MMD450 Media Mining Digest: Africa’s Future, Al Hussein on Human Rights, Autism, Biology Becomes Technology, Bisphenol A (BPA), Blockchain Defined, Cervantes, Chicago Water Tunnels, China 2049, DACA’s Implementation, Dilberts Creator, Disabilities Forum, Educational Reform, Epilepsy Drugs, Ethical Algorithms, Evangelical Trump, Gambling, Government Reform, Holocaust Survivors, Honest Income, Immigration Policy, Impeachment Ends, Innovation Bootcamp, Irrationality, Judiciary, Language Shapes Thought, Low Head Dams, Mathematician Interview, NBA Innovation Experience, Paul Dirac, Precognition, Railroading, Secondhand, Shade Saves, Snow Removal in Colorado, Supply Side Transparency, Telemedicine for Covid 19, Theranos Whistleblower, Trump Analyzed, Ukraine Investigation, Vaccine Development, Vietnam War Music

Exercise your ears: the 52 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,270 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

Africa’s Future 77 mins – “ The new year 2020 marks the beginning of a promising decade for Africa. Through at least the first half of the decade, economic growth across Africa will continue to outperform that of other regions, with the continent continuing to be home to seven of the world’s 10 fastest-growing economies. Collective action among African and global policymakers to improve the livelihoods of all under the blueprint of the sustainable development goals and the African Union’s Agenda 2063 is creating a shared energy and excitement around Africa’s potential. With business environments improving, regional integration centered around the African Continental Free Trade Agreement progressing, and the transformational technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution spreading, never before has the region been better primed for trade, investment, and mutually beneficial partnerships. The recent, unprecedented interest of an increasingly diversified group of external partners to engage with Africa highlights this potential. Despite the continent’s promise, though, obstacles to success linger, as job creation still has not caught up with the growing youth labor force, gaps in good and inclusive governance remain, and climate change as well as state fragility threaten to reverse the hard-won gains of past decades. The Africa Growth Initiative (AGI) at Brookings explores these trends and features diverse expert viewpoints in Foresight Africa, its annual flagship report. Foresight Africa 2020 is a special edition focusing on the top priorities for the continent over the next decade: 2020-2030.” At the link right-click“audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Al Hussein on Human Rights 36 mins – “Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein is perhaps best known as the outspoken UN High Commissioner for Human Rights — considered the world’s moral-arbiter-in-chief — from 2014 to 2018. But he refused to run for a second term because he says it might have meant  “bending a knee in supplication” before the five permanent members of the UN Security Council: United States, France, Russia, China and the United Kingdom. “I didn’t see my job as defending governments. Governments are more than capable of defending themselves. My job is not to defend them. Why should I excuse their behaviour? Why should I play to them? Why should I grovel before them?” Al Hussein told Ideas producer Mary Lynk at his home in Harlem, New York. “The job is to speak on behalf of all of those who are in detention, who are arbitrarily arrested, who are denied basic services, the right to education, the right to health, the right to adequate housing, clean drinking water.”

