick’s solo directorial debut and will air November 25 and 26 on PBS stations. The four-hour series, distilled from nearly 400 hours of cinéma vérité footage, explores the lives of a dozen incarcerated men and women as they struggle to earn degrees in the Bard Prison Initiative (BPI), one of the most rigorous and effective prison education programs in the country. In this era of mass incarceration, America is the world’s largest jailer, with more than 2 million men and women behind bars; 630,000 are released annually, and nearly 50 percent end up back in prison within five years, trapped in a cycle of imprisonment, release and reincarceration. Once commonplace in American prisons, higher education declined precipitously after 1994, when Congress ended federal Pell Grants for inmates as part of the Clinton crime bill. In the nearly 20 years since BPI began, more than 500 alumni have been released, and fewer than four percent have gone back. The program currently enrolls 300 men and women in six prisons and costs $6,000 per student per year, most of it privately funded.  Here’s a chance to get a preview of the series and hear a discussion with the filmmakers and formerly incarcerated BPI students featured in the film about the power of education to transform lives and benefit society at large.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Con Artists 44 mins – “This past week, Indre traveled to London and got her credit card number lifted on the airplane. And that made her feel like she was conned. So we called up Maria Konnikova, author of the new book “The Confidence Game: Why We Fall for It … Every Time”. Maria is a Ph.D. pyschologist from Columbia University, but is best known for her science writing in the New Yorker. Have you ever been conned? Some people who falls for scams, and we all do, seem to fall for cons over and over again. We explore why this is the case and what that means for our own psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Debtors’ Prison 51 mins – “Six months ago this week, Michael Brown was shot dead in Ferguson, Missouri.  Around the world, people wondered at the depth of anger and frustration that poured into Ferguson’s streets.  There are many strands to follow.  One goes to the municipal courts around St. Louis.  They are major money-makers for little cities like Ferguson.  Traffic fees and fines on many who are black and poor.  Jail time.  Lost jobs.  A sense of systematic oppression.  Debtors’ prison.  Now there’s reform talk.  It’s a national issue.  This hour On Point:  American justice and the rage in Ferguson.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dignity and Despair 80 mins – “Do you avoid certain neighborhoods deemed “unsafe?” What exactly gives them that reputation? And what might you find if you did not avoid a stroll through these places? That’s exactly what Chris Arnade, a former small town guy turned Wall Street trader, set out to do. He started in such neighborhoods in his New York home, and then took an epic road trip to better understand life in aAmerica in the “back row.” His experience turned into his new book, Dignity: Seeking Respect in Back Row America, also the subject of this week’s EconTalk episode.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Education Waste 69 mins – “Bryan Caplan of George Mason University and the author of The Case Against Education talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Caplan argues that very little learning takes place in formal education and that very little of the return to college comes from skills or knowledge that is acquired in the classroom. Schooling, he concludes, as it is currently conducted is mostly a waste of time and money. Caplan bring a great deal of evidence to support his dramatic claim and much of the conversation focuses on the challenge of measuring and observing what students actually learn.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Evolution 59 mins – “Books and Ideas is back with an interview of Jonathan Losos, author of Improbable Destinies: Fate, Chance, and the Future of Evolution. This fascinating book reveals the surprising world of experimental evolutionary biology. We explore how experiments both in the laboratory and in the wild are answering long-standing questions about how evolution works.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Expat Experience 61 mins – “What happens when you go abroad to live and work in another culture, surrounded by the strange sounds of a different language, different food, music and customs? What does it take to achieve a successful expatriate experience? Come and learn about the diverse experiences of 14 Americans who worked and lived in various countries—from England to Vietnam, Belarus to India. Learn about their challenges and how they finally adjusted and thrived in their foreign environments. Schickel presents the results of her recent qualitative research, conducted years after she herself experienced the expat life during her two years in the U.S. Peace Corps in Morocco, which inspired her continuing interest in these issues and led to her recently successfully defended dissertation.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Flying Cars 50 mins – “Blade RunnerStar Wars and “The Jetsons” envisioned futuristic worlds of flying cars and mile-high commutes. Now, dozens of companies are moving forward with airborne vehicles, including Airbus’ electric flying car and Uber’s helicopter taxi. Tesla is also hinting at a flying Roadster using rocket technology. Is taking cars off the road and putting them in the sky a realistic solution or just a techno-fantasy? What are the human, technological and regulatory barriers to this high-flying future? Are drones the first step in advancing battery and jet technologies that could reduce the growing carbon impact of aviation?  