Media Mining Digest 443: AI and Machine Learning, Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment, Ankle Surgery and Recovery, Asylum Seekers, Blockchain Book, Bone Fractures, Brain Health, Cancer Prevention, CAR-T Cells, Cassava in Africa, Chronic Pain Treatment, Cotton Seed Edible, Dementia Impact, Drug Prohibition, European Central Bank, GE Crop Ban in Australia, George Will, Hip and Knee Replacement, HIV Prevention, Homeless Drug Deaths, Hong Kong Protests, Immune Functions, Insulin, Irelands Connections, Kidney Transplants, Knee and Cartilage Injuries, Mind-Machine Interfaces, Mosquito Control, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Nitrogen Fixation in Plants, Nitrogen Fixation in Soil, Opioid Crisis History, Opioids Heroin and Fentanyl, Paleontology, Precision Medicine, Pre-diabetes, Radical Markets, Recession Preparation, Small Things, Soonish Book, Tick-borne Diseases,

AI and Machine Learning 25 mins – “The genomics era has generated tremendous data sets, yet the information they reveal is limited by the human biases that search them.  Are there ways to examine complex data sets for hidden patterns that can unearth new perspectives in biology?  This is the role of machine learning, and the patterns form the basis of artificial intelligence that then executes new tasks.  While these concepts seem difficult to fathom, Dr. Gabe Musso makes them understandable, and describes the ways they may be applied in contemporary contexts.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Alzheimer’s Disease 58 mins – “Dr. Geroges Naasan explores the principal clinical syndromes of Alzheimer’s Disease: memory, visual, language and frontal/executive. He also discusses neuropathology, genetic factors and modern biomarkers with colleagues from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. Recorded on 04/30/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment 56 mins – “Dr. Julio Rojas-Martinez discusses the pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer’s disease now and what is in development. Current approaches pursue early intervention in the dementia phase. Novel emerging strategies will likely accompany anti-amyloid and anti-tau approaches in the future. Then Sarah Dulaney, RN, describe dementia education, support, and non-pharmacological treatment strategies. Recorded on 05/14/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Alzheimer’s Therapeutics 37 mins “Dr. Aimee Kao looks at recent news in Alzheimer’s Disease therapeutics including drugs in development and the potential of stem cells and genome editing. Recorded on 10/24/2019. (#35238)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Ankle Surgery and Recovery 37 mins – “Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Daniel Thuillier looks at the options to treat severe ankle pain from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to surgery including ankle replacement and ankle fusion. Recorded on 05/23/2019. (#34797)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Asylum Seekers 45 mins – “Reports from the frontlines of the Trump administration’s “Remain in Mexico” asylum policy. We hear from asylum seekers waiting across the border in Mexico, in a makeshift refugee camp,  and from the officers who sent them there to wait in the first place. This episode won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for audio reporting, the first ever given for audio journalism.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Blockchain Book 11 mins – “What if the next big thing turned out to be the next everything? It would need to be a technology so powerful yet so pliable that it could find a place in every industry, any activity, and all manner of creativity. Blockchain is “The Next Everything” asserts Stephen P. Williams. His latest book offers an explanation in layman’s terms of how the technology works and even suggests reasons why so many people struggle to understand it. “What I find most exciting is that blockchain is a distributed technology, which is a new way of looking at the world,” Williams tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “We generally respond very well to top-down, hierarchical systems– president, father, mother, teacher, each telling us what to do,” he explains. “Blockchain technology allows for a distributed system where everyone who participates in the system has an equal say in how that system works. This presents huge potential for designing new ways of doing business, of creating, of communicating.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Bone Fractures 39 mins – “Fragility fractures occur in structurally weak bones due to aging and bone loss – osteoporosis. Dr. Anthony Ding explains what “fragility fractures” are, where they occur, what they mean to you, and how they are treated. Recorded on 05/02/2019. (#34795)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Brain Health 56 mins – “There are modifiable behaviors that may reduce the risk factor of Alzheimer’s: vascular disease, sedentary lifestyle, depression/stress, diet factors and alcohol. Kaitlin Casaletto talks about the benefits of an active lifestyle and proper nutrition. Then Dr. Joanna Hellmuth looks at how to decode direct-to-consumer interventions – dietary supplements – and the rise of pseudo-medicine for dementia. She explains that supplements may or may not be safe and that manufacturers can make broad claims without supporting evidence. Recorded on 05/21/2019. (#35136)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cancer and the Immune System 55 mins – “Interactive immune systems are at the center of cancer and other diseases. Dr. Matthew Krummel explores how the immune system can regulate cancer progression. Recorded on 10/31/2019. (#35239)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cancer Prevention 39 mins – “Worldwide there are 550,000 new cases of head and neck cancer a year. Dr. Jennifer Grandis explores prevention and an opportunity for chemo prevention, substances to stop cancer from developing. In particular, she looks at aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Recorded on 10/17/2019. (#35237)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

