Media Mining Digest 441: Afghanistan Situation, AI Changes Science, Air Quality, Artificial Intelligence, Bill Browder, Blueberries for Health, Churchill, Congressional Investigation History, Covid19 Impact, Cryptocurrencies, C-Span Radio Anniversary, Cyber Security Threats, Declaration of Independence, Detroit Riots, Economic Status, Enlightenment, FBI and Trump, Federal Debt and Deficit, Flynn Effect, Gerrymandering, Information Control, Interviewing Error, Ketamine for Depression, Kidnapping, Korean War, LBJ Tapes, Lynching, Magnitsky Act, Mathematician Trevino, Melatonin, Middle Class Shrinks, Migrant Story, NATO, Neoliberalism, North Korea and US, North Korea Rulers, North Korean Sanctions, Poaching in Africa, Precision Medicine, Propaganda Control, Putin Background, Ransomeware Everywhere, Saudia Arabia, Surveillance Capitalism, Venezuelan Crisis, Wahls Protocol, Women in Congress, Women Swimming in US, Women’s History Month, WWI Remembering

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 666 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,844 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Afghanistan Situation 30 mins – “President Trump recently announced his plans for the War in Afghanistan, including the deployment of additional US troops to the country. This week we look at the political geography and the recent history of Afghanistan with Ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad, who served as U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan (2003-2005) and Iraq (2005-2007). He also served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (2007-2009). Ambassador Khalilzad discussed the roots and resilience of the Taliban, Afghanistan’s drug trade, and the importance of re-building Afghan state institutions in order to secure long-term peace in the region.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

AI Changes Science 22 mins – “No human, or team of humans, could possibly keep up with the avalanche of information produced by many of today’s physics and astronomy experiments. Some of them record terabytes of data every day — and the torrent is only increasing. The Square Kilometer Array, a radio telescope slated to switch on in the mid-2020s, will generate about as much data traffic each year as the entire internet. The deluge has many scientists turning to artificial intelligence for help. With minimal human input, AI systems such as artificial neural networks — computer-simulated networks of neurons that mimic the function of brains — can plow through mountains of data, highlighting anomalies and detecting patterns that humans could never have spotted.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow under the podcast play bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Air Quality 29 mins – “Northern California’s now infamous Camp Fire was not only the largest, longest, and deadliest wildfire in the state’s history, it also produced record amounts of smoke. Schools closed, there was a run on protective masks, and people were fashioning do-it-yourself air purifiers because there were none left in stores. And it looks like we will only see an acceleration of wildfires in the future. This grim forecast has brought a surge in traffic to websites that monitor air quality like AirNowWeather Underground, and PurpleAir. This week on Sea Change Radio, we speak with the founder and CEO of PurpleAir, a company that sells laser air quality sensors for home use at a reasonable price, and posts all the results in real-time on its site. We discuss PurpleAir’s business model, its unique brand of crowd-sourcing technology, and examine the ways that it casts the world in a different, and sometimes frightening, light.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu. (PurpleAir.com map is here)

Artificial Intelligence 64 mins – “Historian Jessica Riskin of Stanford University talks about her book The Restless Clock with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. What is the difference between human beings and machines? How has science thought about this distinction? When do we have agency and when are we constrained? Riskin discusses these issues and the implications for how we think about ourselves and the growth of artificial intelligence.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blueberries for Health 44 mins – “The Benefits of Blueberries – There’s been plenty of talk in the media about how blueberries are the new superfood.  We’re always hesitant to buy into this kind of hype (remember how margarine used to be “healthy” and eggs were horrible for you?).  But in the case of blueberries, the science backs up the hype. Blueberries improve long-term memory (retention of information over time), access to words and concepts (crucial for dementia or Alzheimer’s sufferers), and short-term memory (aka working memory). They reverse loss of balance and coordination in older rats. The benefits aren’t confined to older people, though.  One study found that blueberry juice improved memory and concentration in children. And if you’re worried about consuming too much sugar from fruit, blueberries even lower blood glucose levels. For more, check out Dr. Krikorian’s latest research on blueberries.At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