Join us for a conversation with Joby Aviation founder and CEO JoeBen Bevirt, Akin Gump attorney Jennifer Richter, former Voom CEO Uma Subramanian and “The Flying Car Radio Show” co-host Charlie Vogelheim on the future of personal flight in a changing climate.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Foreign Policy 64 mins – “This week: an episode we recently recorded live in Chicago, on a topic that’s a bit unusual for us: American foreign policy. A few important things have already changed since our recording. For one: President Trump’s decision to withdraw some U.S. troops from Syria, which scrambled the calculus for the U.S., as well as for the Kurds, Syria, Turkey, Russia and who knows how many other players, eventually. And then, even more recently, U.S. Special Forces closed in on ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, who reportedly then killed himself; this too happened in Syria. The Democrats’ impeachment proceedings have also accelerated, thanks to Trump’s interactions with Ukraine. So: this topic is a moving target, to say the least. In any case: we learned a lot, and hope you do too.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Free-market Economics 81 mins – “At the end of the Carter administration and throughout the Reagan Revolution, belief in the power of markets became America’s preferred economic policy doctrine. President Bill Clinton all but announced the triumph of free markets when he declared that “the era of big government is over.” President Barack Obama faced the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression and pushed a recovery plan that was more limited than many had hoped, seeming to protect the very sectors that had created it. By 2016, the economy was still uneven enough to play a role in Donald Trump’s election. Over the past decade, free-market economics (also known as neoliberalism) has been challenged and questioned on multiple fronts, particularly by the Democratic Party. With the Left making its voice heard as the primaries approach, many former Clinton and Obama officials are openly questioning a governing approach dominated by free-market economics. In his new book, A Crisis Wasted, Reed Hundt, chair of the Federal Communications Commission under Clinton and a member of Obama’s transition team, makes the argument that Obama missed an opportunity to push for a new progressive era of governance, a miscalculation that ultimately hobbled his administration. Hundt is not alone on this score. Former Clinton administration economist Brad DeLong, who is one of the market friendly neoliberal Democrats who has dominated the party for the last 20 years, believes that the time of people like himself running the Democratic Party has passed. “The baton rightly passes to our colleagues on our left,” DeLong wrote in a much-discussed Vox piece earlier this year.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Freedom to Read Foundation 17 mins – ““Reading Dangerously,” features excerpts from famous banned books. The Freedom to Read Foundation marks a half century of court battles to protect the right of free access to controversial books and other media in schools and public libraries. In 1969, the American Library Association organized the Freedom to Read Foundation as a legal defense fund fighting censorship and other challenges to free speech. That same year, 250,000 protesters marched in Washington against the Vietnam War; the Woodstock Festival attracted 500,000 spectators; and the trial began of the Chicago Seven, radical activists who were accused of inciting riots at the 1968 Democratic National Convention. At the annual ALA conference now underway in Washington, DC, the Freedom to Read Foundation is marking a half century of court battles to protect the right of American citizens to free access of controversial books and other media in schools and public libraries. A commemorative book, Reading Dangerously, will be launched too.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Gender Equality 56 mins – “Geena DAVIS: In my opinion, the biggest problem we have in the world — of all the problems that we have — is gender inequality. If we were able to fix that, so that women were no longer second-class citizens, I think it would impact every other problem that we have — hunger and the environment and war. I don’t mean to say that it will cure the other problems, but it would go a long way toward improving these other stubborn problems. I mean, women in most sectors of society — well, in every single sector — there’s big gender inequality. But as far as the leadership positions go, a lot of times, progress seems to stall out at about 20 percent. Congress is 20 percent women, and so many other areas of society are similar. So we’re not using, by any means, all of the talent of women. And the evidence has shown that if you correct that, and get all of the best minds working, things will improve. And women and men just have a different view of the world. There’s all these studies that show that when a body is more blended, where it’s not homogenous, it makes smarter and better decisions.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Harvey Milk 54 mins – “In honor of Pride month I am sharing an interview I recorded earlier this year with LGBT historian Lillian Faderman about her latest book Harvey Milk: His Lives and Death. Milk was the first openly gay man elected to public office, but unfortunately he was assassinated in 1978, after less than a year in office. We discuss some of the highlights of his short career and explore why many consider him the Martin Luther King of the fight for LGBT Civil Rights.