Media Mining Digest 439: Autism Scandal, Beatnik Culture, Daily Show Producer, Divorce and Money, E-Discovery, Farming Costs, Gambling Addiction, Georgia Civil Violence Cases, Impact Investing, Jet Blue Chairman, Kids and Money, Leon Panetta, Library of Congress, Low Income Housing in California, LSD History, Matter-Antimatter Rift, Meyers Leonard, Middle Class American Finances, Money and Couples, Native Americans in California, Olympian Brian Clay, Opium Addiction, Palestine Book, Panama Papers, Political Tribes, Poverty, Predictive Coding, Prisons in US, Processed Foods, Racism, Retirement Paths, Scott Explores Antarctica, Scott Goes Lunar, Scott Goes to Mars, Script Writer and Poet, Self Control, St Bernard Project, Undocumented Immigrant, Vietnam Conflict Project, Women and Money, WWI Myths

Exercise your ears: the 50 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 301 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,745 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 1 25 mins – “Aftereffect Ep 1: “Let me get this on camera” Only Human listeners, we’re here with a new podcast series that we think will be right up your alley. Aftereffect touches on the same themes of how health intersects with our lives everyday. Give it a shot. Let us know what you think. Just before 5pm on Monday July 18th, 2016, a 26-year old autistic man named Arnaldo Rios Soto walked out of his North Miami home. He had a silver toy truck in his hand. Hours later, his life would be changed forever. A passing motorist mistook Arnaldo’s toy for a gun and called 911. Police and SWAT arrived and the confrontation was captured in a cell phone video. The encounter left Arnaldo’s behavioral aide – a black man named Charles Kinsey — severely wounded, and it left Arnaldo in need of round-the-clock care. As a result, three police officers lost their jobs, including the now-former North Miami chief of police, Gary Eugene. In his words: “We blew it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 2 24 mins – “Aftereffect Ep2: “Suck it up, buttercup” The shooting left Arnaldo severely traumatized, unable to remain in the home where Charles Kinsey had taken care of him. The next day, he was involuntarily committed to a hospital psych ward, where days stretched into weeks into well over-a-month as the state of Florida struggled to find a new home for him. Eventually, Arnaldo finds himself in a new facility with a well-documented track record of abuse and neglect. It’s Halloween when we first meet Arnaldo face-to-face. Ironically, after everything he’s endured, the staff have dressed him in a police uniform costume.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 3 30 mins – “Aftereffect Ep3: “He was definitely a handful” Since the beginning, Arnaldo’s mother struggled to find adequate care for her autistic son. Her memories are often painful: the doctors who wouldn’t diagnose him; the staff who punched him, drugged him, tied his hands behind his back in a classroom chair. These early experiences shaped Arnaldo. In this episode, we talk with a number of people who’ve cared for him. They recount a sweet, affectionate young man who was also capable of violent outbursts and fits of rage. Hidden beneath Arnaldo’s story is a disability-services system starved of funding; facilities trying to squeeze every dollar out of their residents; and staff members willing to restrain their clients by any means necessary.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 4 19 mins – “Aftereffect Ep4: “I Baker Act you. You Baker Acted me.” The day of the shooting wasn’t Arnaldo’s first encounter with the police. In fact, they’d loomed large in his life for years before that. Even as he bounced from one group home to another, the people that consistently showed up for him, often in the worst way, were the cops.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 5 24 mins – “Aftereffect Ep5: “I need to believe” A year and a half after the shooting, there are signs of trouble at Arnaldo’s new home, Carlton Palms. The staff isn’t keeping an eye on him. There are unexplained injuries. His mother isn’t allowed to see his room and he’s being physically restrained in a full-body mat for getting out of bed at night. And yet, his family continues to hope that this is the right place for him.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 6 22 mins – “Aftereffect Ep6: “When they don’t behave” A cup of hot water thrown on a developmentally-disabled resident. Another kicked in the ribs. A tooth knocked out by a staff member. Carlton Palms had a dark history long before Arnaldo arrived. So why is the state of Florida so reluctant to close it?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 7 19 mins – “Aftereffect Ep7: “The man behind an empire” For decades, Carlton Palms’ elusive founder, Ken Mazik, has wielded his power and influence to sway members of Congress and state legislatures into bending the rules in his favor, from scuttling laws that would have limited the use of physical restraints, to securing leeway from the state of Florida in order to amass a fortune in Medicaid funding. As one of his former employees told us, “Ken Mazik made millions of dollars tying up little kids.