Media Mining Digest 437: American Comparison, Bacteria Control, Blockchain Discussion, Books Replacement, Brain Divided, Breast Cancer Story, Chinese Capitalism, Cloud Computing, Covid-19 in California, Covid-19 Lessons from China, Culture and Morality, Data Breeches in Law Firms, Disease Spillover Event, Economics in 21st Century, Economics Research Flawed, Electronic Discovery, FBI InfraGard, Genomics Sequencing, HIV Vaccine Research, Home Depot Founder, Hong Kong History, Improving the World, Malaria Discussion, Martin-Luther-King Jr, Native American Diet, Native Americans and Smallpox, Nuclear Bomb Security, Ocean Viruses, Pandemic Lessons, Pneumonia Discussion, Poverty Solution, Prison History in US, Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery, Recommendation Engines, Robot Law, Sex Trafficker Investigator, Telemedicine Discussion, Tuberculosis Discussion

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 199 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 27,750 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Alan Lightman Interview 72 mins – “Author and Physicist Alan Lightman talks about his book Searching for Stars on an Island in Maine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. This is a wide-ranging conversation on religion, science, transcendence, consciousness, impermanence, and whether matter is all that matters.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America Comparison 29 mins – “How Does America Compare to the Rest of the World? Last week we looked at how you might compare to the average American. This week we’re looking at how America compares to the rest of the world around issues of debt, college spending, retirement savings, and more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bacteria Control 43 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Carl Bergstrom of the University of Washington about the mathematics of microbes. Bergstrom is a mathematical biologist who probes the abstract nature of life itself. We talk about how life uses information, and how information can evolve. But in Bergstrom’s hands, these abstractions shed light on very real concerns in medicine, from the way that viruses jam our immune system’s communication systems to to the best ways to fight antibiotic resistance.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bioluminescence 42 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Bonnie Bassler, a professor at Princeton and the president-elect of the American Society for Microbiology. Bassler studies the conversations that bacteria have, using chemicals instead of words, Her research is not only helping to reveal how bacteria work together to make us sick, but also how we might interrupt their dialogue in order to cure infections.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Discussion 41 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Books Replacement 66 mins – “Software Engineer Andy Matuschak talks about his essay “Why Books Don’t Work” with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Matuschak argues that most books rely on transmissionism, the idea that an author can share an idea in print and the reader will absorb it. And yet after reading a non-fiction book, most readers will struggle to remember any of the ideas in the book. Matuschak argues for a different approach to transmitting ideas via the web including different ways that authors or teachers can test for understanding that will increase the chances of retention and mastery of complex ideas.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Divided 84 mins – “Psychiatrist and author Iain McGilchrist talks about his book, The Master and His Emissary, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McGilchrist argues we have misunderstand the purpose and effect of the divided brain. The left side is focused, concrete, and confident while the right side is about integration of ourselves with the complexity of the world around us. McGilchrist uses this distinction to analyze the history of western civilization. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussions of poetry, philosophy, and economics.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Breast Cancer Story 23 mins – “A 39-year-old woman gets diagnosed with breast cancer, then makes a decision that not only helps her survive — it changes the lives of hundreds of other patients and their families.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chinese Capitalism 35 mins – “A Westerner’s Guide to China – We’re joined by Motley Fool Analyst Ben Ra to discuss how China’s history influences its mindset on capitalism and business.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cloud Computing 32 mins – “The large volume of data that many law firms handle makes utilizing cloud computing services a very enticing prospect. What ethical standards should lawyers expect these companies to abide by? What should lawyers look for in a cloud computing provider? In this episode of The Digital Edge, hosts Sharon Nelson and Jim Calloway speak with Clio founder and CEO Jack Newton and Rocket Matter founder and CEO Larry Port about cloud computing and the new cloud security standards for legal professionals released by the Legal Cloud Computing Association. Larry explains what the LCCA is and how it formed out of a need to educate lawyers about what is happening in the cloud. Jack provides some insight into the creation of the security standards, such as terms of service privacy policies and encryption, and states that with these standards as a baseline lawyers will be able to more easily assess if a cloud computing provider is adhering to certain ethical standards. Larry also lists a few factors lawyers should consider, like where the SaaS data center is located, and the four things (vulnerability scans, penetration testing, and aesthetic code and dynamic code reviews) that the standards require in security testing. They both end the interview with an analysis of in-transit and at rest encryption and the benefits and drawbacks of zero knowledge level security.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 in California 20 mins – “San Diego County has Dr. Kristi Koenig as medical director of its emergency medical services. That’s fortunate for the county, because she’s co-edited a definitive textbook, “Koenig and Schultz’s Disaster Medicine: Comprehensive principles and practices.” We’re fortunate to have her as our guest. She’s full of sound advice on organizing a community’s response (for example, setting up “incident command” structures) and evaluating patients as new threats emerge (the well-known “three-I’s” approach — Identify, Isolate, and Inform). With the number of COVID-19 cases rising quickly there in San Diego, she’s been busy (as have all of you).At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Covid-19 Lessons from China 57 mins – “China was the first country in the world to experience effects from COVID-19. Now the epidemic there is slowing. How did the country of more than 1 billion people make it through? Technology played a big role. In this episode, Lydia Lee, Gary Liu, and Andrew McLaughlin join Vivian Schiller, executive director of the Aspen Digital program at the Aspen Institute, to talk over the kinds of technology that were launched or re-purposed to address aspects of the crisis. How did technology help keep the virus from spreading? How was misinformation handled online? Are there lessons that the United States can draw from? The views and opinions of the speakers in the podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Aspen Institute.” At the link find the title, “China, Technology, …” and right-click the play button to hear the podcast. A copy is also included in this blog archive.