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Healthcare Fix 52 mins – “In this Ninth Annual Lundberg Institute Lecture, Kenneth Kizer will provide an overview of the state of health care quality in the United States after taking a historical look at improvement strategies over the past 4,000 years. He will especially focus on the forces and strategies driving health care quality improvement in the past 20 years following several landmark events in the late 1990s. Despite these efforts, receiving high-quality health care remains illusory for many Americans. As the co-chair of the National Quality Task Force, he will then discuss the likely strategies to normalize high-quality health care over the next 10 years.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homeless Myths 61 mins – “If we build homeless housing, won’t that just attract more homeless people? I read an article about this cool thing they’re doing in Utah; why don’t we do that? What about tiny homes? We know the causes of and solutions to homelessness, but public opinion is based on anecdotes and personal observation rather than facts. This talk will look at some of the most common misconceptions and provide a nuanced, evidence-based response on one of the country’s most pressing issues.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homelessness Prevention 67 mins – “On October 8, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law the nation’s most far-reaching bills, which are designed to prevent homelessness, protect tenants from being evicted and make it possible to create new homes for many thousands of Californians. The work was made possible by a collaboration of diverse allies who are attempting to preserve existing affordable homes, protect the families in them and produce more housing at all income levels. They were joined by a broad coalition of elected officials, including Assemblymember David Chiu, who authored several of the recently passed bills and who has made preventing homelessness and providing affordable homes to all Californians one of his signature issues. While these represent important strides, some say a great deal of work still needs to be done. On November 4, The Commonwealth Club will host a panel discussion about the implications of this new legislation as well as what the future holds for addressing the challenge of homelessness and housing in the Bay Area.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Infections 26 mins – “Puscast: September 1 to 15, 2018. CD4 dont return to normal. Mumps and cheerleaders. More H. flu. PJP atovaquone resistance. I love Lucy. More including actual useful stuff.” At the link find the title, “Puscast: September 1 to 15, 2018.” right-click Download (for non ipod mp3 players)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Journaling Method 45 mins – “Episode 64 of Books and Ideas is an interview with Ryder Carroll, author of The Bullet Journal Method: Track the Past, Order the Present, Design the Future. He describes how he developed this popular method that combines to-do lists and journaling. I have never featured a “self-help” like title before, but I decided to make an exception this month because I have found bullet journaling to be an effective method for organizing my complicated life.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Journalism and Intelligence 64 mins – “As most long-standing news outlets have shuttered their foreign bureaus and print operations, the role of Global News Networks (GNNs) as information collectors and policy influencers has changed. Western GNNs are both untethered to government entities and able to produce accurate yet critical situational analyses. But due to the emergence of other GNNs owned or directed by national governments, the global news cycle has become thoroughly manipulatable. Kounalakis’ interviews with a diverse set of GNN professionals vividly depicts the momentous sea change that has occurred in global news production. He also traces the evolution of GNNs from the 20th century to now, revealing today’s drastically altered global news business model. Find out why countries such as Russia and China invest heavily in their news media, and how some GNNs operate in tandem with state strategies and diplomatic sensitivities. Get a firsthand look at how the global media is shaping policy and morphing the public’s consumption of information.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

License Bottleneckers 76 mins – “Dick Carpenter of the Institute for Justice and author of Bottleneckers talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a look at how occupational licensing and other regulations protect existing job holders from competition.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Longevity Project 68 mins – “The Longevity Project explores the drivers of the length of life. It also examines the quality of life in Mediterranean countries such as Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Croatia, Lebanon, Israel and Tunisia. A goal is to explain how the Mediterranean diet is a transnational, intangible asset that can prolong life when combined with biodiversity, healthy lifestyles, beauty and art. Eating together is the basis of the cultural identity and continuity of the communities in the Mediterranean Basin. The Mediterranean diet emphasizes the values of hospitality, neighborhood, intercultural dialogue and creativity, and it represents a way of life guided by respect for diversity. The Longevity Project features expert scientists, chefs, authors, researchers, celebrities and locals to discover the secrets of longevity. Recent film clips from Mediterranean locations will be screened and discussed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Math Education 48 mins – “Most high-school math classes are still preparing students for the Sputnik era. Steve Levitt wants to get rid of the “geometry sandwich” and instead have kids learn what they really need in the modern era: data fluency.