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Autism Scandal at Carlton Palms 8 23 mins – “Aftereffect Ep8: “They call him Cheese” One day in February, a group of staff packed up Arnaldo’s belongings, moved him out of Carlton Palms and into a three-bedroom house in a suburban neighborhood. On its face, it’s the type of setting disability advocates strive toward. Arnaldo has his own bedroom, more autonomy, a staff that looks after him. At the moment, Arnaldo is the only resident. He’ll eventually share the house with two other men, but just days before the first is slated to join Arnaldo, he dies – under suspicious circumstances in the care of Carlton Palms.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Beatnik Culture 38 mins – “William Rorabaugh, who teaches a class on the counterculture of the 1950s and 1960s in America, talked about the literature, clothing, music and world view of the beats and beatniks of the ’50s and the hippies of the ’60s. He also talked about the spread of LSD and the prevalence of drugs in hippie culture.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Daily Show Producer 22 mins – “Bradley Paul’s words are money. He’s written for some of Hollywood’s best television studios, and his credits include AMC’s hit drama “Better Call Saul” and the upcoming “Lodge 49.” But is he getting paid what he’s worth? This is the question we pose to a poet and writer who went from a cash-strapped childhood in Baltimore to a career in Hollywood, but almost gave up along the way.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Divorce and Money 22 mins – “Very few Americans get married with the expectation that their marriage will end in divorce. But despite all our optimism and good intentions, forever often turns out to be shorter than we hoped.According to recent government statistics, over 800,000 divorces and annulments take place every year in the US. Only about half of marriages last twenty years or more. On the surface, Margaret and Leif Jacobsen might sound like a typical divorced couple. They met in college, married soon after, had children, and things were great— until they weren’t. Eventually they both realized that in order to move forward, they would need to go their separate ways. It was a difficult and emotional decision, one compounded by the big question: How do we handle the money? Their unconventional solution has helped them to remain close friends and co-parents.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

E-Discovery 11 mins – “The Association of Certified E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS) is a member organization that offers certification and a community for professionals working in the field of e-discovery, both in the public and private sectors. Recently, experienced e-discovery service provider and industry leader Mary Mack was named the executive director of ACEDS. What will change and what are her future plans for the organization? “ At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Farming Costs 23 mins – “On Open Account, our guests get honest about how they live in harmony with their money—or try to. As a farmer in California’s Central Valley, Jagpaul Badhesha knows all about harmony. His business relies not just on financial harmony, but harmony with nature. With over 1,000 acres of grapes, almonds, and other California staples, Jagpaul’s income is at the mercy of everything from weather patterns, to the California property market, to China’s growing middle class.  The Badhesha family has been farming for generations. Jagpaul’s great-uncle came to California from India, and labored on other people’s farms to earn enough money to buy his own land. By the 1970’s, Jagpaul’s father had one of the largest Indian-owned farms in the country—until he lost everything during a few years of bad luck. Growing up, 32-year-old Jag saw his parents work tirelessly to rebuild what they’d lost. It’s part of why he’s so committed to carrying on the family business, despite the challenges.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Gambling Addiction 22 mins – “Money is one of the toughest subjects for families to talk about openly. We all make financial choices we regret, and it’s not easy to own up to those choices, especially to the people we love. As difficult as these conversations are, they’re also profoundly necessary; secrets about money are often devastating to families. On this episode of Open Account, three siblings share a deeply personal story, of how a bitter financial secret nearly destroyed their family’s livelihood. Growing up, all three remember their mother as quiet and frugal, while their father was a gregarious entertainer. Both parents worked hard to support the family; Mom was a nurse, and Dad owned a bar in their small town in the Pacific Northwest. As adults, all three siblings learned the truth: Dad had a gambling addiction, which both parents had hidden. Over the years, he squandered the entire family fortune…At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Georgia Civil Violence Cases 68 mins – “Professors Hank Klibanoff and Brett Gadsden talked about the intersection of Civil Rights politics and violence in mid-20th century Georgia. They talk about a number unsolved murders during the segregation-era and the Georgia Civil Rights Cold Cases Project.