Culture and Morality 67 mins – “Economist and author Arnold Kling talks about the economic impact of culture and morality with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Drawing on a recent essay on the importance of social interactions, Kling explores the role of culture and norms and their broad impact on economic life. At the end of the conversation, Roberts discusses the implications of human sociality for the way economics is taught and the way economists think about public policy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Data Breach Reports 24 mins – “In the aftermath of the Panama Papers data breach many law firms have become hyper aware of their digital security risks. With the number of breaches on the rise what can lawyers do to keep informed of the most pertinent risks facing legal practitioners? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek speak with Clark Hill PLC Of Counsel David G. Ries about data security, Mandiant’s M-Trends, and Verizon’s Data Breach Investigation Reports. David opens the interview with an explanation of what these reports are (summaries developed by security service providers on data breach trends during the past year) and talks about how they help to organize collected information for ease of use. He then analyzes the subtle differences between the two reports, like the way they define terms like data breach and security incident, and gives some insight into the ways each company acquires their data. David also covers the top three key findings provided by each report and gives examples of how this information can be invaluable to law firms seeking to shore up their security shortcomings. He closes the interview with his major takeaways from this year’s’ reports and tips for law firms on how this research can aid in strengthening your comprehensive cybersecurity program.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Breeches in Law Firms 29 mins – “’33% of Fortune 100 Organizations will experience an information crisis by 2017.’ – Gartner, an information technology research and advisory firm Recently, data breaches have become one of the most serious threats to companies worldwide, and as more corporate infrastructure moves online, studies suggest that the rising number of data breaches will cost 2.1 trillion dollars globally by 2019. Because of this, a new market of data breach practice groups has emerged to assist with e-discovery, information governance, data security, and preparation for high-risk technological emergencies. In light of this, what should your law firm or company do to prepare for one of these potentially imminent situations?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Disease Spillover Event 46 mins – “A spillover event occurs when a human is infected from an animal reservoir. Most spillover events are dead ends for the microbe. Only in a few events does the infected person lead to a transmission chain, in which other people are infected. Convincing funding agencies to conduct surveillance when no outbreaks are occurring is like convincing a healthy adult to buy insurance: a tough sell. Investment in surveillance is the most critical thing, however, to successful outbreak prediction. There is no shortage in the number of scientists who will measure these important parameters, when given the funding and resources, and their basic science observations are critical to predicting what happens when an ecosystem becomes unbalanced. Learning the aspects that grant one vector or pathogen a potential for spreading human disease helps researchers and public health officials to determine other vectors or pathogens that might have similar characteristics. Mapping these geographically can inform surveillance efforts and make a case for increased basic research to define these characteristics.At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Economics in 21st Century 64 mins – “Economist, blogger, and author Arnold Kling talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the state of economics in the 21st century. Kling argues that economics would be more useful if it took account of intangibles like culture, incorporated the role of financial intermediation in the economy, and modeled some of the the subtleties of the labor market–how wages are set and the role of team production.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economics Research Flawed 64 mins – “John Ioannidis of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his research on the reliability of published research findings. They discuss Ioannidis’s recent study on bias in economics research, meta-analysis, the challenge of small sample analysis, and the reliability of statistical significance as a measure of success in empirical research.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Electronic Discovery 24 mins – “Many of our listeners will know the term Technology-Assisted Review (TAR) by it’s more common nickname, “predictive coding.” Lawyers and judges alike need to pay attention to TAR due to potential changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) coming up in December 2015. And since almost all courts accept when lawyers utilize TAR for document review, it is important to keep up. In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Judge Andrew Peck, an expert in issues relating to electronic discovery. Together they discuss the current state of technology-assisted review, how FRCP amendments will affect the way lawyers do discovery, and best practices when using TAR. Judge Peck explains the origin of using “technology-assisted review” as terminology over “predictive coding” or “computer-assisted review.” He explains that training the TAR program effectively is important, but the technology has progressed to a point where TAR will be successful as long as the training is sufficient and the scope of the team is in line. Finally, since the predictive coding programs are very expensive he explains when a case is big enough to warrant its use. Stick around to the end for a tip on using Federal Rule of Evidence 502 in court.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