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meatless Meat 59 mins – “If you haven’t tried a meatless burger yet, scarcity won’t be an excuse much longer. Plant-based meat is exploding in popularity, with fast-food chains and grocery stores now peddling various companies’ veggie patties. Plant-based meat companies used to be underdogs, but as Forbes reports, major food producers are betting big on what they see as the future of food. So what’s causing companies and consumers alike to think twice about the ubiquitous beef patty? A changing climate and swelling global population add up to grave concerns about our increasingly precarious food system.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Meatless Meat 63 mins – “What’s in our food and how it’s grown has a profound impact on the health of our communities. Schools and hospitals are an increasingly critical intervention point for food access and long-term food systems shifts. Food and health issues are set against a seemingly paradoxical backdrop: One in eight Californians face hunger because of distribution and incentive problems. At the same time, one in four Californians suffer from diet-related diseases, directly related to social inequality, poverty and food availability. Learn more from California leaders who are improving lives and working to ensure the success of ecological farming through the food reaches the forks of families.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.  

Medicare View by Conservatives 63 mins – “Though it’s not apparent in the media, there is support among conservatives for universal health care coverage. The preferred approach involves the use of market forces to control costs and activation of consumers to bring the benefits of competition to the health care industry. Avik Roy is a leading conservative thinker, writer and adviser to senior Republican politicians. Yet his views surprise many progressives. A fierce proponent of the use of market forces in health care, Roy is equally vocal about the need for health care to better serve disadvantaged Americans.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Meeting Improvements 44 mins – “In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mental Health Reform 70 mins – “Congressman Tim Murphy, Ph.D, believes in rebuilding the nation’s broken mental health system. As chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, Murphy conducted a year-long investigation with multiple congressional hearings, forums, interviews and research into why those who need help the most have been the least likely to get it. Dr. Murphy, who is also a clinical psychologist, will discuss his groundbreaking Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act (H.R. 3717).” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

National Archive Disruption 9 mins – “As George Orwell wrote in 1984: “Who controls the past, controls the future. Who controls the present, controls the past.” And with the impeachment proceedings behind him, President Trump is well on his way to securing the power he has sought all along. For proof, look to our recent past, which has already been blurred to soften political dissent: last month, the National Archives acknowledged making multiple alterations to photos of huge crowds at the 2017 Women’s March. And that doctored photo might just be the tip of the iceberg. Writing in the New York Times, Matthew Connelly, a professor of history at Columbia University, detailed new evidence that the National Archives is letting millions of documents from the Trump administration vanish. In this conversation with Bob, Connelly explains how these opaque policies might come to distort the record about Trump’s time in office.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nora Ephron 43 mins – “’A Few Words About Breasts,’ from May 1972, is Nora Ephron’s comic lament about how her late onset of puberty and earliest sexual experiences gave her a lifelong obsession with her breasts. Jessi Klein, head writer for “Inside Amy Schumer,” joins David Brancaccio to discuss Ephron’s famous Esquire story and its lasting influence on the way women perceive and voice themselves in writing and comedy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Oil Spill Affects 10 mins – “This week: Stingrays are especially affected by oil spills because they’re so good at smelling; and research into using a spicy cactus to treat pain.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Rwanda Genocide 52 mins – “Our lecture this week is titled “Moving On: Reconstruction and Reconciliation in Post-Genocide Rwanda.”  Our speaker is Anne Kubai, Associate Professor of World Christianity and Interreligious Studies at Uppsala University, Sweden.  The lecture was presented by the Boston University Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Secondhand Stuff 47 mins – “The need for used items to have a secondhand life is increasing both in the U.S. and around the world. We unpack where your used, discarded and donated stuff ends up after its left your possession.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surgery History 44 mins – “Arnold van de Laar, a surgeon in the Slotervaart Hospital in Amsterdam. uses his own experience and expertise to tell this engrossing history of surgery through 28 famous operations―from Louis XIV and Einstein to JFK and Houdini. We talk to him about his new book Under the Knife: A History of Surgery in 28 Remarkable Operations.