Media Mining Digest 442: Abortion and Measles, ALS Patient Story, Artificial Intelligence, Autism, Brain Research, Cancer Treatment, Carbon in Soil, Charlottesville One Year Later, Data Security for Lawyers, Data Storage in Norway, Deep Medicine, Dengue Virus, Enterovirus, Equine Encephalitis Outbreak, Food History in US, Grenfell Tower Fire, Immigrant Crossing, Impeachment Inquiry, Influenza Virus, Information Governance for Lawyers, Kurds-Turkey-Syria Conflict, Madness and Recovery, Math Education, Measles Outbreaks, Metadata, Microbiome, Mind Machine Interfaces, Minimum Wage Discussion, Nobel Prizes in Virology, Norman Maclean author, NSA Surveillance for Lawyers, Osama bin Laden Killer, Parenting, Photographic History, Presidential Campaigns, Ransomware Crisis in Law, Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children, Sony Hack, Special Masters in Court, Ted Williams, Tick Borne Diseases, Trump and California Air Pollution Standards, Trumps Inaccurate Hurricane Forecast, Virology History, Virology Research at the Karolinska Institute, Virus Careers, Virus Infectivity, Virus Research, War and Terrorism in Cyberspace, Whales in America, Whistleblowers and Trump, Women in Congress, WWI Remembrance, Yaba in Bangladesh

Exercise your ears: the 66 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 765 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 28,844 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Abortion and Measles 34 mins – “The story of how abortion became legal in the United States isn’t as straightforward as many of us think. The common narrative is that feminist activism and the sexual liberation movement in the 1960s led to Roe v. Wade in 1973. But it turns out the path to Roe led over some unexpected and unsettling terrain, and involves a complicated story winding through culture, society, disease, and our prejudices and fears about disability. In the 1960s a rubella epidemic swept the United States and panicked every pregnant woman in the country. Rubella, also called German measles, is a disease we hardly remember anymore, but it’s the “R” in the MMR vaccine. Though the virus is relatively harmless for most people, when contracted during pregnancy, it can severely harm the developing fetus. During the epidemic many pregnant women who may have never identified as abortion-rights advocates suddenly found themselves seeking abortions and dismantling barriers to access. Though not everyone agreed with these women, people listened. And this historical moment, sparked by a virus, helped pave the way for the legalization of abortion.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

ALS Patient Story 18 mins – “Jay DesMazes is bedridden with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). extremely limited movement; Using only eye movement and an ipad, DesMazes assembles words one letter at a time. Through his tablet, Jay tells Dr Brian Goldman about his life and abuse he received at the hands of nurses and health care staff.” At the link find the title, “Jay’s tablet,” right-click “Download Jay’s tablet” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Artificial Intelligence 43 mins – “Futurist and author Amy Webb talks about her book, The Big Nine, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Webb observes that artificial intelligence is currently evolving in a handful of companies in the United States and China. She worries that innovation in the United States may lead to social changes that we may not ultimately like; in China, innovation may end up serving the geopolitical goals of the Chinese government with some uncomfortable foreign policy implications. Webb’s book is a reminder that artificial intelligence does not evolve in a vacuum–research and progress takes place in an institutional context. This is a wide-ranging conversation about the implications and possible futures of a world where artificial intelligence is increasingly part of our lives.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Austin Kleon author 18 mins – “Artist and author Austin Kleon talks about what lasting success really means and how to achieve it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Autism 11 mins – “Vaccine scientist, pediatrician, and autism dad Peter Hotez talks about his new book, Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel’s Autism. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Peter Hotez” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Brain Research 12 mins – “In 1953, a twenty-seven-year old factory worker named Henry Molaison, cursed with severe epilepsy, underwent a radical new version of the lobotomy that targeted the most unexplored structures of the brain. The operation was performed by Dr. William Scoville whose brilliance as a surgeon was only tempered by an adventurousness that bordered on recklessness. It did not cure Molaison’s seizures but left him profoundly amnesiac. This tragic, if revelatory, accident opened the door to our understanding of how memory works and Molaison—better known as Patient H.M—was studied for over sixty years, becoming the most important research subject the field of neurology has ever seen. In 2003, Esquire contributor Luke Dittrich—Scoville’s grandson—set out to learn more about this seminal case in his feature, “The Brain that Changed Everything.” He joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the story and how it led to his seven-year journey to write a full-length book, Patient H.M.