FBI InfraGard 24 mins – “InfraGard, one of the longest running outreach associations, represents a partnership between the FBI and the private sector. Members include businesses professionals (including many law firm employees), people from academic institutions, and local participants who share their experience and expertise with the FBI to assist in crime prevention. In the recent climate of rampant cyber security issues, many in the private sector are better equipped to fight these cyber threats. So why is it important for lawyers to know about and potentially join InfraGard? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview FBI special agent and InfraGard coordinator Kara Sidener about the way InfraGard works and why lawyers and other law firm professionals should be interested in joining this two-way information sharing platform.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Genomic Sequencing 56 mins – “Jonathan Eisen is a professor at the University of California, Davis Genome Center. Over the course of his career, he has pioneered new ways of sequencing microbial genomes and analyzing them. I talked to Eisen about some of the weirdest creatures he’s studied, such as bacteria that only live on the bellies of worms at the bottom of the ocean, and how we may be able to exploit their genomes for our own benefit. We also discussed the new movement for open access to scientific literature, a subject that’s a particular passion of Eisen, who is academic editor in chief at the open-access journal PLOS Biology.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play,” but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Government Innovation 67 mins – “Economist and author Mariana Mazzucato talks about her book The Value of Everything with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mazzucato argues that economists have mismeasured value and have failed to appreciate the role of government as innovator. She argues for a more active role for government in the innovation process and for government to share in revenue proportional to its role in the creation of new technology.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

HIV Vaccine Research 37 mins – “Why have scientists struggled to generate a protective HIV vaccine? Dan Barouch lays out the unique challenges and discusses the ongoing clinical trial with an adenovirus-based vaccine developed in his lab.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Home Depot Founder 14 mins – “Langone came from nothing to become a founder of The Home Depot, but never forgot his roots. He’s given staggering sums, but says his money isn’t truly charity. Discover a refreshing outlook that proves you don’t need riches in order to give richly.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong History 74 mins – “Neil Monnery, author of Architect of Prosperity, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book–a biography of John Cowperthwaite, the man often credited with the economic success of Hong Kong. Monnery describes the policies that Cowperthwaite championed and the role they played in the evolution of Hong Kong’s economy. How much those policies mattered is the focus of the conversation. Other topics include the relationship between Hong Kong and China and the irony of the challenges Hong Kong faced from U.S. and British protectionism.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Improving the World 72 mins – “Bjorn Lomborg, President of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, talks about the costs and benefits of attacking climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Lomborg argues that we should always be aware of tradeoffs and effectiveness when assessing policies to reduce global warming. He advocates for realistic solutions that consider the potential to improve human life in other ways. He is skeptical of the potential to move away from fossil fuels and argues that geo-engineering and adaptation may be the most effective ways to cope with climate change.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innate Immune System 16 mins – “Christine Biron is the chair of the Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Brown University in Providence, and she focuses her research program on the mechanisms of the innate immune system – the body’s system of non-specific munitions for fighting off pathogens.  Dr. Biron is also a newly elected fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology. When a pathogen gets on or in your body, your innate immune system is on the front lines, working against the pathogen is a non-specific manner.  