MMD449: Active Measures book, Advertising and Branding, AI Research in China and US, Alpha Girls in Silicon Valley, Amazon Publishing, America’s Great Divide, Apple and FBI, Bootstrapping a Business, Bot Research, Brazil Democracy, Cadillac CMO, Chinese AI Giant, Congressional Reform, Craigslist Killer, Crossfire Hurricane, Cultural Norms, Digging Up Bones, Disinformation, Election Safety, Electronic Discovery, Future of Media, H1B Holder Ban, Hackers for Hire, Harmful Chemicals, iFlytek, Impeachment Inquiry, Industrial Espionage, Iranian Secret Documents, Kim Jong Un, Library Technology, Medical Nihilism, Monopolies, Nematodes, in Space, News Guard, Opioid Crisis, Police Violence, Produce Varieties, Protect and Moderate Online Speech, Puerto Rico Scorcese, Trumps Assault on Truth, Trumps War on Presidency, Warrior Cops, Wikipedia, World Food Prize, Zorin for Linux

Exercise your ears: the 54 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 802 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,000 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Active Measures book 34 mins – “In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth miniseries on disinformation, Quinta Jurecic and Alina Polyakova spoke with Thomas Rid about his new book, “Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare.” Yesterday’s episode of the Lawfare Podcast featured a conversation between Thomas and Jack Goldsmith about the book, focusing on the early history of disinformation through the 1980s. In this episode, Alina and Quinta follow up with a discussion with Thomas on disinformation in the digital age, along with some questions about what it’s like to interview former KGB and Stasi officials about their influence campaigns.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Advertising and Branding 56 mins – “Author and Advertising Executive Rory Sutherland of Ogilvy talks about his book Alchemy with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Sutherland makes the case for the magic (yes, magic!) of advertising and branding in helping markets work well. This is a wide-ranging conversation on consumer choice, public policy, travel, real estate, and corporate decision-making using insights from behavioral economics and decades of experience in the world of advertising.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AI Research in China and US 19 mins – “Who’s spending big? Does it matter? Zach Arnold and Ashwin Acharya join the show to discuss their reports on Chinese public sector AI R&D spending and strengthening America’s AI workforce.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Alpha Girls in Silicon Valley 42 mins – “Julian Guthrie shares the untold story of four dynamic women, Magdalena Yesil, Mary Jane Elmore, Theresia Gouw and Sonja Hoel Perkins, who helped shape the tech landscape of Silicon Valley. Through grit and ingenuity, these trailblazers rewrote the rules and conquered the challenges of working in a male-dominated venture capital industry. Hear more about their personal stories as we celebrate the achievements and relentless perseverance of these extraordinary women. In association with Santa Clara County Library District, Santa Clara County Office of Education, the San Jose Public Library and DeAnza College Speaker photo (from left to right): Theresia Gouw, Sonja Hoel Perkins, Mary Jane Elmore, Magdalena Yesil and Julian Guthrie” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Amazon Publishing 10 mins – “Announced in October 2012 and completed the following July, the merger of Penguin and Random House reduced the Big Six by one. In the years since, trade book publishing has counted its leading houses on a single hand. But that calculation may be quietly changing. If you’re wondering who is the insurgent publisher, then maybe you should ask Alexa. The Amazon smart speaker and virtual assistant is one element of a multi-faceted effort looking to make Amazon a leading force in publishing trade books for adults and children. Over the last two decades, of course, Amazon became the dominant player in book sales. Amazon Publishing, launched in 2009, is also on the rise, says literary agent Mark Gottlieb of Trident Media Group. As its differentiator, he explains, Amazon Publishing has developed strategic marketing programs and sophisticated online author services. Want to know your book’s current monthly sales numbers? Just ask Alexa that, too. “What Amazon is able to do, not just as a publisher but also a retailer, is very similar to what publishers used to do,” Gottlieb tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. In the past, he explains, publishers Scribner and Scholastic operated bookstores from their offices in Manhattan. “Amazon really owns their online storefront in that [same] way, and they can place a lot of their own titles there,” says Gottlieb. “Just look at the Amazon top 100 and see how many titles there are from Amazon imprints.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