—published this summer—a fascinating journey about the history of neuroscience, his grandfather’s methods, and buried family secrets.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Cancer Treatment 55 mins – “Interactive immune systems are at the center of cancer and other diseases. Dr. Matthew Krummel explores how the immune system can regulate cancer progression. Recorded on 10/31/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Carbon in Soil 37 mins – “Journalist and author Moises Velasquez-Manoff talks about the role of dirt in fighting climate change with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Velasquez-Manoff explains how changes in farming can allow dirt and plants to absorb carbon and potentially reduce climate change. At the end of the conversation he discusses the state of the science on hygiene, parasites, and auto-immune disorders that he discussed in his previous appearance on EconTalk in 2014.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Charlottesville One Year Later 31 mins – “On August 11 & 12, 2017, a “Unite the Right” rally brought chaos, violence and death to the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. To mark the anniversary, BackStory broadcasts an episode of “A12,” a new podcast series presented by historian, writer and podcaster Nicole Hemmer. “A12” looks at the legacy of August 12th in Charlottesville and beyond. In it Hemmer, who witnessed the rally and attack, brings together city leaders, activists, scholars, and witnesses to make sense of all the forces surrounding the events. It’s a sprawling story, covering everything from Confederate statues to white nationalists to questions of policing and law. But it’s also an intimate one: a story of trauma, loss and healing.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Commander in Chief Trump 15 mins – “Where do a president’s powers begin and end when it comes to issuing a strike to kill? Can presidents decide how much force to use against an adversary? National security correspondent Karen DeYoung breaks down the administration’s decisions in Iran.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Security for Lawyers 17 mins – “From malware and hackers to BYOD and TYOD, the biggest threat to law firm data could be the attorneys themselves. On this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek interview data expert Ben M. Schorr and discover complex new threats to data security and the simplest solutions to reduce them….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Data Storage in Norway 18 mins – “If data is the new oil, are data centres the new oil rigs? Far into the north of Europe, under half a year of darkness, where the landscape has inspired folklore and legend, are some of the biggest data centres in the world. The frozen mountains and deep fjords under the aurora hide the “dark fibre“ for the modern internet to function in the way we all want it to – instantly and reliably. Ninety percent of the world’s data has been created in the last few years, and as a more internet enabled future, with AI and the internet of things, becomes reality – data more than ever needs a physical home. This requires energy, and by 2020 some estimate around 20% of the world’s energy supply will be used to process data. This can be hugely costly, and damaging for the environment. Norway – which became so rich from oil and gas thinks data mines might be part of a new economic future away from fossil fuels. Abundant renewable energy means it’s cheap to cool the hot whirring servers – the cold landscape itself also lends itself to housing data. We visit a huge data mine in a former mineral mine, next to a deep fjord, and hear how the data is pinged back and forth across the globe. But it’s not as simple as that, as the Sami, the traditional people of the region have found traditional lands in some parts spoiled by huge hydroelectric dams. Modernity and tradition go hand in hand in the far north of Europe, where legends of trolls in mountain caves sit alongside some of the most high tech companies in the world.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Deep Medicine 45 mins – “Cardiologist and author Eric Topol talks about his book Deep Medicine with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topol argues that doctors spend too little face-to-face time with patients, and the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning is a chance to emphasize the human side of medicine and to expand the power of human connection in healing. Topol surveys the current landscape of the application of technology to health care showing where its promise has been overstated and where it is having the most impact. The conversation includes a discussion of the placebo effect and the importance of the human touch in medicine.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dengue Virus 73 mins – “The TWiV pro-vaxxers reveal viruses that infect endangered wild salmon, and how iron in host serum modulates dengue virus acquisition by mosquitoes. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Ebola Treatments 62 mins – “The Autonomous CollecTWiVe reveal two effective treatments for Ebolavirus infection, how a virus in a fungus confers heat tolerance to a plant, and dampened inflammation as a mechanism for bat tolerance to viral infection. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Enterovirus D68 81 mins – “Amy joins the TWiV team to review evidence that enterovirus D68 is an etiologic agent of childhood paralysis, and her finding that the ability of the virus to infect cells of the nervous system is not a recently acquired property. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Equine Encephalitis Outbreak 74 mins – “The TWiV team covers outbreaks of eastern equine encephalitis virus in the US and poliovirus in the Philippines, and explain how a chemokine induced by HIV-1 infection helps release more virus particles from cells. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Food History in US 49 mins – “It’s the holidays — that time of the year when food is everywhere. So, Brian, Joanne, and Nathan sit down to discuss some of America’s many homegrown culinary traditions and what the food we eat says about American identity. In this episode we talked to Pati Jinich of “Pati’s Mexican Kitchen.” Find her recipe for Chilorio Burritas (and more) on her website. We also talked about Maida Heatter’s “Best Damn Lemon Cake.” Learn more about Heatter and find her lemon cake recipe (as well as a few other desserts) in this 1982 story from the Washington Post.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select save file and OK to get the podcast.

Greenland Purchase 12 mins – “President Trump abruptly canceled a trip to Denmark because the country’s prime minister wouldn’t discuss the purchase of Greenland. Economic policy reporter Damien Paletta explains whether Trump’s effort to purchase Greenland is as unusual as it seems.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Grenfell Tower Fire 25 mins – “On 14 June 2017, a fire broke out in the 24-storey Grenfell Tower block of flats in West London; it caused 72 deaths and more than 70 others were injured and 223 people escaped. On the fourteenth floor of Grenfell Tower, firefighters moved eight residents into one flat – 113. Only four would survive. Piecing together evidence from phase one of the Grenfell Tower Public Inquiry, Katie Razzell tries to understand what went wrong that night in flat 113. The answer reveals a catalogue of errors which could help explain the wider disaster.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immigrant Crossings 19 mins – “It’s over two years since the authorities in France closed down the Jungle, the large migrant camp in Calais on the French coast. At its height more than 9,000 people from around the world lived in the camp while attempting to make it across to the UK, often hiding in the back of lorries or packed into small boats. It was hoped the camp’s closure would stem the number of people risking their lives to try to get to Britain. But has it worked? In December, Britain’s Home Secretary, Sajid Javid, declared the number of migrants attempting to cross the English Channel in boats a ‘major incident’ and since then more than 100 people have been picked up in 2019. For Assignment, Paul Kenyon investigates the British gangs making big money and risking migrants’ lives smuggling them across the Channel and reports on the attempts to break up their networks.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Inquiry 10 mins – “House Democrats announced articles on abuse of power and obstruction of Congress against President Trump in its investigation of his conduct regarding Ukraine. Reporter Mike DeBonis explains what the articles mean, why they matter and what happens next.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Influenza Virus 61 mins – “The TWiVologists consider whether to receive an influenza vaccine in August (in the northern hemisphere), and mice implanted with human lung fragments for studying microbial pathogens. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Information Governance for Lawyers 24 mins – “In this edition of Digital Detectives hosts Sharon D. Nelson and John W. Simek invite Jason R. Baron, former director of litigation at the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration to discuss Information Governance as it relates to e-discovery, privacy, record keeping and security. Baron connects the dots between all these areas and helps lawyers understand they need to know about information governance and the current trends he is see in this area.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Kurds-Turkey-Syria 21 mins – “First, Pentagon reporter Dan Lamothe explains the complexities of the Turkey-Syria conflict. Then, political reporter Robert Costa explains how Trump’s decision to withdraw U.S. troops from the border area might be putting his political coalition at risk.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Love in Hong Kong 27 mins – “Unprecedented mass protests have caused chaos in Hong Kong’s public sphere – but what has it meant for private life? How have they affected the increasing number of couples who have married across the divide, with one partner from Hong Kong and another from the Chinese mainland? As part of Crossing Divides, bringing people together in a fragmented world, BBC World Affairs correspondent Paul Adams hears from one such couple, for whom the political has become personal. ‘Daniel’ is a native-born Hong Kong citizen, while his wife ‘Jane’ moved to the city from the Chinese mainland. They are happily married – but are living in a metropolis riven by discontent. How do they navigate the expectations of their friends, families and workplaces and most importantly their spouse – while staying true to their own beliefs? This single marriage reveals a great deal about the emerging, troubled identity of Hong Kong.