In research, the innate immune system got short shrift for a long time, and only in the last 10 or 20 years has the field picked up momentum.  Dr. Biron says back when she was in graduate school “the innate immune system wasn’t thought to be very cool”, but she says the field is fast-moving today, in part because of some major discoveries involving Type-1 interferons, natural killer cells, and an increased appreciation of a wider range of antigen processing cells that link the innate and adaptive immune responses. In this interview, I talked with Dr. Biron about our increasing awareness of the innate immune system, why it’s important to bring microbiologists and immunologists together under one big tent, and why it’s best that a battle between a virus and a host ends not in victory for one and defeat for the other, but in détente.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insect Microbes 54 mins – “How many genes can a species lose and still stay alive? It turns out, bacteria can lose just about all of them! In this podcast, I talk to Nancy Moran of Yale University about her fascinating work on the microbes that live inside insects such as aphids and cicadas. After millions of years, they have become stripped down creatures that are revealing some profound lessons about how superfluous most genes are–at least if you live inside a host.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lincoln 55 mins – “Abraham Lincoln wasn’t the first lawyer to occupy the Oval Office (and he wouldn’t be the last). Lincoln came to national prominence after a long career settling disputes between farmers and representing litigious railway companies. So what did this enterprising lawyer pick up along the way and how did his legal career influence the President he became? Ed and guest host Lindsay Graham of the American History Tellers podcast explore the career of Lincoln the Lawyer.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaria Discussion 55 mins – “In this podcast, I talk with Irwin Sherman, professor emeritus at the University of California at Riverside, about the century-long quest for a vaccine against malaria. Scientists have been trying to make a vaccine for the disease almost since the discovery of the parasite that causes malaria. Yet decade after decade, they’ve encountered setbacks and failures. We talked about why it’s so hard to make a malaria vaccine, and how likely it is that scientists will ever be able to do so in the future. If you want to find out more about this long-running saga, check out Sherman’s new book, The Elusive Malaria Vaccine: Miracle or Mirage. About the Book – Chronicling a 100-year quest, this book tells the fascinating story of the hunt for the still-elusive malaria vaccine. Its clear, engaging style makes the book accessible to a general audience and brings to life all the drama of the hunt, celebrating the triumphs and documenting the failures. The author captures the controversies, missteps, wars of words, stolen ideas, and clashes of ego as researchers around the world compete to develop the first successful malaria vaccine.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Martin Luther King Jr 30 mins – “In 1968, just hours after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated, the legendary historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Garry Wills—then a young writer for Esquire—rushed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he watched as King’s body was embalmed at the mortuary, then later traveled twelve hours by bus with mourners to King’s funeral in Atlanta. Nearly fifty years later, Wills’s “Martin Luther King Jr Is Still on the Case!” remains one of the most revealing and lasting portraits of King and his turbulent era ever written. Writer and director John Ridley—who won an Oscar for his screenplay for 12 Years a Slave—joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why Wills’s wrenching portrait of King continues to resonate today, what has changed in America since it was written, and, most important, what still needs to change.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

More from Less 93 mins – “Andrew McAfee of MIT’s Sloan School of Management talks about his book, More from Less, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. McAfee argues that technology is helping developed nations use fewer resources in producing higher levels of economic output. The improvement is not just a reduction in energy per dollar of GDP but less energy in total as economic growth progresses. This “dematerialization” portends a future that was unimaginable to the economists and pundits of the past. McAfee discusses the potential for dealing with climate change in a dematerialized world, the non-material aspects of economic progress, and the political repercussions of the current distribution of economic progress.