America’s Great Divide P5, P6, P7, P8 77 mins – “FRONTLINE begins its 2020 election year coverage with a two-part, four-hour documentary series investigating America’s increasingly bitter, divided and toxic politics. From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk and his team, America’s Great Divide: From Obama to Trump draws on revelatory new interviews with key political and cultural figures, as well as an unparalleled archive of in-depth broadcast reporting across two presidential administrations, to offer crucial context for the current moment.” At the link right-click “https://soundcloud.com/frontlinepbs/sets/frontline-pbs-americas-great,” and select section to hear. You can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Apple and FBI 63 mins – “In our 317th episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast, Stewart Baker interviews Mara Hvistendahl, investigative journalist at The Intercept and author of the new book, The Scientist and the Spy. Stewart is also joined by Matthew Heiman, Gus Hurwitz (@gushurwitz), and Nick Weaver (@ncweaver) to discuss… “ At the link right-click “Download the 317th Episode (mp3)” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Bootstrapping a Business 35 mins – “Clare Vivier first got the idea for her handbag business while working as a journalist for French TV. She was looking for functional, but stylish laptop cases and, when she couldn’t find one, she made her own. Many other designs followed in the years after, including chic handbags made with luxury materials in colorful, understated designs. In the decade since that first design, Clare has upgraded her business, Clare V, into a well-respected handbag and accessories line that is stocked in retailers ranging from Net-a-Porter to Nordstrom, along with her flagship store in Silver Lake. Tune in to this episode of Girlboss Radio to hear how Clare bootstrapped the business early on, why she insists on producing products locally and how she knew she found the right business partner. Plus, hear how one encounter with a buyer provided a difficult, but valuable lesson on how to best price your products.” At the link left click “Share,” then right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save As” from the pop-up menu.

Bot Research 34 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Darius Kazemi, an internet artist and bot-maker extraordinaire. Recently, there have been a lot of ominous headlines about bots—including an NPR article stating that nearly 50 percent of all Twitter commentary about the pandemic has been driven by bots rather than human users. That sounds bad—but Darius thinks that we shouldn’t be so worried about bots. In fact, he argues, a great deal of reporting and research on bots is often wrong and actually causes harm by drumming up needless worry and limiting online conversations. So, what is a bot, anyway? Do they unfairly take the blame for the state of things online? And if weeding out bot activity isn’t a simple way to cultivate healthier online spaces, what other options are there for building a less unpleasant internet?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Brazil’s Democracy 20 mins – “In her new film, The Edge of Democracy, director Petra Costa tells the story of how Brazil went from a rising star among free nations to a democracy on the verge of collapse. With unprecedented access, Costa documents the rise and fall of Brazil’s Workers Party and its charismatic leader Lula da Silva, the impeachment of Brazil’s first female president, Dilma Rousseff, and the rise of President Jair Bolsonaro who has ushered in, as Costa puts it, a new era of rule by the bible, the bullet, and the banks. After the end of military rule, many had high hopes for Brazil, yet the Bolsonaro regime has been marked by an increase in violent repression and gender-based violence. In this very personal conversation, Laura and Petra discuss life and politics in the U.S. and Brazil—nations built on land theft, genocide, and extraction. They wonder if democracy can survive in states that fail to reckon with their pasts.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.Cadillac CMO 23 mins – “The strategy behind smart marketing, with Melissa Grady, CMO of Cadillac – Marketing isn’t exactly what it used to be 10 years ago (or even five or three years ago). Today, companies big and small are spending big budgets on targeted ads, social media, influencers, and more. But does that mean the fundamentals of marketing no longer apply? On this week’s episode of Girlboss Radio, we get some answers, thanks to Melissa Grady, the CMO of Cadillac. As CMO of Cadillac, Melissa leads strategic marketing around the world for the luxury car dealer. Tune in to hear Sophia chat with Melissa about how Cadillac has continued to find new and ~smarter~ ways to target customers, why she’s so excited about Super Cruise and what’s next for the automobile company. Plus, hear Melissa’s best advice for managers and team leaders.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Chinese AI Giant 28 mins – “In 1937, the year that George Orwell was shot in the neck while fighting fascists in Spain, Julian Chen was born in Shanghai. His parents, a music teacher and a chemist, enrolled him in a school run by Christian missionaries, and like Orwell he became fascinated by language. He studied English, Russian, and Mandarin while speaking Shanghainese at home. Later he took on French, German, and Japanese. In 1949, the year Mao Zedong came to power and Orwell published 1984, learning languages became dangerous in China. In the purges of the late 1950s, intellectuals were denounced, sent to labor camps, and even executed. Chen, who by then was a student at prestigious Peking University, was banished to a Beijing glass factory. Chen’s job was to cart wagons full of coal and ash to and from the factory’s furnace. He kept his mind nimble by listening to his coworkers speak. At night, in the workers’ dormitory, he compiled a sort of linguistic ethnography for the Beijing dialect. He finished the book around 1960. Soon after, Communist Party apparatchiks confiscated it….