CAR-T Cells 20 mins – “Can we use genetic engineering to help the body’s immune system target cancer cells?  This is exactly what happens with CAR-T (chimeric antigen receptor) T-cell therapy.  CAR-T cells are T-cells, immune cells of the body that are reprogrammed to identify specific surface signatures that define specific types of cancer cells.  It allows these immune agents to seek and destroy cancer cells with great accuracy and with fewer side effects to traditional chemotherapy or radiation.  While in their infancy, these techniques show great promise for future therapies.  Today’s guest is Dr. Joe Fraietta, a leader in CAR-T cell solutions.  He explains how the technology works, describes its applications and future uses.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cassava in Africa 16 mins – “Cassava is a staple food crop in Africa and Asia, yet is widely unknown by the industrialized world.  While almost a billion people depend on this crop, production is limited by a series of diseases, and it also lacks critical nutrients that could help reverse local deficiencies. Dr. Chiedozie Egesi is a scientist dedicated to cassava improvement. He discusses the crop, the challenges to growth, and how biotechnology solutions could help facets of production.  They also discuss some of the recent momentum in biotech adoption in Africa.  Hosted by Modesta Abugu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Chronic Pain Treatment 50 mins – “Dr. Grace Dammann, medical director of the Pain Clinic at Laguna Honda Hospital, and seven of her colleagues talk about what does and does not work in the treatment of chronic pain. She talks as both a patient and a provider. There is also a discussion of various non-pharmacologic and complementary medicine modalities to treat pain. Recorded on 05/01/2019. (#34789)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Cotton in Kenya 14 mins – “Kenya is an emerging economy and has significant investment in advanced technologies.  However, a 2013 ban on biotech crops has limited farmer access to the most needed technologies for the field.  That moratorium is finally being lifted, as biotech cotton has been approved and will be available to farmers in 2020.  Farmers recognize the potential for Bt cotton to reduce or eliminate dependence on the insecticides currently required for production.  Today’s guest is Daniel Magondu, Chairman of the Society of Biotech Farmers of Kenya.  The episode is hosted by Modesta Abugu, a graduate student studying tomato improvement.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cotton Seed Edible 29 mins – “Cotton production is massive, but mostly used for fiber. The cotton seed is a tremendous potential resource as it contains high amounts of oil and high-quality protein.  However, the seeds are not directly edible by most mammals because they contain a toxic chemical called gossypol.  Gossypol is a terpenoid that the plant produces as a natural insecticide.  A team led by Dr. Keerti Rathore at Texas A&M University has worked for decades to produce cottonseed without gossypol. The plants have now been approved for production by USDA-APHIS and the FDA.  The technology may now be used to produce new cotton lines that generate massive amounts of high-protein seed, leading to new human food and animal feed, ultimately benefitting farmers, the environment and the food insecure.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Dementia Impact 56 mins – “Worldwide 50 million people live with dementia. By 2040 over 70% of them will be living in the developing world. Dr. Shamiel McFarlane explores the social and economic cost of dementia around the world.
Recorded on 05/28/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Drug Prohibition 39 mins – “The Drug Policy Alliance advances policies and attitudes that best reduce the harms of both drug use and drug prohibition, and promotes the sovereignty of individuals over their minds and bodies. California’s deputy director Laura Thomas talks about the history of drug prohibition, the consequences and a more effective path moving forward. Recorded on 05/22/2019. (#34792)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

European Central Bank 43 mins – “The European Central Bank (ECB) is facing significant challenges that are testing the potency of monetary policy. Confronting a slowing economy and an inflation rate persistently below its target of “close to but below 2 percent,” the ECB, over the objections of some of its top policymakers, recently cut a key interest rate to -0.5 percent and restarted its quantitative easing (QE) program of bond buying. Is monetary policy running out of ammunition in Europe? Is Europe heading for a recession? What will it take to get the Eurozone economy growing sustainably? What have we learned about the impact of negative interest rates and prolonged QE? How does the ECB respond to complaints from Germany about the impact of low rates on savers? What are the implications of Brexit for the Eurozone? On October 16, Philip Lane, a member of the ECB’s Executive Board and its chief economist, discussed these and other questions at a Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy event at Brookings. Before joining the ECB’s Executive Board in June 2019, Lane served four years as governor of the central bank of Ireland. A Ph.D. in economics from Harvard, he was previously on the faculty at Trinity College, Dublin.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up audio.