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Impact Investing 23 mins – “Nancy Pfund is a venture capitalist in San Francisco who believes in “impact investing:” putting her capital towards business ventures that do just as much for the planet as they do for her portfolio. Nancy’s firm is even named DBL Partners, as in “double bottom line.” The double bottom line refers to DBL Partners’ mission: to invest in companies that deliver financial returns while making the world a better place. Along with big names like Tesla, Nancy has backed solar energy companies, healthcare innovators, and sustainable healthy food providers. As a woman in a competitive male-dominated field, she often found she had to work twice as hard to gain investors’ trust. And she met plenty of skepticism when she pitched her vision for a new kind of business, that paid human dividends as well as financial ones. It wasn’t always easy to convince other venture capitalists that investment was about more than dollars and cents, “Some people thought it was nuts, others thought it was visionary,” says Nancy.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Jet Blue Chairman 49 mins – “How did the CEO of a real estate development company become chairman of an airline? How can a competent manager learn to trust his subordinates? Joel Peterson, Chairman of the Board at JetBlue Airways and author of The 10 Laws of Trust, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his career at Trammell Crow and JetBlue and how the concept of trust, outlined in his book, has helped his career. He closes the conversation with a discussion of how he overcame his personal weaknesses that would have handicapped his career–or as he puts it, how he “rewrote his operating system.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kids and Money 19 mins – “Before it looms too large in their lives, kids spend a few years making sense out of money – its made-up symbolism, mysterious behavior, and larger than life power. They see it operating in their parents’ work, at the store, at school and in images of fame and fortune. At its heart, kids understand that money connotes worth, power and freedom – but that it can also empty our lives of meaning and connection. In this episode, we handed the mic over to kids from 5 to 9 years old to discuss the role of money in their lives, and in their imaginations.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Leon Panetta 20 mins – “Our guest this week is former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta. We discussed his time as CIA Director during the first term of the Obama Administration and the process of transitioning the agency from one presidency to another. We also spoke about his advice for new Secretary of Defense, retired General James Mattis, the changes he’s seen during the nearly 40 years he’s spent in politics, and the importance of the President getting honest – often unvarnished – advice from his cabinet members and his White House staff.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Library of Congress 17 mins – “The largest library in the world contains more than 168 million items, with materials in some 470 languages, and is located in Washington, D.C. The Library of Congress, situated right behind the U.S. Capitol Building and just steps from the Supreme Court of the United States, is a popular spot in D.C., beloved for its ornate ceilings, historic reading room and, well, everything it represents….The Teacher-in-Residence program is about 20 years old, and it invites one U.S. teacher to spend a year at the Library of Congress researching, writing and seeking out primary sources that K-12 teachers across the country could use in their classroom lessons. Then the library makes that source material available and easily accessible to all. Past Teachers-in-Residence include a middle school science teacher, a kindergarten teacher and a performing arts teacher, but for this year’s program, the library specifically wanted to bring on a civics teacher to build out its digital collection of civics-focused curriculum materials…. This interview was conducted at the library back in February, before the COVID-19 outbreak restricted in-person meetings, and when it was still conceivable to think and talk about things other than the global pandemic.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Low Income Housing in California 41 mins – “California faces a shortfall of roughly 1.3 million housing units for its lower-income residents. That’s a massive gap to fill even if it was cheap and easy to construct new housing in California. But low-income housing subsidized by public dollars is especially pricey to build in many parts of the state. How pricey? Well, in the case of the Pearl, a small apartment complex a developer hoped to build in Southern California, each unit would cost $1.1 million to build. “People have some idea that building affordable housing has some basis in reality. It doesn’t,” said Ginger Hitzke, the Pearl’s developer who now says the project will almost certainly not be built because of the extravagant cost. “Take everything you know about real estate, anything you’ve learned, anything you really know, and now throw it out the window.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