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Congressional Reform 61 mins – “The United States Congress is a vital institution for pluralistic American governance. Congress is the one body that can represent the broad diversity of the vast American republic and forge complex compromises across competing and overlapping interests and values. In a moment of great challenges facing American political institutions, how can Congress fulfill its role as a co-equal branch of governance? What changes are necessary in order for Congress to measure up to the contemporary challenges facing American political institutions? And what changes are possible in an institution as old and as complex as the U.S. Congress? On January 9, Brookings co-hosted an event with the American Political Science Association and R Street Institute, featuring members of the Task Force Project on Congressional Reform. The expert panel discussed their report on the challenges Congress faces and the reforms needed to support a transformational legislature.” At the link click the “audio only” option, then right-click “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Craigslist Killer 23 mins – “The case of the Craiglist Killer has lived on through digital forensics. The Boston Police released their case files in the Craigslist Killer case to the Boston Phoenix which then published a remarkable story about the investigation in April of 2012. Digital Detectives co-hosts, Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President of Sensei Enterprises, Inc., and John W. Simek, Vice President of Sensei Enterprises, explore the intricacies of this captivating case including: evidence from surveillance cameras and privacy implications, getting social media evidence and poaching wireless networks.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Crossfire Hurricane 81 mins – “By Elena Kagan – Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz appeared before the Senate Judiciary Committee to discuss his recently released report on the Russia investigation. The hearing was contentious and occasionally devolved into speechify-ing. But we cut out all the unnecessary repetition and theatrics to leave you with just the questions and answers that you need to hear.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Cultural Norms 46 mins – “Psychologist Michele Gelfand talks about her book, Rule Makers, Rule Breakers, with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Gelfand distinguishes between loose cultures and tight cultures–the degree to which culture and regulation restrict behavior or leave it alone. Gelfand explores the causes of why some cultures are tighter than others and the challenges societies face when culture is too tight or too loose. She also applies these ideas of cultural tightness and looseness to corporate mergers and family life.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Digging Up Bones 12 mins – “We wanted to address the so-called “CSI Effect,” caused by the simplification of forensic science in popular culture. CSIand like-minded TV shows–with their heroic investigators solving crimes in mere minutes–mislead viewers and affect real court cases. The reality of investigation is much slower and more complex, but no less fascinating. Hosts Michal Meyer and Robert Kenworthy speak with experts Anna Dhody, a physical and forensic anthropologist, and Lisa Rosner, a historian. They discuss the early days of solving crime and the on-going chemistry of the human body throughout life and death.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to download the podcast.

Disinformation 29 mins – “Jack Goldsmith spoke with Thomas Rid about Rid’s new book, “Active Measures: The Secret History of Disinformation and Political Warfare.” The book is about the history of information operations and influence campaigns, and we’re bringing you a two-part Lawfare Podcast to discuss it in detail. On this episode, Jack and Thomas discuss the history of disinformation from the beginning of the 20th century through the 1980s. Tomorrow on the Lawfare Podcast’s “Arbiters of Truth” miniseries on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic will be sharing their discussion with Thomas about his research starting at the beginning of the internet age.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 32 mins – “For this week’s episode of our Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Alina Polyakova talked to Aric Toler of Bellingcat, a collective that has quickly become the gold-standard for open source and social media investigations. Aric recently published a blog post in response to a New York Times article on Russian influence campaigns—one retweeted by former President Barak Obama no less—that Aric called “How Not to Report on Disinformation.” Evelyn and Alina asked him about the article and what exactly Aric thought was wrong with it as a case study in the challenges for reporters writing about disinformation operations. When are reporters helping to uncover threats to democracy, and when are they giving oxygen to fringe actors?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 32 mins – “On this week’s episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Craig Silverman, the media editor for Buzzfeed News and one of the leading journalists covering the disinformation beat. Craig is credited with coining the phrase “Fake News.” Evelyn spoke with him about how he feels about that, especially now that the phrase has taken on a life of its own. They also talked about a book Craig edited, the second edition of the “Verification Handbook,” available online now, that equips journalists with the tools they need to verify the things they see online. Journalism and reporting on disinformation has never been so important—but the internet has never been so chaotic, and journalists are not only observers of disinformation, but also targets of it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 34 mins – “This week on Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Deen Freelon, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina Hussman School of Journalism and Media. Deen’s work focuses on data science and political expression on social media, and they discussed research he conducted on tweets from the Internet Research Agency troll farm and their attempts to influence U.S. politics, including