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Textbooks Go Digital 13 mins- “In July, Pearson announced it would end the longstanding practice among textbook publishers of revising all active titles every three years according to a printing schedule. Instead, the British-based education publisher will employ a digital-first discipline for its publishing program. As textbooks give way to courseware, publishers will be looking for an education in 21st century business models. Publishing analyst and Michael Cairns recently examined the latest developments in the creation, sourcing, and delivery of textbooks. Administrators, instructors, and students, says Cairns, will increasingly demand all-inclusive and unlimited access to online educational materials (think, Netflix for textbooks). Such an all-access model naturally favors global players who already have won prominent positions in university library systems. Meanwhile, a fight looms over control of usage data. “It’s long been prophesized that the print textbook would disappear, but it’s actually taken quite a bit longer than I think people would have anticipated, especially when you look at the growth of eBooks on the trade side, or if you look at the transition from print journals to online databases that has taken place over the last 20 years now,” notes Cairns.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thoreau 53 mins – “This week, we have a lecture by Laura Walls, Professor of English at the University of Notre Dame. Professor Wall’s lecture is titled “Henry David Thoreau’s Legacy of Resistance and Hope,” and is presented by the Boston University College of Arts and Sciences.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and Racism 68 mins – “There are 2.2 million people in American prisons and jails—a 500 percent increase over the last 40 years. We have heard about the role of government policies and law enforcement practices that factor into the creation of this statistic, but we rarely hear about the individuals who interact most closely with putting these people in jail: prosecutors. Renowned journalist and legal commentator Emily Bazelon investigates the power prosecutors hold in the outcome of a case in her new book, Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution­ and End Mass Incarceration. Prosecutors are some of the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system, as they are virtually unchecked in their power to decide what to charge defendants with, how to set bail and determine the plea bargain. Bazelon shows how prosecution in America is at a crossroads and details both the damage that overzealous prosecutors can do as well as the second chances they can extend, if they choose. Join us for a conversation that investigates the unchecked power in the criminal justice system and identifies a possible solution to this mass incarceration crisis.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Uber Overview 67 mins – “Since its launch in 2009, ride-hailing service Uber has undergone major shifts to become a worldwide transportation network despite severe setbacks. Harassment allegations that led to the firing of 20 employees and the resignation of former CEO Travis Kalanick publicly embarrassed the company, yet Uber has grown to become the highest valued private tech company in Silicon Valley. In his new book, Super Pumped: The Battle for UberNew York Times tech reporter Mike Isaac delves into the ambition, excess and massive loss of Uber and Kalanick over the last few years. Isaac has nearly a decade of experience writing about technology industry in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has spent the past few years covering the controversial ascent of Uber and the company’s issues of workplace harassment, sexism and allegations of misconduct that reveal the problematic work culture of Silicon Valley tech companies. Join us as he narrates the deception and bad behavior of Uber that culminated in one of the most controversial periods in American corporate history.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Vagina Bible 67 mins – “In this age of clickbait, pseudoscience and celebrity-endorsed products, it’s hard to know what’s best for our bodies. Jen Gunter, ob-gyn and the Internet’s go-to doctor, is dedicated to debunking the myths, marketing and misinformation surrounding reproductive health. While much of the dialogue surrounding women’s health targets the shame or inexperience of women and girls, Gunter aims to educate and empower with both humor and evidence. Join Gunter in conversation with Mary Roach, author and popular scientist, to answer your burning questions about women’s health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Video Games Impact 69 mins – “Books and Ideas 68 is an interview with psychologist Dr Pete Etchells about his new book Lost in a Good Game: Why we play video games and what they can do for us. We explore both the myths and the science behind video games and consider why the effects of video games are actually quite difficult to study. It seems strange that many people in this field don’t play games themselves. Most of the bad things you have heard about video games do not stand up to the basic standards of good science. Whether or not you enjoy video games yourself this is a fascinating interview.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” from the pop-up menu.

Yoga Instructor Interview 66 mins – “Every breath you take has the power to heal, but learning how to breathe takes practice. In her book Breathwork, established yoga and breathwork teacher Valerie Moselle leads you through a practical program to boost your energy and physical health.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.