LSD History 48 mins – “ Journalist and author Michael Pollan talks about his book, How to Change Your Mind, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Pollan chronicles the history of the use of psychedelic drugs, particularly LSD and psilocybin, to treat addiction, depression and anxiety. He discusses his own experiences with the drugs as well. Much of the conversation focuses on what we might learn from psychedelic drugs about their apparent spiritual dimension, the nature of consciousness, and the nature of the mind.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Matter-Antimatter Rift 8 mins – “In the same underground observatory in Japan where, 18 years ago, neutrinos were first seen oscillating from one “flavor” to another — a landmark discovery that earned two physicists the 2015 Nobel Prize — a tiny anomaly has begun to surface in the neutrinos’ oscillations that could herald an answer to one of the biggest mysteries in physics: why matter dominates over antimatter in the universe. The anomaly, detected by the T2K experiment, is not yet pronounced enough to be sure of, but it and the findings of two related experiments “are all pointing in the same direction,” said Hirohisa Tanaka of the University of Toronto, a member of the T2K team who presented the result to a packed audience in London earlier this month….” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Meyers Leonard 19 mins – “On Open Account, we’re determined to share the diversity of experience around making, losing, and living with money in America. Many of our guests share stories of life without enough to go around, and Portland Trailblazer Meyers Leonard is no different. After he lost his father when he was six, his mom struggled through poor health to provide for him and his brother. But then Meyers was drafted to the NBA, and in his early 20’s he found himself wealthier than he’d ever imagined….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Middle Class American Finances 20 mins – “Neal Gabler’s cover story about the hidden financial struggles of the middle class sparked a firestorm of attention. Here, we talk with him about the personal story behind his revolutionary confessional, and how it feels to live the truth.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Money and Couples 25 mins – “At Umpqua Bank, we know every marriage is unique, just like the financial sharing that goes along with it. We’re focusing this episode of Open Account on money’s role in a marriage. Our host, SuChin Pak, sits down with Meaghan Wright and Sam Huff to ask the tough questions on marriage, money and balancing their life with their two very successful small businesses, Tanner Goods and Mazama Wares based in Portland, Oregon….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native Americans in California 50 mins – “Professor Ashley Riley Sousa talked about Native Americans and capitalism in early 19th century California. She focused on local tribes’ commercial interactions with Spanish missions and fur traders. She also talked about the commodities these groups exchanged, such as livestock, fabric, fur, beads, and fish.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Olympian Brian Clay 22 mins – “Bryan Clay’s story is far from ordinary, but the highs and lows of his journey are familiar to anyone who’s coped with a job change. In 2008, Bryan won gold at the Beijing Summer Olympics in the decathlon, earning him the title of “Greatest Athlete in the World.” He traveled in private jets and juggled sponsorships from heavy hitters like Nike and BMW. But at the 2012 Olympic Trials, Bryan failed to qualify. In just a few months, Bryan lost his spot on the Olympic team, nearly his entire life savings, and most of his sponsorships. He lost his livelihood. How do you bounce back from that? When you’ve worked for something your whole life, and you have a family that depends on you, a job loss can feel like a loss of identity, as well. Bryan recalls, “I had three thousand dollars before I was going to have to empty my 401K. I remember going through this, I’m in a panic and depressed and I’m just trying to survive at this point. And my wife says ‘listen, it doesn’t matter. As long as we’re healthy and we’re together, we’ll be fine.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Opium Addiction 32 mins – “Professor Elizabeth Gray talked about the use of and public opinion on opium and laudanum in the 19th century. Professor Gray described how most laudanum addicts at the time were upper class women who had originally been prescribed the drug by their doctors. She argued that since men at the time were less likely to seek medical attention, and it was more socially acceptable for them to drink, a gender divide was created between alcoholics and opium addicts.” At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Palestine Book 21 mins – “Books and Ideas #8: Palestine by Jimmy Carter. President Jimmy Carter’s book Palestine: Peace not Apartheid has raised the ire of many pro-Israel Americans. Why? Because he dares to point out the blight of the Palestinians. In this podcast, I discuss what I learned from this book and why I think Americans should read this book for themselves.