Autism 22 mins – “Many people with autistic spectrum disorder learn techniques to overcome their difficulties interacting with others. The first study that has looked at the consequences of these compensatory strategies reveals some benefits but also significant downsides. The consequences can be stress, low self-esteem, mental illness and misdiagnosis. Claudia talks to lead researcher Professor Francesca Happé from King’s College London and Eloise Stark, a woman with autism. A new research programme at Imperial College London is investigating the link between obesity and infertility in men. Madeleine Finlay explores why weight gain and other factors of modern life might be influencing men’s sperm health. Tick-borne Lyme disease is on the rise in the northern hemisphere. Lyme disease can develop into a serious illness. It is hard to diagnosis early and delayed diagnosis means lengthy treatment and recovery. Dr Mollie Jewett at the University of Central Florida is working on a much faster means of diagnosis, and a more effective treatment. Deborah Cohen meets Dr Jewett and her ticks. Graham Easton is in the Health Check studio to talk about links between hearing loss and dementia, and the worrying spread of bacteria resistant to carbapenems, one of the most important kinds of antibiotic drugs.” At the link left-click “Download,” then right-click “Higher Quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Biology Becomes Technology 8 mins – “We’ve been promised a future of chrome — but what if the future is fleshy?” asks biological designer Christina Agapakis. In this awe-inspiring talk, Agapakis details her work in synthetic biology — a multidisciplinary area of research that pokes holes in the line between what’s natural and artificial — and shares how breaking down the boundaries between science, society, nature and technology can lead us to imagine different possible futures.” At the link left-click “Share,” then right-click “Download audio” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Bisphenol A (BPA..19 mins – “As part of a special issue on chemicals for tomorrow’s Earth, we’ve got two green chemistry stories. First, host Sarah Crespi talks with contributing correspondent Warren Cornwell about how a company came up with a replacement for the popular can lining material bisphenol A and then recruited knowledgeable critics to test its safety. Sarah is also joined by Beate Escher of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research and the University of Tübingen to discuss ways to trace complex mixtures of humanmade chemicals in the environment. They talk about how new technologies can help detect these mixtures, understand their toxicity, and eventually connect their effects on the environment, wildlife, and people.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain ABRA 26 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Blockchain Defined 27 mins – “What is the blockchain according to Bill Tai? The internet. The blockchain is the same thing but with assets. It can aggregate history into groups of information with communities of interests surrounding it. CEO of ABRA, Bill Barydt. ABRA has recently partnered with the extremely well known American Express. ABRA is a digital currency wallet for IOS and Android. It allows you to store digital dollars on your smartphone with no bank involved. It is the only application that interoperates between the traditional and the new worlds. The third guest was Toni Lane Casserly, founder of Vnation.io. The idea? To leverage core innovation made by Blockchain infrastructure so that people can design new systems of governance. Next was Kevin Shen from Averon with a goal to make sure people aren’t forgetting they are secure on that side. Lastly, on the legal end of the blockchain was Pawel Kuskowski from Coinfirm. Coinfirm serves as a foundation for the safe adoption and use of blockchain.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Cervantes 9 mins – “He was destined for greatness.  No one knew it but him.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Chicago Water Tunnels 13 mins – “Managing stormwater in cities is important to reduce flooding and secure people and property. Stormwater needs some kind of treatment before it flows to surface waters, and that treatment can be essential in older areas where stormwater and sanitary waste are collected in combined sewers. The Chicago area has built a network of underground tunnels to store that stormwater for later treatment before it goes to the river. To understand this extraordinary project we’re talking with Kevin Fitzpatrick, Managing Civil Engineer for the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, who works on what is called the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan.” At the link find the title, “Storing Stormwater Underground – Chicago’s Deep tunnel System,” and right-click “Listen to this episode nowto get the podcast.

China 2049 99 mins – “In 2012, the Chinese government announced two centennial goals. The first was to double the 2010 GDP and per capita income for both urban and rural residents by 2021. The second was to build China into a fully developed country by 2049, the year when the People’s Republic of China (PRC) celebrates its centenary. Indeed, China has ascended successfully from one of the world’s poorest economies in 1978 to a high middle-income economy in 2019. However, there are greater uncertainties surrounding the path to the second centennial goal. How might rising domestic challenges such as an aging population, automation and AI, and financial risks impact China’s growth and stability? How might escalating economic tensions at home and abroad and de-globalization affect the international environment for China’s development? What role might China be able to play in managing tensions, reforming the global economic order, and developing nodes of cooperation in the face of global challenges such as climate change and financial instability?” At the link right-click “audio only” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

