Media Mining Digest 440: 1918 Influenza Pandemic, Abortion History, Cancer Drug Costs, Civil Rights Movement Women, Covid-19 Pandemic, Deindustrialization in US, End of Life Care, George Washington’s Life, Government Surveillance, Hacking by US Government, Holocaust Denial, Immigration Reform, Improvised Explosive Devices, Industrialization of US, Intelligence Under Kennedy, Malcolm X on Africa, Native American Displacement, Sexual Assault Kit Discussion, Sickle Cells Kill Prodigy, Slavery in US, Socialism in US, Southeast Asia Refugee Issues, Vietnam Politics, Waldenponding, WWII Equipment Development

Exercise your ears: the 47 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 451 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,745 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

1918 Influenza Pandemic 51 mins – “Stony Brook University Professor Nancy Tomes taught a class about the 1918 influenza pandemic and public information efforts in the United States to stop the spread of the disease. She described methods such as canceling public gatherings, social distancing, and propaganda about good hygiene, which are still implemented. This class was filmed on March 10, 2020, during the early stages of the coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. Professor Toms compared the symptoms, economic impact, and national response between 1918 and today.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Abortion History in US 49 mins – “Tulane University Professor Karissa Haugeberg taught a class about the legal history of abortion in the United States from the 1840s through 2016. She discussed laws in the late 19th century that originally criminalized abortion as well Roe v. Wade in 1973 and the court cases and legislation that followed that landmark decision.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

August Wilson Playwright 48 mins – “Tulane University professor John “Ray” Proctor taught a class about playwright August Wilson, his contribution to African American theatre and his Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Fences.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Drug Costs 48 mins – “Can a life-saving drug be too expensive? What explains the high price of cancer drugs? Dr. Vincent Rajkumar of the Mayo Clinic talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the high price of cancer drugs–drugs that can cost an American with cancer $300,000 per year and require multiple years of treatment. Rajkumar explains how little a role market forces play in setting prices and what might be done to improve the situation.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Civil Rights Movement Women 48 mins – “African American Women and the Civil Rights Movement,University of Delaware professor Tiffany Gill taught a class about the role of African American women in the Civil Rights Movement. She described how beauty parlors, while often overlooked, functioned as a safe place for women to organize sit-ins, voter registration drives, and boycotts.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Cases in NYC 47 mins – “I am in Karachi, Pakistan, on March 2, when I read the news: New York City has its first patient hospitalized with the coronavirus. Though I am more than 7,000 miles away — reporting on a different disease outbreak — I am already worried about what I will face when I return home in two days to my job as an emergency-room doctor in the city. Even in the best of circumstances, the E.R. can be swamped, with patients doubled up in rooms and too few monitors and beds to go around. Doctors and nurses are always multitasking at the edge of their limits. “Damage control,” we call it….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Pandemic 35 mins – “Join Eric Verdin, live Wednesday, April 15th, as he shares his perspective on how to think about, deal with, and potentially treat the COVID-19 pandemic. President and CEO of the Buck since November 2016, Eric was previously associate director and senior investigator at the Gladstone Institute for Virology and Immunology and has held faculty positions at the University of Brussels, the National Institutes of Health, and the Picower Institute for Medical Research. Eric is also currently a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. A native of Belgium, he earned his MD from the University of Liege and completed additional training at Harvard Medical School. The Verdin lab focuses on how nutrition modulates immune system aging. In response to the current pandemic, the lab is now researching the over-active innate immune response implicated in many deaths from COVID-19. Eric is leading an international collaborative team which is investigating the role of metabolism and evaluating 69 potential drugs that act on molecular targets of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Second Wave 14 mins – “China’s strict and interrelated clinical and social protocols played a key role in its dealing with the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic. While many now are looking to colleagues for lessons as the novel coronavirus spreads globally, unanswered questions remain regarding long-term side effects, prospects for organ or tissue damage, identification of prognostic biomarkers, and development of therapeutics. Ewelina Biskup, MD, MPH, calls for robust data recording and the creation of a big data set to support analysis to improve care for the next waves.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Deindustrialization in US 46 mins – “Loyola University Chicago Professor Michelle Nickerson taught a class on the deindustrialization of the U.S. in the 1970s and ’80s and how music and popular culture of the period reflected these economic changes.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