C-Span Radio Anniversary 43 mins – “C-SPAN Radio was launched on October 9th, 1997. To mark the 20th anniversary, we spoke with C-SPAN Co-Founder and Executive Chairman Brian Lamb about the creation of the radio station, the evolution of C-SPAN, and the importance of our mission.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Churchill 68 mins – “Historian Andrew Roberts talks about the life of Winston Churchill and the art of biography with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. How did Churchill deal with the mistakes he inevitably made in a long career? Was he prescient or just the right man in the right place at the right time? Was he an alcoholic? Did he suffer from depression? Drawing on his recent biography of Churchill, Andrew Roberts answers these and other questions in this wide-ranging conversation that includes a discussion of the mechanics of writing a 1000 page book on a man who has had over 1000 biographies written about him already.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Congressional Investigation History 29 mins – “Ray Smock discussed the history of congressional investigations. Ray Smock is the director of the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies at Shepherd University and a former Historian of the House of Representatives.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Covid-19 Impact 31 mins – “In this short extra episode, Jim talks to Dr. Ben Goertzel about the economic & cultural impacts we could expect after the peak of COVID-19, the end of the tech backlash, income inequality, homeostasis & hysteresis, business travel bets from Jim & Ben, in-person vs virtual events, potential opportunities, cryptocurrency & blockchain, answering the cultural wakeup call, dynamics of centralized responses in decentralized systems, and more.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cryptocurrencies 43 mins – “In this Slate Money miniseries, Felix Salmon investigates SWAG—silver, wine, art, and gold—and other things people invest in. This week, Felix talks to Nathaniel Popper of the New York Times about whether cryptocurrency is a real investment asset or a total gamble. At the link left-click “Share” and the sound bar and select the down-pointing arrow to get the podcast.

Cyber Security Threats 22 mins – “Just because phishing is gradually becoming less of a threat does not mean you are safe from cyber criminals. Smishing is the use of cell phone texting software to lure victims into downloading malware or handing over personal information. In this episode, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek talk to Joe Hamblin, director of IT operations for Sprint, about what smishing is, why it’s growing, and how it could affect your legal business. They also discuss simple ways to identify and combat smishing both in your personal and professional life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Declaration of Independence 24 mins – “Our guest this week is Jeffrey Rosen, President & CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia. The Declaration of Independence is part of the framework of America’s democracy. He offers his perspective on the document that shapes our country 240 years later.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Detroit Riots 29 mins – “50 years ago this week, the 1967 Detroit Riots began. They lasted over five days in July, ignited by long-simmering racial tensions. This week on C-SPAN’s The Sidebar podcast we look back at the riots with Joseph Califano Jr. He who served as a principal domestic aide to President Lyndon B. Johnson and was with him during that tumultuous time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Economic Status 88 mins – “Nobel Laureate Paul Romer of New York University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the nature of growth, the role of cities in the economy, and the state of economics. Romer also reflects on his time at the World Bank and why he left his position there as Chief Economist.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Enlightenment 66 mins – “Richard Reinsch, editor of Law and Liberty and the host of the podcast Liberty Law Talk, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the Enlightenment. Topics discussed include the search for meaning, the stability of liberalism, the rise of populism, and Solzhenitsyn’s indictment of Western values from his Harvard Commencement Address of 1978.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

FBI and Trump 24 mins – “Tim Weiner, author of Enemies: A History of the FBI, discussed the history of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and President Donald Trump’s dismissal of now-former FBI Director James Comey.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Federal Debt and Deficit 29 mins – “Our guest this week is the Maya MacGuineas, She is the president of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget and the head of the Campaign to Fix the Debt. We talked with her about the differences between the $20 trillion debt and the year-to-year deficit and why failing to raise the debt ceiling could be catastrophic for the U.S. and global economies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Flynn Effect – “The Flynn Effect is a strange-but-true revelation.  Over the course of the 20th century — and apparently continuing still — “average” people in countries around the world, as measured by standardized IQ tests, are getting smarter and smarter and smarter.  Dr. Roger Staff explains his findings from research into the cognitive health of the population of the city of Aberdeen over seven decades (and counting!).  In addition, we’ll learn the suspected reasons behind the generalized growth in smartness — and what we can expect for the continuation of the trend.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Information Control – “EconTalk host Russ Roberts does a monologue on how political discourse seems to have deteriorated in recent years and the growth in outrage, tribalism, and intolerance for those with different views from one’s own. Roberts suggests that part of the problem is the revolution of the market for information caused by the internet that allows people to customize what they see to fit their own political narratives and worldview. In short, the market for news works to make us feel good rather than to help us to discover the truth. The monologue closes with some suggestions for how we might improve the way we consume information and interact with those we disagree with.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Interviewing Errors – “To Err is Human – Good, we’ve got that part covered.  So remember – none of what follows should be taken personally. Some of the errors we make are “special little snowflake” errors, mistakes that only we could have made, with our personal brand of dumb-assery.  But other errors are more standard-issue.  And many of our hardest-to-spot goofs fall into categories that are so predictably human that we can organize them, give them taxonomic names, and formally study them…And what’s worse… we can expect them.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Israeli-Arab Peace Process – “Robert Danin, a senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations and former Deputy Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs, talked about the history of the Israeli-Arab peace process.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ketamine and Depression – “Falling down the K-Hole.  Taking “Special K.”   Ketamine has quite the reputation as a recreational club drug.  But research is showing its promising potential as a treatment for severe cases of depression. Jesse talks to Dr. Panos Zanos, Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, (who has possibly the best name of any Smart Drug Smarts guest to date) about his research on ketamine and depression.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