China Economy 58 mins – “The resilience of China’s economy since the global financial crisis has provided a welcome boost to global demand, and substantial progress has been made in rebalancing China’s external accounts. However, according to the latest IMF annual report on China’s economy, the country’s growth remains too reliant on investment and credit, with growing risks in the financial sector, local government finances, and real estate. The resulting questions surrounding China’s economic outlook reverberate globally, given China’s meteoric rise over the past three decades to become the second-largest economy in the world. On September 26, Brookings hosted a discussion on the IMF’s latest assessment of the economic outlook and policies in China. In particular, the panel explored recent economic developments and whether a ‘hard landing’ of the economy is imminent, and reviewed initial progress with the government’s reform blueprint announced last year. Brookings Vice President Kemal Derviș introduced the panel, followed by a short presentation by Markus Rodlauer, IMF Deputy Director of the Asia and Pacific Department and China Mission Chief, and then moderated a discussion onstage.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

DACA’s Implementation 45 mins – “Given the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program’s unique position at the convergence of the immigration and education fields, the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy has sought to capture the ways in which local educational institutions, legal service providers, and youth advocates have responded to DACA’s first phase. In this webinar, authors of the report Lessons from the Local Level: DACA’s Implementation and Impact on Education and Training Success discuss key challenges facing legal service providers and educators serving DACA youth, along with lessons for new and ongoing efforts seeking to support the implementation of the DACA and Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents programs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Dilbert Creator 39 mins – “Today on the Knowledge Project, I speak with Scott Adams (@ScottAdamsSays), creator of the Dilbert cartoon and author of multiple best-selling books, including his most recent Loserthink: How Untrained Brains are Ruining America. After a stalled career in the telecommunications and banking industry left Scott unfulfilled and uncertain of his future, he decided to try his hand at his childhood dream of becoming a cartoonist. As you’ll hear in this interview, Scott combined his unique talents with some hard work, persistence, some kind encouragement from a stranger, and a little luck, to transform his little cartoon into a syndicated powerhouse that’s recognized all over the world. Dilbert now appears in over 2,000 newspapers in 65 countries and is translated into 25 languages….” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Disabilities Forum 10 mins – “Publishing has long approached visual disabilities as an opportunity, at least for its products. Over many decades, publishers have created special editions of books and other texts in Braille and in large print. The proliferation of audio books, too, means even greater access to information and entertainment for the visually impaired. Access to jobs in publishing for the disabled, though, is another matter. While publishing has made strides in opening its ranks to greater diversity, the industry still struggles with inclusion for people with disabilities. At Elsevier, Simon Holt, a senior acquisitions editor, is chair of Elsevier Enabled, a company-wide initiative to promote an accessible workplace and to highlight best practices for creating an inclusive professional culture. “As publishers, we have a responsibility to our customers,” he tells CCC’s Chris Kenneally. “If we aren’t a diverse set of people, we’re not going to be able to publish diverse perspectives, and we’re not going to be aware of the challenges that face our readers, including, of course, accessibility.” December 3rd is observed as International Day of Persons with Disabilities, an occasion first proclaimed by the United Nations in 1992. For Holt, who is visually impaired, the occasion is an opportunity to remind people that physical challenges often give individuals special strengths. “Obviously through childhood, like a lot of people, books were very important to me, and access to books in large print and audio were also very important to me. The education sector is quite good at making provision for differently-abled people,” he explains. “When I got into the world of work, I realized that it was different. I found the publishing industry to be a place where people were super wanting to help but not really knowing how to help. I’d go to interviews and I’d get some inappropriate questions. I thought, well, if I ever get to a position where I can change things, then I’m going to try and do that, so in the future when people come for an interview the manager will see somebody who’s resilient, resourceful, and good at problem solving and good at building relationships, etc., as a result of having a disability, as opposed to just seeing limitations and problems.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Educational Reform 47 mins – “Political Scientist and author Terry Moe of Stanford University talks about his book, The Politics of Institutional Reform with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Moe explores the politics and effectiveness of educational reform in the New Orleans public school system in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Moe finds that policy-makers turned to charter schools for pragmatic reasons and students enjoyed dramatic improvements in educational outcomes as a result. Moe uses this experience to draw lessons about political reforms generally and the power of vested interests to preserve the status quo in the absence of catastrophic events like Katrina.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Epilepsy Drugs 19 mins – “About one-third of people with epilepsy are treatment resistant. Up until now, epilepsy treatments have focused on taming seizures rather than the source of the disease and for good reason—so many roads lead to epilepsy: traumatic brain injury, extreme fever and infection, and genetic disorders, to name a few. Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about researchers that are turning back the pages on epilepsy, trying to get to the beginning of the story where new treatments might work. And Sarah also talks with Torsten Neurbert at the Technical University of Denmark’s National Space Institute in Kongens Lyngby about capturing high-altitude “transient luminous events” from the International Space Station (ISS). These lightning-induced bursts of light, color, and occasionally gamma rays were first reported in the 1990s but had only been recorded from the ground or aircraft. With new measurements from the ISS come new insights into the anatomy of lightning.” At the link right-click “Download MP3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ethical Algorithms 39 mins – “On January 14, Michael Kearns and Aaron Roth, authors of “The Ethical Algorithm: The Science of Socially Aware Algorithm Design”, joined Brookings scholar Nicol Turner-Lee to discuss the role, limits, and challenges of implementing ethical algorithms. Defining ethical algorithmsFrom education to employment, algorithms are increasingly augmenting human decisionmaking in important sectors. Despite widespread implementation to streamline processes, reduce human prejudice, and cut costs, algorithms are far from neutral. In fact, algorithmic bias can lead to systematically discriminatory outcomes that have significant impacts on people’s lives. Under most circumstances, algorithmic bias is an unintentional side effect of machine learning. Training these algorithms involves the collection and analysis of enormous quantities of historical data that is used to inform decisionmaking and optimization. However, any historical biases embedded in the data can be absorbed and reproduced.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Government Reform 40 mins – “The United States is at a major inflection point as the government struggles to contain a widespread pandemic and every facet of life has been upended. The ongoing crisis has exposed government shortcomings and raised questions about performance, efficiency, and effectiveness. The country faces critical issues in terms of public health, the economy, and social well-being. Problems such as political polarization, disinformation, and the weaponization of social media continue to be problematic in the lead-up to the 2020 elections. On May 5, as part of the twelfth annual A. Alfred Taubman Forum on Public Policy, Governance Studies at Brookings hosted a webinar to look at problems of American government and possible structural and institutional reforms. Speakers discussed how to improve government performance and how to mitigate the effects of disinformation and polarization—all obstacles that hinder good governance.” At the link right-click “Download the Audio” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Holocaust Survivors 52 mins – “Today I’m excited to welcome to The Knowledge Project Esther Perel, renowned couples therapist and New York Times best selling author of Mating in Captivity and The State of Affairs. Esther’s refreshingly frank approach to topics like sex, intimacy, divorce, and fidelity has made her one of the most unique and sought after voices on modern relationships. Between her best-selling books, her TED talks (which have been viewed nearly 30 million times,) and her award-winning podcasts, Esther’s simple, yet insightful advice is positively impacting millions of people all over the globe from the bedroom to the boardroom. (Her new podcast series How’s Work? shifts her expertise from couples, to the stressors, conflicts and ever-changing dynamics of the workplace.) In this interview, Esther shares lessons she learned from two parents who survived the Holocaust and the key differences between living and surviving. She also offers practical strategies for reigniting romance in a busy or “autopilot” relationship, how to spot and overcome common triggers and fight patterns that weaken our bonds, and how we can invite more imagination and play into our partnerships.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Honest Income 56 mins – “Economist and author Daniel Klein of George Mason University talks about the ethics of working and the potential for our working lives to make the world a better place. This is a wide-ranging conversation that includes discussion of Adam Smith, what jobs we should work on, what charities we should donate to, how we can make ourselves more virtuous, the movies Se7en and Sabrina, and ultimately what Adam Smith calls “the becoming use of our own.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Horse Evolution 33 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the origins of horses, from their dog sized ancestors to their proliferation in the New World until hunted to extinction, their domestication in Asia and their development since. The genetics of the modern horse are the most studied of any animal, after humans, yet it is still uncertain why they only have one toe on each foot when their wider family had more, or whether speed or stamina has been more important in their evolution. What is clear, though, is that when humans first chose to ride horses, as well as eat them, the future of both species changed immeasurably.” At the link right-click “Download,” select “Higher Quality,” then right-click it and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P2 50 mins – “In recent years, the humanitarian and migration crisis in the three Northern Triangle countries of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras has resulted in increasing international migration, particularly of women and children as well as unaccompanied minors. Most of them cross the Guatemala-Mexico border to head towards the United States, while some migrate to countries in the region, such as Costa Rica. Many are fleeing serious violence carried out by gangs and other non-state actors, though the search for better livelihoods and family reunification with relatives already in the United States plays a role as well. Governments do not control territories where gangs and drug cartels rule, nor are they able to protect women and girls from domestic abuse and other forms of violence or insecurity. Natural disasters, climate change, food insecurity, and poor economic conditions exacerbate the situation for vulnerable people. This panel discussed the best ways for governments, international organizations, and NGOs in the region to address this crisis, particularly in terms of root causes and the protection of families and children.