End of Life Care 41 mins – “Dickinson College professor Jim Hoefler taught a class about end of life care and perceptions of death in the United States since the 1800s. He explored how changes in medical practices and technology have extended life expectancy, but argued that in recent decades, Americans have become removed from death through hospitals and funeral homes.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Feminism 45 mins – “Gloria Steinem talked about the topic, “The Progression of Feminism: Where Are We Going?” Topics included individual rights, human experiences, masculine and feminine qualities, sexual harassment, sex trafficking, race and gender equality, and abortion. After her presentation she responded to audience members’ questions.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

George Washington’s Life 37 mins – “Gene Allen Smith, a Texas Christian University history professor, taught a class about George Washington’s character. He examined how the first president interacted with his contemporaries, how he viewed himself, and how he is remembered.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Golden State Killer Case 18 mins – “In the last episode of Just Science, Dr. Barbara Rae-Venter shared her techniques for creating family trees and discussed the resolution of her first cold case. In episode five of the DNA season, we continue that conversation. In February 2017, Forensic Magazine published an article detailing the Bear Brook Murders, an abandoned girl, and Rae-Venter’s involvement in the resolution of a cold case that tied them all together. One month later, she was contacted by investigator Paul Holes and was on the hunt yet again. Listen along as she discusses building a profile and explains how she used investigative genetic genealogy to identify the Golden State Killer. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.nstitute hosted a day-long conference on government surveillance and privacy issues. The event began with a discussion focusing on oversight of the intelligence community. The panel consisted of law professors, security experts and former government officials.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Government Surveillance  32 mins – “American University lecturer Aaron Bell taught a class about privacy laws and federal surveillance of civil rights leaders. He described the mid-20th century creation of the Counter Intelligence Program, often called COINTELPRO, and their tracking and infiltrating of domestic political organizations.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hacking by US Government 49 mins – “Privacy and Government Surveillance, Part 2 Panelists debated limitations of cyber hacking powers by the FBI and other law enforcement agencies. Recent rule changes to the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure allow federal agents to search millions of private computers across the country with a single search warrant. The panel “Government Hacking” was part of the day-long 2016 Cato Surveillance Conference with intelligence officials, security experts, and professors on government surveillance and privacy concerns.” At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Holocaust Denial 47 mins – “The authors talked about their book Denying History: Who Says the Holocaust Never Happened and Why Do They Say It?, published by the University of California Press. The book is an examination of “Holocaust deniers,” people who say the Holocaust never happened. Slides were shown during the presentation. Following their remarks they answered questions from the audience.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Demographics 49 mins – “Early 20th Century Nativism and Immigration University of North Florida Professor David Courtwright taught a class about changes in immigration demographics and the rise of nativism in the early 20th century.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Immigration Reform 65 mins – “Historians talked about U.S. immigration policy from the 1920s to the 1960s, including a Japanese guest worker program and Cuban immigrants during the Cold War. They also explored how the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act changed restrictions based on race and national origins. The Organization of American Historians hosted this session at their annual meeting in Philadelphia.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Improvised Explosive Devices 20 mins – “In episode six of the Identification season, Just Science interviews Hillary Daluz, an instructor for Tritech Forensics and author on latent print analysis. From soda cans and cigarette packs to animal carcasses and pressure cookers, an improvised explosive device is just that: improvised. One of the most difficult parts of I.E.D. identification after the explosion is figuring out what was part of the bomb itself. Hillary Daluz spent 14 months in Iraq as a latent print examiner working on the remains of improvised explosive devices. Listen along as she discusses contextual bias, the difficulty of identifying finger prints on improvised explosives, and the importance of partnering with other disciplines in this episode of Just Science. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Industrialization of US 36 mins – “Late-20th Century Transformation of Work – Georgetown University Professor Joseph McCartin taught a class on the post-industrialization transformation of work, starting in the 1960s and continuing through the end of the 20th century. He described emerging technologies, such as bar codes and computers, which enabled global supply chains. He also talked about the move to shareholder capitalism, a decrease in union power, and an increase of wage inequalityAt the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Intelligence Under Kennedy 43 mins – “Catholic University professor and former CIA historian Nicholas Dujmovic teaches a class about national intelligence during President Kennedy’s administration.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Jazz Age of the 20’s 32 mins – “The 1920s – Karen Markoe of State University of New York Maritime College taught a class on the 1920s. She talked about politics, prohibition, and organized crime, as well as popular music and sports of the era.