GE Crop Ban in Australia 25 mins – “While the country of Australia has been growing genetically-engineered crops for over 15 years, the state of South Australia has banned their use.  This moratorium has been in place since 2004, and requires farmers to shift to alternative crop protection strategies that often have a significant yield penalty. Recent changes in political representation in the region appeared to be more farmer friendly, and many felt that change was coming. Unfortunately, local activists connected to Green Party representatives in Parliament, were able to derail efforts to end the moratorium. Today’s podcast meets with Caroline Rhodes, CEO of Grain Producers South Australia.  She describes the rationale behind the ban, the effects, and next steps to ensure seed sovereignty. Ultimately this is a case of restricting farmer choice, and a look into the playbook of how to manipulate politicians with fear, uncertainty and doubt.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

GE Crop Discussion 30 mins – “Dr. Stuart Smyth is no stranger to anyone that has watched social media.  As a leading ag economist he has consistently represented science and technology fairly and accurately, and tethered to his prolific publication of books and scholarly publication, he is a visible influencer in scientific and social media circles.  In today’s podcast we discuss his views on risks and benefits of GE crops, the rules of the EU and his home country of Canada.  We discuss the future of new technology, and made a few predictions about the next decade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

George Will 52 mins – “George Will talks about his new book, The Conservative Sensibility, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Will argues for a conservative vision that embraces the dynamic nature of life. Topics discussed include the current political landscape, the American founding, James Madison’s vision of government vs. Woodrow Wilson’s, Friedrich Hayek, and of course, a little baseball.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Hip and Knee Replacement 56 mins – “Orthopaedic surgeon Dr. Jeff Barry goes over the basics of hip and knee replacement and what’s improved over the last decade. Recorded on 05/30/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

HIV Prevention 30 mins – “While HIV incidence has remained stable in the industrialized world, the virus is still transmitted in the Developing World.  The development of methods of prophylaxis are critical to disease containment, yet moving products into affected areas is not practical or affordable.  Dr. Evangelia Vamvaka was part of a team that placed anti-HIV proteins into rice.  The rice produced a transgenic protein that inhibited the virus, and did so with great efficacy in the presence of other compounds from the plant.  The rice can be ground to a powder and potentially be used as an HIV preventative wherever rice is grown. Co-hosted by Lethbridge Canada high school student Michelle Wu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Homeless Drug Deaths 55 mins – “Dr. Barry Zevin is the medical director of Street Medicine and Shelter Health, San Francisco Department of Public Health. He describes programs to treat opioid use disorder in persons experiencing homelessness, safe consumption sites, and homeless deaths. Recorded on 04/17/2019. (#34787)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Hong Kong Protests 49 mins – “For over 100 days now, protesters in Hong Kong have taken to the streets every weekend. What it’s like to live through that.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Immune Functions 55 mins – “Microbiome expands the genetic and functional capacity of its human host. Susan Lynch explains that human microbiome develops early in life and that gut microbes shape immune function and relate to disease outcomes in childhood. She also explores next-generation microbiome therapeutics and research. Recorded on 11/07/2019. (#35240)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Insulin 4 mins – “Insulin is necessary to utilize the energy we obtain from carbohydrates. Diabetes is characterized by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production. Here, Dr. Sarah Kim briefly describes the crucial role insulin plays in the body. (#35068)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Irelands Connections 38 mins – “Brexit—the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union, has been scheduled to occur on October 31. But will it still happen? As events continue to evolve in Britain and in the European Union–including Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s likely failed attempt to hold new elections in December–where do things stand? Amanda Sloat, the Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, explains what’s been going on, and what to expect next in Brexit. Also on this episode, Joseph Parilla, fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, speaks to the issue of talent development as a component of city and regional economic development.