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P3 54 mins – “Under the current administration, U.S.-Mexico border polices have dominated headlines, becoming both the symbol and testing ground of hardline immigration policy. Family separation, the deaths of children in immigration custody, and the detention of men, women, and children in unsafe, overcrowded conditions have stirred national concern. The asylum system alone has been hamstrung by “metering” that slows entry to a trickle, enormous court backlogs, the wholesale return to Mexico of asylum applicants awaiting their court appearances, and policies that attempt to force applicants to first seek protection in other countries. This panel explores what these policies have meant to asylum seekers and the communities that straddle the 2,000-mile-long line. Topics include family separation, Remain in Mexico, the wall, state and local work, and more. The panelists also considered whether the administration is achieving results with its efforts to reshape overall enforcement, the responses from local border communities, and related litigation.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Immigration Policy P4 52 mins – “From Donald Trump’s first utterances as a presidential candidate in 2015 to the hundreds of policy actions undertaken during his administration, immigration has loomed as the major touchstone for his political base. It is the issue to which the president and his administration return again and again. Chaos at the U.S.-Mexico border resulted from a sharp uptick in flows, as well as outmatched policies, infrastructure, and resources. Now, a growing number of Americans cite immigration as one of the most crucial national issues. Yet Congress remains incapable of even small-bore fixes, continuing its nearly two-decade inability to undertake substantive immigration legislation. Vast differences exist among Republican and Democratic politicians and other stakeholders—from “build the wall” and narrowing humanitarian protections on one side, to #AbolishICE and pressing to decriminalize illegal crossings on the other. Whither immigration as high-stakes elections approach in 2020? In this lively State of Play conversation, political and policy experts will explore the politics of immigration, the pitfalls for both political parties, and the potential for a post-election pause in the brinkmanship, along with what other pressing challenges may converge to force action in Washington.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Impeachment Ends 18 mins – “Where are we on impeachment today? Lawmakers in the Senate voted yesterday along near-perfect party lines to acquit President Trump of the two articles of impeachment, abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The only Republican to break ranks was Utah’s junior Senator Mitt Romney, who voted to convict based on only the abuse of power charge. Alabama Democrat Doug Jones, a moderate up for election in November, whose vote was seen by members of his party as up in the air, ultimately voted to convict the President. And with those votes cast, the impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump has come to an end.  On today’s episode: Andrea Bernstein, senior editor for politics and policy for WNYC News and co-host of the podcast Trump Inc. and the author of American Oligarchs: The Kushners, the Trumps, and the Marriage of Money and Power (W. W. Norton & Company, January 2020)” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Bootcamp 26 mins – “…My strong belief is that creativity is not a gift.  It is not bestowed on people, it is a skill that anybody can learn, practice, and become proficient at.  It ignores age, demographics, education levels, and geography.  It is the ability to put your own thought processes in place, to come up with the next idea, product, or service.  A lot of people are self-pessimistic and are convinced that they do not have it and they are not creative. The fact is that we are creative creatures; we were created to create.  Think about kids and how creative they are with a simple object like a toilet paper roll. The problem is through the process of our education systems and through jobs, we literally beat that creativity out of our people.  How do we bring back that amount of creativity that we see in kids and bring it back to our day to day lives?  We need that ability to take our filters off and see things from an unbiased and different perspective.  I had a conversation with a co-worker many years ago about “old think and new think.”  Old think is when you are coming up with an idea and then you put a filter on it and decide to go safe and go with the old way of doing things.  New think is all about breaking perspectives and getting rid of perspectives that confine and restrict us from coming up with new ideas.  The best ideas will sound stupid.  If you are not coming up with stupid ideas, then try harder!” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Language Shapes Thought 46 mins – “BS 168 is an interview with psychologist Cecilia Heyes from Oxford University in the UK. We talk about her fascinating book “Cognitive Gadgets: The Cultural Evolution of Thinking.” Our focus is on exploring the evidence that several cognitive skills that appear to be unique to humans are learned from other people rather than being inherited genetically as is often assumed. Her proposal that language is a cognitive gadget NOT a cognitive instinct is controversial and has very important implications. Cognitive Gadgets is written for an academic audience, but this interview makes the key ideas assessable to everyone.” At the link left-click the down-pointing and “Save As” from the pop-up menu to download the podcast.