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Panama Papers 20 mins – “Nuix Chief Technology Officer Stephen Stewart sits down with Sharon Nelson and John Simek to discuss the Panama Papers, the world’s largest data breach.2.6 terabytes of information spanning over forty years of a Panamanian law firm’s life was leaked to a German newspaper and subsequently, the world. What questions does this raise about a law firm’s responsibility for the loss of client/customer data? What lessons can we learn about security as a result of this firm’s data being compromised? In this episode of the Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek chat with Nuix Chief Technology Officer Stephen Stewart about the Panama Papers, the world’s largest breach of information. Stephen explains that a law firm in Panama named Mossack Fonseca had 2.6 terabytes of information taken from them by an anonymous party, who then gave that information to the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ). The leaked data contained 11.5 million items that consisted of roughly 5 million emails, 3 million databases, 2 million PDF files, and 1 million images. In an attempt to understand and further investigate the received data, SZ then contacted the International Consortium of Investigative Reporters (ICIJ). Stephen talks about what the ICIJ is (basically an international network that includes 165 investigative journalists over 65 countries) and how Nuix’s software was utilized to aid in the data analysis. The group discusses the authorities’ later raid on the law firm’s office and what evidence the digital forensics experts and financial analysts might be looking for. Stephen closes the interview with an summary of the practices that this breach sheds light on, like who the beneficiaries of offshore funds really are and what significant revelations might come from this particular breach.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Political Tribes 46 mins – “Helen Pluckrose and James Lindsay talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their essay on the enemies of modernity. Pluckrose and Lindsay argue that modernity–by which they mean democracy, reason, and individual liberty–is under attack from pre-modern and post-modern ideological enemies. They discuss why modernity is under attack and encourage people on the political left and right to support modernity.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Poverty 22 mins – “Our goal with Open Account has always been to talk to people about their relationship to money: how they use it, sometimes lose it, the way it changes beliefs, affects relationships and everything in between. From compelling stories about handling money after divorce, to the work it takes to achieve the American Dream, we’ve covered it all. But we’ve never talked about what it means to have never had money at all, and not know if you ever will. On this episode, we’re diving headfirst into what it’s like to live in poverty. Our host, SuChin Pak, sits down with Dr. Donna Beegle, a rare academic that can actually speak from experience. The only person in her family who has never been incarcerated, Dr. Beegle had only ever known poverty. At 26, she couldn’t read a newspaper. Today, she’s one of the most powerful voices in the conversation around poverty in America, and there’s no one better to speak with authority about what it takes to break the cycle.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Predictive Coding 22 mins – “Discovery, as all lawyers know, is the process of collecting and exchanging information about the court case to prepare for the trial. Traditionally, this was done by many lawyers over countless billable hours in which every page of potential evidence was examined for important information. Because of this, the more information existed in reference to a case, the more expensive the case was. As technology developed, law firms began using computers to do keyword searches and conceptual searches. Unfortunately, there were problems including picking the right keywords or concepts, misspelled words, how to structure the items, and that these searches only yielded 20% of important data. Recently, technology has advanced to predictive coding, or teaching a computer program to think like a lawyer would. But how cost effective and practical is predictive coding, and how well does it actually work? In this episode of The Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss the evolution of technology and case discovery, how predictive coding works and is priced, and examples of cases that have involved predictive coding. Simek first explains the importance of culling, or filtering out unimportant data sets through DeNISTing, deduping, or filtering by dates. He then explains predictive coding in its simplicity: to feed a computer program information based on discovery attorneys have already done until the computer can accurately predict which information is important….Nelson concludes the podcast by giving examples of when predictive coding has already appeared in court cases. The landmark case was Da Silva Moore v. Publicis Groupe, in which Magistrate Judge Andrew Peck allowed predictive coding to be used as long as the defense and prosecution agree to its use, there are a large volume of documents, it is the superior technology, it is more cost effective, and it is transparent and defensible. Inevitably, the conclusion is that it is not for the judge to micromanage the discovery process.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Prisons in US 48 mins – “Professor Dan Berger talked about the U.S prison system in the late 20th century and the politics behind it. He spoke about how mass incarceration arose in response to the unexpected ways prisoners joined in the Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1960s and 1970s. He also described the role of activist prisoners, such as George Jackson, whose prison letters were published and shed light on problems with the justice system.