KidnappingAnja Shortland of King’s College London talks about her book Kidnap with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Kidnapping is relatively common in parts of the world where government authority is weak. Shortland explores this strange, frightening, but surprisingly orderly world. She shows how the interaction between kidnappers, victims, and insurance companies creates a somewhat predictable set of prices for ransom and creates a relatively high chance of the safe return of those who are kidnapped.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Korean War – “This week author and journalist Blaine Harden joins us to discuss his book ‘King of Spies,’ and how the Korean Peninsula continues to be impacted by a war fought more than 50 years. It created the De-Militarized Zone along the 38th Parallel and tensions for every U.S. President since Harry Truman.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

LBJ Tapes – “This week: The LBJ tapes- President Lyndon Baines Johnson and the audio recordings made during his presidency. We spoke with presidential historian and author Michael Beschloss. He’s the author of two books examining the recordings, “Taking Charge: The Johnson White House Tapes, 1963-1964” and “Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson’s Secret White House Tapes, 1964-1965.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Lynching – “On this week’s episode, Nathan, Brian, Joanne & Ed talk about how Americans remember and reckon with systematic violence, and how we keep this difficult history alive and in the public eye. Historian Kidada Williams reads letters from a man seeking justice for his son who was lynched, and Brian visits an exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington D.C.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Magnitsky Act – “Bill Browder was kicked out of Russia and labeled a national security threat by President Vladimir Putin. Mr Browder discussed Vladimir Putin’s Russia and the Magnitsky Act, which was named for his late lawyer, Sergei Magnitsky, who was imprisoned for 11 months before dying in prison.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mathematician Trevino – “Dr Keith Pannell sits down with Lake Forest College mathematician Enrique Trevino to discuss his fascination with numbers and his connections to the Southwest.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Melatonin – “Quick — tell us everything you know about the pineal gland. It’s probably not much, right?  That’s ok, because until surprisingly recently, scientists didn’t know much either. But we now know quite a lot, including the pineal gland’s essential function producing melatonin.  Dr. Richard Wurtman, Cecil H. Green Distinguished Professor emeritus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, talks to us about his work studying the pineal gland and melatonin.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Middle Class Shrinks – “This week’s guest is Washington Post reporter Max Ehrenfreund. We spoke with him about a new report examining declining American wages and the shrinking middle class.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Migrant Story – “NPR reporter Aarti Shahani arrived in New York as a little girl in the 1980s. For years, her family lived without legal status. When the Shahanis eventually got green cards, they thought they had achieved their American dream. But when her father mistakenly got caught up in legal trouble, they learned that, for many immigrants, life in this country isn’t as secure as it seems. Aarti Shahani tells her family’s story in a new book, “Here We Are: American Dreams, American Nightmares.” In it, she asks the question who is a “deserving” immigrant? The answer, she says, is almost always more complicated than it seems.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

NATO – “Fabrice Pothier, the former Director of Policy Planning, talked about NATO’s history, mission, and budget.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neoliberalism – “Dani Rodrik of Harvard University talks about neoliberalism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Rodrik argues that a dogmatic embrace of markets has increased inequality and limited who benefits from economic growth. He argues for a more interventionist approach to the economy with the goal of better-paying jobs and more widely shared prosperity.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea and US – “Our guest this week is the former Governor of New Mexico, Bill Richardson. As a diplomat and Special Envoy, Gov. Richardson has received four Nobel Peace Prize nominations, and has successfully won the release of hostages and American servicemen in North Korea, Cuba, Iraq and Sudan. We talked with him the current state of tension between North Korea and the U.S. and why he thinks the U.S. needs to change its approach to engaging with what many describe as “the Hermit Kingdom.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

North Korea Rulers – “As tensions with North Korea rise, this week we examine the history of that country’s ruling Kim family. We spoke to Jean H Lee, author of “Kings of Communism: Inside Kim Jong Un’s Bloody Scramble to Kill of His Family” in the September edition of Esquire Magazine. She also led the Associated Press’s coverage of the Korean Peninsula as bureau chief from 2008 to 2013 and opened the AP’s Pyongyang bureau in January 2012. We spoke with Ms. Lee about the Kim family’s rise to power, the idea of North Korea as an absolute monarchy, and the message Kim Jong Un sent with the assassination of his brother in February.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

