MMD452 Media Mining Digest: 12 Rules for Life, 1619 Slavery, Agriculture Industry, Airplane Safety, Andersonville, Antarctica Explorer, Arms Trafficking in North Korea, AUMF Impact, Australia Wildfire Impact, Babeiosis, Behavior Modification, Civil Rights Sit-Ins, Dan Carlin Podcast, Depression Era Women, Digital Billboards, Economic Question, Environmental Movement and Litigation, Ethics, Feeble Mindedness, Feminism and Music, Gender Roles Over Time, Girl Power, Heart Disease, Homeland Threats, Innovation Skills, Latif at Guantanamo Bay, Libyan Female Fighters, Man Against Horse, Maps, Metaphysics, Mexico and California War, Middle East War, Munition Explosions, Race to the Moon, Racism Machine, Railway Train Control, Russian Election Interference, Satanic Panic, Scarsdale Murder Case, Sexism in Science, Slavery in North America, Small Arms Gender, Solar Power Development, Soleimani Assassination, Suicide Prevention, Technology and Government, Unmasking the Presidency, US Trade Policy, Vietnam War Lessons, Weinstein Sexual Assaults, WW II Women

Exercise your ears: the 68 podcasts shown below present the best ideas, information and stories from a larger group of 772 for the week, to hear while your hands and eyes are busy. Get all the files as a group here, or double (ctrl-click) individual  titles to get single podcasts and explore the source. A collection of 29,270 podcasts, listed alphabetically and grouped by topic, can be downloaded piecemeal, with files A-E at this link, and the remainder here. You’ll be limited to a 4GB maximum per download at the last place, so multiple group downloads will be needed to get all files, totaling over 170GB and may take a few hours. The first entry in the collection is a text file with just titles for quicker reference. A collection of abstracts for all the podcasts is available at this link and updated quarterly. Get the discarded material, too, using a podcast aggregator loaded with this opml file of the 503 sources. And try PodcastRE from the University of Wisconsin with over 150,000 titles. Exercise your ears and relax the rest.

12 Rules for Life 52 mins – “Jordan Peterson, author of 12 Rules for Life, talks about the book with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. Topics covered include parenting, conversation, the role of literature in everyday life, and the relationship between sacrificial rites and trade.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

1619 Slavery 36 mins – “In 1619, a privateer ship called the White Lion arrived in the English colony of Virginia carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans. This fateful trip ultimately changed America, shaping the country’s history and identity as we know it today. On the 400th anniversary of this consequential moment, 1619‘s host Nikole Hannah-Jones explores the long, harrowing history of American slavery and the shadow it left behind.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Agriculture Industry 66 mins – “In this Panel Debate, Patrick Holden (Sustainable Food Trust), Joanna Lewis (Soil Association), Jo Edwards (Castle Farm Organics), Phil Stocker (National Sheep Association), and Jack Farmer (LettUs Grow) discuss how can we ensure that the way we grow, distribute and eat food provides healthy and affordable nutrition whilst restoring ecosystems and improving the livelihoods of farmers; what the future of British farming may look like; and how we can measure and value sustainability and soil, plant and animal health, whilst at the same time protecting our farmers and farming communities as well as our environment. This Panel Debate took place on 19 November 2019, and is part of the IPR’s public event series, ‘The future is in our lands’.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Airplane Safety 48 mins – “Well, here it is…..finally ! Episode 1 of Plane Safety Podcast with Pilot Pip. In this episode, latest news, feedback (sort of) and the topic of the week is ‘Flying in Uncontrolled Airspace’ Enjoy and please get involved by sending feedback, questions and ideas to planesafetypodcast@gmail.com.” At the link right-click “Direct download: plane_safety_podcast_episode_1final48.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Andersonville Prison 39 mins – “Professor Carole Emberton talked about Andersonville Prison, the Confederate Civil War military prison where 13,000 Union soldiers died, and the trial of its commander, Henry Wirz. She also spoke about the halt of the prisoner exchange program toward the end of the war and how the Wirz trial was used as a precedent for later war crimes proceedings.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Antarctica Explorer 12 mins – “It’s 100 years this month since Amundsen – and then Scott – first reached the South Pole. It was one of the great achievements of the golden age of exploration – and it seemed that mankind would go on to reach every corner of the globe. But despite another 100 years of exploration, there are still vast swathes of our planet which remain uncharted, unknown to the map makers, the geologists and the botanists. So where’s left to explore? This week on One Planet we speak to three modern-day adventurers to discuss the parts of the world still unknown to science – and what will happen to us when we’ve been everywhere. Polar explorer and broadcaster Paul Rose, marine biologist Katrin Linse and botanist Alex Monro join Richard Hollingham at London’s Natural History Museum. As ever, tune in, have a listen and let us know what you think.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Arms Trafficking in North Korea 24 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on illicit arms trafficking from North Korea, including sources of arms, routes and modes of transport, concealment methods, and ways to curb such trafficking. Our discussants are Bruce Bechtol, North Korea expert as well as professor of Political Science, Angelo State University; and Matt Schroeder, senior researcher, Small Arms Survey, and co-author of the Survey’s upcoming Briefing Paper on the mechanics of North Korean arms trafficking. The episode forms part of the Small Arms Survey project Strengthening Implementation and Enforcement of the Arms Embargo on North Korea (SAENK), supported by the Kingdom of the Netherlands.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