around the 2016 election. In a recent article, Deen and his coauthors found that IRA tweets from accounts presenting themselves as Black Americans received particularly high engagement from other users on Twitter—which raises interesting questions about the interaction of race and disinformation. They also talked about what the data show on whether the IRA actually succeeded in changing political beliefs and just how many reporters quoted IRA trolls in their news reports without realizing it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Disinformation 37 mins – “By Jen Patja Howell – In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Whitney Phillips and Ryan Milner, authors of the new book, “You Are Here: A Field Guide for Navigating Polarized Speech, Conspiracy Theories, and Our Polluted Media Landscape.” Phillips is an assistant professor in Communications and Rhetorical Studies at Syracuse University, and Milner is an associate professor of Communication at the College of Charleston. In “You Are Here,” they look at the uniquely disorienting aspects of the current online information environment and how that is exacerbated by aspects of “internet culture” that don’t make sense from the outside. They discussed the challenges for journalists in understanding and reporting on that culture and how that can fuel information pollution, how the internet got to this point where everything is so polluted, and, of course, what QAnon has to do with it.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Election Safety 28 mins – “COVID-19 is still rampaging around the country, primaries in several states did not go as planned, and, of course, there are Russians lurking in the background. With all of this happening around us, what is going to happen with the election we are about to hold in November? Benjamin Wittes checked in with Nate Persily, the James B. McClatchy Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, a guru on conducting a safe and efficacious election in the era of COVID, and Lawfare senior editor Margaret Taylor, who has been tracking what, if anything, Congress is going to do about any of this. They talked about where we are, where we need to be and how long a road we can expect over the next few months. ” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Electronic Discovery 16 mins- “Joe Looby recently released his documentary The Decade of Discovery about the United States versus Philip Morris tobacco lawsuit in the early 2000s and email e-discovery issues. The film also discusses the emergence of the Sedona Conference as a think tank and forum for discussion about cooperation in e-discovery. Many prominent federal judges were interviewed about the issues with open government and record keeping. Also in the documentary, Jason R. Baron, Esq. talks about open government, record keeping at the White House, and how the e-discovery issues played out in the lawsuit. We are beginning to wonder, in this world of big data, how are we dealing with information governance, specifically within issues of open government and data security? In this episode of Digital Detectives, Sharon Nelson and John Simek interview Jason Baron about information governance, dark data, open government, and his role in The Decade of Discovery. Baron talks about the increasing amount of electronic data affecting the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the discussion e-discovery experts need to have about providing public access to government records….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included on this blog archive.

Future of Media 33 mins – “It’s no secret that the media landscape has changed dramatically with the growth of social media apps. (Think: Click bait headlines and inflated viewership that make it harder to decipher what content is actually resonating with audiences). But fear not! At Girlboss, we’re focused on YOU, our loyal community of listeners, readers and fans. Which brings us to why we’re so excited about the next chapter of Girlboss. That is, we’ve *officially* been acquired by the media holding company Attention Capital! Sound scary? It’s not—it just means even bigger things are ahead for us. To walk us through what changes are ahead for Girlboss, Sophia talks with Ashlyn Gentry, a founding partner of Attention Capital. Tune in for an honest conversation about the future of media, why brands must pass the “T-shirt test,” and so much more. To learn more about Attention Capital, go to:https://attentioncapital.com/ Have feedback on the show?” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

H1B Holder Ban 29 mins- “This week Trump banned valid H1B holders from entering the country. What are the broader implications for America’s technological ecosystem and national security? To discuss, Tina Huang and Remco Zwetsloot from CSET talk about their recent research on tech and immigration. We discuss the potential lasting impacts of the, for now, temporary ban, how the US immigration process compares to other nations’ policies, what China is doing to bolster their homegrown talent as well as the threat of corporate espionage. Here is the paper I mentioned on corporate espionage. See here for the CSET research discussed.