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Kidney Transplants 37 mins – “The wait time for a kidney transplant from a deceased donor is many years. Dr. Brian Lee, Medical Director of the Living Kidney Donor Program at UCSF, discusses the risks and benefits of live donor kidney transplant, both for the donor and the recipient. He also talks about the importance of a crossmatch test and the National Kidney Registry and the Advanced Donor Program. Recorded on 10/23/2019. (#35232)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Knee and Cartilage Injuries 37 mins -“Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Drew Lansdown goes over the basic science of knee cartilage and looks at treatment options including injections, such as hyaluronic acid, and biologics, such as platelet rich plasma and mesenchymal stem cell injections. He also looks at surgical knee preservation options. Recorded on 05/16/2019. (#34796)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mind-Machine Interfaces 38 mins – “Millions of Americans have difficulties with their physical functioning. Dr. Karunesh Ganguly explores the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The concept of bio-interactive neural interfaces sates to the early 20th century with successes like cochlear implants, deep brain stimulation and responsive stimulation. He is now working on neural interfaces for communication and movement by working to translate neural engineering based approaches into treatments for those with impaired function. Recorded on 11/21/2019. (#35242)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Mosquito Control 21 mins – “The tiny mosquito is a nuisance in the industrialized world, yet around the world it is a ruthless killer, spreading blood-borne diseases that bring about pain and suffering, particularly in developing nations.  In many regions these are invasive species with little to no ecological role. For years scientists have used “sterile insect technique” to control them, a process that treats sexually compatible insects with radiation, rendering them infertile.  The low-fertility insects are released into the wild and crash problematic populations. The Oxitec company has a genetic solution.  Mosquitoes have been genetically engineered to contain a lethal gene that can be turned off in the laboratory with a simple chemical.  Upon release, these mosquitoes breed against target populations, spreading the lethal gene, and leaving the next generation inviable.  The process creates a reproductive dead end.  While amazingly successful, these trials have suffered from a lack of public acceptance….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Neurodegenerative Diseases 60 mins – “Alzheimer’s disease is the most common but not the only cause of dementia throughout the lifespan. Dr.Salvatore Spina discusses frontotemporal dementias and how they differ. Recorded on 05/07/2019.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Brain 60 mins – “Neurologist Dr. Serggio Lanata explores the neurodegenerative disease of the brain, what they have in common and how they differ. alzheimer’s is the most common neurodegenerative disease but there are several others including Parkinson’s, Huntington Disease and others. Recorded on 04/23/2019. (#34774)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Nigtrogen Fixation in Soil 34 mins – “Nitrogen is a reality of growing plants, and must be supplied to maximize crop yields.  At the same time our atmosphere is >70% nitrogen that is not usable by plants in its atmospheric form.  Humans have devised processes to “fix” nitrogen into plant usable forms, but they require energy and the products need to be transported, both leading to a substantial carbon footprint.  A number of microbes naturally fix nitrogen, yet do not form good associations with all plants.  Joyn Bio is a collaborative effort by a number of companies in chemistry and synthetic biology. Their CEO Dr. Michael Mille talks about efforts to engineer microbes that can form tight associations with crop plants and fix the nitrogen they need.  These strategies seek to lower the carbon footprint of farming, at the same time limiting nitrogen pollution by producing it directly in association with the plant that needs it.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nitrogen Fixation in Plants 24 mins – “Nitrogen is essential for crop growth.  That reality has led to intensive crop fertilization using nitrogen fixed through the Haber-Bosch process, which has energy costs in production and transport.  At the same time there are well known examples of nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with plants, as well as some that colonize within the plant itself.  Can these naturally occurring bacteria actually be used within the plant to assist in the nitrogen fixation process?  Nolan Berg joins the podcast from Azotics, a company with a pioneer product.  This bacterial strain lives within the plant, fixing nitrogen and limiting the need for exogenous application.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis History 55 mins – “Dr. Phillip Coffin talks about the history of opioid crisis and available medical treatments. Coffin is the director of substance use research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health and assistant professor in the division of HIV/AIDS at the University of California, San Francisco Recorded on 05/08/2019. (#34790)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Opioid Overdose Treatment 39 mins – “In the U.S. 47,000 people died from opioid overdose in 2017 alone but most people who could benefit from medications for opioid use disorder (OUD) do not receive them. Dr. Scott Steiger argues that OUD is a treatable chronic brain disease and should be treated accordingly. Medications for OUD are effective and save lives but they are not available to many people who need them; denying access to them is denying appropriate medical treatment. Recorded on 04/24/2019. (#34788)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Opioids, Heroin and Fentanyl 39 mins – “Deaths from drug overdose are greater than from car accidents or guns. Dr. Daniel Ciccarone, talks about the triple wave: opioids, heroin and fentanyl. This epidemic is the worst in decades and a comprehensive response is needed. Recorded on 05/15/2019. (#34791)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Paleontology 39 mins – “There’s a lot that can be gained from unearthing the past — learning about oneself, learning about others. But, it doesn’t always go how you’d expect.