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Processed Foods 18 mins – “Have you ever wondered how chicken nuggets are made? Or what propylene glycol monostearate, monocalcium phosphate, or other listed ingredients are doing in your favorite packaged snacks? Distillations hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy certainly wondered, and they went to the corner deli to inspect some processed food themselves. They also spoke with experts Bryant Simon, a historian, and David Schleifer, a sociologist, about how trans fats and chicken nuggets arrived on the food scene as the healthier options, but have since turned into villains. Both Simon and Schleifer suggest that when it comes to deciding what we eat, we might have less choice than we think. Class, geography, and convenience (for both food makers and food eaters) all play a role.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 1 37 mins – “We wrap up the show with Anna Holmes, Baratunde Thurston, and Tanner Colby reflecting on what they’ve learned through this experiment in multiracial dialogue, and the ways in which we can’t talk, don’t talk, would rather not talk, but intermittently, fitfully, embarrassingly do talk about culture, identity, power, and privilege in our most-definitely-not-yet-pre-post-yet-still-very-racial society.” At the link right-click “Listen with MP3 player” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 2 26 mins – “Anna Holmes, Tanner Colby, and Fazeelat Aslam discuss listener feedback to episode #1701: “Will You Be My Black Friend?” At the link right-click “Listen with MP3 player” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Racism 3 36 mins – “Hosts Baratunde Thurston, Raquel Cepeda, and Tanner Colby discuss the media’s treatment of recent events in Baltimore; why black women, Latinos, and Native Americans are being left out of the current debate on police brutality; and a new study on race, neighborhoods and social mobility.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Retirement Paths 27 mins – “You don’t have to be just starting your career to be intimidated by the prospect of planning for retirement. But the good news is that it’s never too late to start.  The first step in facing your long-term financial future is talking about it. That’s where Open Account comes in. Our mission is to demystify money by having open, honest conversations about the way it affects our lives, both now and in the years to come. One thing is certain: not everyone follows the same path to retirement. That’s what we learned on this week’s episode of Umpqua Bank’s podcast. One of our guests worked at a burger joint. The other is a lawyer. Both have made retirement a financial priority—they’re just choosing to get there in two very different ways….”  At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Scott Explores Antarctica 12 mins – “In recent years, much has been written about Scott the polar loser and bungler. But that personalised focus ignores the pioneering scientific research and discoveries. The revelations transformed Antarctica from an unknown quantity on the map into a profoundly important continent in the Earth’s past and present. Before Scott and Shackleton trekked across the vast ice sheets in the early 1900s, no-one was sure whether there was even a continent there. Some geographers had suggested Antarctica was merely a vast raft of ice anchored to a scattering of islands. The science teams on Scott’s expeditions made fundamental discoveries about Antarctic weather and began to realise the frozen continent’s fundamental role in global climate and ocean circulation. They discovered rocks and fossils which showed Antarctica was once a balmy forested place. They mapped the magnetism around the South Pole for both science and navigators. They found many new species of animals and revealed the extraordinary winter breeding habits of the penguins. The dedication to scientific discovery is most poignantly revealed by fossils that Scott’s party collected after their disappointment of being beaten by Amundsen and a few weeks before they froze to death trudging across the Ross ice shelf. They found a particular plant fossil which had been one of the Holy Grails on the early explorations of Antarctica’s interior. Its discovery proved an hypothesis raised by Darwin among others that all the southern continents were once linked together by a landmass that would lain where Antarctica is today. The fossils were also important evidence to support the new and controversial theory of Continental Drift – a theory which now underpins the entirety of modern Earth science.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Goes Lunar 12 minsOne hundred years ago, Scott reached the South Pole. However, more than four decades passed before people went back there. On the Moon, Neil Armstrong took his leap for mankind in 1969 and it has been forty years since the last astronaut left the lunar surface. Presenter Kevin Fong talks to space scientists and historians to find out if Robert Scott’s Antarctic exploits provide a road map for future human exploration of the Moon and the planet Mars. Imperial and geopolitical motivations lay behind both South Polar exploration and the effort which took humans briefly to the lunar surface. But what would get us back to the Moon – would it be geopolitical rivalry or science? In times of economic austerity (in the West at least), what scientific questions are important enough to justify exploration of the Moon? The