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Hackers for Hire 42 mins – “Our interview this week is with Chris Bing, a cybersecurity reporter with Reuters, and John Scott-Railton, Senior Researcher at Citizen Lab and PhD student at UCLA. John coauthored Citizen Lab’s report last week on BellTroX and Indian hackers for hire, and Chris reported for Reuters on the same organization’s activities – and criminal exposure – in the United States. The most remarkable aspect of the story is how thoroughly normalized hacking legal and lobbying opponents seems to have become, at least in parts of the US legal and investigative ecosystem. I suggest that instead of a long extradition battle, the US give the head of BellTroX a ticket to the US and a guaranteed income for the next few years as a witness against his customers. In the news roundup, Nick Weaver tells the remarkable story of how Facebook funded an exploit aimed at taking down a particularly vile online abuser of young girls who was nearly invulnerable because he was using TAILS, the secure, thumb drive-based communication system (Vice, Gizmodo). This is a great story because it really doesn’t fit into any of the stilted narratives into which most internet security stories are usually jammed.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Harmful Chemicals 17 mins – “As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is also joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtures, understand their toxicity, and eventually connect their effects on the environment, wildlife, and people.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

IFlytek 28 mins – “In 1937, the year that George Orwell was shot in the neck while fighting fascists in Spain, Julian Chen was born in Shanghai. His parents, a music teacher and a chemist, enrolled him in a school run by Christian missionaries, and like Orwell he became fascinated by language. He studied English, Russian, and Mandarin while speaking Shanghainese at home. Later he took on French, German, and Japanese. In 1949, the year Mao Zedong came to power and Orwell published 1984, learning languages became dangerous in China. In the purges of the late 1950s, intellectuals were denounced, sent to labor camps, and even executed. Chen, who by then was a student at prestigious Peking University, was banished to a Beijing glass factory…. Chen’s job was to cart wagons full of coal and ash to and from the factory’s furnace. He kept his mind nimble by listening to his coworkers speak. At night, in the workers’ dormitory, he compiled a sort of linguistic ethnography for the Beijing dialect. He finished the book around 1960. Soon after, Communist Party apparatchiks confiscated it.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment Inquiry 36 mins – “The White House has released a memorandum of a July 25 call between Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky and President Donald Trump. The call is at the center of the new impeachment inquiry into the president, and is reportedly also the subject of a whistleblower complaint that the Department of Justice has prevented the Acting Director of National Intelligence from sharing with congressional intelligence committees. For the second time this week, Lawfare put together a special edition podcast. Scott Anderson, Susan Hennessey, Quinta Jurecic and Margaret Taylor joined Benjamin Wittes in the Jungle Studio, while Bob Bauer, David Kris and Bob Litt called in from afar to discuss the new revelations and what this all means for the president, Congress and the impeachment inquiry.” At the link right-click “Direct download: Emergency_Podcast_mixdown_1.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Industrial Espionage 63 mins – “Our interview is with Mara Hvistendahl, investigative journalist at The Intercept and author of a new book, The Scientist and the Spy: A True Story of China, the FBI, and Industrial Espionage, as well as a deep WIRED article on the least known Chinese AI champion, iFlytek. Mara’s book raises questions about the expense and motivations of the FBI’s pursuit of commercial spying from China. In the News Roundup, Gus Hurwitz, Nick Weaver, and I wrestle with whether Apple’s lawsuit against Corellium is really aimed at the FBI. The answer looks to be affirmative, since an Apple victory would make it harder for contractors to find hackable flaws in the iPhone….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Iranian Secret Documents 32 mins – “’Intercept’ Senior National Security Correspondent James Risen says new documents show how Iran has embedded itself in the politics of its neighbor, Iraq — and that the late Gen. Soleimani oversaw Iran’s proxy wars in Iraq and Syria.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Kim Jong Un 35 mins – “Jung Pak is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, a former CIA analyst and a North Korea specialist. She is the author of “Becoming Kim Jong Un: A Former CIA Analyst’s Insights into North Korea’s Enigmatic Young Dictator.” She joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss Kim Jong Un, the recent questions about whether he had died or become seriously ill, his rise to power and his confrontations with Donald Trump over nuclear weapons.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Library Technology 12 mins – The content librarians manage today is no longer measured in bookshelves, but in bytes.  Over the last two decades librarians have increasingly come to view their roles and responsibilities in terms of technology.  And in the delivery of information, innovation is pre-eminent. Jason Griffey self-identifies as a library technologist. He is currently Director of Strategic Initiatives at NISO, and was very recently a fellow and affiliate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University. “The library technologist is increasingly a way that a lot of people tend to identify themselves in libraries,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “A technologist is someone who is a sort of jack of all trades when it comes to things digital.  I started using the term as my experience in libraries expanded outward from the small managing a Web presence or managing a particular set of systems to the broader understanding of how technology interacts with all of the multifaceted parts of a modern library.