AUMF Impact 44 mins – “This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. Last weekend President Trump authorized a strike that killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani in Iraq. The news had us thinking about an episode we produced in 2014. We pulled apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law – called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) –  has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the “war on terror.” In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the last two decades. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace. Finally, we check back in with Wittes, to see how the AUMF has trickled into the 2020s.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Australia Wildfire Impact 36 mins – “When Valentina Mella looks out the window of her Sydney home, she’s horrified at what she sees. “To be honest with you it’s literally like an apocalypse,” Mella told Quirks & Quarks host Bob McDonald.  “People don’t know if it’s day or night and this red smoke and sky near the ocean. It doesn’t even look real. It looks like one of those Hollywood movies.” Since October, Australia has been battling massive, unpredictable bushfires. So far, 27 people have been killed and 103,000 square kilometres of land have burned. More than a billion animals are feared dead. “I think that’s actually a conservative estimate,” said Mella, an ecologist with the University of Sydney. “What we are seeing is a lot more has been lost.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Behavior Modification 19 mins – “In this episode you’ll learn: • Jacob introduces the last two systems for learning the psychology of behavior modification • The habit cycle and changing the way we perceive things • Why working on your behaviors before stepping foot in the studio is critical to do • Ways to add new behaviors and eliminate the old ones • How momentum and motivation work in tandem in the process of behavior modification” At the link right-click the box with three dots, then right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