North Korean Sanctions – “Robert Kahn discussed the North Korea sanctions policy and how America and other countries implement sanctions, how effective they are, and why China will be critical in determining the success of any new sanctions against North Korea.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Poaching in Africa – “Catherine Semcer of the Property and Environment Research Center (PERC) talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the role of incentives in preserving wildlife in Africa. The conversation discusses how allowing limited hunting of big game such as elephants and using revenue from hunting licenses to reward local communities for habitat stewardship has improved both habitat and wildlife populations while reducing poaching. Semcer draws on her experience as former Chief Operating Officer of Humanitarian Operations Protecting Elephants and also discusses recent efforts to re-locate lions in Mozambique.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Precision Medicine – “Dr. Jill Hagenkord, Chief Medical Officer at Color Genomics discussed precision medicine and genetic testing for hereditary cancer and high cholesterol risks as well as preventative health services, including genetic counseling. She spoke about recent breakthroughs in cancer research and precision medicine, the benefits of testing for cancer-causing gene mutations, and what it means for patients, families, and medical providers.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Propaganda Control – “Has this ever happened to you: You are talking with a friend or family member, and as the topic moves to politics, things start to get a little heated. You make what you think are excellent points, based on data, logic, and what you fervently believe to be the absolute truth. Yet, when the debate concludes, somehow neither of you has budged an inch, and no one leaves any wiser. Perhaps this is why we are instructed to “never discuss politics in polite company.” This week on Sea Change Radio, we are talking about bridging the divide, with James Hoggan, an author and the co-founder of Desmog Blog. Hopefully, the next time the subject of impeachment or the Democratic nominee of your choice arises, the debate can be spirited, productive, and maybe even polite.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Putin Background – “This week we look into the background of Russian President Vladimir Putin with Sam Greene, the Director of the Russia Institute at King`s College London. We spoke with him about how Putin’s time in the KGB shaped his political philosophy, his rise to power in Moscow, and how Putin views his role in the Russian Government. Follow C-SPAN Radio on Twitter and join the conversation using the hashtag “CSPANSidebar”. Like, rate, and review us wherever you listen to podcasts. Every C-SPAN podcast is available on the FREE C-SPAN Radio App for Apple and Android devices.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ransomeware Everywhere – “Google expands its bug bounty program; New bug bounty millionaires; Google’s Project Zero group dropped a bomb on iOS; Ransomware attacks on local governments and businesses are on the rise” At the link left-click “Download Options,” then right-click “Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Saudia Arabia – “This week we take a look at the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with Bruce Riedel. He is a senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project at the Brookings Institution. He’s also the author of “Kings and Presidents: Saudi Arabia and the United States Since FDR.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Surveillance Capitalism – “Shoshana Zuboff of Harvard University talks about her book Surveillance Capitalism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Zuboff argues that the monetization of search engines and social networks by Google, Facebook, and other large tech firms threatens privacy and democracy.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Venezuelan Crisis – “Francisco Toro on the Crisis in Venezuela.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Wahls ProtocolDr. Terry Wahls is back for a third time to talk functional medicine, ketosis, and implementing the Wahls Protocol™. Who is Terry Wahls, M.D.? In case you missed her earlier episodes (Episode 15 and Episode 27), Dr. Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa and is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. That diagnosis confined her to a wheelchair, prompting her research into functional medicine and the Paleo diet.  The research and subsequent experimentation paid off, as within a year she was out of the wheelchair and completing an 18-mile bicycle ride.  She wrote a book, Minding My Mitochondria, about her experience recovering from MS.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Wahls Protocol – “Dr. Terry Wahls was given a diagnosis of MS and told she’d have to spend the rest of her life in a wheelchair. After radically transforming her diet, her outlook, and her medical care, she is now able to walk and ride a bicycle.” At the link you can listen but not download; however, a copy of the talk is included in this blog archive.

Women in Congress – “Today, 131 women serve in the House and Senate, making Congress the most female and most diverse it’s ever been. But women in politics continue to face an uphill battle. Even after their election, Congresswomen such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib have faced criticism for their choice of clothing and language. One radio commentator in Atlanta even suggested Lucy McBath should “go back to the kitchen.” We look at the history of “women in Congress,” how much progress we’ve made and how much work lies ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women Swimming in US – “In 1907, Australian competitive swimmer Annette Kellerman was arrested on an American beach for wearing a one-piece swimsuit that bared her legs. OR WAS SHE? Scholar Christine Schmidt tells us about Kellerman’s first six month long sojourn in the United States, and her attempts to popularize swimming.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Women’s History Month – “In celebration of Women’s History Month, Brian showcases our favorite BackStory segments that highlight female achievement in American history. We’ll hear from a former switchboard operator about her experiences at New York Telephone in the 1970’s and learn how Ida B. Wells found her voice as an advocacy journalist. We’re also sharing a Radio Diaries story on Margaret Chase Smith, a Republican Senator from Maine whose 1964 presidential bid inspired a generation of women to enter politics.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI Remembering – “On November 11, 1918, Germany formally surrendered to the Allied Powers, about 19 months after the United States entered the conflict. On this episode, Brian and Nathan reflect on how, 100 years later, “the war to end all wars” is still with Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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