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Native American Diet 44 mins -”Lewis and Krithivasan Sankaranarayanan—“Krithi”– both from the University of Oklahoma in Norman talk with Jeff Fox about their analyses of the gut microbiomes of American Indians of Cheyenne and Arapaho ancestry. Lewis, Krithi, and their collaborators learned that the gut microbial taxonomic profiles of these Native Americans are characterized by a reduced abundance of anti-inflammatory bacteria and also that their fecal metabolite profiles are similar to those found in individuals with metabolic disorders. Although this was a random sampling from a generally healthy group of individuals, their gut microbiota suggests that some of them might have health problems brewing below the surface—not a surprise among a population prone to metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. “For three years, we collaborated with the Cheyenne and Arapaho to discuss these topics and identify common ground for the research process, including our microbiome data,” Lewis says. I don’t believe the microbiome pattern resulted from the genetics of the American Indian. It is likely related to the socioeconomic challenges and resource availability in rural areas of Oklahoma.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans and Smallpox 29 mins – “Paul Kelton of the University of Kansas, Lawrence, talks with Jeff Fox about the introduction of infectious diseases among Native American populations. Kelton’s book Cherokee Medicine, Colonial Germs: an Indigenous Nation’s Fight against Smallpox, 1518–1824, published in April 2015 by the University of Oklahoma Press, looks at how Native American communities responded to new diseases, including establishing quarantines, to protect themselves against smallpox and other diseases. He offers evidence that the high mortality rate ascribed to smallpox in native populations had as much to do with cultural factors and the ferment of trade and warfare during the colonial period, as to any lack of immunity to the new disease. Kelton also discusses the question of whether Europeans may have means to deliberately infect Native Americans.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Bomb Security 56 mins – “In 1942, American scientists created the first sustained, controlled nuclear reaction, under the bleachers of a football field. Needless to say, it was the beginning of a new era. On this week’s show, Brian, Joanne and Ed talk atomic power, and the indelible mark it left on American culture. Correction: The Nuclear Test Ban treaty wasn’t signed in 1958. Instead, the U.S. & USSR reached an unofficial moratorium on above-ground weapons testing. Both countries resumed above-ground testing in 1961, but ended it permanently when The Nuclear Test Ban treaty was signed in 1963.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ocean Viruses 27 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Curtis Suttle, a professor and associate dean at the University of British Columbia.Suttle studies the diversity and population of viruses across the entire planet. He has helped show that viruses are by far the most common life forms on the planet. They also contain most of the genetic diversity of life, and they even control how much oxygen we have to breathe. I talked to Suttle about coming to terms with the fact that we live on a virus planet, and how hard it is to find a place on Earth that’s virus-free–even two miles underground.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Pandemic Lessons 14 mins – “Perhaps the only good news from the tragic Ebola epidemic in Guinea, Sierra Leone, and Liberia is that it may serve as a wake-up call: we must prepare for future epidemics of diseases that may spread more effectively than Ebola. There is a significant chance that an epidemic of a substantially more infectious disease will occur sometime in the next 20 years; after all, we saw major epidemics during the 20th century, including the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918–1919 and the ongoing pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus. In fact, of all the things that could kill more than 10 million people around the world, the most likely is an epidemic stemming from either natural causes or bioterrorism….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photosynthesis 21 mins – “In this episode I speak to Sallie “Penny” Chisholm, the Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies at MIT. Dr. Chisholm studies photosynthesis—the way life harnesses the energy of the sun. Plants carry out photosynthesis, but so do microbes in the ocean. Dr. Chisholm studies the most abundant of these photosynthetic microbes, a species of bacteria called Prochlorococcus.  There are a trillion trillion Prochlrococcus on Earth. Dr. Chisholm researches these microbial lungs of the biosphere, and how they produce oxygen on which we depend. Along with her scientific research, Dr. Chisholm is also the author of a new children’s book, Living Sunlight: How Plants Bring The Earth To Life.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Pneumonia Discussion 24 mins – “In this podcast I talk to Keith Klugman, William H. Foege Chair of Global Health at Emory University. Dr. Klugman studies the disease that is the number one killer of children worldwide. If you guessed malaria or AIDS, you’d be wrong. It’s pneumonia. Two million children under five die every year from it every year–one child every 15 seconds. Dr. Klugman and I spoke about his research on how pneumonia causes so much devastation, its hidden role in the 50 million deaths in the 1918 flu pandemic, and how a new pneumonia vaccine can stop the disease in its tracks. For more information on pneumonia and how we can all help fight it, visit the World Pneumonia Day web site.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive. 