California Gold Rush Impact 55 mins – “Professor Patrick Allitt talked about the California Gold Rush of the mid-1800s. He described how people got there, the physical geography of the area, and the evolving technology used to mine gold.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Civil Rights Sit-Ins 48 mins – “In 1960, four African American students sat down at a segregated Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, launching a civil rights movement that would spread to other cities. University of Massachusetts, Amherst Professor Traci Parker joined American History TV and “Washington Journal” to take viewer questions about protests against desegregation during that time. She is the author of Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights from the 1930s to the 1980s.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dan Carlin Podcast 6 mins – “Dan Carlin has been creating podcasts for pretty much as long as podcasts have existed.  He launched his first show, Common Sense, way back in 2005, when you still could only listen to podcasts on a desktop computer or an iPod — because smartphones hadn’t been invented yet. Dan is probably best known as the host of Hardcore History. It’s a longform podcast that dives deep into moments from world history, from the ancient world to the 20th century. The episodes are as epic as the stories they tell — they often run more than five hours long. Now, after many years behind the mic, Dan Carlin has released a book. It’s called The End Is Always Near: Apocalyptic Moments, from the Bronze Age Collapse to Nuclear Near Misses. Podcast Playlist associate producer Julian Uzielli recently spoke to Dan Carlin from a studio in Eugene, Ore.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Dan Savage 46 mins – “Trouble in love? Time to call in an expert. Savage Lovecast is a call-in pod hosted by sex, love and relationship authority, Dan Savage. His sex-advice column titled Savage Love first appeared in The Stranger, Seattle’s alternative biweekly paper, in 1991. To this day, his column is syndicated to more than 50 papers across North America. But to keep up with the growing number of e-mails from those seeking his advice, he created the Savage Lovecast in 2006 which has since emerged as one of the most highly acclaimed podcasts about sexual health and dating.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Depression Era 51 mins – “Southern Methodist University professor Alexis McCrossen teaches a class on the abundance of the 1920s and the Great Depression. She argues that low wages and an unequal distribution of wealth hindered American consumers from keeping up with the high levels of economic productivity. She also talks about the demands for political solutions and President Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Depression Era Women 49 mins – “Georgetown University Professor Katherine Benton-Cohen taught a class on the Progressive Era. She talked about how politicians and reform groups in the early 20th century attempted to improve social and economic conditions through trust busting, interstate regulation, and prohibition. She also discussed the policies and campaigns of Theodore Roosevelt, the period’s most dominant political figure.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Digital Billboards 17 mins – “We’ve all seen billboards. That’s sort of the point. Can’t click out of them, can’t turn the channel, can’t use fast forward through them. Basically, you can’t miss them. Almost two centuries since their advent, billboards are still one of the most powerful tools in advertising. In today’s show, we explore their power, and why, after all these years — when it comes to catching your attention — nothing beats a billboard. Here are some of the studies we mention in this episode: OOH Online Activation Survey. Yale Privacy Lab – Tracker Profiles.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Economic Question 14 mins – “The American Economic Association’s annual conference is the biggest meeting of economists in the United States. Everyone who’s anyone in economics attends. We decided to go and ask a bunch of different economists one simple question to try and better understand not only the economy, but life, and the world. The question is: What’s the most useful idea in economics?” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Environmental Movement and Litigation 44 mins – “Rutgers University Professor Jefferson Decker taught a class on the history of the environmental movement and laws and litigation regarding natural resources. He described the relationship between private property and government regulation and explored who is legally allowed to represent environmental interests in court.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the lecture is included in this blog archive.