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Madness and Recovery 14 mins – “Award-winning Irish author and playwright Arnold Thomas Fanning sits down with Dr. Brian Goldman to discuss his new book Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery.” At the link find the title, “Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery,” right-click “Download Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Malaysia Air 370 22 mins – “The question is astonishingly simple: In the year 2015, with GPS and satellites and global surveillance everywhere all the time, how does a massive airplane simply go missing? To find the answer, writer Bucky McMahon boarded one of the vessels searching for Malaysia Air 370 in one of the most isolated and treacherous stretches of ocean on the planet. In telling the story of the search crew and the massive amounts of technology, money, and human capital being spent trying to find this airplane, McMahon tells a story of our time—of a world completely dependent on nets of redundant technology, yet completely lost and broken when those nets suddenly break. McMahon joins host David Brancaccio to discuss his October 2015 story, “The Plane at the Bottom of the Ocean.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Math Education 18 mins – “Dr. Pannell welcomes the Nomellini & Olivier Professor of Education at Stanford University to talk math and what is wrong with the way it’s being taught in America. Author of many books including Limitless Mind.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Measles Outbreaks 24 mins – “In this episode, we will be discussing the recent updates in measles outbreaks, where the vaccination recommendations stand, and other preventative strategies.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

MetaData 14 mins – “Many are hearing about metadata in articles and blogs, but secretly admit that they don’t fully understand what it is.  Digital Detectives co-hosts, Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, join Karen Massand, the President of Litéra, to take a look at metadata, whether it takes an expert to find metadata in documents, leaking hidden data, and the new metadata problem caused by the “bring your own device movement”.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Michael Bey Director 10 mins – “In 2001, director Michael Bay was one of Hollywood’s most successful commercial filmmakers when he took on the daunting task of directing an epic about Pearl Harbor. How would his testosterone-laden, explosive-style adapt to a serious subject? (Hint: the critics hated it but the movie made $450 million at the box office.) Jeanne Marie Laskas joins host David Brancaccio this week to discuss her sympathetic but piercing—and often hilarious—profile of Bay, who rages at his critics, complains about his agents and studio executives, and attempts, often unsuccessfully, to conduct life at the top without becoming a total…jerk.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Microbiome 55 mins- “Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explains that human microbiome develops early in life and that gut microbes shape immune function and relate to disease outcomes in childhood. She also explores next-generation microbiome therapeutics and research. Recorded on 11/07/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mind Machine Interfaces 38 mins – “Millions of Americans have difficulties with their physical functioning. Dr. Karunesh Ganguly explores the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The concept of bio-interactive neural interfaces sates to the early 20th century with successes like cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation and responsive stimulation. He is now working on neural interfaces for communication and movement by working to translate neural engineering based approaches into treatments for those with impaired function. Recorded on 11/21/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Minimum Wage Discussion 38 mins – “Jacob Vigdor of the University of Washington talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the impact of Seattle’s minimum wage increases in recent years. Vigdor along with others from the Evans School of Public Policy and Governance have tried to measure the change in employment, hours worked, and wages for low-skilled workers in Seattle. He summarizes those results here arguing that while some workers earned higher wages, some or all of the gains were offset by reductions in hours worked and a reduction in the rate of job creation especially for low-skilled workers.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nobel Prizes in Virology 49 mins – “From the 16th Smögen Summer Symposium on Virology, Vincent speaks with Erling Norrby about how he has used archival material to provide insight into early Nobel Prizes for research on viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Erling Norrby ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Norman Maclean author 12 mins – “Norman Maclean published A River Runs Through It when he was seventy-three, and only after his children implored him to write down the stories about fly-fishing, brotherhood, and the wilds of Montana that he’d told them for years. The resulting novella—published forty years ago last month—is a classic of economy and clarity. A few years later, Pete Dexter visited Maclean in Montana and profiled him for Esquire in “The Old Man and the River.” Dexter, a National Book Award winner, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the master class he got from Maclean in what truly matters most—in writing, nature, and life.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