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Medical Nihilism 52 mins – “Philosopher and author Jacob Stegenga of the University of Cambridge talks about his book Medical Nihilism with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Stegenga argues that many medical treatments either fail to achieve their intended goals or achieve those goals with many negative side effects. Stegenga argues that the approval process for pharmaceuticals, for example, exaggerates benefits and underestimates costs. He criticizes the FDA approval process for approving too many drugs that are not sufficiently helpful relative to their side effects. Stegenga argues for a more realistic understanding of what medical practice can and cannot achieve.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Monopolies 47 mins – “Matt Stoller of the Open Market Institute talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the growing influence of Google, Facebook, and Amazon on commercial and political life. Stoller argues that these large firms have too much power over our options as consumers and creators as well as having a large impact on our access to information.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nematodes in Space 25 mins – “Dr. Fatma Kaplan and Cameron Schiller founded Pheronym, an agricultural biotech company that provides safe, non-toxic, and innovative solutions to solve numerous agricultural problems. They also recently become involved in the development of space nematodes under the company AstroNematode. AstroNematode seeks to establish interstellar agriculture for Earth. The first launching experiment will happen this December and provide data to pave the way for sustainable agriculture outside of Earth. Dr. Fatma and Cameron join me today to share their latest project, AstroNematode, and how it can help provide sustainable solutions for future generations. They describe the origins of this idea and the companies that helped fund the project. They discuss their tie-ins with private companies like Space-X and explain the experiments that will happen in space. They also share what it’s like to work on this project while running Pheronym at the same time.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get podcast.

News Guard 11 mins – “In the emerging area of online trust technology, the startup NewsGuard has decided to disinfect the web of false reporting with the detergent of journalism. A team of experienced journalists researches online news brands; determines when a website has a hidden agenda or publishes falsehoods; and then posts red or green rating signals visible as a plug-in on many web browsers. Public libraries can use NewsGuard as a news literacy tool, while advertisers can keep their brands off unreliable sites. Journalism advocates the Knight Foundation and global advertising conglomerate Publicis are among the company’s investors. “The world has become such that regular people feel very anxious about whether they’re getting news from reliable sources or not,” says Gordon Crovitz, a distinguished publishing veteran who co-founded NewsGuard with acclaimed journalist Steve Brill in 2018. In 2016 and 2017, Crovitz was interim CEO, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. He is also a former publisher, editorial board member, and opinion columnist for the Wall Street Journal.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis P1 32 mins – “Dr. Jeanmarie Perrone runs a medical toxicology and addiction department in the University of Pennsylvania’s medical system. This means she’s an E.R. doctor as well as a UPenn professor and researcher who knows a great deal about — and who’s seen a great deal of the opioid crisis up close. Perrone recently walked us through the E.R. at one of the UPenn hospitals. She introduced us to the team working that day. Here’s Dr. Kit Delgado:…” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Opioid Crisis P2 32 mins – “The opioid crisis, we learned, is really a story of supply and demand. In retrospect, there’s plenty of blame to go around; there was inattention and wishful thinking and almost certainly some deception, or at least greed. As a result, hundreds of thousands of people have died; countless families have been broken. And one unintended consequence of the crisis is that many people who have legitimate need for pain management and who have never abused those drugs now find it much harder to get the medicine they need. One such person wrote to us recently. “I was born with severe scoliosis,” he said, “and needed multiple surgeries starting as an 11-year-old. I was on fentanyl patches for over 10 years. They allowed me to not hurt every minute of the day. I did not get high. I went to a pain clinic every month and was drug-tested. A year and half ago, they stopped prescribing me because of government regulations. Now every day is a struggle to get out of bed and be productive.” So as this man suggests, the prescribing protocols for opioids have changed — in his case, not for the better. How have the new protocols affected potential opioid abuse? The fact is that more than one in five Americans still gets at least one opioid prescription filled or refilled per year. And a dependence on prescription opioids often leads to a dependence on heroin or synthetic fentanyl, both of which are even deadlier. Just how many people are we talking about here? The Department of Health and Human Services estimates there are roughly 2 million people in the U.S. with what it calls opioid-use disorder. As the healthcare economist Alicia Sasser Modestino told us last week: an entire generation has been addicted at this point. So what’s to be done about that? Today on Freakonomics Radio: our second of two episodes about the opioid crisis. The focus today: an addiction treatment option that some people think should be universal.