Ethics 13 mins – “Are thought experiments the best way of doing practical ethics? Not according to James Wilson. He thinks we need the rich detail of real cases or complex imaginary cases not a simplified version of reality to make sense of the moral problems we face. We are grateful for support for this episode from the Marc Sanders Foundation and from our supporters on Patreon.” At the link right-click “Direct download: James_Wilson_on_Real_World_Ethics.mp3” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feeble Mindedness 36 mins – ““The New York Times Book Review calls She Has Her Mother’s Laugh “extraordinary…This book is Zimmer at his best: obliterating misconceptions about science with gentle prose. He brings the reader on his journey of discovery as he visits laboratory after laboratory, peering at mutant mosquitoes and talking to scientists about traces of Neanderthal ancestry within his own genome. Any fan of his previous books or his journalism will appreciate this work. But so, too, will parents wishing to understand the magnitude of the legacy they’re bequeathing to their children, people who want to grasp their history through genetic ancestry testing and those seeking a fuller context for the discussions about race and genetics so prevalent today.”  Two strands, twenty-three pairs of chromosomes, tens-of-thousands of genes. These are the elements that define our eye colour, our sex and our susceptibility to certain diseases; but how did scientists figure out how it all works, and what terrible mistakes got made along the way? In his latest book, She Has Her Mother’s Laugh, Carl Zimmer looks at the history, the science and the thorny ethical problems of genetic inheritance.” At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Feminism and Music 49 mins – “Indiana University history professor Michael McGerr talked about women and feminism in 1960-1970s popular music. This class was from his course titled “Rock, Hip Hop and Revolution: Popular Music in the Making of Modern America, 1940 to the Present.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Gender Roles Over Time 51 mins – “Vassar College Professor Rebecca Edwards taught a class about the differences between 19th-century political parties and their views on gender roles, racial equality and family dynamics. She described the transition from a patriarchal family unit before the Civil War to a Reconstruction-era ideal of a nuclear family comprised of a husband as breadwinner and a wife in charge of the domestic sphere.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Girl Power 15 mins – “These days there are more and more celebrations of women who might have otherwise been relegated to the footnotes of history. They’re finally getting their own books, movies and streets named after them. And here at Nerdette, we’re all about that. Totally into it. Zero complaints. But what is equally as wonderful is when the spotlight also lands on accomplished young women. And that’s what author Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl have done with their book Rad Girls Can, which tells the stories of inspiring young women who have made positive impacts on the world before turning 20. Below are three of Schatz and Stahl’s favorite stories from Rad Girls Can….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Green Growth 38 mins – “In this IPR Public Lecture, Professor Timothy Mitchell discusses how the climate emergency confronts us with the problem of growth. Can we avert a planetary catastrophe by altering the ways we consume resources, adopting a new path of “green growth”? Or is the survival of human societies incompatible with continued economic expansion, requiring the radical alternative of de-growth? Professor Mitchell is a University of Bath Global Chair for the 2018 – 2019 academic year. His appointment has been funded by the International Relations Office’s Global Chair scheme, a flagship programme designed to attract distinguished, globally renowned scholars to engage in high-profile research activities at Bath.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Heart Disease 31 mins – “We talk to cardiologist, writer, and clinical researcher Haider Warraich about his new book State of the Heart: Exploring the History, Science, and Future of Cardiac Disease.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Homeland Threats 16 mins – “Despite the successes that result from the hard work of the men and women of the FBI, our Joint Terrorism Task Forces, and our partners across the government, terrorism continues to pose a persistent threat to the homeland and our interests overseas. As we saw just recently, with the arrest of a man in Pueblo, Colorado, who allegedly planned to bomb a synagogue in furtherance of his ideology, lone actors pose a lethal terrorism threat to the American people. But this case also highlights the power of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, whose reach extends around the globe and is a force multiplier in the fight against terrorism. Together, with our partners, we stand shoulder to shoulder and remain vigilant against these threats. It’s been said, “It takes a network to defeat a network.” While the whole-of-government approach has been successful in mitigating many of the threats posed by overseas terrorism networks, a whole-of-society approach will be required to mitigate the evolving lone offender terrorism threat within our borders…” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment of Trump 19 mins – “The impeachment trial of President Donald Trump has formally started. But as U.S. Senators prepare to consider the two articles of impeachment brought against Trump, more details in the case continue to emerge. If, and, when any of the new evidence will be part of the Senate trial is still a question. Even if it is, whether it would sway any Senators – many of whom have already laid down their positions – is also unclear. To explain this historic moment, Diane spoke with Neal Katyal. He’s a Georgetown Law professor and the author of “Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump.” Katyal previously served as the acting solicitor general of the United States.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Impeachment of Trump 21 mins – “Why The Senate Trial Matters (Even If No Minds Are Changed) Frank Bowman, constitutional law professor, joins Diane to discuss the arguments being made on both sides. At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Innovation Skills 26 mins – “The number one skillset I have discussed many times over the years is self-confidence that you are creative. We were all born highly creative. Watch kids with the creative things they say, do and come up with. The problem is creativity is driven out of us from an early age. Children learn conformity from grade school through college. We are brainwashed into thinking that it is vital to act the same in order to be relevant. When we move into a professional career we are asked to be more creative, think differently and come up with solutions, after being taught conformity for 16+ years. It’s no myth that CEOs recruit creativity. Creativity drives innovation. It’s a catalyst for growth in a business. If you are not exercising your creativity and unlocking its potential you could become irrelevant.” At the link left-click the down-pointing arrow, select “Save Link” and “OK” from the pop-up menu.

Interviews and Skype Out 9 mins – “Today I answer a listener question about the best way to get interviews PLUS the ins and outs of Skype Out.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Latif at Guantanamo Bay 42 mins – “Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Libyan Female Fighters 17 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on Libyan female fighters and the role of women during the Libyan conflict and post-conflict peacebuilding, as part of the Survey’s Security Assessment in North Africa (SANA) project. The discussants are: Hasnaa El Jamali, Small Arms Survey consultant who has conducted original research with Libyan women who were active during and after the 2011 revolution; David Lochhead, Small Arms Survey consultant with wide experience on security sector reform, border security, and peacekeeping in different parts of Africa with the United Nations; and Manal Taha, Small Arms Survey consultant and northern Africa regional expert with extensive knowledge on violent extremist, stabilization, and conflict resolution.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Lincoln-Johnson and Constitution 47 mins – “Andrew Slap of East Tennessee State University taught a class on Abraham Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and the Constitution. He compared how both presidents have been portrayed as either upholding or disregarding the Constitution and whether their reputations match their actions in office.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the lecture is included in this blog archive.