NSA Surveillance for Lawyers 25 mins – “Edward Snowden’s leaks about NSA surveillance have been a hot topic in the media for the last few months. But what do lawyers, specifically, need to worry about? The answer is: a lot. On this edition of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq. and John W. Simek take the stage and examine NSA surveillance as it relates to lawyers. Tune in for an overview of Snowden and the NSA surveillance controversy, how effective (or ineffective) encrypting data is, whether the surveillance is having a chilling effect on lawyers, how to abide by the Model Rules of Professionalism 1.6, and an answer to the underlying question – has George Orwell’s dystopia, 1984, arrived a few decades late?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Osama bin Laden Killer 12 mins – “In March 2013, the man who shot and killed Osama bin Laden came forward to tell his story for the first time in “The Shooter,” by Phil Bronstein. It is a report of the celebrated mission by turns captivating, astonishing, and visceral, but also heart-breaking: The shooter decided to break his silence because, now a civilian, he feared for the safety of his family, was concerned about a life without a safety net, and he wanted to shine a light on a little-known and worrisome aspect of Special Forces service. Bronstein, the executive chair of the Center for Investigative Reporting, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss why the shooter decided to finally emerge and what he’s doing now.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Parenting 42 mins – “Obstetrician gynecologist Amy Tuteur and author of Push Back, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Tuteur argues that natural parenting–the encouragement to women to give birth without epidurals or caesarians and to breastfeed–is bad for women’s health and has little or no benefit for their children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Photographic History 18 mins – “In the 21st century, we often assume that a picture captures what really happened in a given moment. But on this week’s show, Joanne and Brian look at the early days of photography – when Americans had to figure out how to ‘read’ images – and learn if photos should be trusted at all. Historian Martha Sandweiss explains how an unusual set of daguerreotypes changed the way she thinks about photography.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Populist Curtain in Poland and Hungary 14 mins – “In 1946, Winston Churchill coined a memorable phrase: “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an iron curtain has descended across the continent,” he said. Today the Soviet Union has gone, but populist parties are in government in every country along the route of the Iron Curtain, as defined by Churchill. In this series, political scientist Yascha Mounk travels that route, and finds out what is changing under these new governments in smaller cities, far away from the capitals. He speaks to supporters and opponents of the populist parties and builds up a complex picture of Europe in a time of flux. Yascha begins in the north in the Polish city of Szczecin (Stettin) – where Solidarity was originally created. Today the PIS party governs the country, with its appeal to traditional religious values and social conservatism. Critics say it is attacking independent institutions, especially the judiciary. Szczecin saw vigorous protest against a law restricting abortion. He stays on the former Eastern side of the curtain by travelling on to Sopron, Hungary – the site of the picnic which led to the first mass breach of the Iron Curtain, then to the fall of the Berlin Wall. Victor Orban’s Fidesz party is accused of attacking civil society and the freedom of the press in his pursuit of an “illiberal democracy” – but there are forces fighting back locally.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Presidential Campaigns 12 mins- “Published in 1992, Richard Ben Cramer’s What It Takes: The Way to the White House remains the richest and most unvarnished account of the personal price of running for president. The irony, as Cramer pointed out to C-SPAN shortly after the book came out, is that to become president a candidate must sacrifice the entire life that had prepared him or her for office in the first place. Earlier this year longtime Esquire political correspondent Charles P. Pierce joined host David Brancaccio to discuss how Cramer’s book—which was excerpted in three parts in Esquire—continues to shape how we understand presidential politics and the psyches of those with the hubris to seek the highest office.