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Pre-diabetes 3 mins – “UCSF endocrinologist Dr. Umesh Masharani explores what pre-diabetes means. (#35244)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Precision Medicine 25 mins – “There is a massive amount of human genomic DNA sequence data, and it is now possible to identify correlates with specific disease, drug sensitivity and physiological variation.  The concept of “genomic medicine” or “precision medicine” is that therapeutic interventions are guided by genetic information.  In today’s podcast we speak with Dr. Julie Johnson.  Dr. Johnson is a Dean and Distinguished Professor of Pharmacy at the University of Florida.  She outlines what precision medicine is, along with some of its strengths and limitations, as well as some predictions of new approaches on the horizon to improve delivery of specific therapies.  Co-hosted by Dr. Karla Claudio.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Radical Markets 42 mins – “Economist Glen Weyl of Microsoft Research New England and Visiting Senior Research Scholar at Yale University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book (co-authored with Eric Posner) Radical Markets. Weyl urges a radical transformation of land and housing markets using a new federal real estate tax based on self-assessment. Owners would be required to sell their houses at the self-assessed price. Weyl argues this would eliminate the market power home owners have in the re-sale market and the revenue tax would could be used to reduce inequality. In the last part of the conversation, Weyl proposes an overhaul of U.S. immigration policy by having residents sponsor immigrants for a fee.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Preparation 77 mins – “During the Great Recession, cities and states saw revenue declines and expenditure increases. This led to record levels of fiscal stress resulting in service cuts, deferred maintenance of infrastructure, and reduced payments to pensions and other liabilities. This webinar will focus on how state and local governments can adopt best practices and strategies now in order to mitigate the impacts of any future recessions. This may include maintaining adequate cash balances, stress testing revenues and expenditures, and reviewing fees and benefits. To understand the practices and strategies firsthand, we will be joined by Michael Nadol, managing director of the PFM Group, and Laura Porter, managing director and head of U.S. public finance at Fitch Ratings, in conversation with the Hutchins Center’s David Wessel. The presentations will be followed by a discussion with webinar participants.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As”, then “Save” from the pop-up menu.

Recession Preparation 77 mins – “When the next recession comes, and it certainly will, how will policymakers respond? In a new volume of policy proposals from the Hamilton Project at Brookings and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth, a group of experts propose new and updated antirecession solutions to boost the economy and save jobs. These ideas center on the concept of automatic stabilizers, which are simply policy responses that trigger when a crisis is starting, and when policymakers may be too overwhelmed by the crisis to respond. On this episode, Jay Shambaugh—a senior fellow at Brookings and director of the Hamilton Project—and Heather Boushey—executive director and chief economist of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth—address these policy proposals. Also on today’s show, Senior Fellow Molly Reynolds discusses what steps the House of Representatives would have to take in any impeachment process, and also other business that Congress is pursuing, including a budget deal.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Small Things 41 mins – “Stories about being little. Secret writings in tiny letters. The power of a very small number. And a medication that’s supposed to cure shortness.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Soonish Book 47 mins – “Ecologist Kelly Weinersmith and cartoonist Zach Weinersmith–creator of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal–talk with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about their new book, Soonish–a look at cutting-edge and not-quite cutting edge technologies. The Weinersmiths speculate about everything from asteroid mining to robotic house construction to the nasal cycle and how the human body and medicine might be transformed in the future. They discuss the likelihood of some really crazy stuff coming along and changing our lives as well as the possible downsides of innovation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Tick-borne Diseases 39 mins – “Ticks are vectors for human disease, including Lyme disease. Semay Chou studies the vector–pathogen relationships at UCSF. Here she discusses strategies for blocking tick-borne diseases and what we can learn from ticks. Recorded on 11/14/2019. (#35241)” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Thanks for stopping by.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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