Man Against Horse 40 mins – “This is a story about your butt. It’s a story about how you got your butt, why you have your butt, and how your butt might be one of the most important and essential things for you being you, for being human. Today, reporters Heather Radke and Matt Kielty talk to two researchers who followed the butt from our ancient beginnings, through millions of years of evolution, and all the way to today, out to a valley in Arizona, where our butts are put to the ultimate test.” At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.  

Maps 9 mins – “Tim Harford returns with a new series of Pop Up Ideas. This time Tim and his guests tell intriguing stories inspired by maps. In the first talk, Tim argues that maps – for all their beauty – can be dangerous. In the hands of powerful people, the map begins to shape the world in its image. He tells the story of th Johann Gottlieb Beckmann, who mapped German forests. He developed the idea of the “normalbaum”, a kind of platonic ideal of what a tree should be, which could be planted in neat rows to make mapping and harvesting them easier. It appeared to be a brilliant idea and produced unprecedented growth in the forestry business. But the forests came to resemble the map – with all its uniformity – and eventually the resulting lack of diversity led to the destruction of the forests themselves. Tim then looks at the taxpayer-funded Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC) which operated in Depression-era America and refused “to grant credit to people, not because of their credit history, not because of their ability to repay, not even because of their need. But just because of where they lived on the map.” At the link left-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Marijuana Legal Loses in Canada 36 mins – “…The Indicator is constantly surprising – and this episode on how the legalization of marijuana will have an impact on Canada’s GDP totally changed the way I thought about Canada’s black market economy. Which, to be honest, is not something I had thought much about. Plus, the podcast gets bonus points for being short and sweet, so it’s always worth your time.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Metaphysics 13 mins – “Some philosophers have drawn very strange conclusions about the nature of reality. But that doesn’t necessarily mean we shouldn’t study their work. In this episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast Emily Thomas discusses how wildly implausible metaphysics can be enlightening when we learn the reasons why these philosophers adopted these positions.” At the link right-click “Listen to Emily Thomas on Wildly Implausible Metaphysics” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Mexico and California War 45 mins – “When Mexico gained its independence from Spain in 1821, the new country’s northernmost holding was the sparsely populated territory of California. Rick Kennedy of Point Loma Nazarene University taught a class about Mexico’s governance and plans for California in the decades leading-up to the 1848 Mexican-American War, in which Mexico lost California to the United States.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Middle East Nations 21 mins – “The Washington Institute for Near East Policy hosted a discussion on the future of foreign policy among Middle East nations, with a focus on U.S. allies Saudi Arabia, Oman, and the United Arab Emirates. Topics discussed included relations with U.S. under the Trump administration, the influence of Iran, and anti-corruption efforts within each nation. Panelists also reported back on their meetings with leaders from each country.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Munition Explosions 34 mins – “This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on unplanned explosions at munitions sites (UEMS). Our speakers, Jovana Carapic, Remo Gassmann, and Benjamin King, discuss the problem at hand, the causes behind these explosions, as well as their consequences. The episode forms part of our Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Nature’s 150th Anniversary 22 mins – “Nature is arguably the world’s most prestigious scientific journal. Editor in chief Magdalena Skipper spoke with Scientific American’s acting editor in chief Curtis Brainard about her journal as it celebrates its 150th anniversary.At the link right-click the down-pointing arrow at the soundbar end and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Partially Examined Life 10 yr Retrospective 49 mins – “Mark, Seth, Dylan, and Wes reflect on the changing state of podcasting and public philosophy over the last decade, how our goals and interests have changed since we started we arted. Why don’t colleges pay their faculty to educate the public through regular, broadcasted conversations like ours? If you think we’re snarky, take a look at actual philosophy faculty! Should we continue to do more literature, poetry, and other topics that are not strictly philosophy? Also, the stalled state of the PEL book. Thanks so much to each and every Partially Examined Life listener for making it worth our time to do this!At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Race to the Moon 29 mins – “With no idea how to get there, the race to the moon begins – “we intend to win”. To understand how the story ends, we need to start at the very beginning. With Kevin Fong.” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.  