Low Head Dams 12 mins – “People have been building dams for centuries to impound water for drinking and recreation, to support navigation, to manage floods, and as a source of hydroelectric power. But dams can also present dangers. Low-head dams, in particular, can pose invisible and deadly hazards to swimmers and boaters. To learn more about these dams, the risks they present, and what we can do about them we talk with Roger Adams, President of the Association of State Dam Safety Officials, and Paul Schweiger, a member of the Association and Vice President and Dams and Hydraulics Section Manager with Gannett Fleming.” At the link find the title, “Dam Dangers – The Risks of Low-Head Dams,” and right-click “Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Mathematician Interview 64 mins – “Today on The Knowledge Project, I speak with Steven Strogatz (@StevenStrogatz), professor of applied mathematics at Cornell University and the author of five books. His most recent book, Infinite Powers explores the power of calculus in reshaping our world, from its role in ensuring NASA’s rocket wouldn’t miss the moon, the development of technologies like GPS, cell phones, and ultrasound, to downgrading AIDS from an acute fatal disease to a manageable chronic condition. In this discussion, Steven and I talk about the negative stigma of math, how to make it fun again, and what parents can do to encourage their children to embrace math as a tool to explore the wonders of the universe. We also talk about decision making, mental models of learning, and why it’s critical to put your ego on the shelf when you venture into new, uncharted territory.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Paul Dirac 34 mins – “Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the theoretical physicist Dirac (1902-1984), whose achievements far exceed his general fame. To his peers, he was ranked with Einstein and, when he moved to America in his retirement, he was welcomed as if he were Shakespeare. Born in Bristol, he trained as an engineer before developing theories in his twenties that changed the understanding of quantum mechanics, bringing him a Nobel Prize in 1933 which he shared with Erwin Schrödinger. He continued to make deep contributions, bringing abstract maths to physics, beyond predicting anti-particles as he did in his Dirac Equation.” At the link left-click “Download,” then left-click “Higher Quality” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Precognition 36 mins – “In 2011, an American psychologist named Daryl Bem proved the impossible. He showed that precognition — the ability to sense the future — is real. His study was explosive, and shook the very foundations of psychology.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in the blog archive.

Railroading 10 mins – “The US freight railroad system is moving to a different operating strategy, called Precision Scheduled Railroading (PSR), intended to speed up service, get better utilization from infrastructure, and reduce operating costs. What is it and why does it matter? In this interview, we learn about PSR from John Friedmann, who is Vice President-Network Planning and Optimization for the Norfolk Southern railroad.” At the link find the title, “Precision Scheduled Railroading,” and right-click ”Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Secondhand 46 mins – “Journalist and author Adam Minter talks about his book Secondhand with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Minter explores the strange and fascinating world of secondhand stuff–the downsizing that the elderly do when they move to smaller quarters, the unseen side of Goodwill Industries, and the global market for rags.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Snow Removal in Colorado 13 mins – “Colorado gets plenty of snow in the winter – some mountain areas dig out of as much as 40 feet in a season. Keeping the state roads open and safe for trucks and cars is both important and demanding. To find out more about how it’s done, the role technology is playing, we are speaking with Kyle Lester, who is Director of Maintenance and Operations for the Colorado Dept. of Transportation.” At the link find the title, “Battling Snow on the Roads of Colorado,” and right-click “Listen to this episode now” to get the podcast.