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Ransomware Crisisin Law 17 mins – “To those unfamiliar with ransomware, it is a malicious software that effectively holds your files hostage until you pay a ransom. For lawyers, this could mean losing or compromising the data that keeps your business running smoothly. In this episode of Digital Detectives, hosts Sharon Nelson and John Simek discuss this malware with the CEO of LMG Security, Sherri Davidoff. Sherri divulges what we know about ransomware, what to do when it has infected your computer, and how to prevent data loss. While there are few ways to stop the infection when it has started, backing up your information and educating your team on malware countermeasures can significantly lessen ransomware’s impact on your business. Sherri Davidoff is the CEO of LMG Security, a cybersecurity and digital forensics company. She has more than a decade of experience as an information security professional, specializing in penetration testing, forensics, social engineering testing and web application assessments.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Respiratory Syncytial Virus in Children 17 mins – “Inuit babies ‘don’t have a lobby’: Doctor petitions to expand use of palivizumab against respiratory virus – A petition based on research by Dr. Anna Banerji is calling for Nunavut to expand the use of an antibody to all Inuit babies to protect them against a contagious respiratory virus. But the territory’s health department says it needs “conclusive evidence” to change its policy.” At the link find the title, “Download Inuit babies ‘don’t have a lobby’:….”, right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Robert Noyce 9 mins – “It was a meeting of two American masters: Robert Noyce, who, in inventing the integrated computer chip and founding Intel, willed Silicon Valley into being, and Tom Wolfe, who, in holding a magnifying glass over the social and class currents that shape America, rewrote the laws of what it meant to be a journalist. Their resulting Esquire story from 1983, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce,” remains one of the most revealing and entertaining portraits of early Silicon Valley and the personalities, imagination, and freewheeling moxie that triggered and continue to power the computer revolution. Kara Swisher, who spent two decades covering digital issues for The Wall Street Journal before cofounding the influential technology site Re/code, joins host David Brancaccio to discuss what both Noyce and Wolfe wrought, and how the influence of each—in computers and nonfiction writing, respectively—remains as powerful and mesmerizing as ever.” At the link find the title, “The Tinkerings of Robert Noyce, by Tom Wolfe,” – you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sony Hack 19 mins – “In November of 2014, hackers infiltrated Sony’s computer network lifting terabytes of corporate data, human resources information, internal intel, films, corporate emails, and other valuable information. This led the corporate world to question how protected we really are from cyber attacks. In the 1990’s, the only computer issue was viruses, but the attack vectors have since changed. Companies and individuals are now subject to spear phishing, spyware attacks, malware, drive-by downloads, and browsers. What steps are now necessary to keep hackers from accessing your valuable data? And on a separate but equally interesting subject for lawyers, who really was behind the Sony attack?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Special Masters in Court 18 mins – “In this October edition of Digital Detectives, co-hosts Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc. and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, join returning guest, attorney Craig Ball, to talk about special masters in e-discovery. Craig describes how an ESI special master gets involved in a case, what a special master does to fix broken discovery efforts and how to select an ESI special master.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ted Williams 8 mins – “Richard Ben Cramer’s masterful profile of Ted Williams from 1986 is often cited as one of the greatest magazine stories of all time. It’s about a sports idol who wanted fame but hated celebrity, who shouted louder than anyone but demanded privacy, who wanted to be the best at everything, always, and thus wanted to be immortal. Former Esquire editor David Hirshey joins host David Brancaccio to discuss the enigmatic and bigger-than-life Teddy Ballgame and the journalist who finally uncovered his essence.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Tick Borne Diseases 39 mins – “Ticks are vectors for human disease, including Lyme disease. Semay Chou studies the vector–pathogen relationships at UCSF. Here she discusses strategies for blocking tick-borne diseases and what we can learn from ticks. Recorded on 11/14/2019.” At the link you can watch, or right-click “Audio MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump and California Air Pollution Standards 18 mins – “The latest move from the Trump administration threatens to set in motion a massive legal battle and plunge automakers into uncertainty. The Post’s Juliet Eilperin explains how much power a president has over national environmental policy.