Racism Machine 11 mins – “When a white nationalist massacred 22 people in an El Paso Walmart last week, who besides the shooter was to blame? Most of the media commentary on that question this week focused on Trump, but Bob starts this hour by taking on another culprit — Fox News. But it’s not just Fox that’s spreading dangerous rhetoric. Racism and xenophobia seep into other mainstream outlets under the guise of electoral pragmatism. Bob speaks with Tom Scocca, politics editor at Slate, about how tolerance for intolerable ideology is too often framed as a virtue — even in “ostensibly liberal” outlets.  This is a segment from our August 9, 2019 program, The Democracy We Think We Live In.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Railway Train Control 13 mins – “The US freight railroad system is moving to a different operating strategy, called Precision Scheduled Railroading (PSR), intended to speed up service, get better utilization from infrastructure, and reduce operating costs. What is it and why does it matter? In this interview, we learn about PSR from John Friedmann, who is Vice President-Network Planning and Optimization for the Norfolk Southern railroad.” At the link find the title, “Precision Scheduled Railroading,” right-click “Listen to this episode now, and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Red Cross Donuts 14 mins – “Everybody likes free. But free can be dangerous, too. Today’s show is about what happens when you take something that was free and you give it a price. That is a highly risky move. And the damage can be enormous. Free of charge, we bring you the story of the Red Cross, its free doughnuts, and what happened when they suddenly weren’t free any more.At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Ronald Walters Career 49 mins – “University of Texas at Austin Professor Peniel Joseph taught a class on the life and career of civil rights pioneer Ronald Walters. In 1958, Mr. Walters organized a desegregation sit-in and was later influential in the spread of African-American studies as a scholarly field. He also served as an adviser to the founding members of the Congressional Black Caucus and was campaign manager and consultant for Jesse Jackson in his 1984 and 1988 presidential campaigns.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Russian Election Interference 23 mins – “Russia’s Attempts To Influence 2020 May Already Be Paying Off – After a week of mixed messages from the U.S. intelligence community about Russia’s plans to influence the 2020 election, Diane talks to Shane Harris of the Washington Post what’s really going on.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Satanic Panic 32 mins – “New True Crime Podcast Discoveries – You’ve heard about art heists. You’ve heard about bank heists. But what about maple syrup heists? We go behind the syrupy scheme that made millions. This week on Podcast Playlist, we bring you the best true crime podcasts to binge this winter. Podcasts featured this week: . The Score: Bank Robber Diaries – “Breaking the rules at a young age set Joe Loya up for a descent into crime. From his first time robbing a bank, to a violent altercation behind bars, this is Joe Loya’s origin story.” . Uncover: Satanic Panic – “In the newest season of Uncover, host Lisa Bryn Rundle unravels the history of a moral hysteria that took root across North America.” Plus: An interview with creator Lisa Bryn Rundle. . Detective Trapp – Los Angeles Times’ Christopher Goffard tells the story of homicide detective, Julissa Trapp, who worked on a case about four missing women in Orange County, California. In this clip we meet Detective Julissa Trapp. . Beyond Bizarre True Crime – “With popularity comes demand and with every commodity comes a black market. Maple syrup is no different. So when a group of thieves decided to steal some sweet liquid gold from a storage warehouse in Quebec, they weren’t about to stop at a couple of bottles or cases. This would go down as one of the most lucrative and perhaps most unusual robberies in Canadian history.” At the link find the title, “New True Crime Podcast Discoveries,” right-click “Download New True Crime Podcast Discoveries,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Scarsdale Murder Trial 46 mins – “University of Colorado Denver Professor Sarah Fields taught a class about the 1981 trial of Jean Harris, who was accused of murdering the “Scarsdale Diet” doctor. Professor Fields described Harris’ background, her long relationship with Dr. Herman Tarnower, and her conviction for the doctor’s murder.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Sexism in Science 36 mins -”It’s 2019 and women are still significantly underrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Women hold about about one-third of the academic positions in science, though that number is much lower in fields like math and engineering. In all, women are fewer than a quarter of the science and technology workers in Canada….” At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Small Arms Gender 19 mins – This episode of the Small Arms Survey podcast series focuses on gender in small arms control, as part of the Gender Lens for Arms Control Support and Sustainability (GLASS) project, funded by the Government of Canada. The Small Arms Survey will publish a Handbook on gender and arms control later in 2019, the authors and editor of which are discussants in this episode: Vanessa Corlazzoli, independent evaluation consultant Emile LeBrun, Small Arms Survey consultant Henri Myrttinen, independent researcher Allison Pytlak, disarmament programme manager, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Solar Power Development 14 mins – “When solar started it had a problem: solar panels were extremely expensive and not very efficient. In this episode we head to Germany to find out how one country built a market to solve that problem. On today’s show, we meet the person who kickstarted the green energy market and learn about the wonky policy tool that helped him do it. We teamed up with Vox’s The Impact podcast for this story. (More from them here.)At the link right-click “Download” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Soleimani Assassination 20 mins – “It began when President Trump ordered the assassination of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani … and ended when Iran retaliated with a non-fatal missile strike against an American base in Iraq. But the deteriorating relationship between the two countries’ leaders started long before the assassination, and are not likely to end with this current de-escalation. Diane talks to longtime National Intelligence Analyst Paul Pillar about what’s next for the relationship between the U.S. and Iran. At the link you can listen, but not download; however, a copy of the podcast is included in this blog archive.