Political Partisanship 68 mins – “Political scientist Lilliana Mason of the University Maryland and author of Uncivil Agreement talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Mason argues that political partisanship has become stronger in America in recent years because it aligns with other forms of community and identity. People are associating primarily with people who share their political views in their other social activities outside of politics. As a result, they encounter fewer people from the other side. The intensity of partisanship can even overcome ideology as partisans change their policy positions in their eagerness to be on the winning side. The conversation closes with a discussion of what might be done to improve political discourse in America.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty Solution 76 minsPoverty activist, social entrepreneur and author, Mauricio Miller, talks about his book The Alternative with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Miller, a MacArthur genius grant recipient, argues that we have made poverty tolerable when we should be trying to make it more escapable. This is possible, he argues, if we invest in the poor and encourage them to leverage their skills and social networks. Miller emphasizes the importance of self-determination and self-respect as keys to helping the poor improve their own lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Prison History in US 38 mins – “(Contains archival audio in segments 1 and 3.) The United States imprisons more of its citizens than any other nation in the world. This month prisoners across the U.S. took part in a National Prison strike protesting how they are used as cheap labor, and calling for an end to “prison slavery.” In this episode, Brian, Nathan and Joanne reflect on the history of prison labor, and learn more about the challenges facing those behind bars.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Puerto Rico Hurricane Recovery 54 mins – “In August of 2018, officials in Puerto Rico reported that over 3,000 people died in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. One year after the disaster, Brian, Ed and Nathan take a look at the historical relationship between Puerto Rico and the United States. Are Puerto Ricans really Americans in the eyes of the federal government?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recommendation Engines 16 mins – “Agents and publishers want to find authors. Authors want to find readers. And readers, they want to find books. Helping make these discoveries happen is a powerful digital tool that evaluates writing styles and matches a work with books just like it. Inkubate is a data analytics platform expressly designed for authors to reach audiences with pinpoint accurate marketing. Research has shown that readers respond more to writing style than either genre or subject matter. The digital service at Inkubate “reads” a manuscript to find writing characteristics it has in common with other works. On social media platforms, authors then match their books with readers already inclined to like them. “We use very powerful algorithms to look for patterns within a manuscript,” explains Inkubate cofounder Jay Gale. “This allows us to hone on how an individual author uses the underpinnings of the construction of language. We then compare this to the pre-computed ‘fingerprints’ of thousands of manuscripts previously published in the marketplace, and we are able to measure the similarities to find the closest matches.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robot Law 23 mins – “From self-driving cars and drones to robotic surgeons and soldiers, humans are delegating more tasks to machines and software. But who is responsible when then these new innovations cause damage, injury, or death? Can we trust machines to prioritize preserving human life when accidents inevitably occur? Should we be thinking about sweeping regulations? In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview The Law of Robots Professor Ed Walters. Together they discuss our robotic world and potential future risks. Can humans keep up, will our laws protect us, and how worried should we be? Tune in to hear insight on these questions plus many more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sex Trafficker Investigator 24 mins – “In middle school, Emily Kennedy thought sex trafficking “was the worst fate I could think of.” Now she’s the CEO of Marinus Analytics, a tech company that’s helping cops send traffickers to jail.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Solzhenitsyn Discussion 60 mins – “Historian and author Stephen Kotkin of Princeton University and Stanford University’s Hoover Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the historical significance of the life and work of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Solzhenitsyn’s birth.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine 21 mins – “Has your clinical practice shifted to telemedicine yet? In the era of COVID-19, clinicians everywhere are being thrown into telemedicine, often without any experience or background knowledge. To help us all get up to speed with this patient care technology, Hippo Education’s Dr. Neda Frayha sits down with Dr. Edward Kaftarian, the Vice Chair of Mental Health at the American Telemedicine Association and CEO of Orbit Health Telepsychiatry. Together they explore the benefits and potential pitfalls of telemedicine, the equipment required, billing and coding considerations, appropriate etiquette, and much more.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trent Lott 25 mins – “Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott talked about how the Senate has changed since he left in 2007, what he thinks needs to be done to get both parties to work together, and lessons from Watergate, the Clinton impeachment trial, and some of the grand political bargains of the 1980’s and 1990’s.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tuberculosis Discussion 24 mins – “Ian Orme is a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology at Colorado State University, and his research focuses on the immune response to tuberculosis (TB) – a bacterial disease that most often infects the lungs. He’s speaking at the American Society for Microbiology’s Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE). In the U.S., TB seems like a thing of the past. Here, public health measures and medical care have all but wiped out the threat from this infection. But worldwide, the WHO says there were 9.2 million new TB cases in 2006 alone, and each person with TB infects an average of 10 to 15 people with the TB bacterium every year. These are just some of the reasons Dr. Orme is delivering a talked titled “Tuberculosis: Why Now Is a Good Time to Leave the Planet” at ASMCUE. He admits leaving the planet isn’t a practical suggestion, but he wants to raise awareness of the disease and he’s not afraid to stir the pot a little. Orme and his group not only study the immune responses to TB bacteria, they’re also following a number of different avenues for developing new vaccines and improving the existing vaccine, BCG (bacille Calmette-Guérin). In this interview, I talked with Dr. Orme about his vaccine work, why he thinks latent TB bacteria aren’t really latent, and how he sometimes feels like the wild-haired radical, cat-calling from the corner of the lecture hall.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Play”, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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