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Trumps Inaccurate Hurricane Forecast 18 mins – “Weather editor Andrew Freedman explains how Trump’s inaccurate hurricane tweet led to worrying implications for NOAA and the NWS, and what happens when a president politicizes scientific institutions.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Virology History 75 mins – “William Summers joins the TWiV team to discuss some virology history, including the ever-changing concept of ‘virus’ and the contribution of phage research to the study of animal viruses. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit Guest: William Summers” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research at Karolinska Institute P2 57 mins – “In the second episode from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Vincent speaks with Jan Albert, Petter Brodin, and Anna Smed-Sörensen about their work on enterovirus D68, systems immunology, and human pulmonary viral infection and inflammation Hosts: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Jan Albert, Petter Brodin, and Anna Smed-Sörensen” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virology Research at Karolinska Institute P1 47 mins – “From the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Vincent speaks with Niklas Björkström, Ali Mirazimi, and Matti Sällberg about their work on the impact of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on NK cells, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus vaccines, and immunotherapy to block entry of hepatitis B and D viruses. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Niklas Björkström, Ali Mirazimi, and Matti Sällberg ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Careers 85 mins – “TWiV travels to Rutgers University to speak with Brad, Kay, Siobain, and Kim about their careers and their work on viruses of plants, fungi, bacteria, diatoms, and coccolithophores. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, and Brianne Barker Guests: Brad Hillman, Kay Bidle, Siobain Duffy, and Kim Thamatrakoln” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Infectivity 74 mins – “The TWiV team reveals the protein corona that surrounds virus particles and influences infectivity and amyloid aggregation, and a proofreading-impaired herpesvirus that produces quasispecies-like populations. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Alan Dove, and Rich Condit Guest: Kiki Warren” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Research 67 mins – “At Aarhus University in Denmark, Vincent speaks with Trine Mogensen, Søren Paludan, Ole Søgaard, and Madalina Carter-Timofte about their careers and their work on sensing herpesviral DNA, immunodeficiencies that predispose to severe viral infections, and the path to a cure for HIV/AIDS.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Virus Research 69 mins – “The League of Extraordinary Virologists celebrate the eradication of wild poliovirus type 3, and consider the effectiveness of an influenza vaccine produced in insect cells, and how small RNAs are protecting the Koala germline from retroviral invasion. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

War and Terrorism in Cyberspace 20 mins – “The phrase”data breach” now seems common, and looking at this infographic, data breaches are more common than we think. These days, we’re more inclined to wonder when we’ll be hacked, not if, and perhaps we wonder where, or what service we use, will be next. Then there is the issue or ransomware. Data breaches that are familiar, like the ones at Target, JP Morgan, and Home Depot, are usually organized by hackers working towards financial gain. All of that customer data is worth something, and though such data breaches make the news for the consumer angle, there is a cyber war happening with military and political objectives—with potentially far more damaging results. Cyber terrorists and militaries have already developed technologies that are able to hack into important data systems, destroy critical infrastructure, and take down crucial things like power grids and financial systems. If this does not scare you, you should know that there are almost no direct laws that deal with the ramifications of cyber attacks, the contractors who built the failing technology, or innocent bystanders. On this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview cybersecurity expert David Bodenheimer about the effects of cyber attacks, whether they are likely to proliferate, the connection between the private sector and government defense, and the legal risks to contractors and bystanders. Bodenheimer first explains how economic cyber crimes are different than cyber war, and gives some examples like the US cyber security threat in 2009, the 2007 cyberattacks on Estonia, and Stuxnet, a computer worm that destroyed many control systems in Iranian nuclear plants. He explains that there is a global cyber race and, in a few years, no self-respecting military will be without cyber attack capabilities. Unfortunately, there are no international treaties or laws that directly govern cyber weapons and war. Bodenheimer also discusses US laws that federal agencies and contractors could face to account for damages. These could include the DHS SAFETY Act, Public Law 85-804, and various legislative proposals, but there is no clean fit.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select save file and OK to get the podcast.