Suicide Prevention 18 mins – “Changing the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline from 1-800-273- 8255 (TALK) to a three-digit number could save lives—especially when coupled with other strategies. Host Meagan Cantwell talks to Greg Miller, a science journalist based in Portland, Oregon, about three effective methods to prevent suicides—crisis hotlines, standardizing mental health care, and restricting lethal means. Greg’s feature is part of a larger package in Science exploring paths out of darkness. With more solutions this week, host Sarah Crespi speaks with A. R. Siders, a social scientist at the Disaster Research Center at the University of Delaware in Newark, about her policy forum on the need for “managed climate retreat”—strategically moving people and property away from high-risk flood and fire zones. Integrating relocation into a larger strategy could maximize its benefits, supporting equality and economic development along the way.” At the link right-click “Download MP3,” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Technology and Government 39 mins – “University of Washington History Professor Margaret O’Mara discussed her book The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America, about the rise of Silicon Valley and the role that the federal government played in its evolution.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Unmasking the President 25 mins – “The Presidency According To Donald Trump – How Donald Trump is transforming fundamental ideas about what it means to be president. Diane talks to Lawfare’s Susan Hennessey and Benjamin Wittes about their new book, “Unmaking the Presidency.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

US Trade Policy 20 mins – “Trump claims victory on two trade deals. Diane talks to New York Times reporter Ana Swanson about what they will mean for U.S. business, the economy, and American families.” At the link right-click “Download This Episode” and select “Save Link As” from the pop-up menu.

Vietnam War Lessons Learned 41 mins – “Triton College professor Edward White taught a class on lessons learned from the Vietnam War. He covered what military generals said after the war and how films and documentaries have portrayed the conflict.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

Weinstein Sexual Assaults 7 mins – “In New York this week, jury selection began in the trial of former Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein. News of his alleged sexual predations launched the #MeToo movement in October 2017, through investigative reporting from both The New York Times and The New Yorker. Even as he prepares to stand trial in New York, sexual assault charges were filed against him in Los Angeles. To date, over eighty women in the film industry have accused him of rape and sexual assault and abuse. Weinstein claims they were all consensual acts. The reporting has been groundbreaking in its detail, laying out the allegations for the public. But in Hollywood, Weinstein’s abuses already were an open secret. In 2017, Brooke spoke with Buzzfeed senior culture writer Anne Helen Petersen about the essential role of gossip and whisper networks in protecting the vulnerable and spreading news that threatens the powerful. 

WW II Origins 53 mins – “Lafayette College Professor Robert Weiner taught a class on the origins of World War II in Europe. He described how the British and French governments initially saw Soviet Russia as a bigger threat than the fascists in Germany and Italy. He argued that some leaders’ reluctance to enter another war led to appeasement efforts with Hitler and military unpreparedness.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

WW II Women 54 mins – “Texas Woman’s University Professor Katherine Landdeck taught a class about the ways American women contributed to the World War II effort. She detailed the expectations for women on the home front to write letters to soldiers, plant victory gardens, and work in factories. She also compared what options were available to women for service with each military branch.” At the link you can purchase a download; however, a copy is included in this blog archive.

About virginiajim

Retired knowledge nut.
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