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Kentucky’s First Settlements 51 mins – “Western Lands Before and After the American Revolution – University of Utah Professor Eric Hinderaker taught a class about western settlement before, during and after the American Revolution. Using the Kentucky territory as an example, he described the conflicts and relationships between the new federal government, settlers and Native Americans.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Las Vegas Concert Shooting 29 mins – “In the fourth episode of our medicolegal death investigation special release season, Just Science interviews John Fudenberg, the Coroner for Clark County, where he discusses the tragic events of the 2017 concert shooting in Las Vegas, and the aftermath that followed. This episode will focus on lessons learned and how other coroner offices can prepare now for unforeseen incidents. John Fudenberg also stresses the importance of knowing who to contact and how critical a family assistance center can be for victims, families, responders and scene investigators during a mass casualty event. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Licensing Trends 42 mins – “Economists often oppose the expansion of licensing in America in recent years because it makes it harder for people with low skills to get access to opportunity. Sociologist Beth Redbird of Northwestern University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about a different perspective. Redbird finds that licensing expands opportunity for women and minorities and has little impact on wages. She argues that licensing helps historically disadvantaged groups discover ways into various careers they otherwise would have trouble accessing. The discussion closes with a discussion of Redbird’s work on the economic situation of Native Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malcolm X on Africa 39 mins – “Malcolm X’s Views on Africa – American University professor Ibram Kendi taught a class about Malcolm X’s views on Africa. Professor Kendi argued that through the 1960s, Africa had been associated with a lack of civilization and described how Malcolm X advocated for African Americans to have a more positive view of Africa in order to develop better self-esteem and combat racism.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Native American Displacement 48 mins – “Native Americans and Colonial-Era Power Struggles – Daniel Richter of the University of Pennsylvania taught a class on 18th century power struggles among Native Americans, colonial settlers and European empires. The class was part of a seminar for high school teachers hosted by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the Library Company of Philadelphia.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Nuclear Weapons Testing 38 mins – “Colorado College Professor Amy Kohout taught a class on nuclear weapons testing in the continental U.S. in the 1950s and ’60s and how it impacted the environment. She described scientific tests done to measure the impact on humans, protests against nuclear testing, and current debates over where to store nuclear waste.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Public Lands in US 50 mins – “Public Lands and the Law in the Early Republic = Duke University professor Laura Edwards taught a class on public lands and the law in the early American Republic. She looked at competing visions for westward expansion among the Founders, particularly Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson. She also talked about the multiple federal laws aimed at controlling land distribution, and discussed the role of the law in usurping Native American lands.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Analysis 16 mins – “In episode seven of the DNA season, Just Science interviews Molly Hall, an examiner for the United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory, about their transition to a Direct-to-DNA approach to processing sexual assault kits. The United States Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory acts as the true crime lab for the entire Department of Defense and serves all branches of the military. With roughly 2,000 sexual assault kits being submitted per year, they needed to find a way to efficiently process these kits without being bogged down by screening or an influx in submissions. Listen along as Molly Hall discusses Sexual Assault Kit processing and why their lab made the switch to a Direct-to-DNA approach in this episode of Just Science.” At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Discussion 21 mins – “Just FORESIGHT on Sexual Assault Kits_Forensic… 31 MINS Nov 19, 2018In episode three of the forensic advancement season, Just Science interviews Dr. Paul Speaker from West Virginia University about THE JURISDICTIONAL RETURN ON investment for DNA Databases. With the help of FORESIGHT crime labs can have not only an emotional argument but also an economical argument for testing all sexual assault kits. Just Science explores questions in this episode such as, should labs test all sexual assault kits? Should labs prioritize by if it was a consent case? does this data have more than just a societal impact? Stay tuned as Dr. Speaker leads us through how individualized crime lab DNA data can aid crime labs competing for scarce resources. This month the FTCoE will be releasing a report written on Forensic DNA Unit Efficiency Improvement Program EIP. This episode as well as the report is available at http://www.forensicCOE.org. Follow the FTCOE on Facebook and twitter, or sign up for the newsletter to be notified when the report is released. This season is funded by the National Institute of Justice’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sexual Assault Kit Training 23 mins – “The National Sexual Assault Kit Initiative (SAKI), funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance, aims to create a coordinated community response that ensures justice and resolution to sexual assault cases by utilizing a comprehensive and victim-centered approach. With 54 sites nationwide, SAKI has had a significant impact on policy and practice surrounding sexual assault kit processing. In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Just Science met with Dr. Kevin Strom and Dr. Patricia Melton of the SAKI Training and Technical Assistance project. Listen in as they discuss the SAKI TTA program, its impact, and the support SAKI TTA provides the community.