six short Apollo visits to the lunar surface were enough to crack the mystery of how the Moon itself formed – namely that a Mars sized planet crashed into the early Earth. The molten rock that was blasted into orbit by that collision coalesced as our lunar neighbour. Sending astronauts back to explore the rocks of the Moon could solve the most important mysteries about the early Earth – when did life first evolve and under what sort of conditions? Their findings could also settle the questions about the origins of our oceans here on Earth ” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scott Goes to Mars 12 mins – “One hundred years ago, the first humans reached the South Pole of this planet. More than 40 years ago, man first walked on the moon. When will our species first set foot to explore the planet Mars? Kevin Fong seeks a likely launch date. He asks who will get us there and why we really need to explore the Red Planet.” At the light right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Script Writer and Poet 22 mins – “At Umpqua Bank, we understand that not everyone’s financial or professional goals are the same. That’s why we’re using our podcast to start tough conversations about money and personal finance, to inspire listeners to take charge of their finances without shame or hesitation. In this episode of Open Account, host SuChin Pak talks to writer and poet Bradley Paul about the ups and downs of his career, and how he’s balanced his creative aspirations with the financial needs of himself and his family….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Self Control 12 mins – “Neurophilosopher Pat Churchland discusses the nature of self-control and the light that neuroscience can throw on its mechanisms in conversation with Nigel Warburton.” At the link you can listen by clicking “Listen to Pat Churchland on Self Control;” however, a copy of the podcast is also included in this blog archive.

St Bernard Project 13 mins – “Reese May joined the Marine Corps Reserves at 18 and turned 21 in western Iraq. When he heard about Veterans Corps at the St. Bernard Project, he felt like it had been designed just for him. He interviewed in mid-September and went to work the following Monday. “I thought I wanted to be a site supervisor, but they asked me to take a more analytical position,” he says. “I told them, ‘I want to do whatever you think will make me help best.’ May works on a computer at the St. Bernard Project headquarters, sorting and tracking information from the beginning to the end of each rebuilding project and looking for ways to make each step more efficient. He’s also in charge of filing all building permits. He has no idea what his title is. “I work with an incredible group of people who are more focused on what needs to be done than on titles”. He says being part of Veterans Corps feels fantastic.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Undocumented Immigrants 27 mins – “In this episode of Open Account, SuChin Pak talks money with two young immigrants, Daniel Alejandro Leon-Davis and Santhosh Daniel. Daniel, whose parents brought him to the USA from Venezuela, faced immense challenges when he discovered as a teenager that he was undocumented, which severely curtailed his rights and strained his finances. Santhosh shares a very different story about how his father provided for their family, and contributed to his community in the United States, while holding on to the financial lessons he’d learned growing up in India…..” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Conflict Project 32 mins – “In the early 1960s the Pentagon set up a top-secret research project in an old villa in downtown Saigon. The task? To interview captured North Vietnamese soldiers and guerrillas in order to measure the effect of relentless U.S. bombing on their morale. Yet despite a wealth of great data, even the leaders of the study couldn’t agree on what it meant.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive. 

Women and Money 32 mins – “Paula Pell is the woman behind many of the funniest, most laugh-out-loud, on-the-floor-crying moments of the past 20 years. From being a lead writer on SNL, to writing and producing NBC’s 30 Rock, to her first feature film Sisters—not to mention rewriting almost every comedy script you know and love—we could go on and on. Never heard of her? That’s just it. Paula’s not one to demand credit, and she’s often in the shadows of comedy greats (and good friends) like Judd Apatow, Amy Poehler and Tina Fey. Her success didn’t happen overnight, either. It was a slow climb, one that meant living paycheck-to-paycheck in New York City, relying on her own admittedly terrible money-management skills. This made for a bumpy road, laden with check-cashing places and what she calls “funky financing.” Paula had to learn fast how to manage the money she was earning. But most importantly, Paula learned to ask for what’s she’s worth— without a single apology.At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

WWI Myths 54 mins – “Professor Jennifer Keene talked about myths about America’s involvement in World War I, including the misconceptions that the U.S. was not involved in Europe prior to entering the war, or that World War I failed to have a lasting impact on American society.At the link you can pay for a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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