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the sound bar and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Police Violence 35 mins – “By Jen Patja Howell – Dr. Rashawn Ray is a David M. Rubenstein fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution. He’s also an associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he directs the Lab for Applied Social Science Research (LASSR). He is a scholar of, among other things, police-civilian relations and has done a lot of work on police-involved killings. He joined Benjamin Wittes to discuss the mechanisms of police violence, what causes it, what can be done to address it and reduce it, and the role of race in this problem. They talked about police unions, implicit bias, the difference between legality and morality in police shootings and what policy levers are available to bring an end to the rash of police killings.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Produce Varieties 29 mins – “The produce section of most American supermarkets in the 1950s was minimal to a fault, with only a few dozen fruits and vegetables to choose from: perhaps one kind of apple, one kind of lettuce, a yellow onion, a pile of bananas. Today, grocery stores routinely offer hundreds of different fruits and vegetables, many of which would be unrecognizable to time travelers from a half century ago. What changed, and how did Americans learn to embrace spaghetti squash, sugar snap peas, and kiwi fruit? This episode, we tell the story of the woman behind this transformation: Frieda Caplan, the Queen of Kiwi. In late 1950s, when Frieda Caplan began working as a book-keeper at a wholesale produce business owned by her husband’s aunt and uncle, she had no interest in fruit and vegetables beyond eating them. She also had no real qualifications for the job: she had studied political science at UCLA, and, according to her daughter, Karen Caplan, “she got a D in math.” But that political background and love for campaigning ended up coming in handy. When her relatives went out of town on vacation a few weeks after hiring her, she found herself on the Los Angeles Produce Market floor, enthusiastically promoting a pallet of brown mushrooms that had been sitting in the corner, looking neglected. At the time, white button mushrooms were the only kind of fungi found in most grocery stores—but, somehow, Karen told us, Frieda “fluffed her hair and put on her lipstick,” and she succeeded in charming a supermarket buyer into purchasing these exotic brown mushrooms. Word quickly spread among growers of unusual or foreign fruits and vegetables that Frieda was the secret to getting their underloved produce onto supermarket shelves. Frieda’s Specialty Produce, the company Frieda ended up founding in 1962, was the first wholesale produce business to be owned and operated by a woman. Since then, Frieda and her daughter Karen, the company’s current CEO, have successfully introduced hundreds of new fruits and vegetables to the American supermarket shelves, including red seedless grapes, radicchio, Habanero peppers, Delicata squash, shallots, and, her first big hit, the kiwi.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Produce Varieties 35 mins – “From stripy fuchsia beets to unicorn doughnuts, the foods available today on grocery store shelves and in cafe displays are more brightly colored than ever. But this hasn’t always been the case. This episode of Gastropod, we offer three stories that explore the colors of our cuisine: How did a food fight between Florida and California turn oranges (the fruit) that perfect bright orange (the color)? Why did US consumers freak out about the food dye Red #2, and what was the impact on our M&Ms? And finally, who invented the blue raspberry? All that, plus one very sexy indigo-hued blossom.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Protect and Moderate Online Speech 27 mins – “On this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Alina Polyakova and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Eileen Donahoe, the executive director of the Global Digital Policy Incubator at Stanford University. There’s no shortage of controversies roiling right now about free expression and the future of the internet—from platforms aggressively removing misinformation about the ongoing pandemic, to President Trump’s executive order targeting Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Eileen, Quinta and Alina take a step back and review the landscape of online speech as a whole to get a more holistic sense of what things look like right now and where platforms and governments might be headed when it comes to regulating speech. They talked about the various debates over content moderation taking place within the United States and around the world, and Eileen made the case for why international human rights law should be used as the framework for both protecting and moderating online speech.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Puerto Rico 20 mins – “What does freedom from fantasy mean? When most Americans know about Puerto Rico is based on a colonial fantasy, says journalist and Columbia University professor, Ed Morales. This fantasy, and the reality it obscures, is the subject of his new book, Fantasy Island. In this episode, Laura interviews Morales and scholar/activist Rosa Clemente about the personal and political implications of the island’s ongoing debt crisis, recovering from Hurricane Maria, and #RickyRenuncia, the intersectional protest movement that led to the resignation of Governor Ricardo Rosselló in the summer of 2019. Exploitation, corruption, and neglect may be business as usual in the United States’ relationship with Puerto Rico but Morales and Clemente suggest that new movements provide some hope for change and freedom from fantasy.