Supply Side Transparency 9 mins – “In our own homes and in the House of Representatives, the holder of the power of the purse is in a powerful position. Spending choices determine what we will have for dinner and how government will invest in guns and butter. Yet spending choices also matter in many far-reaching and lasting ways. Welcome to Copyright Clearance Center’s podcast series. I’m Christopher Kenneally for Beyond the Book. Jane Mosbacher Morris is founder and CEO of To The Market, a company that connects businesses and consumers to ethically made products from around the world. In her new book, Buy the Change You Want to See, Mosbacher Morris urges us to think consciously about all of our purchases and to leverage our consumption habits to bring about change in the world around us. The choices we make whenever we open our wallet, she says, affect our environment, our communities, and our culture. Jane Mosbacher Morris joins me now on Beyond the Book. Welcome, Jane.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As: from the pop-up menu.

Telemedicine for Covid 19 11 mins – “Recognizing that patients prioritize convenient and inexpensive care, Duffy and Lee recently asked whether in-person visits should become the second, third, or even last option for meeting patient needs.1 Previous work has specifically described the potential for using telemedicine in disasters and public health emergencies.2 No telemedicine program can be created overnight, but U.S. health systems that have already implemented telemedical innovations can leverage them for the response to Covid-19.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Theranos Whistleblower 17 mins – “In the second episode of our “Entrepreneurship and Ethics” miniseries, Stanford professor Tom Byers connects with Theranos whistleblower Erika Cheung. Together, they explore how she found the courage to speak up, and why she’s starting a nonprofit organization focused on creating ethical toolkits for entrepreneurs.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P1 35 mins – “The first two years of the Trump presidency were tied up with the Russia scandal. Now, there’s another scandal involving Russia’s next-door neighbor: Ukraine. The revelation that President Trump and his envoys pressured the Ukrainian government for information about debunked claims of Biden family corruption in Ukraine have brought Ukrainian domestic politics onto the American stage. The Ukrainian side of this very American scandal is complicated yet vital to understanding the whistleblower complaint and the reality of what happened with the Ukrainian prosecutor and Joe Biden’s son. Quinta Jurecic sat down with Alina Polyakova, the Director of the Project on Global Democracy and Emerging Technology at the Brookings Institution, to break it all down. They talked about recent Ukrainian political developments, what exactly Joe Biden did or didn’t do in Ukraine, and what this might mean for the U.S.-Ukraine relationship going forward.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P2 39 mins – “There is an evolving standoff between the House Intelligence Committee and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence over a whistleblower complaint reportedly involving President Trump. Meanwhile, reports have emerged that Trump urged the president of Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden’s son during a July telephone call between the two leaders—have captured national attention in the past week. In a series of public comments, both President Trump and his personal lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, have confirmed certain aspects of Ukraine reporting. Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire is scheduled to testify before the House Intelligence Committee on Thursday and will likely face questions about the whistleblower, the president’s phone call and the potential links between the two. Benjamin Wittes talked with Susan Hennessey, David Kris, Bob Litt and Margaret Taylor to try to make sense of it all.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ukraine Investigation P3 108 mins – “On Thursday, Fiona Hill, the former National Security Council Russia adviser, and David Holmes, counselor for political affairs at the U.S. embassy in Ukraine, testified before the House Intelligence Committee. Here is the testimony of Hill and Holmes with no member-infighting, no speechifying, and no unnecessary fluff.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vaccine Development 15 mins – “The continuing spread of SARS-CoV-2 remains a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. What physicians need to know about transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of Covid-19 is the subject of ongoing updates from infectious disease experts at the Journal. In this audio interview conducted on July 15, 2020, the editors discuss a phase 1 study of a candidate vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 and outline what needs to happen next.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Music 42 mins – Doug Bradley and Craig Werner talk about their new book “We Gotta Get Out of This Place,” which explores how and why U.S. troops turned to music as a way of coping with the complexities of the war. Through personal stories from Vietnam veterans, the book demonstrates how music was important for veterans of all races, gender and military rank.” At the link right-click “Episode Website” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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