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 2 20 mins – “As a kid with sickle cell anemia, Prodigy was told he’d barely make it to adulthood. The work of doctors, athletes, Hollywood stars and The Black Panthers help transform his fate. But what kind of life would he lead?” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 3 15 mins – “Someone is shot inside Def Jam. A rap star chases Mobb Deep through Lower Manhattan. And Prodigy convinces a hip hop mogul to sneak weapons into one of New York’s most decadent nightclubs. Mobb Deep came up in rap’s golden age. No other group defined the era quite like the duo from Queens.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 4 23 mins – “ When Prodigy goes on trial for violating probation, his lawyer files over 90 pages of P’s medical records in his defense. We find those records buried deep in a Brooklyn courthouse, and they open a window into how Prodigy’s body was at war with itself.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 5 21 mins – “It’s The Alchemist’s birthday, but thanks to the NYPD’s “Rap Intelligence Unit,” he and Prodigy are forced to celebrate in a jail cell, and soon after, P is headed upstate. But even Prodigy says prison changed him for the better.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell and Prodigy 6 20 mins – “Prodigy is supposed to fly back home right after a show in Vegas, but he never gets on the plane. As the world of hip hop mourns, there are still questions surrounding his death. We try to find answers, and go inside Prodigy’s memorial service to say goodbye to a rap icon.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Sickle Cell Kills Prodigy 1 20 mins – “Prodigy and Havoc begin laying down rhymes together in high school. When their first album flops, they come up with a new sound that’s directly influenced by P’s sickle cell, and it helps define a generation of hip hop. Plus: Big Twins talks about the sickle cell attack he’ll never forget.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Slavery in US 35 mins – “University of Alabama Professor Joshua Rothman taught a class on abolition and pro-slavery movements in the early 1800s. He highlighted the way that both sides used printing presses and mailing literature to spread their ideas.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Socialism in US 40 mins – “More candidates for political office in America today identify themselves as socialists than ever before. But isn’t the idea of socialism anathema to American values of free enterprise and entrepreneurism? BackStory reveals the rich history of socialism in the USA.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Southeast Asia Refugee Issues 47 minsUniversity of Michigan professor Melissa Borjautaughtaclass about Southeast Asian migration to the United States and post-Vietnam War refugees. She examined how laws and public opinion have changed over the past five decades and emphasized the difference between immigrants and refugees.At the link you can listen, or purchase a download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

US-Soviet Relations Under Reagan 51 mins – “George Washington University Professor Chris Tudda taught a class about foreign relations between the United States and the Soviet Union during President Ronald Reagan’s administration. He began with the Iran-Contra affair but then examined the impact of changes in Soviet leadership during the 1980s on Cold War policies in both countries.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Conflict 1968 52 mins – “Arizona State University professor Kyle Longley taught a class on President Lyndon Johnson and the Vietnam War in 1968. He discussed LBJ’s reaction to the Tet Offensive in January, and talked about the reasons behind the president’s decision in March not to seek re-election. Professor Longley also described LBJ’s attempts to forge a peace agreement with the North Vietnamese, and the role the war played in the November presidential election.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Vietnam Politics 35 mins – “Nixon, Kissinger and U.S. Withdrawal From Vietnam – U.S. Air Force Academy Professor Stephen Randolph taught a class about President Richard Nixon, his National Security Adviser Henry Kissinger, and their strategy for the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam.At the link you can listen, but not download it; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Waldenponding 53 mins – “Writer and management consultant Venkatesh Rao talks about Waldenponding with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Rao coined the term Waldenponding to describe various levels of retreating from technology akin to how Thoreau extolled the virtues of retreating from social contact and leading a quieter life at Walden Pond. Rao argues that the value of Waldenponding is overrated and that extreme Waldenponding is even somewhat immoral. Rao sees online intellectual life as a form of supercomputer, an intellectual ecosystem that produces new knowledge and intellectual discourse. He encourages all of us to contribute to that intellectual ecosystem even when it can mean losing credit for some of our ideas and potentially some of our uniqueness.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWII Equipment Development 47 mins – “Weber State University Professor Branden Little taught a class about military vehicle innovations and the role of American factories during World War II. He focused on types of amphibious vehicles used in the Pacific and described the process of testing, production and battle application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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