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scorsese 33 mins – “Scorsese’s latest film, ‘The Irishman,’ is up for 10 Academy Awards, including best picture and best director. He spoke with Terry Gross about death, redemption and his biggest flop. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the WWI epic ‘1917.’ At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Trump’s Assault on Truth 27 mins – “Glenn Kessler is the head of the Fact Checker staff of the Washington Post. Along with Salvador Rizzo and Meg Kelly, he is the author of the new book, “Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lies.” It is a compilation and distillation of the 19,000 false or misleading statements Donald Trump has made and the Washington Post has documented in its mammoth database of presidential untruths since the president took office. Kessler spoke with Benjamin Wittes about what makes Trump different from other presidents, the task of documenting the president’s lack of candor on a daily basis and what it all means to have a president who lies this much.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Trump’s War on Presidency 24 mins – “From the moment of his inauguration, Trump has challenged our deepest expectations of the presidency. But what are those expectations? Where did they come from, and how great is the damage? “Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump’s War on the World’s Most Powerful Office,” by Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey, which is excerpted in this episode, situates Trump era scandals and outrages in the deeper context of the presidency itself. Now, the coronavirus pandemic presents one of the greatest challenges the modern American executive has ever faced. How did we get here? And in Donald Trump’s hands, where does the world’s most powerful office go from here?” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Warrior Cops 38 mins – “Patrick Skinner is a police officer in Savannah, Georgia, who brings diverse experience to that job. He served as a case officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, handling foreign intelligence sources in places like Afghanistan, Iraq and Jordan. He also has previous law enforcement experience with the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Capitol Police and the U.S. Federal Air Marshal Service. David Priess spoke with Skinner about today’s policing crisis, Pat’s experiences with counterterrorism operations and what they taught him about effective law enforcement, and the hazards of the warrior mentality that is common across many police departments today.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

Wikipedia 34 mins – “In this episode of Lawfare‘s Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Ryan Merkley, the chief of staff to the executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation. We’ve spent a lot of time on this podcast discussing how social media platforms have handled issues of disinformation and misinformation. But what about Wikipedia? It’s a massive online encyclopedia written and edited entirely by volunteers—so, not a platform, but still an online service grappling with a wave of untruths in an uncertain time. Ryan, Evelyn and Quinta talked about Wikipedia’s unique structure, how the site has managed to become a reliable resource on an often untrustworthy internet, and how readers, writers and editors of Wikipedia are navigating the need for information amidst both the pandemic and ongoing protests over police abuse of Black Americans.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save As” and “OK” to get the podcast.

World Food Prize 24 mins – “Kenneth Quinn is the former President of the World Food Prize Foundation, an organization that seeks to give individuals recognition for achievements that directly improve the quality, quantity, and availability of food in the world. Kenneth is often referred to as “the Ambassador” because he was the US Ambassador to the Kingdom of Cambodia. During his time as President, he received various high-level honors and awards from different organizations, including The American Farm Bureau and The Crop Science Society of America. Kenneth joins me today to describe what the World Food Prize Foundation stands for, how it got started, and what makes it similar and different to the Nobel Peace Prize. He shares his journey, his time as Ambassador, and how he began to follow in the footsteps of Norman Borlaug. He explains the current state of agriculture across various countries and the agricultural hindrances that America needs to fix. Kenneth also discusses what he wants his legacy to be and the dangers that Americans face in regards to agricultural research.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save File” and “OK” from the pop-up menu to get podcast.

Zorin for Linux Users 22 mins – “Zorin OS is the alternative to Windows and macOS designed to make your computer faster, more powerful, secure, and privacy respecting. It’s Time To Pay Attention To Zorin OS 15 — Zorin OS is the best desktop Linux distribution you’ve never heard of. Our review of of Zorin OS includes a give-away of one copy of Zorin Ultimate. The following resources are mentioned in this episode: Zorin Linux: https://zorinos.com/ Contact Zorin: https://zorinos.com/about/#contact Education version: https://zorinos.com/education/ Computers with Zorin pre-installed: https://zorinos.com/computers/ 08:50 Zorin Review 09:33 Core vs. Ultimate 10:35 Is the Core version of Zorin crippled? 16:44 Any issues installing or running Zorin? 20:10 What about installing software applications? 22:45 Customizing the Zorin Desktop 24:37 Anything else we need to know about Zorin? 27:49 The overview 32:01 Bill’s final rating of Zorin 33:02 What is the price of Zorin Ultimate?” At the link right-click “MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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