Whales in America P1 39 mins – “Whale deaths are reaching record numbers in 2019. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Association, gray whale deaths are “notably greater than the average” and have led the NOAA to declare the occurrence an Unusual Mortality Event (UME). In addition, NOAA considers the death rates of North Atlantic right whales an urgent conservation crisis leading the U.S. to begin working with Canada this month to help protect the species. On this episode, Brian, Nathan and Joanne explore how Native American whalers faced stereotypes within the industry, how whaling went from boom to bust, and learn how a real white whale named Mocha Dick became the inspiration for Herman Melville’s novel.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whales in America P2 31 mins – “Whale deaths are reaching record numbers in 2019. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Association, gray whale deaths are “notably greater than the average” and have led the NOAA to declare the occurrence an Unusual Mortality Event (UME). In addition, NOAA considers the death rates of North Atlantic right whales an urgent conservation crisis leading the U.S. to begin working with Canada this month to help protect the species. Brian, Nathan, Joanne and Ed uncover the story of Cabin Boys who were women in disguise, find out why a decomposing whale was turned away from a Midwestern Town, and learn all about the Black whaler and entrepreneur who became one of the wealthiest men in America.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Whistleblowers and Trump 21 mins – “President Trump’s targeted effort to discredit, and reveal the name of, a government employee raises questions about legal protections for whistleblowers — and the repercussions for whoever might disclose his or her identity to the public.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Women in Congress 54 mins – “Today, 131 women serve in the House and Senate, making Congress the most female and most diverse it’s ever been. But women in politics continue to face an uphill battle. Even after their election, Congresswomen such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib have faced criticism for their choice of clothing and language. One radio commentator in Atlanta even suggested Lucy McBath should “go back to the kitchen.” We look at the history of “women in Congress,” how much progress we’ve made and how much work lies ahead.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

WWI Remembrance 49 mins – “On November 11, 1918, Germany formally surrendered to the Allied Powers, about 19 months after the United States entered the conflict. On this episode, Brian and Nathan reflect on how, 100 years later, “the war to end all wars” is still with Americans.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Yaba in Bangladesh 19 mins – “Thousands of Bangladeshi addicts are hooked on Yaba – a mix of methamphetamine and caffeine. It’s a powerful drug that gives big bangs for small bucks. The Yaba epidemic has ripped through the population of Bangladesh, urban and rural, poor, middle-class and rich. This is a drug that’s manufactured in industrial quantities in the jungles of neighbouring Myanmar. As the economy of Bangladesh has boomed, drug lords have worked to create new markets for their product. And the Rohingya crisis – when nearly a million fled Myanmar for Bangladesh – has created further opportunities for the traffickers, as desperate refugees have been employed as drug mules. The Bangladeshi Prime Minister, Sheikh Hasina, declared a ‘war on drugs’ last May. Thousands have been arrested. But critics see a disturbing trend – hundreds of suspected Yaba dealers have been killed by law enforcement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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